web site hit counter From Cronkite to Colbert: The Evolution of Broadcast News - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

From Cronkite to Colbert: The Evolution of Broadcast News

Availability: Ready to download

In a time when increasing numbers of people are tuning out the nightly news and media consumption is falling, the late-night comedians have become some of the most important newscasters in the country. From Cronkite to Colbert explains why. It examines an historical path that begins at the height of the network age with Walter Cronkite and Edward R. Murrow, when the evenin In a time when increasing numbers of people are tuning out the nightly news and media consumption is falling, the late-night comedians have become some of the most important newscasters in the country. From Cronkite to Colbert explains why. It examines an historical path that begins at the height of the network age with Walter Cronkite and Edward R. Murrow, when the evening news was considered the authoritative record of the day's events and forged our assumptions about what "the news" is, or should be. The book then winds its way through the breakdown of that paradigm of "real" news and into its reinvention in the unlikely form of such popularized shows as The Daily Show and The Colbert Report. From Cronkite to Colbert makes the case that rather than "fake news," those shows should be understood as a new kind of journalism, one that has the potential to save the news and reinvigorate the conversation of democracy in today's society.


Compare

In a time when increasing numbers of people are tuning out the nightly news and media consumption is falling, the late-night comedians have become some of the most important newscasters in the country. From Cronkite to Colbert explains why. It examines an historical path that begins at the height of the network age with Walter Cronkite and Edward R. Murrow, when the evenin In a time when increasing numbers of people are tuning out the nightly news and media consumption is falling, the late-night comedians have become some of the most important newscasters in the country. From Cronkite to Colbert explains why. It examines an historical path that begins at the height of the network age with Walter Cronkite and Edward R. Murrow, when the evening news was considered the authoritative record of the day's events and forged our assumptions about what "the news" is, or should be. The book then winds its way through the breakdown of that paradigm of "real" news and into its reinvention in the unlikely form of such popularized shows as The Daily Show and The Colbert Report. From Cronkite to Colbert makes the case that rather than "fake news," those shows should be understood as a new kind of journalism, one that has the potential to save the news and reinvigorate the conversation of democracy in today's society.

44 review for From Cronkite to Colbert: The Evolution of Broadcast News

  1. 4 out of 5

    Angela Maria Hart

    From Cronkite to Colbert by Geoffrey Baym is a book I have read at least three times. This text is extremely important for people interested in journalism and or media studies. This is a great book to have on hand because it discusses the evolution of what audiences believe a news anchor should be. I will make note of the fact that the book was originally published in 2009 and does not dive into a lot of what has currently been going on in the world of news, especially entertainment shows and sa From Cronkite to Colbert by Geoffrey Baym is a book I have read at least three times. This text is extremely important for people interested in journalism and or media studies. This is a great book to have on hand because it discusses the evolution of what audiences believe a news anchor should be. I will make note of the fact that the book was originally published in 2009 and does not dive into a lot of what has currently been going on in the world of news, especially entertainment shows and satirical programs. As the title suggests, Baym stopped talking about the evolution of news with Colbert and, as we know now, The Colbert Report went off the air in December 2015. But, it does demonstrate the transition from Cronkite, someone who is known to be the standard of the Golden Age of journalism, to Colbert, a satirical conservative pundit. There is a large difference between what journalism was and where it is today. Due to the analytical nature of this book, I will mention that it does not dive into the media bias satires tend to have. I cite this because Comedy Central is predominantly liberal in its news. Similarly, Full Frontal on TBS and Last Week Tonight with John Oliver on HBO are also more liberal in nature and are not cited in this text. On page thirty-one, Baym wrote, “As many as forty percent of the reporters who appear in the stories examined here appear only once and some of them are never seen on camera.” I found this quote interesting because a lot of camera work (and moving elements) are behind the scenes and unknown to the audiences. There are reporters and workers who may not necessarily be seen to the viewer and yet they are the ones who truly report on the incidents and news. There are a lot of unseen faces who help create the news. For instance, there are people in the editing room who have their own perspectives that will be incorporated into the footage shown. From Cronkite to Colbert touches on a lot of important elements that journalists are currently facing. If you are interested in learning more about how news is delivered, I highly recommend this text. This book is very well done and there is a lot to be noted. I give From Cronkite to Colbert five out of five stars. It is a great read for anyone interested in media studies.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Varsha

    This was an extremely well-written and thoughtful analysis of the evolution of journalism, specifically the news media from, to use Baym's own phrasing, "Cronkite to Colbert". As a millennial, I can tell you that much of the lamentations of my generation by older generations are unfair and have little basis in fact - we are simply different from the previous generation just as they were indeed different from the generation that preceded them. But I suppose each generation will undoubtedly bemoan This was an extremely well-written and thoughtful analysis of the evolution of journalism, specifically the news media from, to use Baym's own phrasing, "Cronkite to Colbert". As a millennial, I can tell you that much of the lamentations of my generation by older generations are unfair and have little basis in fact - we are simply different from the previous generation just as they were indeed different from the generation that preceded them. But I suppose each generation will undoubtedly bemoan the next; such is the circle of life. However, I can attest that at least one observation of my generation has a solid foothold in the facts - while cautiously optimistic, we tend to take what 'the mainstream media' says with a grain of salt, preferring to get our news from Internet sources and 'fake news' shows rather than traditional media outlets. Even without Baym's thorough analysis, I could have given you, if asked, a list of reasons that I didn't fully trust network news; however, Baym provides a detailed look at how what he calls 'post-modernist' news came to be. For me, that really highlighted my own suspicions of the mainstream media's inherent inclinations to serve corporations and protect the status quo - an idea that Baym puts forth much more eloquently than I could ever hope to. By examining the integrity of the Golden Age of Journalism and it's most veneered names in Walter Cronkite and Edward R. Murrow, Baym shows exactly how different today's news media is, and how, to quote Jon Stewart, "the bias of the mainstream media is towards sensationalism , conflict, and laziness." All of this only amplifies my longing for Jon Stewart to come back on television - Why did you leave us now, Jon, why? - although his successors, namely Stephen Colbert (now on CBS' The Late Show), Samantha Bee (on TBS), and John Oliver (on HBO), are doing a stellar job trying to make sense of whatever the hell is going on this election season. To summarize, if anyone is interested in understanding how exactly the news media, from its revered days only fifty or so years ago, became so focused on ratings, and how this has opened the door for alternative sources, this is a great book to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    I've read a great deal about media and political coverage and I think Baym has added some excellent insight to the literature. He begins with a brief history of three evolutions of broadcast news coverage and then moves to specific comparison between early objective journalistic goals and the current opinionated news commentary style of coverage. Baym does this through detailed comparison of the commentary and visuals used during the Nixon impeachment compared to the Clinton impeachment. Not onl I've read a great deal about media and political coverage and I think Baym has added some excellent insight to the literature. He begins with a brief history of three evolutions of broadcast news coverage and then moves to specific comparison between early objective journalistic goals and the current opinionated news commentary style of coverage. Baym does this through detailed comparison of the commentary and visuals used during the Nixon impeachment compared to the Clinton impeachment. Not only is the voice of the journalist different but the technology and the spectacle of political news has become entertainment. Then the text moves on to discussion of the Stewart and Colbert era of political "comedy" coverage. Baym gives detail of how Stewart and Colbert function as political commentators and why this type of commentary may be beneficial rather than detrimental to political understanding. One argument that Baym makes is that the variation of coverage and the voices available in alternative media now is actually providing more comprehensive information than during the days of objective journalism. Is he correct about that? Were "objective" journalistic accounts, such as in the days of Nixon, actually factual and above reproach? Is is better to have more voices interpreting and delivering the news than ever before even if many of these voices have clear bias? You could disagree with Baym's conclusions but his detail about the type of broadcast news now available is strong and enlightening. Plus, this is an entertaining and interesting read, well-written and easy to comprehend.

  4. 4 out of 5

    NancyL Luckey

    Based on the title, I thought this would be a book about TV anchors since Cronkite. It's about how we are given the news and how we accept it. The book goes from a non-participatory listening to the news to taking an active part in getting the news, thinking about what we hear and passing it along. Also brings out how TV news has become owned by corporations who are concerned more about advertising and share-holders than what's actually happening. Based on the title, I thought this would be a book about TV anchors since Cronkite. It's about how we are given the news and how we accept it. The book goes from a non-participatory listening to the news to taking an active part in getting the news, thinking about what we hear and passing it along. Also brings out how TV news has become owned by corporations who are concerned more about advertising and share-holders than what's actually happening.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Schaubel

  6. 4 out of 5

    Casey Lyn

  7. 5 out of 5

    Leah

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Ellefson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Herold

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anabelen Sanchez

  12. 5 out of 5

    R

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

  14. 5 out of 5

    Niccole L Mardis

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shayna

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

  18. 5 out of 5

    a.caley

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joe Xu

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cody

  22. 5 out of 5

    Josh Bramlett

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lyndsay L

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kimberley Jackson

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

  27. 4 out of 5

    William Snow

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  29. 4 out of 5

    Teela

  30. 4 out of 5

    David

  31. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

  32. 5 out of 5

    Chad

  33. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

  34. 5 out of 5

    Bethany Woodson

  35. 4 out of 5

    Season

  36. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Hill

  37. 4 out of 5

    Ktsharrock

  38. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  39. 5 out of 5

    Adam Lewis

  40. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

  41. 5 out of 5

    Paradigm Publishers

  42. 4 out of 5

    Estefanía Sol

  43. 5 out of 5

    DJ Yossarian

  44. 4 out of 5

    Saffron

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.