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Drafted down to the Big Smoke thanks to a supposed expertise in the modus operandi of serial killers, Inspector John Rebus is on a train south from Edinburgh. His Scotland Yard opposite number, George Flight, isn’t too happy at yet more interference. It’s bad enough having several Chief Inspectors on your back without being hounded at every turn by an upstart Jock. Rebus i Drafted down to the Big Smoke thanks to a supposed expertise in the modus operandi of serial killers, Inspector John Rebus is on a train south from Edinburgh. His Scotland Yard opposite number, George Flight, isn’t too happy at yet more interference. It’s bad enough having several Chief Inspectors on your back without being hounded at every turn by an upstart Jock. Rebus is going to have to deal with racial prejudice as well as the predations of a violent maniac. When he’s offered a serial killer profile of the Wolfman by an attractive lady psychologist, it’s too good an opportunity to turn down. But in finding an ally, he may have given his enemies an easy means of attack.


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Drafted down to the Big Smoke thanks to a supposed expertise in the modus operandi of serial killers, Inspector John Rebus is on a train south from Edinburgh. His Scotland Yard opposite number, George Flight, isn’t too happy at yet more interference. It’s bad enough having several Chief Inspectors on your back without being hounded at every turn by an upstart Jock. Rebus i Drafted down to the Big Smoke thanks to a supposed expertise in the modus operandi of serial killers, Inspector John Rebus is on a train south from Edinburgh. His Scotland Yard opposite number, George Flight, isn’t too happy at yet more interference. It’s bad enough having several Chief Inspectors on your back without being hounded at every turn by an upstart Jock. Rebus is going to have to deal with racial prejudice as well as the predations of a violent maniac. When he’s offered a serial killer profile of the Wolfman by an attractive lady psychologist, it’s too good an opportunity to turn down. But in finding an ally, he may have given his enemies an easy means of attack.

30 review for Tooth and Nail

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Smith

    So, my favourite Scottish sleuth has been called down to London to help track down a serial killer. There’s a couple of mysteries here: 1. Who is killing women in the capital – stabbing them and leaving bite marks on the body? 2. Why has Rebus been asked to go down south and help? Ok, he’d played a part in arresting a multiple murderer back in his own patch, but it wasn’t really the work of a serial killer. It’s really interesting to see Rebus out of his comfort zone, mixing with cockney coppers w So, my favourite Scottish sleuth has been called down to London to help track down a serial killer. There’s a couple of mysteries here: 1. Who is killing women in the capital – stabbing them and leaving bite marks on the body? 2. Why has Rebus been asked to go down south and help? Ok, he’d played a part in arresting a multiple murderer back in his own patch, but it wasn’t really the work of a serial killer. It’s really interesting to see Rebus out of his comfort zone, mixing with cockney coppers who seem to resent his presence and stumbling around a city he has no real knowledge of. Throw in the fact that his ex-wife and daughter now live in London (the daughter with a boyfriend Rebus detests on sight) and you have a delicious concoction that you just know will be hilariously entertaining. The comedy, of course, comes in the bone-dry form. Snide comments and hurtful one-liners abound. And the meeting with the daughter’s boyfriend is a classic of it’s ilk. Great stuff. There aren’t too many characters here but probably a few too many coincidences – well, how else do you make a mystery work when you have a city of ten million people and just a couple of hundred pages to work with? But, as always, the beauty here is in the banter and the observation of our hero in action. It’s brilliantly done. In the end we witness a madcap scenario as the chase concludes – it’s the one thing the author doesn’t always get right, how to finish off his stories – and Rebus is off back to Auld Reekie to track down a few more criminals back in his home city. I’m loving these early books in the series. It really is all about the main character and his inability to be civil to more than ten percent of the population. The humour and the tension Rankin is able to portray is second to none. Yes, he catches the bad people, but that’s a secondary factor in these books. Rankin really is a master of his craft.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Annet

    i love my Scotsman Rebus, always a good relaxing read!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    Third book in the series and I’m still enjoying it. Rebus is in London helping to catch a serial killer. It’s never really explained why he’s been requested to help, but I didn’t care. We got to see Rhona, his ex, and Samantha, his daughter. Unrealistically, Rebus finds his way around London with no problem. I still liked the book. Rankin does a great job developing a relationship between Rebus and Inspector George Flight: tentative at first and then growing respect and to friendship in the end. Third book in the series and I’m still enjoying it. Rebus is in London helping to catch a serial killer. It’s never really explained why he’s been requested to help, but I didn’t care. We got to see Rhona, his ex, and Samantha, his daughter. Unrealistically, Rebus finds his way around London with no problem. I still liked the book. Rankin does a great job developing a relationship between Rebus and Inspector George Flight: tentative at first and then growing respect and to friendship in the end. I liked Flight and how his anxiety would turn to anger, only to calm down and accept Rebus’s ideas. And I loved the judge in the back seat of the Jaguar. I will definitely will be reading the next book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Number 3 in the Rebus series and I enjoyed it very much. Rebus is in London and is quite out of his comfort zone, but still manages to be his normal bend all the rules self. And of course he has the final flash of inspiration which catches the killer. I had absolutely zero idea of who the killer was going to be. I didn't even know the gender of the person we were looking for and yet when I found out who it was I thought "Oh yes . Of course!" The mark of a good thriller writer I think. I will mos Number 3 in the Rebus series and I enjoyed it very much. Rebus is in London and is quite out of his comfort zone, but still manages to be his normal bend all the rules self. And of course he has the final flash of inspiration which catches the killer. I had absolutely zero idea of who the killer was going to be. I didn't even know the gender of the person we were looking for and yet when I found out who it was I thought "Oh yes . Of course!" The mark of a good thriller writer I think. I will most certainly continue with this series.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Of all the fictional coppers I read about on a regular basis, Detective John Rebus is the least likeable. Granted, I've only just finished the third book in the series (I am reading them in order), so he may become more likeable as I progress, but right now there is nothing I like about this character. I connect on a shockingly deep level (could it be love?) with Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallander, feeling a kinship with the sullen Ystad detective that I've felt with few fictional characters in my Of all the fictional coppers I read about on a regular basis, Detective John Rebus is the least likeable. Granted, I've only just finished the third book in the series (I am reading them in order), so he may become more likeable as I progress, but right now there is nothing I like about this character. I connect on a shockingly deep level (could it be love?) with Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallander, feeling a kinship with the sullen Ystad detective that I've felt with few fictional characters in my life, and I enjoy the fictional company of both Martin Beck and Lennart Kollberg in Sjöwall and Wahlöö's police procedurals. But I find Rebus to be an insufferable prick. Why do I loathe Rebus so much? At first I thought it must be because he was like me (that's always the place my self-critical brain first takes me when I meet or read someone I don't like), but it took very little soul searching to see that he's really nothing like me at all (apart from being in his forties by book #3 in the series). No. I don't like him because he is arrogant without cause. I don't like him because he is a manipulative bastard when it comes to the people in his life. I don't like him because he is hypocritically self-righteous. I don't like him because he puts anyone and everyone in danger without thinking about the dangers so long as his goal of "catching the criminal fast" is fulfilled. I don't like him because of his wishy washy religious beliefs and his selfishness and his opinions about evil and bad teeth and mindless book collection and his self-righteousness (didn't I mention that already?). Yet for all Rebus' dislikeability and the uncanny levels of luck he has when it comes to solving the crimes he's investigating, I find Ian Rankin's compelling. I get the sense that Rankin wants us to dislike Rebus. His detective is supposed to be a difficult man to like, a problematic protagonist who flies in the face of the classic police "hero." More than that, though, Rankin's an inviting writer. He knows pace. He knows how to build suspense. He knows mystery, and he keeps me wanting more from page to page and book to book. I badly want to see a film version of Rebus. I'm guessing he'll be a much more likeable guy on-screen. I wonder if that will make me like the books more or less? I am curious to find out. Oh yeah, Tooth and Nail's mystery was dumb. But fun.* *did you like my Rankinesque fragment?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    3.5 stars My assault on this series' backlist continues. Lordie, can this really be 25 years old? 3.5 stars My assault on this series' backlist continues. Lordie, can this really be 25 years old?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jill Hutchinson

    This early entry in the Rebus series is not the best nor the worst of the books....it has its strong points such as the continuing unpleasant attitude of the detective which the author just keeps building upon as the series progresses. The weak point is the motive/identity ot the serial killer who Rebus has been seconded to London to help capture. It is one of those "pick the least likely suspect" and you have solved the case which has become a rather lame plot device in modern police procedural This early entry in the Rebus series is not the best nor the worst of the books....it has its strong points such as the continuing unpleasant attitude of the detective which the author just keeps building upon as the series progresses. The weak point is the motive/identity ot the serial killer who Rebus has been seconded to London to help capture. It is one of those "pick the least likely suspect" and you have solved the case which has become a rather lame plot device in modern police procedurals and it surprised me that Rankin would choose it. I have read many of the books in this series and have enjoyed them immensely but this one falls a little short of what one usually expects from this best selling author. If you read it and don't like it, give the series another chance since most of the books are very well done. This was just early days.

  8. 4 out of 5

    aPriL does feral sometimes

    ‘Tooth and Nail’ by Ian Rankin is number three in the Edinburgh’s Inspector John Rebus series of mysteries. I wish all mysteries could have endings like this book! Loved it! Keystone Kops would have optioned the rights to vid it. Rebus has been asked to go to London. He is representing Lothian and Borders Police, or as John's boss put it, ""No fuck ups, John."" Rebus has unexpectedly become a reputed expert on serial murderers although he truly feels mystified by why anyone would think that, espe ‘Tooth and Nail’ by Ian Rankin is number three in the Edinburgh’s Inspector John Rebus series of mysteries. I wish all mysteries could have endings like this book! Loved it! Keystone Kops would have optioned the rights to vid it. Rebus has been asked to go to London. He is representing Lothian and Borders Police, or as John's boss put it, ""No fuck ups, John."" Rebus has unexpectedly become a reputed expert on serial murderers although he truly feels mystified by why anyone would think that, especially the London police, and especially since the cases that apparently this new reputation is based on wasn't that in his opinion. Yet, here he is. A killer is killing middle-aged women in a monstrous fashion involving biting and knives. Early days, but already four bodies with the recognized modus operandi have turned up. The press are going bonkers, already calling the murderer "the Wolfman." The only Englishman showing him any respect, faint as it is, is Detective Inspector George Flight. Rebus finds time to visit his ex-wife Rhona in her new London flat to see his daughter, Samantha. Both women look terrifically good and happy he morosely notices. He also meets Samantha's lout of a boyfriend who he hates on sight. FYTP. This novel is fast-paced and a very exciting mystery! But there are graphic scenes, so sensitive readers beware. The series is very popular and in my opinion, has aged well despite it's age (book one is Knots and Crosses, published in 1987). Highly recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Tooth & Nail by Ian Rankin. This is the 3rd in the Inspector Rebus series and my 14th. I decided to hunt down Rebus's beginnings in his sleuthing career. Rebus has been called into London for his expertise in serial murderers. It seems murders have occurred in which each victim has been bitten. Hence the press has labeled him The Wolfman. George flight is the head of the investigation and is not happy about Rebus being assigned to his case. Flight shows his true colors by taking credit for any clu Tooth & Nail by Ian Rankin. This is the 3rd in the Inspector Rebus series and my 14th. I decided to hunt down Rebus's beginnings in his sleuthing career. Rebus has been called into London for his expertise in serial murderers. It seems murders have occurred in which each victim has been bitten. Hence the press has labeled him The Wolfman. George flight is the head of the investigation and is not happy about Rebus being assigned to his case. Flight shows his true colors by taking credit for any clues Rebus informs him of as his own. But...let's not underestimate Rebus. His retaliation has him coming ouit on top no matter what the odds. The climatic ending had me panting! There's no keeping up with Rebus even as just the reader. so well written I was running behind Rebus all the way-and what a way it was!!! Brilliantly narrated/performed by Samuel Gillies who had just the perfect Scottish lilt to his voice without throwing me off track.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This is one of the earlier books in the Rebus series I had missed. I found it rather interesting to go back in time to when Rebus was in his 40's, assigned to a serial-killer case in London and thus able to at least visit his ex-wife and daughter living there in a fairly questionable neighborhood. Rebus is not universally welcomed by the London police force. I was not familiar with the slang utilized in identifying a Scot as "Jock" so I had to read a bit about that. Rebus was referred to in this This is one of the earlier books in the Rebus series I had missed. I found it rather interesting to go back in time to when Rebus was in his 40's, assigned to a serial-killer case in London and thus able to at least visit his ex-wife and daughter living there in a fairly questionable neighborhood. Rebus is not universally welcomed by the London police force. I was not familiar with the slang utilized in identifying a Scot as "Jock" so I had to read a bit about that. Rebus was referred to in this manner and within the context it most certainly was not friendly. However these Londoners may have viewed his presence in London, he shows them just how to catch a serial killer. I usually avoid books that detail serial killers, and that may be why I had skipped over this one. Yes, that part of the story is gruesome and graphic but presents enough of a mystery that it becomes more interesting than revolting. Library Loan - Thank you, library!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bicky

    Just into his third book of a police procedural series, Ian Rankin decides to write a comedy! DI Rebus from Edinburgh is unbelievably called upon for help by the London police because of his supposed expertise on serial killers. This allows Rankin to make fun of both Londoners and the Scots even about such a sensitive topic as racism: “Of course, there wasn’t nearly so much racism in Scotland. There was no need; the Scots had bigotry instead.” Despite being an extra in the great metropolis, Rebus Just into his third book of a police procedural series, Ian Rankin decides to write a comedy! DI Rebus from Edinburgh is unbelievably called upon for help by the London police because of his supposed expertise on serial killers. This allows Rankin to make fun of both Londoners and the Scots even about such a sensitive topic as racism: “Of course, there wasn’t nearly so much racism in Scotland. There was no need; the Scots had bigotry instead.” Despite being an extra in the great metropolis, Rebus improbably manages to be at the centre of things; giving impromptu press briefings, being on the front pages, throwing off suggestions, inducting a profiler, making sense of strange bite marks etc. As far as I can make out, no aspect of the plot or the characters, including the serial killer, is to be taken seriously. This is a great and funny read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    "Fish out of water" Rebus. Loved it. Rebus is on loan to London to help solve a serial murder case. Somehow he's now got the rep as a serial killer expert and has been called in to solve this series of heinous, brutal murders. His interactions with the London police and resentment of their "hick from the sticks" attitude towards him is classic Rebus as is his awkward concern regarding his daughter and her new "Beau" and the suspicions he has that this boy in her life is trouble. The mystery was "Fish out of water" Rebus. Loved it. Rebus is on loan to London to help solve a serial murder case. Somehow he's now got the rep as a serial killer expert and has been called in to solve this series of heinous, brutal murders. His interactions with the London police and resentment of their "hick from the sticks" attitude towards him is classic Rebus as is his awkward concern regarding his daughter and her new "Beau" and the suspicions he has that this boy in her life is trouble. The mystery was good; well-crafted and hard to figure out. The car chase scene at the end gave good entertainment value. Having the story set in London was a nice twist as I know that city well but I look forward to #4 when Rebus is back in his own stomping grounds in Edinburgh. A really enjoyable series so far.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This must be one of the silliest books I've ever read. The plot is rambling; the denoument is melodramatic and farcical; the central character, Inspector Rebus, comes over as a bit thick in his conversations with the young female psychology student who, predictably enough, ends up in bed with him; and the characterisation of the villain, a serial killer who leaves bite marks in his victims, is like something out of a pantomime. This must be one of the silliest books I've ever read. The plot is rambling; the denoument is melodramatic and farcical; the central character, Inspector Rebus, comes over as a bit thick in his conversations with the young female psychology student who, predictably enough, ends up in bed with him; and the characterisation of the villain, a serial killer who leaves bite marks in his victims, is like something out of a pantomime.

  14. 5 out of 5

    John

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My first ever Inspector John Rebus novel. Number 3 in the series and also called The Wolfman. Rebus is drafted down to London from Edinburgh to assist Detective Flight in a serial killer case. Someone is killing women by stabbing them in the throat and deviantly stabbing them as well as biting their stomachs. Rebus arrives by train just as another murder takes place. Lots of gritty action, procedural descriptions and colorful humor as well as racism against the Scotsman. The subplot with his ex My first ever Inspector John Rebus novel. Number 3 in the series and also called The Wolfman. Rebus is drafted down to London from Edinburgh to assist Detective Flight in a serial killer case. Someone is killing women by stabbing them in the throat and deviantly stabbing them as well as biting their stomachs. Rebus arrives by train just as another murder takes place. Lots of gritty action, procedural descriptions and colorful humor as well as racism against the Scotsman. The subplot with his ex wife and daughter Samantha with her unsavory boyfriend Kenny was not necessary. The oblique mention of Hard Times by Dickens was amusing. The romance with Lisa a bit far fetched as the final chase scene around trafalgar Square and the National gallery. When lawyers go bad! Or brigs case stark raving bonkers. Nice play on words with the name Chambers. A few red herrings but overall a satisfying read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    This is one of the earliest Rebus novels, so it's a bit shorter than the later ones. Having said that, the story packs a punch. Rebus is sent down to London as an "expert" on serial killers to help the Met with a killer of their own. He battles bigotry as he tries to track down the killer that the media has dubbed "Wolfman". The story plods along a little, right up to the big reveal of the killer, and that point the story explodes. I was laughing with sheer delight by this point. I don't think any This is one of the earliest Rebus novels, so it's a bit shorter than the later ones. Having said that, the story packs a punch. Rebus is sent down to London as an "expert" on serial killers to help the Met with a killer of their own. He battles bigotry as he tries to track down the killer that the media has dubbed "Wolfman". The story plods along a little, right up to the big reveal of the killer, and that point the story explodes. I was laughing with sheer delight by this point. I don't think any other writer could have got away with what Ian Rankin did. In fact, I know they couldn't have, because I know any other writer would have had me throwing the book against the wall with cries of "Bollocks" and "This is ridiculous crap." "Tooth and Nail" is, I think, the book where we first got to see just how special Ian Rankin is as a writer. Highly recommended.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

    As a lover of British crime thrillers, I try to read all the big names. I would like to be able to say I have read most of the big ones, yet the reality is that I have read nowhere near as many as I would like to be able to claim. I’ve been trying to amend that, and my journey into Ian Rankin is an example of me trying to better myself when it comes to one of my favourite genres. For as long as I can remember, I’ve been meaning to pick up an Inspector Rebus book. It is such a well-known name – fr As a lover of British crime thrillers, I try to read all the big names. I would like to be able to say I have read most of the big ones, yet the reality is that I have read nowhere near as many as I would like to be able to claim. I’ve been trying to amend that, and my journey into Ian Rankin is an example of me trying to better myself when it comes to one of my favourite genres. For as long as I can remember, I’ve been meaning to pick up an Inspector Rebus book. It is such a well-known name – from the television series all the way through to references being made in other crime fiction (points towards Stuart MacBride) – with the books catching my attention on many occasions. Despite how often a Rebus book would grab my attention in book stores, I held off on buying for one important reason – I’ve been trying to read crime series in order. It’s fine to jump in here and there, but so much better if you follow the development of the characters throughout. Thus, I waited until I was able to get my hands on the first Rebus book. It turns out getting my hands on the first Rebus book came about through me getting my hands on the first nine plus an unrelated Ian Rankin book through a boxset – needless to say, I was set and more than willing to dive in. With so much behind my desire to read the books, and having heard so many great things, I went in with quite high expectations. Unfortunately, I wasn’t crazy about the first book, Knots and Crosses. It was an okay read, but it did not blow my mind in the way I had been hoping it would. Nevertheless, it did leave me interested in finding out more. Thus, as I own a fair few of the books, I decided to dive straight into the second book. I may not have loved Knots and Crosses but there was enough to leave me with the belief Hide and Seek would be more enjoyable. It was more enjoyable, but I wasn’t crazy about it. The first book was a rounded up three-star rating, whereas the second book was a solid three-star rating. With book three, I was hoping for a four-star read but I wasn’t holding out hope. It turns out my enjoyment of Tooth and Nail sits somewhere between the first two books. It was closer to my enjoyment of the second book, but it was still only a three-star rating. By this point, I’ve concluded Rebus is not for me. It’s unfortunate, but such seems to be the case. They are decent reads, but they are not the kind of books I will obsessively read. I’ll be continuing the series because I own more of the books, but I doubt I will go beyond that. That being said, it’s likely a small part of me will continue to hold out hope in regard to my view changing. I realised with book two what it is that makes it so difficult for me to enjoy these books – I’m not crazy about Rebus. The crime aspect is interesting – I would not label any of the books thus far my favourite crime story, but they are decent enough stories to pass the time – but I do not care for the characters. I really do not care for Rebus at all – he’s nothing more than a means of explaining how things came to be. In fact, I rather dislike him as a character, which is making it difficult to become too invested in this series. If I’m going to be addicted to a crime series, it is as much about the characters as it is about the crimes – and this series does not seem to tick both boxes. As I said, I’ll continue on, but it’ll be at a slow pace rather than being an obsessive read of the series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Hall

    The third book in the Inspector Rebus series sees the wonderfully sardonic, truculent and, at times, antagonistic DI John Rebus uprooted from his home turf and mixing it amongst 'the big boys' of Scotland Yard. Originally published in 1992 as Wolfman, Ian Rankin used this third book primarily to explore his own feelings about London during his time spent residing in the capital and the device works well as chippy Rebus is down south and on more of a back foot than ever before. The presence of DI The third book in the Inspector Rebus series sees the wonderfully sardonic, truculent and, at times, antagonistic DI John Rebus uprooted from his home turf and mixing it amongst 'the big boys' of Scotland Yard. Originally published in 1992 as Wolfman, Ian Rankin used this third book primarily to explore his own feelings about London during his time spent residing in the capital and the device works well as chippy Rebus is down south and on more of a back foot than ever before. The presence of DI John Rebus is requested by Scotland Yard for his supposed knowledge of the modus operandi of serial killers after London has fallen prey to the savage murderer whom the press have dubbed 'Wolfman' This provides plenty of amusement for his superior in Edinburgh as the serial killer who Rebus put behind bars had a very personal motive and a grudge aimed squarely at the detective. Feeling like a fraud as he travels south his welcome is hostile and the sarcasm that the London cops reserve for him is on another level. The sneers and smart remarks are thinly veiled and Rebus is fighting to sink or swim and reliant on his wits alone. When Rebus arrives in the aftermath of the fourth murder and sees the brutality of the perpetrator at close quarters and the chilling bite mark on the stomach that is a feature of the murders he feels out of his depth and envisages a swift return home. Scotland Yard is muddling along with the day to day work of the investigation but with nobody in the office willing to put their neck on the line and suggest an idea which could potentially backfire, Rebus finally begins to think that with his fresh attitude he could make a breakthrough. After all, Rebus knows that you make your own luck in the subtle art of crime fighting! Rebus is as eager as ever to rely on a hunch and his willingness to snatch at red herrings and clutch a straws makes the man altogether more human. The introduction of Lisa Fraser as a psychologist offering a profile of the Wolfman seems a great opportunity for Rebus to gain a better insight into the perpetrator and offers an altogether more romantic indulgence... But whether Lisa and his fellow Scotland Yard colleagues can be taken as face value is another question entirely and Rebus has to watch his back as his enemies are never far away. Throughout Tooth and Nail Ian Rankin makes time for Rebus to muse on his thoughts about the city, where the wealthy and the poor live "almost cheek by jowl". No contacts or knowledge of the way the police operate in London puts Rebus at a true disadvantage and he grows tired of being told the city is home to the "cream of the crop' and the best in the business. Tooth and Nail also allows Rebus to catch up with daughter Sammy and his former wife Rhona and needless to say provides an opportunity for him to interfere in their lives! Sammy is now a blossoming young woman with a motorbike courier boyfriend in tow and Rebus does his own checking up on the youth who has enamoured his daughter, taking him to the notorious Churchill estate and making for a humorous diversion in a gritty storyline. Interestingly this third entry also marks the introduction of Scottish words into the Rebus books and as London struggles with his thick accent and occasional Scottish slang, he finds himself similarly confounded by the Cockney rhyming slang! Tooth and Nail also marks the first usage of the FYTP acronym which seems to sum up Rebus in a nutshell.. As ever Rebus makes an endlessly fascinating character to explore and Tooth and Nail also marks a real high point in the fluidity of Rankin's prose and this humorous and addictive series jumps right off the page to its readers. If you haven't already encountered DI John Rebus it is never too late to do so and with each novel in the series bringing a clearer appreciation of the man there is no doubt that these early novels are essential for a hardened fan. I thought that this was the first in the series which combined a brilliant forensic knowledge with the rigorous psychological detail which is so pivotal in identifying any serial killer. A brilliant testimony to the London of the late 1980's and an eye opener to the workings of the Old Bailey and the heart of justice in the city. I would warmly welcome DI John Rebus back down south again but in the meantime I am happy to follow him back to Edinburgh for book four of the series!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Juliet Sem

    SPOILERS I wanted to read several crime novels that were considered accurate for the genre, as being the child of a police officer, I often find it hard to suspend disbelief when reading a crime novel when I find inaccuracies. Ian Rankin's Tooth And Nail was highly recommended to me by a friend who loves crime novels, so I forked out the $17 required to purchase this in paperback. I would like a refund. I didn't think the main character did much, if anything, in the way of solving the crime, inst SPOILERS I wanted to read several crime novels that were considered accurate for the genre, as being the child of a police officer, I often find it hard to suspend disbelief when reading a crime novel when I find inaccuracies. Ian Rankin's Tooth And Nail was highly recommended to me by a friend who loves crime novels, so I forked out the $17 required to purchase this in paperback. I would like a refund. I didn't think the main character did much, if anything, in the way of solving the crime, instead spending most of his time drinking tea, shagging a beautiful woman who for some reason instantly wants the overweight older protagonist, and dealing with his dysfunctional ex and his child. Then, he instantly solves the murders by realizing the bad guy used TWO WORDS in a manner that made him certain that this person was the killer. Really? I'm all for intuitive leaps, but I feel this plot was grasping at straws. The cliches were thick in this one, and as it's an older book, it feels quite dated as well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Francis

    Well I'm back to reading about Rebus and not surprisingly he is just as surly, petulant, impulsive and distrusting as ever. No, that's not right. The fact is, he reaches new heights in this book. First of all, he's chasing down a serial killer ( I know what your thinking ...Hey everybody has to, so what's so special about that?) Well for one thing, the serial killer is British and he's Scottish, and secondly he is being forced to work with the Brits in damned London, and the Brits they're thinki Well I'm back to reading about Rebus and not surprisingly he is just as surly, petulant, impulsive and distrusting as ever. No, that's not right. The fact is, he reaches new heights in this book. First of all, he's chasing down a serial killer ( I know what your thinking ...Hey everybody has to, so what's so special about that?) Well for one thing, the serial killer is British and he's Scottish, and secondly he is being forced to work with the Brits in damned London, and the Brits they're thinking, "Who forced this damned Scot on us, it ain't like we can't take care of our own business" And if that isn't enough, the Scots have just finished defeating the Brits in a big football match. So, all in all. it's kind of an explosive situation to be putting somebody like Rebus into, considering his blatant lack of charm and his outsider pedigree. Oh, and did I mention earlier, the man is tactless. Well he is. So it's tough on the working relationship, but then it's tough for the serial killer as well. So hang in there, it's a rough ride but a good one.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Excellent plot, with a grippingly suspense and an unexpected end. 3* The Third Gentleman 3* The Serpent's Back Inspector Rebus series: 4* Tooth and Nail (Inspector Rebus, #3) 3* Strip Jack (Inspector Rebus, #4) 3* The Black Book (Inspector Rebus, #5) 3* Let It Bleed (Inspector Rebus, #7) 2* Death Is Not the End (Inspector Rebus, #10.5) 4* Resurrection Men (Inspector Rebus, #13) 4* A Question of Blood (Inspector Rebus, #14) 4* Fleshmarket Close (Inspector Rebus, #15) TR Knots and Crosses (Inspector Reb Excellent plot, with a grippingly suspense and an unexpected end. 3* The Third Gentleman 3* The Serpent's Back Inspector Rebus series: 4* Tooth and Nail (Inspector Rebus, #3) 3* Strip Jack (Inspector Rebus, #4) 3* The Black Book (Inspector Rebus, #5) 3* Let It Bleed (Inspector Rebus, #7) 2* Death Is Not the End (Inspector Rebus, #10.5) 4* Resurrection Men (Inspector Rebus, #13) 4* A Question of Blood (Inspector Rebus, #14) 4* Fleshmarket Close (Inspector Rebus, #15) TR Knots and Crosses (Inspector Rebus, #1) TR Hide and Seek (Inspector Rebus, #2) TR Mortal Causes (Inspector Rebus, #6) TR Black and Blue (Inspector Rebus, #8) TR The Hanging Garden (Inspector Rebus, #9) TR Dead Souls (Inspector Rebus, #10) TR Set in Darkness (Inspector Rebus, #11) TR The Falls (Inspector Rebus, #12) TR The Naming of the Dead (Inspector Rebus, #16) TR Exit Music (Inspector Rebus, #17) TR Standing in Another Man's Grave (Inspector Rebus, #18) TR Saints of the Shadow Bible (Inspector Rebus, #19) TR Even Dogs in the Wild (Inspector Rebus, #20)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Ellis

    Rebus is sent to London (a form of punishment in his eyes) to assist the police in the investigation of a serial killer. He quickly manages to step on many toes with his rather abrupt manner and his "foreign" ways (!) as well as shocking everyone by allowing an attractive psychology student to become involved with the case trying to profile the killer. But no amount of insults or attempts to brush him off can keep Rebus from pursuing and resolving these crimes. I am enjoying the Rebus series mor Rebus is sent to London (a form of punishment in his eyes) to assist the police in the investigation of a serial killer. He quickly manages to step on many toes with his rather abrupt manner and his "foreign" ways (!) as well as shocking everyone by allowing an attractive psychology student to become involved with the case trying to profile the killer. But no amount of insults or attempts to brush him off can keep Rebus from pursuing and resolving these crimes. I am enjoying the Rebus series more and more and especially like the way the author lets us inside his head. The characters in all the books, but especially this one, are fascinating, and I found it particularly interesting to read about the attitude toward and treatment of Rebus the Scot by his London colleagues, being rather appalled by their condescending and insulting manners. No matter how badly anyone treats him, though, Rebus perseveres and makes us want to read more and more of his adventures.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Smith (A Mother’s Musings)

    Superb read would highly recommend.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Metabull

    3.5 stars. Once again, the buildup is great in the third Rebus novel. Rebus is written perfectly as the Scot who isn't on his own turf in London. Rebus is in London to assist the police with The Wolfman Case, as an expert on serial killers. And of course, Rebus goes in and does his thing. The novel is great until the end. It just unravels too abruptly to do the novel justice. The killer wasn't too obvious, the killer's voice and perspective was well done and had me guessing. Also enjoyed the nod 3.5 stars. Once again, the buildup is great in the third Rebus novel. Rebus is written perfectly as the Scot who isn't on his own turf in London. Rebus is in London to assist the police with The Wolfman Case, as an expert on serial killers. And of course, Rebus goes in and does his thing. The novel is great until the end. It just unravels too abruptly to do the novel justice. The killer wasn't too obvious, the killer's voice and perspective was well done and had me guessing. Also enjoyed the nodds to the previous novels, they added to the whole Rebus world.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    This morning on the way into work I completed my latest audio book, Tooth and Nail, by Ian Rankin. This was the first book I had read (or listened to) by Mr Rankin. I had picked it out of the library like I usually do...it looked interesting: a serial killer is on the loose, with the interesting characteristic that he bites his victims sort of like a werewolf. I've done a little research since then and have found that Ian Rankin is one of the top selling British novelists alive today. In fact Wi This morning on the way into work I completed my latest audio book, Tooth and Nail, by Ian Rankin. This was the first book I had read (or listened to) by Mr Rankin. I had picked it out of the library like I usually do...it looked interesting: a serial killer is on the loose, with the interesting characteristic that he bites his victims sort of like a werewolf. I've done a little research since then and have found that Ian Rankin is one of the top selling British novelists alive today. In fact Wikipedia, if you can trust it, says 10 percent of all books sold in Britain are written by Ian Rankin. Wow, that's impressive. I also discovered this book is part of a series of crime solving novels featuring Detective Inspector Rebus. From the moment I inserted the first disc into my car's CD player and heard the fantastic British accents of the narrator, Samuel Gillies, I was transported to London where the majority of the plot takes place. Inspector Rebus is a Scottsman and the narrator is incredibly adept at portraying the various British and Scottish accents of the characters, helping the listener to keep track of who's who. In fact, the narrator might be too good for I often found myself admiring his skill as opposed to following the plot. As a result I often found my mind wandering a bit and having to jerk myself back to the tale itself. But that aside, I enjoyed this novel. It's been quite a while since I've read a straight forward detective novel. The mysteries I've read lately tend to be more of the amateur sleuth variety, the ones where the protagonist is a "normal" person (i.e. not a professional detective, police force, etc.) and happens to find themselves in the midst of a murder situation. In this novel, I particularly liked the other major character, George Flight, who is Inspector Rebus' equivalent in London. They work together on the case and it was a pleasant switch from the typical modern day detective novel where the protagonist is forced to work around the local buffoonery and tolerate their incompetence. I wonder if future Ian Rankin novels include Flight or perhaps he may have his own novel or two. The serial killer mystery itself was quite engaging...I didn't figure out the culprit until it was revealed in the course of the story, and yet it was entirely logical. No doubt my wife would have figured it out before hand but she is smarter than me. Nevertheless, this is always a good sign for murder mysteries.

  25. 4 out of 5

    LJ

    TOOTH AND NAIL (Pol Proc-John Rebus-Scotland-Cont) - Ex Rankin, Ian - 3rd in series From Fantastic Fiction: They call him the Wolfman - because he takes a nip out of his victims and because they found the first victim in the East End's lonely Wolf Street. But there's no urban predator that Rebus fears. When Scotland Yard are anxious to find the last serial killer on their patch they look north and soon Rebus is on his way south from the chill of Edinburgh to the rain of London. A serial killerfrom TOOTH AND NAIL (Pol Proc-John Rebus-Scotland-Cont) - Ex Rankin, Ian - 3rd in series From Fantastic Fiction: They call him the Wolfman - because he takes a nip out of his victims and because they found the first victim in the East End's lonely Wolf Street. But there's no urban predator that Rebus fears. When Scotland Yard are anxious to find the last serial killer on their patch they look north and soon Rebus is on his way south from the chill of Edinburgh to the rain of London. A serial killerfrom Dr Liza Frazer is attractive in more ways than one and Rebus is happy to take her up on her offer of help. But in taking on one ally who doesn't think that everyone achilles heel in the fight against the Wolfman. Rebus is a great, but dark character, with lots of dimension. Wonderful pollice procedural in a great setting. Love this series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    Here we go again. This could easily have been a 4 star book if Rankin hadn't broken down in the end. The ending was rushed and not well set up. Otherwise it was a truly creepy story about a London serial killer. Rebus is borrowed by the London police because of his supposed expertise in solving serial killer cases, but as we know the murders in Knots and Crosses were not quite serial killings. In this installment Rebus gets a love interest and visits with his ex-wife and his 16 year old daughter Here we go again. This could easily have been a 4 star book if Rankin hadn't broken down in the end. The ending was rushed and not well set up. Otherwise it was a truly creepy story about a London serial killer. Rebus is borrowed by the London police because of his supposed expertise in solving serial killer cases, but as we know the murders in Knots and Crosses were not quite serial killings. In this installment Rebus gets a love interest and visits with his ex-wife and his 16 year old daughter.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    This is a fast paced mystery with a couple of satisfying twists at the end.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mal Warwick

    A serial murderer dubbed The Wolfman by the press has killed and mutilated three women in London, one a month. The pressure is on the police to catch the killer before panic spreads further. Now, someone at New Scotland Yard has written to Edinburgh to request help from Inspector John Rebus, much to his surprise. Whoever it is has mistaken Rebus for an expert on serial murder, because the difficult case he had solved was very personal and held few lessons for other investigators. But orders are A serial murderer dubbed The Wolfman by the press has killed and mutilated three women in London, one a month. The pressure is on the police to catch the killer before panic spreads further. Now, someone at New Scotland Yard has written to Edinburgh to request help from Inspector John Rebus, much to his surprise. Whoever it is has mistaken Rebus for an expert on serial murder, because the difficult case he had solved was very personal and held few lessons for other investigators. But orders are orders. And no sooner does he arrive in London than he learns from the radio that The Wolfman has killed a fourth woman. Thus opens Tooth and Nail, the third novel in Ian Rankin’s venerable series of detective novels featuring Inspector Rebus. The trouble starts virtually as soon as Rebus makes contact with Inspector George Flight, who has been assigned as his partner: Flight can’t understand a word he says because of Rebus’ strong Scottish accent. Practically everyone else in the homicide department resents his having been called in—and they’re not the least bit shy about showing it. They can’t understand him, either. No reader of the series will be surprised to learn that matters soon go further downhill. The disagreeable Scot manages to alienate all his new colleagues at Scotland Yard by ignoring established procedure and disappearing without explanation to investigate on his own. Since this is fiction, we’re confident that Inspector Rebus will eventually identify and catch the killer, and in short order. However, there’s a great deal of confusion and conflict before that happens, and Rebus is saved from arrest himself only because he manages to resolve the case. In a sense, Tooth and Nail is a traditional whodunit, since many suspects surface in the course of the investigation and Rebus’ job, above all, is to sort through them to find the one who is guilty. But Rankin is a much more skillful writer than most. He manages to create a credible portrait of his difficult hero and to convey a sense that he fully understands police procedure. This is one detective novel that’s genuinely suspenseful to the end. The conclusion took me by surprise—and that doesn’t happen all that often. This is a very satisfying read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Larraine

    This is a book that could keep you awake at night or give you some vivid dreams. Rebus is asked to be part of an investigation in London for a murderer who has been dubbed The Wolfman because he bites into his victim's stomachs after they are dead. It was the idea of a particular police inspector to bring him in after his success with another serial killer. Rebus is doubtful, but his boss wants him to go. When he gets there he soon discovers that not everyone is happy to see him as part of the t This is a book that could keep you awake at night or give you some vivid dreams. Rebus is asked to be part of an investigation in London for a murderer who has been dubbed The Wolfman because he bites into his victim's stomachs after they are dead. It was the idea of a particular police inspector to bring him in after his success with another serial killer. Rebus is doubtful, but his boss wants him to go. When he gets there he soon discovers that not everyone is happy to see him as part of the team especially a snarky young up and coming detective named Lamb. Rebus is approached by a beautiful woman who says she is a PhD with a local university and presents her self as an expert. It doesn't take long for their relationship to go from professional to personal. At the same time he visits his daughter who is living in London with her mother, his ex wife. His daughter, Sammy, is 16 and has left school and is working. She is involved with a young man who Rebus thinks is unsavory, but he admits to himself that even if she was seeing a member of the royal family he would be suspicious. The book unfolds in very typical Rankin style with an emphasis on details and Rebus' private life at the same time. I really enjoyed it, but just beware: it's a bit more bloody than some of his other books.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Todd Simpson

    An Excellent book, and very well written. I’m a big fan of the character John Rebus and Ian Rankin has done a fabulous job with each story. I like that each book is so different from each other, however the characters background and storyline is continued in each book. Detective inspector John Rebus had been requested to assist in London in tracking down a serial killer. With the bodies pilling up and the British Police not getting any closer to catching the killer they have sort out the one det An Excellent book, and very well written. I’m a big fan of the character John Rebus and Ian Rankin has done a fabulous job with each story. I like that each book is so different from each other, however the characters background and storyline is continued in each book. Detective inspector John Rebus had been requested to assist in London in tracking down a serial killer. With the bodies pilling up and the British Police not getting any closer to catching the killer they have sort out the one detective with the experience of successfully catching a serial killer in the past. Not that John thinks he’s going to be much help, but he’s not one to back out of a case once he’s started an investigation. This is certainly a book that I would strongly recommend. It’s well worth a read. 5/5 Star Rating.

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