web site hit counter Selected Poetry and Prose - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Selected Poetry and Prose

Availability: Ready to download

Edited by Northrop Frye


Compare

Edited by Northrop Frye

49 review for Selected Poetry and Prose

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wyatt Reu

    Good intro/reader but I’m opting for the complete poems — if you’re planning to read the prophecies you should find an edition where they’re unabridged.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ramzzi Fariñas

    BLAKE: THE SPECTRE BETWEEN POETRY AND PHILOSOPHY “O spectre over Europe and Asia!” chanted William Blake in one of his Major Phropecies: Jerusalem. A century after, Karl Marx & Friedrich Engels spread their Communist Manifesto, bearing the unforgettable line: “A spectre is haunting Europe...” Could it be so that this is a mere coincidence? Marx himself nevertheless, was oceanic in his philological background. His readings would date back to the first poetry of the West—Homerʼs The Iliad & Odyssey. BLAKE: THE SPECTRE BETWEEN POETRY AND PHILOSOPHY “O spectre over Europe and Asia!” chanted William Blake in one of his Major Phropecies: Jerusalem. A century after, Karl Marx & Friedrich Engels spread their Communist Manifesto, bearing the unforgettable line: “A spectre is haunting Europe...” Could it be so that this is a mere coincidence? Marx himself nevertheless, was oceanic in his philological background. His readings would date back to the first poetry of the West—Homerʼs The Iliad & Odyssey. The very difference though, if previous studies could not unearth who was first, between Blake and Marx—the latterʼs opener had been mostly passed to generations with the American spelling of the word: “specter.” In the 20th century, Blake resurfaced again—earlier than the coming of the Beat Generation where Allen Ginsberg and Bob Dylan mused on him. Before such contemporaneous appeal, Blakeʼs first biographer Arthur Symons, and William Butler Yeats had a singular observation on the poet. Blakeʼs “intellectual heir” is Friedrich Nietzsche, they said. Years and miles apart were the gaps however, of these two thinkers. Blake was of the 17th century, while Nietzsche would be in the latter time. But both had that similar intensity (and even insanity) in their literature. No one could deny that they had these aphorisms in the voice of a distant sage shining from their works; and yes, the two were shut down by their contemporaries, they retreated from the public world, and wrote and wrote (and also painted in the case of Blake) without a grasped audience. The two opened fire at their predecessors: Blake lambasting Plato and Locke; while Nietzsche focused on Socrates and Descartes, among others. They have either, though not the clearest similarity, a sour taste of the publicʼs yearning to religion. Not the clearest because Blake had prophecies dismissing only “natural religion.” The most fascinating in the end are their notable metaphors or symbols. If Blake had Urizen and the Red Dragon; Nietzsche had Zarathustra and the Golden Dragon. Parallel this might seems, but the similarities are there. No matter how rejected these two were in their time—they are smiling now. No poet and philosopher had been more influential and imitated than Blake and Nietzsche. Especially the poet and painter who could be the first spectre—the first dragon.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bryan--Pumpkin Connoisseur

    I've decided to put this aside--many of Blake's later works are only sampled, and I felt that wasn't what I was looking for. Plus I recently found a collection of his complete writings, which will fit my needs better. On the plus side for this volume is a introduction by Northrop Frye, and 8 examples of Blake's engravings. Again, though, I think a book containing Blake's complete engravings is something I'll be looking for in the future, to complement the collection of his writings, which contai I've decided to put this aside--many of Blake's later works are only sampled, and I felt that wasn't what I was looking for. Plus I recently found a collection of his complete writings, which will fit my needs better. On the plus side for this volume is a introduction by Northrop Frye, and 8 examples of Blake's engravings. Again, though, I think a book containing Blake's complete engravings is something I'll be looking for in the future, to complement the collection of his writings, which contains almost nothing of his artwork. As a sampler of Blake's work, this seems representative, and if that's all that someone was looking for, than I would't have any problem recommending this volume. But if one were interested in the complete poem Jerusalem, for instance, they would need to look elsewhere.

  4. 5 out of 5

    ZaRi

    Earth rais'd up her head, From the darkness dread & drear. Her light fled: Stony dread! And her locks cover'd with grey despair. Prison'd on watry shore Starry Jealousy does keep my den Cold and hoar Weeping o'er I hear the Father of the ancient men Selfish father of men Cruel, jealous, selfish fear Can delight Chain'd in night The virgins of youth and morning bear. Does spring hide its joy When buds and blossoms grow? Does the sower? Sow by night? Or the plowman in darkness plow? Break this heavy cha Earth rais'd up her head, From the darkness dread & drear. Her light fled: Stony dread! And her locks cover'd with grey despair. Prison'd on watry shore Starry Jealousy does keep my den Cold and hoar Weeping o'er I hear the Father of the ancient men Selfish father of men Cruel, jealous, selfish fear Can delight Chain'd in night The virgins of youth and morning bear. Does spring hide its joy When buds and blossoms grow? Does the sower? Sow by night? Or the plowman in darkness plow? Break this heavy chain, That does freeze my bones around Selfish! vain! Eternal bane! That free Love with bondage bound.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    I really enjoy the early poetry and the politics of Blake. I dont like the strange mythos in the Prophecies though I do see his attacks on capitalism as kind of mystical insight into the more scientific opponents of capital in the 19th century shortly after his death.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erik Akre

    Blake's poetry, his take on experience: Holy Desire: stretches to the infinite; there are no bounds. Bounded desire (desire of "the ratio" only): leads to a dull round, repeated over and over. Desire of the Infinite: Knows God in all things--neverending discovery; Imagination; urging forward; expanding... through Creativity. (And the prose is almost literally insane. Stick with it, flow with it all. It's crazy, and rewarding.) Blake is Crazy-Holy. Worth a read for anyone digging artistic creativity. Blake's poetry, his take on experience: Holy Desire: stretches to the infinite; there are no bounds. Bounded desire (desire of "the ratio" only): leads to a dull round, repeated over and over. Desire of the Infinite: Knows God in all things--neverending discovery; Imagination; urging forward; expanding... through Creativity. (And the prose is almost literally insane. Stick with it, flow with it all. It's crazy, and rewarding.) Blake is Crazy-Holy. Worth a read for anyone digging artistic creativity.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katrinka

    *Finally* finished! If 2.5 stars were possible, that's how I'd rate this one. The only way I can see Ginsberg et al inspired by what often feels like an extended, weirdly Christian round of Dungeons & Dragons, with occasionally excellent phrases thrown in, is via the help of hallucinogens-- in which case, yeah, this poetry would be terrifying. *Finally* finished! If 2.5 stars were possible, that's how I'd rate this one. The only way I can see Ginsberg et al inspired by what often feels like an extended, weirdly Christian round of Dungeons & Dragons, with occasionally excellent phrases thrown in, is via the help of hallucinogens-- in which case, yeah, this poetry would be terrifying.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jordan N

    FAVOURITES: On Another's Sorrow [1789] The Marriage of Heaven and Hell [1973] The Lilly [1794] Jerusalem [1804] FAVOURITES: On Another's Sorrow [1789] The Marriage of Heaven and Hell [1973] The Lilly [1794] Jerusalem [1804]

  9. 5 out of 5

    RB

    Review to come.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Billy Sheppard

    Blake is fearless imagination in luminous form.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pavla Rudolfová

    Love at the first page.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt Barger

  13. 5 out of 5

    christina

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  15. 5 out of 5

    João

  16. 4 out of 5

    K

  17. 4 out of 5

    OTIS

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lourdes Saraiva

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Red

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marie Pascale Geist

  21. 4 out of 5

    Heather Plant

  22. 5 out of 5

    Clarissa Mond

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  24. 4 out of 5

    مهدیه

  25. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Halbert

  26. 4 out of 5

    Victor Hugo

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Devkrit Vasisht

  29. 4 out of 5

    Darkvante

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brian Ball

  31. 5 out of 5

    R&M

  32. 4 out of 5

    Pat Winter

  33. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  34. 4 out of 5

    Sleonhardi

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Martin

  36. 4 out of 5

    Lerio

  37. 4 out of 5

    T. I.

  38. 5 out of 5

    Wentzel Lombard

  39. 5 out of 5

    Sprite1989

  40. 4 out of 5

    Laure-anne

  41. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  42. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Wood

  43. 4 out of 5

    Jediraven

  44. 4 out of 5

    Corey

  45. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  46. 5 out of 5

    Pat Winter

  47. 4 out of 5

    Roger Sarao

  48. 5 out of 5

    Scott Ryalls

  49. 4 out of 5

    Court Corley

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.