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s/t: All That Fall; Embers; Acts Without Words, I and II; Mimes This collection of Nobel Prize winner Samuel Beckett’s dramatic pieces includes a short stage play, two radio plays, and two pantomimes. The stage play Krapp’s Last Tape evolves a shattering drama out of a monologue of a man who, at age sixty-nine, plays back the autobiographical tape he recorded on his thirty s/t: All That Fall; Embers; Acts Without Words, I and II; Mimes This collection of Nobel Prize winner Samuel Beckett’s dramatic pieces includes a short stage play, two radio plays, and two pantomimes. The stage play Krapp’s Last Tape evolves a shattering drama out of a monologue of a man who, at age sixty-nine, plays back the autobiographical tape he recorded on his thirty-ninth birthday. The two radio plays were commissioned by the BBC; All That Fall “plumbs the same pessimistic depths [as Waiting for Godot] in what seems a no less despairing search for human dignity” (London Times), and Embers is equally unforgettable theater, born of the ramblings of an old man and his wife. Finally, in the two pantomimes, Beckett takes drama to the point of pure abstraction with his portrayals of, in Act Without Words I, frustrated desired, and in Act Without Words I, corresponding motions of living juxtaposed in the slow despair of one man and the senselessly busy motion of another.


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s/t: All That Fall; Embers; Acts Without Words, I and II; Mimes This collection of Nobel Prize winner Samuel Beckett’s dramatic pieces includes a short stage play, two radio plays, and two pantomimes. The stage play Krapp’s Last Tape evolves a shattering drama out of a monologue of a man who, at age sixty-nine, plays back the autobiographical tape he recorded on his thirty s/t: All That Fall; Embers; Acts Without Words, I and II; Mimes This collection of Nobel Prize winner Samuel Beckett’s dramatic pieces includes a short stage play, two radio plays, and two pantomimes. The stage play Krapp’s Last Tape evolves a shattering drama out of a monologue of a man who, at age sixty-nine, plays back the autobiographical tape he recorded on his thirty-ninth birthday. The two radio plays were commissioned by the BBC; All That Fall “plumbs the same pessimistic depths [as Waiting for Godot] in what seems a no less despairing search for human dignity” (London Times), and Embers is equally unforgettable theater, born of the ramblings of an old man and his wife. Finally, in the two pantomimes, Beckett takes drama to the point of pure abstraction with his portrayals of, in Act Without Words I, frustrated desired, and in Act Without Words I, corresponding motions of living juxtaposed in the slow despair of one man and the senselessly busy motion of another.

30 review for Krapp's Last Tape and Other Dramatic Pieces

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    [Night. Interior. The REVIEWER, an elderly man, is seated alone in front of his laptop; a large screen above the stage shows that he is currently looking at the Goodreads page for "Krapp's Last Tape". Sounds of thunder, lightning, torrential rain from outside. The REVIEWER shakes his head, reaches into a drawer, changes his mind, reaches in again, takes out a banana, eats it. He continues to look at the same page. He takes out another banana and eats that too.] REVIEWER: I've reviewed it eighteen [Night. Interior. The REVIEWER, an elderly man, is seated alone in front of his laptop; a large screen above the stage shows that he is currently looking at the Goodreads page for "Krapp's Last Tape". Sounds of thunder, lightning, torrential rain from outside. The REVIEWER shakes his head, reaches into a drawer, changes his mind, reaches in again, takes out a banana, eats it. He continues to look at the same page. He takes out another banana and eats that too.] REVIEWER: I've reviewed it eighteen times. [He clicks his way to one of his reviews, which is clearly very long. As scrolls up and down, we see fragments of text:A harsher Proust, in a major key and without the redemptive quality of art... reductio ad absurdum of the theatre of the absurd... distillation... semantics...He jumps up and paces around the room.] REVIEWER: Jesus Christ, what a fucking wanker. Did I really write that? [He shakes his head] REVIEWER: Wanker. Let's look at one of the autobiographical ones. [He clicks to a second review:I sat, looking at the stage, but more at my companion, who was leaning comfortably against me, sound asleep. I wondered if I should adjust her dress, which was showing a generous amount of cleavage; but in the end, I only smoothed her hair. She turned towards me and smiled, half pleased, half irritated. I couldn't tell if she was was still asleep.The REVIEWER suddenly screams twice, then smiles at the audience.] REVIEWER: Here's my first one. [He clicks to another review. The whole text consists of the single line:I DONT GET IT. BORING.He shrugs.] REVIEWER: Well, at least that's honest. [He clicks back to the second review and scrolls down:... I wondered if I should adjust her dress, which was showing a generous amount of cleavage; but in the end, I only smoothed her hair...He starts shaking his head again.] REVIEWER: I shouldn't have done that. She never liked me touching her hair. [He starts to open another review, then suddenly closes the laptop.] REVIEWER: Enough. I'm glad I don't have to do any more of those. CURTAIN

  2. 5 out of 5

    brian

    saw john hurt play krapp last week in culver city. when he spoke that last bit about the slitted eyes and the light i audibly moaned. transcendental stuff. "She lay stretched out on the floorboards with her hands under her head and her eyes closed. Sun blazing down, bit of a breeze, water nice and lively. I noticed a scratch on her thigh and asked her how she came by it. Picking gooseberries, she said. I said again I thought it was hopeless and no good going on and she agreed, without opening he saw john hurt play krapp last week in culver city. when he spoke that last bit about the slitted eyes and the light i audibly moaned. transcendental stuff. "She lay stretched out on the floorboards with her hands under her head and her eyes closed. Sun blazing down, bit of a breeze, water nice and lively. I noticed a scratch on her thigh and asked her how she came by it. Picking gooseberries, she said. I said again I thought it was hopeless and no good going on and she agreed, without opening her eyes. [Pause.] I asked her to look at me and after a few moments— [Pause.]— after a few moments she did, but the eyes just slits, because of the glare. I bent over her to get them in the shadows and they opened. [Pause. Low.] Let me in.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    notgettingenough

    Discussed with Molloy. http://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpres... Discussed with Molloy. http://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpres...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Perifian

    Excellent selection that makes me think I should read his complete works to add to my box of thinking tools. Seemingly more personal than his longer plays, if partly for focalisation, though my favourite quale is still the leaf on the tree in the second act of Godot, these dealing more with human limits and deterioration. Don't forget that the absurd is itself absurd, or whatever, and that it is itself struable. Excellent selection that makes me think I should read his complete works to add to my box of thinking tools. Seemingly more personal than his longer plays, if partly for focalisation, though my favourite quale is still the leaf on the tree in the second act of Godot, these dealing more with human limits and deterioration. Don't forget that the absurd is itself absurd, or whatever, and that it is itself struable.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mary Slowik

    December of Drama 2015, day ten I'm reading a play every day (have I established that?) and I selected them in advance, so I didn't read the radio plays Embers or All Fall Down which are included in this volume. When it comes to Krapp's Last Tape, I can understand and even agree with those reviewers who call it brilliant, genius, a masterpiece, etc. etc. but I can't say that I necessarily enjoyed it all that much. And the blurb on the back: 'shattering drama,' really? That seems to overstate it j December of Drama 2015, day ten I'm reading a play every day (have I established that?) and I selected them in advance, so I didn't read the radio plays Embers or All Fall Down which are included in this volume. When it comes to Krapp's Last Tape, I can understand and even agree with those reviewers who call it brilliant, genius, a masterpiece, etc. etc. but I can't say that I necessarily enjoyed it all that much. And the blurb on the back: 'shattering drama,' really? That seems to overstate it just a tad. It's a bitter artistic statement, sure, but far from 'shattering.' I would love to see it staged, however-- more so than any of the other plays I've read so far, except for Thom Pain. It is original, to say the least, and compellingly bizarre. Anyone else craving a banana or three?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    Young people and what to do about them was one of the great issues for middle class America in the sixties. Containment was one of the answers. My hometown, Park Ridge, had had a number of youth centers, but all had closed when I dropped out of Grinnell for the 1971-72 school year because of impending prosecution by the local draft board. Two of us put our mind to the matter one night at my house and came up with the idea of starting a process which might result in the creation of a new alternati Young people and what to do about them was one of the great issues for middle class America in the sixties. Containment was one of the answers. My hometown, Park Ridge, had had a number of youth centers, but all had closed when I dropped out of Grinnell for the 1971-72 school year because of impending prosecution by the local draft board. Two of us put our mind to the matter one night at my house and came up with the idea of starting a process which might result in the creation of a new alternative for our peers, a youth center we'd own and operate ourselves, on our terms. The trick was to get the momentum to accomplish this end. We had no money. Indeed, I had only debt, a poorly paying job and the possible prospect of incarceration for draft resistance. What we needed was a credible movement. So we called a meeting. Well, a person or persons unknown called a meeting. What we did was create three anonymous fliers, one with a leftist slant to be distributed in and around the high schools; another with a rightist slant to be displayed in the business and wealthier sectors of town; a third with a sober, intellectual approach. All announced a meeting about youth and youth problems to be held in a park district fieldhouse. During the course of one long night, we plastered thousands of these pieces the length and breadth of Park Ridge. The meeting, amazingly, was quite successful as were those to follow. What we'd wanted from the start proved to be the will of the masses. Now the trick was to get the money to purchase, or the political power to be given, a suitable property while, in the meantime, having fun. In the course of this lengthy meantime we hosted cultural events, mostly weekly rock concerts with one dollar admissions, all well attended, but we were open to almost anything. A recent high school graduate and thespian, Walter, came to us with a proposal. He wanted to produce, direct and perform a play. He just needed a venue, some money for a simple set and some publicity. The result was 'Krapp's Last Tape', a one-person drama about an old man--played in this case by a very young one, albeit credibly given the poor lighting called for. It was no easy sell, Beckett not quite inspiring the hormonally charged masses like Led Zeppelin did, but it came off with enough of an audience to cover almost all expenses. I liked it, but then I was long more comfortable with suicidal ideation than with the notion of publicly dancing.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Of all the authors I have read, I find Beckett to be the most challenging by far. In much the same way as reading textbooks and scholarly works (meaning books meant to teach first and foremost and not to entertain or take one's mind off the day or transport you to another world/time/perspective), reading Beckett forces you to pay full attention to every single word. You can't skim Beckett, or if you do, then you are not reading Beckett at all, for by skipping or eliding or jumping ahead you miss Of all the authors I have read, I find Beckett to be the most challenging by far. In much the same way as reading textbooks and scholarly works (meaning books meant to teach first and foremost and not to entertain or take one's mind off the day or transport you to another world/time/perspective), reading Beckett forces you to pay full attention to every single word. You can't skim Beckett, or if you do, then you are not reading Beckett at all, for by skipping or eliding or jumping ahead you miss the point. The words, the cadences, the repetitions, the minimalism, the circularity, the now-ness. Beckett demands your attention and immersion, or maybe he just expects it. Why else read? Why words? Why? I won't get into over-reviewing each specific text in any Beckett book as I find that defeatist, or maybe beyond my ken. Often it’s merely words on the page given meaning by how the reader interprets/intuits/internalizes them. I say Beckett is unequaled, unmatched, unsurpassed, but that is just one opinion. Still, I say read him, often, and again… So, genius. My first exposure to Samuel Beckett was back in my 20’s when I bought a Scanner (Robin Rimbaud) CD titled “Sound For Spaces”. One of the tracks is “A Piece Of A Monologue”. I was entranced. As a result I sought out Beckett’s writings and fell in love with them all. Beckett’s works for the stage are always brilliant, always meticulously plotted, often rather short, and, at times, quite confounding in their bleak simplicity. Even so, they carry aspects of his weighty prose work and leave you with much to consider. I have read several of these plays in single volumes and in other collections, so while all the plays were not new to me, re-reading Beckett is often more rewarding than the first go-round. Selections I enjoyed the most: “A Piece Of A Monologue”, “Rockaby”, and “Krapp’s Last Tape”. The first two have much the same feel to them, while the last one has such a fabulous set up for the stage. Beautiful.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    this was pretty pointless. sounds like a long nonsensical blabber about pretty much nothing. i found absolutely no meaning in the whole narration, except that maybe krapp has a deadly addiction to bananas.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Bateman

    Krapp's Last Tape--more focused and emotionally coherent than many of Beckett's other works--builds to a conclusion that is profoundly moving. If you have an extra hour or so, search for a performance of KLT on YouTube. Krapp's Last Tape--more focused and emotionally coherent than many of Beckett's other works--builds to a conclusion that is profoundly moving. If you have an extra hour or so, search for a performance of KLT on YouTube.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    Going to see John Hurt perform this tonight at the Shakespeare Theater! Super excited! http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifesty... Going to see John Hurt perform this tonight at the Shakespeare Theater! Super excited! http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifesty...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vel Veeter

    This is a short collection of dramatic monologues by the Irish/French writer Samuel Beckett. So, I need to start off by stating that I couldn’t possibly rate this post because I am definitively ill-equipped to offer judgment of what I read here. I will discuss what I felt about it and the interesting aspects of the production (this is an audiobook) but otherwise, I will leave the criticism to those who know about these things. There are four pieces in this collection. In the first, an older man ( This is a short collection of dramatic monologues by the Irish/French writer Samuel Beckett. So, I need to start off by stating that I couldn’t possibly rate this post because I am definitively ill-equipped to offer judgment of what I read here. I will discuss what I felt about it and the interesting aspects of the production (this is an audiobook) but otherwise, I will leave the criticism to those who know about these things. There are four pieces in this collection. In the first, an older man (Krapp) listens to audiotapes of his younger self. In the piece, we are not merely treated to his listening of these tapes but in addition we get the odd shambling of the man himself as he does. For example, there’s a lot to do with the eating of bananas. The other pieces in this collection are dramatic monologues. Most of them deal with an internalized set of verbalizations or thoughts or maybe the impressionistic sense of thoughts. I am sympathetic to the desire to collect thoughts on the page and by this I do mean straight out thoughts. Human thought is a bizarre beast and we tend to think they come from words or images, but I tend to see my own thoughts as the overlay of images, even a series of images. In addition, we also have the mesh of words and formulations of interpretations on those images as they occur immediately on top of those images. So to try to formulate that in text is deeply impressive, and probably impossible. I will return before too long with some of Beckett’s fiction. I have read a few of his plays, but this is a departure for me otherwise.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mark Valentine

    Beckett is tough reading. His jagged alienation is as comfortable as reclining on a mattress without any batting or wading in cold water only to step on an urchin or chipping a tooth on a blind date or pinching your finger in the car door of a '67 Corvair Monza or biting on aluminum foil or falling asleep in a laundromat in Cleveland or locking your car keys in your car in the middle of the night or losing a longtime close friend to cancer. Krapp recalls the lack of connection and intimacy 30 ye Beckett is tough reading. His jagged alienation is as comfortable as reclining on a mattress without any batting or wading in cold water only to step on an urchin or chipping a tooth on a blind date or pinching your finger in the car door of a '67 Corvair Monza or biting on aluminum foil or falling asleep in a laundromat in Cleveland or locking your car keys in your car in the middle of the night or losing a longtime close friend to cancer. Krapp recalls the lack of connection and intimacy 30 years prior. He never had a good memory so his memories late in life stink like a dank cellar. The bifurcation between the present and a mechanical reconstruction of his past via the tape recorder and the classification of tapes might appeal to an IRS accountant but for me, seemed as sterile as a weed patch in November. I respect Beckett but I don't like his works.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jonfaith

    White world, great trouble, not a sound, only the embers, sound of dying, dying glow Buster Keaton. Waves crashing. Burgess Meredith playing recordings of his own spoken word performances. Crashing waves. Ms. Rooney being helped into a lorry. The horror, the horror, Silence. It is easy to gauge how impactful these were upon publication. I believe despite our iEfforts to fill in the silence we remain as bleak as ever.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julian Dones

    This is Beckett renown play Krapp’s last tape accompanied by All that fall and Embers, finishing with act without words I & II. This continues the absurdist way of life in the 50s after ww2... how tia black comedy represent the absurdity of life and how it revolves around with pretty much none sense and meaningless air... and pretty much a representation of our tenure in this world.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    It's depressing. Great, but depressing. It's short, so read it through a couple of times. After, go to YouTube and watch Patrick Magee's performance of this. It too is superb. It was actually written for him, so it's only right that you watch it. It's depressing. Great, but depressing. It's short, so read it through a couple of times. After, go to YouTube and watch Patrick Magee's performance of this. It too is superb. It was actually written for him, so it's only right that you watch it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    PanicPillow

    Krapp's Last Tape and especially Not I were absolutely amazing. My first encounter with the work of Beckett and it made me very excited to take a look at his literature. I will be going through the rest of the plays shortly and will be on the lookout to see these two performed. Krapp's Last Tape and especially Not I were absolutely amazing. My first encounter with the work of Beckett and it made me very excited to take a look at his literature. I will be going through the rest of the plays shortly and will be on the lookout to see these two performed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ms E Lacey

    A bananas one-man play that is also moving in its ability to encourage the audience to reflect on the life choices one makes and the impact these choices have on others. Absurd, touching and disturbing.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laurens

    As great as I think Beckett's other work is, these were appearantly his "meh-plays". I liked "All that fall", but that was all... As great as I think Beckett's other work is, these were appearantly his "meh-plays". I liked "All that fall", but that was all...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Ah, Mr. Beckett! How wonderful to find you again after all these years! The world rarely looks so bleak and wonderful at the same time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Allen

    Krapp's Last Tape id a great play, too! Krapp's Last Tape id a great play, too!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erik Steevens

    A great collection with a twist of whirlwinds through the contents of mister Beckett's theatrical works. A great collection with a twist of whirlwinds through the contents of mister Beckett's theatrical works.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Sometimes you just gotta say Beckett!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    MH

    All that falls... Beckett used his genius to excite emotions; most of all sadness. there's nothing in this play unless it is in a desperate situation. Absolutely nothing! not even a pipe dream. Even the gearbox is getting crucified! It's a dead world, or maybe like the girl it wasn't even born! It also has a great characterization along with deep metaphorical events and dialogues. Reader's mind is trying to put all this together and understand what all this is about, then suddenly a shocking end.. All that falls... Beckett used his genius to excite emotions; most of all sadness. there's nothing in this play unless it is in a desperate situation. Absolutely nothing! not even a pipe dream. Even the gearbox is getting crucified! It's a dead world, or maybe like the girl it wasn't even born! It also has a great characterization along with deep metaphorical events and dialogues. Reader's mind is trying to put all this together and understand what all this is about, then suddenly a shocking end... Krapp's Last Tape... Krapp's life is a crap! at the end he hates himself; let say his old-self. But it's paradoxical, he still eat banana, still listening to the past and still recording. Does he know who he is? A person who seeks something out of darkness(life), then come to light; where he could realize it's all a void... I found Act Without Words I & II very deep, like them very much. Embers a good work too but not as good as other works here.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    From one who is hardly the expert on the subject of drama or the stage: I have heard many illustrious things about Mr. Beckett. This is the first set of plays I’ve actually been privy to. Compartmentalized into five different plays, the book seems to share an overall theme or perhaps it is my mind trying to find some sort of coherence from what is, for the most part, something quite nonsensical. Krapp’s Last Tape (for whom the book is named after) & Embers are my two favorites from this collecti From one who is hardly the expert on the subject of drama or the stage: I have heard many illustrious things about Mr. Beckett. This is the first set of plays I’ve actually been privy to. Compartmentalized into five different plays, the book seems to share an overall theme or perhaps it is my mind trying to find some sort of coherence from what is, for the most part, something quite nonsensical. Krapp’s Last Tape (for whom the book is named after) & Embers are my two favorites from this collection. There is no shortage of phrases packed with profundity sprinkled throughout all the plays in this book. To me, that’s what keeps the audiences’ attention. I love that he utilizes the common place as a carriage for such whimsical & simultaneously irking statements from characters who seem almost as inconsequential as the places where these events take place. It is as if the language, the statements, the intertwining of emotion & subject matter take precedence over the vessels that profess them or the locations by where the events are housed. Death looms throughout, a subject which refuses to leave our species alone, a subject that binds all of us. Time a crafty instrument by which death draws closer plays a key role as well. Ever a constant, the unspoken but ever-present character. Beckett toys with the tense, the past confronting the present, the present convoluted & mixed with different tenses, & in this cocktail of tenses, a new one is born outside & inside of the consciousness. It is as if that tense can only exist there & not exist at all except for the plain which manifests itself within the experience of the character engulfed in this reality. It is a masterful experiment of time, death, life, language, comedy & tragedy converging & confronting one another. Although I may not understand in totality the magnitude of this man’s talents thus far, I look forward to grasping & learning about his playful & serious brush strokes used throughout the readings of his version of drama on live stage.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    This volume contains five dramatic pieces by Beckett: Krapp's Last Tape, All That Fall, Embers, Act Without Words I, and Act Without Words II. A few comments below about each. Krapp's Last Tape: Fascinating and complex meditation on the power of memory. The replaying of the tape becomes a metaphor for what we do with our memories. It's not a memory of the actual experience, but a memory of his recollection of the experience. Not clear if it's the last tape he recorded or the last tape he listens This volume contains five dramatic pieces by Beckett: Krapp's Last Tape, All That Fall, Embers, Act Without Words I, and Act Without Words II. A few comments below about each. Krapp's Last Tape: Fascinating and complex meditation on the power of memory. The replaying of the tape becomes a metaphor for what we do with our memories. It's not a memory of the actual experience, but a memory of his recollection of the experience. Not clear if it's the last tape he recorded or the last tape he listens to before he dies. All That Fall: Funny and devastating. Beckett is a master of combining laugh out loud humor with tragedy. Mrs. Rooney is a great character - horribly self absorbed and all too familiar. Embers: The least compelling and most impenetrable piece in this collection. Still interesting to read, though. Act Without Words I: Existential burlesque. Would love to see this piece performed someday. Act Without Words II: Not sure I completely grasped this one in a single reading. Might be clearer in performance.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bruneholm

    I don’t have this particular volume so I cant say how the different plays works together but I have both read and seen Krapps last tape many times. A short, terse, very intense piece. We meet the old recluse Krapp a late night in the future (as Beckett puts it in the stage directions). Here he listens to tapes recorded by himself where he comments his life situation. The contrast between the old neighing, silent and sullen old man and the artificial, soft, almost eerie sound of the tape is dizzyi I don’t have this particular volume so I cant say how the different plays works together but I have both read and seen Krapps last tape many times. A short, terse, very intense piece. We meet the old recluse Krapp a late night in the future (as Beckett puts it in the stage directions). Here he listens to tapes recorded by himself where he comments his life situation. The contrast between the old neighing, silent and sullen old man and the artificial, soft, almost eerie sound of the tape is dizzying. We admitted to the fragmentary glimpses of the recordings and Beckett's nearest hypnotic language sense of glow in the dark scene and sucks us deeper into the lonely man on stage. Towards the end comments Krapp things one last time. An gruesome effect of eternal loneliness arises when we recognize the formulations from previous recordings, but this time exploited in any form of hope and lust for life and surrounded by bitter recognition of his fate.

  27. 5 out of 5

    C is for **censored**

    The star rating given reflects my opinion within ‘the official goodreads rating system’. 1 star: Didn’t Like it 2 stars: It’s Okay 3 stars: Liked it 4 stars: Really Liked it 5 stars: It Was Amazing I don’t really give a rat-fuck that there are some who think I ‘owe’ an explanation for my opinion. Nope, nada, and not sorry about it. Sometimes I may add notes to explain what my opinions are based on, and sometimes I don’t. I do this for me, on my books, in my library and I don’t ‘owe’ any special snowfla The star rating given reflects my opinion within ‘the official goodreads rating system’. 1 star: Didn’t Like it 2 stars: It’s Okay 3 stars: Liked it 4 stars: Really Liked it 5 stars: It Was Amazing I don’t really give a rat-fuck that there are some who think I ‘owe’ an explanation for my opinion. Nope, nada, and not sorry about it. Sometimes I may add notes to explain what my opinions are based on, and sometimes I don’t. I do this for me, on my books, in my library and I don’t ‘owe’ any special snowflakes a thing. Fuck off if you don’t like it and stop reading my shit. Particularly given the ‘modifications’ to reader’s personal content going on (and outright censorship), unless particularly motivated I will not comment in detail. It would help if GR was forthcoming in the new ‘appropriate’ and would make a site-wide announcement delineating the new focus from a reader-centric site to one that is now for authors and selling.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Zan

    Hmm. As always, Beckett, I mentally shake hands with you for your construction. I enjoyed the two mediums in the play: the recorder and the actor. I also enjoyed the almost ridiculous banana riff int he middle. How can Beckett handle such heavy material and a certain vaudeville element at the same time? I don't know how, but i do love that aspect of him. I recently attended a lecture by John Calder, a Beckett scholar among other things, and found his insights about Beckett's view of God interesti Hmm. As always, Beckett, I mentally shake hands with you for your construction. I enjoyed the two mediums in the play: the recorder and the actor. I also enjoyed the almost ridiculous banana riff int he middle. How can Beckett handle such heavy material and a certain vaudeville element at the same time? I don't know how, but i do love that aspect of him. I recently attended a lecture by John Calder, a Beckett scholar among other things, and found his insights about Beckett's view of God interesting as well. He mentioned Beckett's Manichean approach to things, and we see that present in the black and white of this play (and so many others). Interesting stuff.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Liam

    I did not see the plays, I read this and did my imagination's best. I just stuggled to 'like' the content, Beckett seems to write only of death and not about life. It just read off as "life sucks, there's nothing we can do, ha!" x100, which may be the point/intention here but it just doesn't seem to go anywhere or offer any progression or variety. Maybe this was more original when it was written, I am not seeing something or they just are far more enjoyable to watch. To be honest, I liked Act wi I did not see the plays, I read this and did my imagination's best. I just stuggled to 'like' the content, Beckett seems to write only of death and not about life. It just read off as "life sucks, there's nothing we can do, ha!" x100, which may be the point/intention here but it just doesn't seem to go anywhere or offer any progression or variety. Maybe this was more original when it was written, I am not seeing something or they just are far more enjoyable to watch. To be honest, I liked Act without words part II maybe a bit more than Krapp's Last Tape, which probably says something.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Ok, so I totally understand why Beckett is such an important playwriter, and I quite enjoyed a few of his shorter plays! Although I think that they sometimes can be a little too weird, even for me. I love his new trail of thinking, and the play Breath, which actually is a breath and lasts for 36 seconds show how amazing Beckett was. I can't give it more than three stars, because it's all a little too hard and heavy for me to read, since english is my second language, but all in all I quite enjoye Ok, so I totally understand why Beckett is such an important playwriter, and I quite enjoyed a few of his shorter plays! Although I think that they sometimes can be a little too weird, even for me. I love his new trail of thinking, and the play Breath, which actually is a breath and lasts for 36 seconds show how amazing Beckett was. I can't give it more than three stars, because it's all a little too hard and heavy for me to read, since english is my second language, but all in all I quite enjoyed it, and I think everyone that studies literature should read some Beckett in their lives!

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