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n all three full-length screenplays, presented with the secrets that led to their creation. Through hours of exclusive interviews with George Lucas and others involved in crafting the original trilogy, Laurent Bouzereau has uncovered the complex process through which life was breathed into the legendary Star Wars saga.


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n all three full-length screenplays, presented with the secrets that led to their creation. Through hours of exclusive interviews with George Lucas and others involved in crafting the original trilogy, Laurent Bouzereau has uncovered the complex process through which life was breathed into the legendary Star Wars saga.

30 review for Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    STAR WARS: THE ANNOTATED SCREENPLAYS “George Lucas went through many different permutations of plot, subplot, and character before he was satisfied with what he had.” (vii) In 1973, George Lucas wrote a forty-page outline about Mace Windy. Sound familiar? Inspired by Joseph Cambell’s The Hero With a Thousand Faces, early drafts of Star Wars had Annikin Starkiller, The Knights of Sith, kiber crystals, and Lars Owen. “The two droids did not exist in the first treatment.” (9) As a Star Wars fan and h STAR WARS: THE ANNOTATED SCREENPLAYS “George Lucas went through many different permutations of plot, subplot, and character before he was satisfied with what he had.” (vii) In 1973, George Lucas wrote a forty-page outline about Mace Windy. Sound familiar? Inspired by Joseph Cambell’s The Hero With a Thousand Faces, early drafts of Star Wars had Annikin Starkiller, The Knights of Sith, kiber crystals, and Lars Owen. “The two droids did not exist in the first treatment.” (9) As a Star Wars fan and historian, this publication could be used to explain the concept of historiography, revisionism, and demonstrate how science fiction is inspired and crafted. “it is fascinating to go back and explore how Lucas created the stories and the characters and try to visualize what the movies might have been like if Luke Skywalker has been over sixty years old.” (vii) Welp, now we can. In the story meeting transcripts between George Lucas and Leigh Brackett, Lucas defined the Force as: “The act of living generates a force field, an energy. That energy surrounds us; when we die, that energy joins with all the other energy. There is a giant mass of energy in the universe that has a good side and a bad side. We are part of the Force because we generate the power that makes the Force live. When we die, we become part of that Force, so we never really die; we continue as part of the Force.” (181) According to Ben Kenobi, “The force is what gives the Jedi his power. It’s an energy field created by all living things. It surrounds us and penetrates us. It binds the galaxy together.” (35) “A Jedi can feel the Force flowing through him.” (59) It partially controls your actions, but also obeys your commands. Master Yoda adds, “A Jedi must have the deepest commitment, the most serious mind.” (175) The force needs to be felt, size doesn’t matter, and concentrating is important to feel the Force flow. “For my ally is the Force. And a powerful ally it is. Life creates it, makes it grow. Its energy surrounds us and binds us. Luminous beings are we.” (187) “You must feel the Force around you. Here, between you… me… the tree… the rock… everywhere! Yes, even between the land and the ship!” (187) Luke didn’t want to believe it, but “Through the Force, things you will see. Other places. The future…the past. Old friends long gone.” (191) “Always in motion is the future.” (191) “Decide you must how to serve them best.” (191) It could be argued that many of the original ideas not used, especially in The Empire Strikes Back, are recycled or adapted in THE FORCE AWAKENS or THE LAST JEDI. * “He plays it into Artoo, and Threepio translates that the crystal gives the coordinates to a star system.” (140) * “I imagined that beneath the mask Vader was hideous; his mouth was cut away, and he had one eye hanging low.” (165) * “Caped and hooded in a cloth of gold” (174) * “In the story treatment Yoda tells Luke that Ben gave him the talisman he wears around his neck so that he could find him.” (178) * “Luke says he feels the Force the most when he is angry.” (183) * “Later Yoda and Luke reach a tree with giant twisted roots near a dark sinister cave. Yoda says that the tree is strong with the dark side of the Force and tells Luke he must face it. Luke feels he is not ready but eventually goes inside the cave. At one point he sees a shape and instinctively swings his weapon, only to realize that there is nothing. He comes out shaking and scared, and the scene ends with Yoda telling him to go back inside the cave.” (183) “At one point in the original Star Wars, Han Solo was going to be black.” (196) “At one point Luke and Leia were going to be Oriental.” (197) “One of the things he was doing on Tatooine besides watching over Luke was learning how to keep his identity after he became part of the Force.” (198) * “The Emperor raises his hand, and Vader starts choking; the Emperor tells him that the boy is his to train and that Vader’s place is with his fleet. Vader asks for forgiveness and leaves.” (307) * “During story meetings Lawrence Kasdan suggested that in order to give an emotional twist to the story, Luke should die and his sister should take over at the end. George Lucas was opposed to this idea, arguing how upset he was as a child when a hero was killed.” (314) * “It was conceivable that Luke could die or turn to the dark side, and if he did, then it would be up to Leia to redeem everybody.” * “Another dark idea that Lawrence Kasdan had for the ending was to have Luke put on Vader’s mask and say that he’s now going to destroy the Rebel fleet and rule the universe.” (314) A NEW HOPE Artoo was named after, “Reel 2, Dialogue 2.” Chewbacca was inspired by George Lucas’ co-pilot canine, Indiana. Subtitles were used to encourage children to learn how to read and to encourage bonding with their parents. The famous, “May the Force be with you” catch phrase didn’t appear until the third draft. A lot of battle sequences were initially cut using World War II film footage. In the climax, the footage of the Rebels in the war room during the Attack Run was cut from previous footage with off-screen dialogue through a PA system. The Special Editions were also done for archival purposes, among other things. This screenplay adds seven additional scenes, including Jabba confronting Han, the “space pirate.” The Millenium Falcon is a “hunk of junk” and is often referred to as the “pirate ship.” Star Wars fans could debate whether Han shot first for lightyears. THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK In Empire, characters like Chewbacca were filmed welding because I was the only thing you could see what they were doing. Irvin Kershner drew storyboards for Empire about six hours a day for an entire year! He believes that “In any film, communication is key; miscommunication is a curse.” (148) “If I ever used a long shot, it was for an emotional effect, not to show the sets.” (144) Also- “All the Americans in the film play the good guys, and all the characters who speak with a British accent are the bad guys. I did that on purpose.” (141) “At first I thought Yoda should be eight feet, nine feet tall with a big beard, like an oversized Moses” (188) (Ki-Adi-Mundi anyone?) In early drafts, Master Yoda was simply referred to as, “The Critter.” When Mark Hamill was talking to Yoda, he couldn’t hear his voice. “He did a good job, Mark; he is a good actor.” (199) In the second draft of Empire, the idea of Vader being Luke’s father first appeared. Han was also supposed to reply, “I’ll be back.” NAHT AHNOLD! “When Chewbacca is trying to put Threepio back together and he’s got his head in his hands, that’s like in Shakespeare’s Hamlet; it’s the grave digger staring down at the skill.” (204) I never would have made this connection, though IG-88 is also in the background! The screenplay adds two additional scenes and Chewbacca howls, moans, and barks rather frequently. The phrase “buffeted” is also used quite a bit. RETURN OF THE JEDI “Blue Harvest” was a “bogus title” used during production. Lucas came up with the idea of Leia strangling Jabba with her chain similar to a scene in the Godfather. According to George Lucas, Return of the Jedi is about the redemption of this fallen angel and Luke building his own lightsaber symbolized himself detaching from his father. “When Luke finally manages to fix the weapon, Yoda’s image appears. He tells Luke that now that he has mastered the secret of the lightsaber, his training is complete and he is ready for the final test: his father.” (273) I wonder if a similar moment will happen to Rey? “We don’t ever get to see how he does it, but the idea of retaining your identity after you’ve passed on is something that Ben learned as a Jedi.” (269) The screenplay adds five additional scenes and axes the Yub Nub song. According to George Lucas, “I said this is the stuff that happens later, this is the stuff that happens before, and this is the material I need to make the script about. And that’s how it came about that there was enough material for six scripts.” (120) He also is on record saying, “Writing has never been something I have enjoyed.” (144) Before Yoda peaced out, he told Master Skywalker: “Luke, when gone am I…the last of the Jedi you will be. Luke, the Force runs strong in your family. Pass on what you have learned.” (266) Sounds like a great title for a movie! “Even though at some point Yoda and Ben interfered, I eventually decided they couldn’t connect physically with what Luke was doing.” (301) How did Yoda come back in the newest installment and light the tree on fire with lighting? Help me George Lucas, you’re my only hope.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eric Farr

    What is fascinating about these annotated screenplays is that such an authoritative text actually deconstructs its own authority, the idea of canon/continuity (so important to so many fans), and even the idea of a core "true" narrative. Just as fascinating, I cannot determine whether Laurent Bouzereau set out to achieve this. The screenplays in and of themselves are fairly straightforward, though even here there is ambiguity. Some descriptions, for instance, simply do not match the final film (th What is fascinating about these annotated screenplays is that such an authoritative text actually deconstructs its own authority, the idea of canon/continuity (so important to so many fans), and even the idea of a core "true" narrative. Just as fascinating, I cannot determine whether Laurent Bouzereau set out to achieve this. The screenplays in and of themselves are fairly straightforward, though even here there is ambiguity. Some descriptions, for instance, simply do not match the final film (the bounty hunters in Episode V, for example). Then again, what is the final film? With the original films, then special editions, DVD versions, and Blu-ray versions, the classic trilogy at least does not really offer a single definitive version of events to choose from. These screenplays, published in 1997, allude to the beginnings of these changes, with some blocks of text printed in parallel, original edition on one side and special edition on the other. These recurrent, sometimes subtle, challenges to a single primary text (and they are challenges, since even ignoring the special edition, these screenplays at times contradict the scenes in the films) feel quite...postmodern, whether that was the intent or not. There are many excerpts from interviews with several creative personalities behind the movies, and interspersed throughout there are also summaries of different drafts of the screenplays. These blocks of text interrupt the reading of the screenplays, constantly encouraging the reader to step away from the script as pure narrative and to instead review it as a constantly evolving creative work, changed both by time and collaboration. The summaries of older drafts are fascinating, to see how ideas were dropped and remixed--many dropped ideas could easily make interesting independent stories of their own, and I suppose there was an attempt to demonstrate this reality years later with The Star Wars comic series. The interview snippets can be just as fascinating, and not everything involves story development; as Bouzereau says in the introduction, while some non-story-development excerpts detail how production impacted design of creatures or could have impacted character development, "I'll admit that some of the stories were just too good to be dismissed!" These interviews offer more challenge to the idea of authoritative Creation or Creator. There is some tension between different accounts of certain events, and perhaps most interestingly, one can see George Lucas himself fluctuate between honesty and the myth-building that he has always been prone toward. I have had this book for many years, since childhood. I often skimmed through passages or looked up lines, but I never actually read it from front to back until now. On the one hand, I feel like I have really been missing out on a delightful pseudo-history; on the other hand, I wonder if I would have even recognized the most tantalizing tensions present in this meta-narrative at a young age. This book can be a fun way to "read" the films, but it can offer a lot more if you'll let it. I would certainly recommend the latter.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    This book is basically the full screenplays of A New Hope, the Empire Strikes Back, and Return of the Jedi, intercut with observations from George Lucas and various writers, directors, producers, and special effects people on how the final story/screenplay changed or was different from previous drafts or iterations. A few times Lucas would wax eloquent and speak to his underlying philosophy of story and therefore why he chose to go in certain directions with his space sage. The enjoyment of this This book is basically the full screenplays of A New Hope, the Empire Strikes Back, and Return of the Jedi, intercut with observations from George Lucas and various writers, directors, producers, and special effects people on how the final story/screenplay changed or was different from previous drafts or iterations. A few times Lucas would wax eloquent and speak to his underlying philosophy of story and therefore why he chose to go in certain directions with his space sage. The enjoyment of this book will be entirely dependent upon situation, outlook, and knowledge of Star Wars. For instance: I am a nerd/geek and have loved Star Wars all my life, and by loved I mean have-studied-intentently. Yes, I am one of *those* people who know all the ins and outs of the Star Wars galaxy and sort of think it all matters. I am a fanboy (Original Trilogy - Han Shot First! - No Hayden in Jedi etc) and an enthusiast, so for me, the Annotated Star Wars Screenplays held little factual surprises. I knew that Han used to be a green, gilled alien. I knew that Chewbacca was based on Lucas' dog, I knew that there was originally a wampa invasion of the Rebel base on Hoth, and I even knew that Owen Lars was originally Obi-Wan Kenobi's brother, not Anakin Skywalker's brother. If you don't know these things, then *spoiler alert* (?). Anyway, it was interesting to read the culled insights of Irvin Kershnerr, the director of Empire Strikes Back, because he had the most fascinating and intelligent insights on the craft of filmmaking. However, as delightful as it is to present the "untold" facts of Star Wars' origins to the interested few, it is hideous to understand that you are being lied to. The main, large problem with the Annotated Screenplays is George Lucas himself. At this point, it is vital to know that this book was published in 1997, just after Lucas finished his first bout of "updating" the original Star Wars trilogy with the first of his many "Special Editions". He had also, obviously, begun work on The Phantom Menace (released in 1999). All of this means that Lucas was full into retconning himself and his saga. If you didn't know better, you would accept everything in the book at face value and as true, but if you had watched any of the behind the scenes, documentaries, interviews, or read anything about Star Wars before 1997, you would be able to pick up on the subtle lies that Lucas tells about his Star Wars. [For example, Lucas claims in the Annotated Screenplays that the original title for Return of the Jedi, Revenge of the Jedi, was merely a false title to throw people off about the nature of the movie and that it was never intended to be the real title, when he in fact (and others) have said many times previously that Revenge of the Jedi was the true title until a few weeks before release when Lucas realized that he had made a mistake because, ideologically, the Jedi don't take revenge and Lucas had it changed. This actually echoes the most famous title change of all when Lucas added "Episode IV: A New Hope" to the original title of "Star Wars" a week or so into its theatrical release. Strangely, he doesn't lie about that.] These little factual idiosyncrasies may be small, and unimportant to those outside the fandom, but it is the principle of the thing that bothers me. That Lucas would intentionally change what he himself said earlier in order to cover up mistakes, or simply to present a different (in his mind, no doubt better) version of the past is unconscionable and, quite frankly, wrong. To be clear, I don't care if Lucas wants to change his movies. They are his creative property and he can alter them however he wants. I have a problem with him constantly saying or doing one thing and then maintaining that he never said or did that thing. It is dishonest, and I really see no reason for his dishonesty. Creative vision naturally changes with time, so why not acknowledge that in 1977 he had one idea about Star Wars and that vision evolved in 1997? Why lie to say that your 1997 idea was what you had thought of all along in 1977 (despite clear evidence to the contrary)? And so it goes. None of this means that the Annotated Screenplays are not worth taking a look at, if for no other reason than curiosity, but don't believe everything you read, especially if it comes from George Lucas.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brett Farkas

    This is a great book if you are interested in the art of story-making. The screenplays are presented in full, but the important part of the book is the alternate versions of the script that are presented. By comparing and contrasting the early ideas with the final version of the script you can see the gears turning in Lucas' head as he chooses one thing over another. A lot of people don't know that he spent an entire year writing the first draft of the 1977 film's script, then afterwards threw i This is a great book if you are interested in the art of story-making. The screenplays are presented in full, but the important part of the book is the alternate versions of the script that are presented. By comparing and contrasting the early ideas with the final version of the script you can see the gears turning in Lucas' head as he chooses one thing over another. A lot of people don't know that he spent an entire year writing the first draft of the 1977 film's script, then afterwards threw it away and started over. If you have been enjoying Star Wars from the audience's viewpoint for years this book will help you to see it from the artist's perspective.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Jamieson

    Fascinating read for the nerdier of Star Wars fan. The annotations are the most interesting bit here, including all sorts of trivia about how the original screenplays came into being. The Empire Strikes Back is my favourite part of the book, and there are some great contributions from those involved throughout.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brendon Mustaciola

    A gallon of gold nuggets in the Star Wars making of genre.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jack Herbert Christal Gattanella

    The first screenplay(s) I ever owned (that weren't like full scripts bought at some street fair or something). The first screenplay(s) I ever owned (that weren't like full scripts bought at some street fair or something).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia

    Not always easy to read, because scripts dialogues are often interrupted with stories about the making of, but it's about Star Wars so it get 5 stars. Not always easy to read, because scripts dialogues are often interrupted with stories about the making of, but it's about Star Wars so it get 5 stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joel Kirk

    As a person who is writing his own screenplays, I still am amazed how the three Star Wars screenplays flow so well, and how I'm able to visualize the action. Granted, I've seen the movies countless times, but there is a reason why the classic trilogy is so iconic. I initially read these screenplays when they were realized years ago as art books; art from the movies with the screenplay included. Bouzereau has combined screenplays from all three of the classic trilogy films, and has included annota As a person who is writing his own screenplays, I still am amazed how the three Star Wars screenplays flow so well, and how I'm able to visualize the action. Granted, I've seen the movies countless times, but there is a reason why the classic trilogy is so iconic. I initially read these screenplays when they were realized years ago as art books; art from the movies with the screenplay included. Bouzereau has combined screenplays from all three of the classic trilogy films, and has included annotations or notes of how the early drafts compare to the final product. Unfortunately, for me, it got confusing at times because there is so much information. Early drafts, especially for the first film, have a lot of characters and situations that were fleshed out. It was jarring because in the middle of a scene, the author would have annotations asking us to recall plot points and plot turns in one (or more drafts). I would have suggested putting all notes for drafts after each screenplay, but then the reader might skip over notes. At least with the notes placed at certain points in the script, said scenes are fresh in the minds so we can compare. It was also cool getting notes from the production crew as well as Special Edition script additions for the new scenes that were added when the films were rereleased in 1997.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sheldon

    Excellent insight into the evolution of the original trilogy writing process. Any quotes by George have to be taken with a pinch of salt because he's said so many contradictory statements over the years. Excellent insight into the evolution of the original trilogy writing process. Any quotes by George have to be taken with a pinch of salt because he's said so many contradictory statements over the years.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Fantastic book. Great tales of the creative meetings and thought that went into the original trilogy. Recommended reading for anyone who defends Disney's lack of planning by saying the old movies were similarly haphazard. Fantastic book. Great tales of the creative meetings and thought that went into the original trilogy. Recommended reading for anyone who defends Disney's lack of planning by saying the old movies were similarly haphazard.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brad Wheeler

    Aside from having the final scripts, which is pretty cool, there are some interesting revelations from Lucas and others about early versions of the scripts. It's never exactly mind-blowing, but it's a good, fast read, and it did make me watch these movies (for the millionth time) with new eyes. It also cast some light on the prequels, even though it was released well before The Phantom Menace. For example, did you know the term "Padawan" for a Jedi apprentice actually predates the final name for Aside from having the final scripts, which is pretty cool, there are some interesting revelations from Lucas and others about early versions of the scripts. It's never exactly mind-blowing, but it's a good, fast read, and it did make me watch these movies (for the millionth time) with new eyes. It also cast some light on the prequels, even though it was released well before The Phantom Menace. For example, did you know the term "Padawan" for a Jedi apprentice actually predates the final name for the Jedi Order? I assumed it was invented for Episode I. Anyway. My main complaint is that facts on early drafts often aren't related in clear order, so the different story drafts all kind of run together. The author tries to tie everything together, but he only succeeds sometimes, so I ended up glossing over quite a bit. Still, it was worthy purchase, and great fun to read in small doses or when I don't feel like grappling with a novel.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rich

    Yeah, big deal -- the screenplays. What made this actually interesting were the annotations discussing the process of making the films. Given the total disaster of the prequel trilogy was in terms of good storytelling, it's interesting to see the thought Lucas put into the development of the storyline of the original three movies -- how the emphasis was on the story, not the special effects. There's also a wealth of trivia regarding casting and production that raises some interesting possibiliti Yeah, big deal -- the screenplays. What made this actually interesting were the annotations discussing the process of making the films. Given the total disaster of the prequel trilogy was in terms of good storytelling, it's interesting to see the thought Lucas put into the development of the storyline of the original three movies -- how the emphasis was on the story, not the special effects. There's also a wealth of trivia regarding casting and production that raises some interesting possibilities. (Burt Reynolds as Han Solo? Really? Given the prospect of Han Solo, P.I., even Jar Jar Binks doesn't seem like such a bad idea after all...)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Punkie

    Four stars for the annotation, great behind the scenes information. But only a 2 for presentation. This should have been in a nicely bound edition with photographs.

  15. 5 out of 5

    John Cress

    This was fun to read but if one is a big Star Wars nut, the scripts aren't needed because one probably has most of the movie memorized. The book gives a scene then some background. The rough drafts are fun to read since one sees the changes that were made. Some ideas that were axed was Luke dying in Jedi, Ben coming back in Jedi to fight Vader, Ewoks being Wookies (I think most know that one), having duel death stats and the Emporor residing around a lava pit instead of the death star. I would r This was fun to read but if one is a big Star Wars nut, the scripts aren't needed because one probably has most of the movie memorized. The book gives a scene then some background. The rough drafts are fun to read since one sees the changes that were made. Some ideas that were axed was Luke dying in Jedi, Ben coming back in Jedi to fight Vader, Ewoks being Wookies (I think most know that one), having duel death stats and the Emporor residing around a lava pit instead of the death star. I would recommend if you are a fan of the movies. There is nothing groud breaking but an enjoyable read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Llewellyn

    Before the wonderful invention of Blue-ray HD DVDs with commentaries and special features, before George Lucas ruined the Star Wars trilogy with those three unnecessary prequels...there was this book. Read along while watching the movies because you won't find these great back stories and funny outtakes on any DVD. Before the wonderful invention of Blue-ray HD DVDs with commentaries and special features, before George Lucas ruined the Star Wars trilogy with those three unnecessary prequels...there was this book. Read along while watching the movies because you won't find these great back stories and funny outtakes on any DVD.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Darin

    This book include the screenplays for movies in the original Star Wars trilogy with annotations that compare the multiple drafts of each film and shares quotes from the filmmakers. The draft comparisons are broken by scene, which allows the scene development to overshadow the story development. It creates a unique take on sharing the story of Star Wars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    The Annotated Screenplays is a comparison of the drafts/changes to the screenplay and storyline of the original Star Wars movies. It's well-done, but a little tedious to read straight through. I recommend reading the sections of your favorite scenes to get insight and commentary on how that particular scene or character changed. The Annotated Screenplays is a comparison of the drafts/changes to the screenplay and storyline of the original Star Wars movies. It's well-done, but a little tedious to read straight through. I recommend reading the sections of your favorite scenes to get insight and commentary on how that particular scene or character changed.

  19. 5 out of 5

    hayls 🐴

    If you are a Star Wars nerd, and also like commentary about previous script editions, film-making and special effects, learning the inspiration behind the characters and ideas of the original trilogy, and other general trivia, this is the book for you!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jessamyn Leigh

    Well this was really interesting. I was disappointed when I realized this wasn't the original screenplay or the shooting scripts, but basically a transcript of the movies. There was a lot of fascinating stuff in the annotations though. Well this was really interesting. I was disappointed when I realized this wasn't the original screenplay or the shooting scripts, but basically a transcript of the movies. There was a lot of fascinating stuff in the annotations though.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jose Melo

    Just like the movies

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    It's screenplays, of movies you've already seen. Still, really interesting backstory on the movies, especially Episode 4. It's screenplays, of movies you've already seen. Still, really interesting backstory on the movies, especially Episode 4.

  23. 4 out of 5

    E.W. Pierce

    The scripts from the original trilogy, with an added bonus of thoughts and stories from those involved in the creation of the movies. Good read for fans of the series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alex Woodring

  26. 5 out of 5

    A.J. Hawkins

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Gordon

  28. 5 out of 5

    mary martinez

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Gill

  30. 4 out of 5

    Angela Wagner

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