web site hit counter Apostle of the Crucified Lord: A Theological Introduction to Paul and His Letters - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Apostle of the Crucified Lord: A Theological Introduction to Paul and His Letters

Availability: Ready to download

"An innovative and comprehensive treatment of Paul, including commentary on all of the Pauline letters, Gorman's Apostle of the Crucified Lord unpacks the many dimensions of Paul's thought carefully and holistically. Six introductory chapters provide background discussion on Paul's world, his resume, his letters, his gospel, his spirituality, and his theology, while the ma "An innovative and comprehensive treatment of Paul, including commentary on all of the Pauline letters, Gorman's Apostle of the Crucified Lord unpacks the many dimensions of Paul's thought carefully and holistically. Six introductory chapters provide background discussion on Paul's world, his resume, his letters, his gospel, his spirituality, and his theology, while the main body of the book covers in turn and in full detail each of the Pauline epistles. Gorman gives the context of each letter, offers a careful reading of the text, and colors his words with insightful quotations from earlier interpreters of Paul." Enhancing the text itself are questions for reflection and discussion at the end of each chapter and numerous photos, maps, and tables throughout. All in all, Apostle of the Crucified Lord is the ideal book for students and any other readers interested in seriously engaging Paul's challenging letters.


Compare

"An innovative and comprehensive treatment of Paul, including commentary on all of the Pauline letters, Gorman's Apostle of the Crucified Lord unpacks the many dimensions of Paul's thought carefully and holistically. Six introductory chapters provide background discussion on Paul's world, his resume, his letters, his gospel, his spirituality, and his theology, while the ma "An innovative and comprehensive treatment of Paul, including commentary on all of the Pauline letters, Gorman's Apostle of the Crucified Lord unpacks the many dimensions of Paul's thought carefully and holistically. Six introductory chapters provide background discussion on Paul's world, his resume, his letters, his gospel, his spirituality, and his theology, while the main body of the book covers in turn and in full detail each of the Pauline epistles. Gorman gives the context of each letter, offers a careful reading of the text, and colors his words with insightful quotations from earlier interpreters of Paul." Enhancing the text itself are questions for reflection and discussion at the end of each chapter and numerous photos, maps, and tables throughout. All in all, Apostle of the Crucified Lord is the ideal book for students and any other readers interested in seriously engaging Paul's challenging letters.

30 review for Apostle of the Crucified Lord: A Theological Introduction to Paul and His Letters

  1. 5 out of 5

    Justine Olawsky

    I have not been very nice to St. Paul over the years. I think I even called him a jerkcheese in the margins of my Bible once. And though so many things he wrote to the various churches were achingly beautiful or air-gaspingly convicting, I had a hard time relating to him in general. To me, he became the medicine I had to take to "do theology" well. Though good for my health, I did not find him delicious. Dr. Michael Gorman (along with Dr. Michael Barber of the Augustine Institute who assigned thi I have not been very nice to St. Paul over the years. I think I even called him a jerkcheese in the margins of my Bible once. And though so many things he wrote to the various churches were achingly beautiful or air-gaspingly convicting, I had a hard time relating to him in general. To me, he became the medicine I had to take to "do theology" well. Though good for my health, I did not find him delicious. Dr. Michael Gorman (along with Dr. Michael Barber of the Augustine Institute who assigned this book for our class) has gone a long way to reconciling me to this Apostle and even to shyly learn to like him a bit more for himself and not just the canonical stature of his epistles. Starting by listing and commenting on many different perspectives on Paul—the various interpretive lenses through which his letters and his life can be read—Dr. Gorman writes that his own perspective will be along the lines of what is called the "participationist" reading of Paul—stressing "transformative participation in the death and resurrection of Christ as the central dimension of Pauline theology" (4). For Gorman, this reading is a particularly cruciform one in which the Cross of Christ becomes not only the source but also the shape of our salvation (665). He then proceeds to guide us through Paul's life, the context in which he wrote, and then unpack letter by letter from 1 Thessalonians (thought to be the earliest authentic letter of Paul's) through Titus (thought by many to be a late pseudonymous homage to Pauline pastoral exhortation). Dr. Gorman takes a moderate and balanced approach toward those tricky points of Pauline theology that can lead Protestants and Catholics to come to loggerheads. This study is so rich with historical context and thoughtful exegesis, I think anyone who reads it will feel like they've sat at a feast of fat things. To me, the Epilogue alone is worth the price of admission. It is a masterful gathering of Dr. Gorman's study, research, and reflection into one grand vision of Paul that draws the scrappy saint out of the hazy mists of antiquity and unapproachability of his canonical stature as The Apostle and helps us see him as a man completely undone by the great revelation of God's radical grace and the saving power of the crucified and resurrected Lord who invites us to participate in His divine life, being made "heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ, provided we suffer with him in order that we may also be glorified with him" (Romans 8:17). Highly recommend reading this alongside Paul, A New Covenant Jew—because that is what I did. :-)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Wade

    An in-depth commentary on each of Paul’s letters. Gorman isn’t a Catholic, but much, though not all, of his theology is in line with Catholic theology.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Радостин Марчев

    Чудесно въведение в света и мисленето на апостол Павел. За хора с не съвсем начални познания вероятно това би била книгата, която бих препоръчал. Макар че книгата не представлява нищо повече от въведение и това носи своите последствия върху обема и задълбаването в материята Гормън пише ерудирано и без повърхностност и идеализъм често срещни при подобни четива. Светът на Павел е представен (доколкото мога да преценя) информирано, а богословието му с удачните акценти отразяващи, разбира се, специф Чудесно въведение в света и мисленето на апостол Павел. За хора с не съвсем начални познания вероятно това би била книгата, която бих препоръчал. Макар че книгата не представлява нищо повече от въведение и това носи своите последствия върху обема и задълбаването в материята Гормън пише ерудирано и без повърхностност и идеализъм често срещни при подобни четива. Светът на Павел е представен (доколкото мога да преценя) информирано, а богословието му с удачните акценти отразяващи, разбира се, специфичното виждане на автора (а Гормън определено има такова). Като цяло книгата постига интересен баланс между задълбочаване във въпросите на повече от начално ниво без все пак да излиза от категорията въведение. Според мен добро постижение. Разглеждането на отделните послания е подобно, което обаче според мен прави трудно четенето им последователно. Ако човек не изучава в момента (или преди това не се е занимавал по-задълбочено) със съответното послание вероятно не би извлякъл особено голяма полза от анализа. Ако обаче се четат като начално запознаване с послание, което някой започва да изучава главите биха били много полезни. Подозирам, че целта на автора е именно такава. По този начин първата част на книгата спокойно може да се прочете наведнъж докато втората е добре да бъде разглеждана на части и във връзка с текстовете, които анализира. Давам 5 звезди като обръщам внимание, че те трябва да се разбират във връзка с целите, които си поставя автора. Ако някой търси наистина задълбочено разглеждане на света и богословието на Павел няма да ги намери в тази книга (нито пък събрани на едно място в една единствена книга).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Fr. Jedidiah Tritle

    This book is an exhaustive upper mid-level commentary on the complete corpus of Pauline Literature. The theological insights are valuable as Gorman goes through the many different views on Pauline theology. While being a Lutheran, his views are very (if not mostly) compatible with orthodox Catholic views on Paul, making it a very helpful text. Highly recommended as an introduction to--and expose of--St. Paul's Epistles. This book is an exhaustive upper mid-level commentary on the complete corpus of Pauline Literature. The theological insights are valuable as Gorman goes through the many different views on Pauline theology. While being a Lutheran, his views are very (if not mostly) compatible with orthodox Catholic views on Paul, making it a very helpful text. Highly recommended as an introduction to--and expose of--St. Paul's Epistles.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Charles Cowen

    Every preacher and teacher of the Bible should have this book. Excellent historical background gives a foundation for spiritual and theological readings of Pauline literature. Gorman sometimes makes controversial statements, but he always backs them up and concedes that some scholars differ. This is an excellent resource!

  6. 4 out of 5

    John Martindale

    This was my first time to read a book on Paul by a Participationalist (Gorman also incorporated a good deal from the New Perspective on Paul). As far as what Paul emphasizes, I think the Participationalist does well in capturing the center of Paul's thought. As the title says, Paul was an Apostle of the Crucified Lord, and Gorman repeatedly hammers the point home, letter after letter, Paul saw himself living a cruciform life like his Lord and he demanded everyone else do so as well. If your life This was my first time to read a book on Paul by a Participationalist (Gorman also incorporated a good deal from the New Perspective on Paul). As far as what Paul emphasizes, I think the Participationalist does well in capturing the center of Paul's thought. As the title says, Paul was an Apostle of the Crucified Lord, and Gorman repeatedly hammers the point home, letter after letter, Paul saw himself living a cruciform life like his Lord and he demanded everyone else do so as well. If your life didn't participate in Christ crucified, you didn't believe Paul's gospel. Paul seems so many light-years away from a Lutheran or Reformed understanding, that its a marvel he can be read by so many in a way that seems so utterly antithetical to so much Paul clearly states. But yeah, as the Participationalist show, for Paul, absolute fidelity, loyalty, obedience to Christ; becoming the gospel--participating in Christ death by laying down one's rights, dying to all sin and suffering for the gospel, was what it meant to have faith. Only this kind of faith would result in justification--being put into a right covenantal relationship with God. There is no easy grace, a simple affirmation of doctrinal statements wouldn't mean anything, there was no legal fiction due to penal substitution of Christ for the elect. But yeah, instead you had to 100% die to all sin (and never could return to it), and live 100% a slave of God and righteousness (enduring suffering to the end) to be saved. But this was supposed to be possible due to grace--divine power. There was supposed to be the spirit whose force was greater than that of the flesh. The new covenant was supposed to be here, meaning God would write His laws on the heart and would make one perfect. Once it was like we were swimming against the current, but now the motorboat was here so we could get in jet ahead. But tragically, that is where Paul seems to be dead wrong. For him, the problem with the law, was the law didn't come to the ability to fully live it, and thus it was a ministry of condemnation, but he thought it was different now with the coming of Jesus. But his very letters, especially the ones to the Corinthians was a defeater for any such thing, for one, with the new covenant, according to the prophets, there would be no need to teach (what Paul is having to do constantly), for two, this Spirit was supposed to enable them to die to sin, division, and ambition, and to live in unity, truly love one another, but all the Spirit seemed to do was allow them to engage in chaotic externals tongues and the like. Those Paul wrote to were all too human, just as weak as they would be under the Torah. So Christ crucified simply became a new law, impossible to participate in fully, and thus a message of condemnation. For what Paul thought was the problem under the old way--the flesh, was still a problem in the new system. Even Paul himself demonstrated the problem, for how he couldn't find any love for his Christian rivals (the Judaizers), but instead showed nothing but vitriolic hatred for them; constantly cursing them and wishing them harm throughout most of his letters.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cj Guth

    This is, in many ways, a good book. Gorman is a clear, often engaging writer. He has thoughtful things to say, and brings a balanced, sensible perspective to controversial issues, such as the authorship of the Pauline letters, Paul's relationship to Christological and Trinitarian doctrine, and Paul's soteriology vis-a-vis the New Perspective. For instance he's mercifully free of the most radical New Perspective readings, and seems to be distilling views I associate with N. T. Wright. Similarly, This is, in many ways, a good book. Gorman is a clear, often engaging writer. He has thoughtful things to say, and brings a balanced, sensible perspective to controversial issues, such as the authorship of the Pauline letters, Paul's relationship to Christological and Trinitarian doctrine, and Paul's soteriology vis-a-vis the New Perspective. For instance he's mercifully free of the most radical New Perspective readings, and seems to be distilling views I associate with N. T. Wright. Similarly, and rightly to my mind, he insists that Paul has a "high" Christology against some recent trends (e.g. Dunn). Here he particularly stresses Philippians 2:6-11, which he calls Paul's "Master Story." Gorman also emphasizes, in an illuminating way, I think, the significance of suffering in Paul's thought. Good stuff. What makes this book often very frustrating, however, is Gorman's argumentation, or rather, the lack thereof. He offers a few interesting chapters at the beginning of the book about major background issues (Paul's Mediterranean world, or the "core" of his spirituality, letter writing, etc.), and then chapters on each of Paul's letters. These are the frustrating ones. He moves through each book passage by passage, more or less summarizing the text. The effect is that he often spends far too much space on passages that anyone who can read carefully would have a good grasp of, but far too little space on difficult issues in Paul's thought. This results in Gorman simply making assertions about what's "best supported" or "most likely" without much (one wants to say, any) exegetical or argumentative support (e.g. his treatment of the unity of 2 Corinthians, or his discussion of what the "justification" word-family means). Compounding the problems here is that he doesn't interact much (at all!) with other scholars in his exegesis. For instance, he doesn't deal with competing interpretations of Phil. 2:6-11, even though he puts so much weight on them--indeed, he doesn't really tell you there's much of a controversy about this at all. In summary, Gorman provides a fairly good introduction to the Pauline corpus. However, it seems to me it's at a level of sophistication that would be best for a beginning student. I wonder if the book is too long (600+ pages) for that task. However, those who would want to work through such a long book, I suspect, are probably looking for a bit more thorough discussion of the controversial, scholarly issues that attend Paul's writings than Gorman provides. No doubt it's difficult to avoid being too basic without thereby becoming too technical for non-specialists; perhaps Gorman's book illustrates this difficulty well.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This is a good introductory commentary on the person and letters of Paul. Gorman is honest and upfront about where he stands on certain scholarly issues but he isn't concerned about convincing you of his stance. He presents alternative opinions and gives a brief explanation why he thinks the way he does. He begins by given a historical background (as best as can be assembled) and then deals with the Pauline letters (some in contention and other that are certainly Paul's) in chronological order. This is a good introductory commentary on the person and letters of Paul. Gorman is honest and upfront about where he stands on certain scholarly issues but he isn't concerned about convincing you of his stance. He presents alternative opinions and gives a brief explanation why he thinks the way he does. He begins by given a historical background (as best as can be assembled) and then deals with the Pauline letters (some in contention and other that are certainly Paul's) in chronological order. For covering as much as he does, Gorman is concise and informative. I appreciate that Gorman doesn't need Paul to write all the letters attributed to him in order for them to be theologically significant. Nor do the various books have to line up together perfectly in order to construct the life and mission of Paul. This book should be on the shelf of every person who wants to seriously study Paul's letters.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paul Boger

    I probably needed a simpler, shallower, introduction to The Epistles, and it took me a few months to absorb and complete this text. I might have had an easier time if reading as part of a study group or actual class, and would still enjoy discussing this interpretation with more knowledgeable readers. Regardless, Gorman answered many of my most fundamental questions about the Letters, deepened my understanding of Pauline concepts, and will now enable me to re-read St. Paul with more heartfelt ap I probably needed a simpler, shallower, introduction to The Epistles, and it took me a few months to absorb and complete this text. I might have had an easier time if reading as part of a study group or actual class, and would still enjoy discussing this interpretation with more knowledgeable readers. Regardless, Gorman answered many of my most fundamental questions about the Letters, deepened my understanding of Pauline concepts, and will now enable me to re-read St. Paul with more heartfelt appreciation. Lots of work, at least for me, but well worth the effort.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ted

    More of a reference book than something to be read from beginning to end, but I appreciate Gorman's take on St. Paul's epistles. More of a reference book than something to be read from beginning to end, but I appreciate Gorman's take on St. Paul's epistles.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    i think this is one of the best, insightful overview of Paul's letters. not that i've read much others.. but the point is! i understood it! i think this is one of the best, insightful overview of Paul's letters. not that i've read much others.. but the point is! i understood it!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Chott

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eric Andriot

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joe Johnson

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Pritchett

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ado

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lauren S.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  20. 5 out of 5

    Zianthuingam Panmei

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Rugg

  24. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Brasfield

  26. 5 out of 5

    James B

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kory

  29. 4 out of 5

    Zac

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anna

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.