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Marvels: Eye of the Camera

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News photographer Phil Sheldon's back, with the man-on-the-street's perspective on the big events of the Marvel Universe. But this time, Phil's world is going to be rocked not just by superheroes and super-villains, but by something far more personal. News photographer Phil Sheldon's back, with the man-on-the-street's perspective on the big events of the Marvel Universe. But this time, Phil's world is going to be rocked not just by superheroes and super-villains, but by something far more personal.


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News photographer Phil Sheldon's back, with the man-on-the-street's perspective on the big events of the Marvel Universe. But this time, Phil's world is going to be rocked not just by superheroes and super-villains, but by something far more personal. News photographer Phil Sheldon's back, with the man-on-the-street's perspective on the big events of the Marvel Universe. But this time, Phil's world is going to be rocked not just by superheroes and super-villains, but by something far more personal.

30 review for Marvels: Eye of the Camera

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    2.5 stars It's an epilogue to Marvels that didn't quite do it for me. It. Was. Depressing. Other than finding out what happened to the little mutant girl, Maggie, there was nothing here that I couldn't have lived my entire life without reading. The art was beautiful, but unless you're an expert on what happened in the Marvel universe during the 70's and 80's I think a lot of the story will go over your head. 2.5 stars It's an epilogue to Marvels that didn't quite do it for me. It. Was. Depressing. Other than finding out what happened to the little mutant girl, Maggie, there was nothing here that I couldn't have lived my entire life without reading. The art was beautiful, but unless you're an expert on what happened in the Marvel universe during the 70's and 80's I think a lot of the story will go over your head.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Antonin Januska

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I definitely loved this Comic book. I know that a lot of people criticize it for its haphazard focus on superheros but for me, it was indicative of Phil's disposition toward the heroes. Think about it. All through the series, he commented on how "things were simpler" back during WWII and before that. It WAS simpler. If you fought the nazis, you were shown as a "hero". However, just like the time in history this book took place in, things weren't so black and white, so simple. Things were much mor I definitely loved this Comic book. I know that a lot of people criticize it for its haphazard focus on superheros but for me, it was indicative of Phil's disposition toward the heroes. Think about it. All through the series, he commented on how "things were simpler" back during WWII and before that. It WAS simpler. If you fought the nazis, you were shown as a "hero". However, just like the time in history this book took place in, things weren't so black and white, so simple. Things were much more complicated. And it showed. Phil also made a lot of great comments on the state of the media at that time. Again, during WWII and before that, the media was positive, trying to improve the morale of the people. In the 70s and 80s, media was all about controversy. The book showed that very nicely. On top of that, having such a "depressing" ending showed that Phil was a human. A normal being. While many heroes from his era were back, they did not seem older or anything like that. But Phil was. The book was great in showing his small bit of GREAT influence on the world as a human, as someone without powers. And I liked the ending too. I did, however, have some issues with the book: * It was confusing to see superhero you remember from pre-WWII era (in the original Marvels book) come back the same age as before. * It was also confusing having superheroes introduced as "new superheroes" when we've seen them before. Spider-man is a good example. Twenty years go by and he's still a young dashing photographer? There also used to be two human torches so that was bizarre. And for example, FF came back in this book yet the book started off with Reed Richards landing and the FF turning into superheroes for the first time? Very strange. Phil did touch on how the X-men from WWII era were the same as the current ones and that journalists just didn't do their due diligence.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt Bromagin

    I honestly never knew they made a sequel to Marvels - one of my favorite mini-series. Excellent sequel that most definitely holds up to its predecessor. It was great to see Maggie again. The events of the second issue always had a profound effect on me. Phil throwing the brick when he finds himself in the mob, and of course, Maggie's disappearance and all the unanswered questions it resulted in. It was also cool to see them go through another couple of decades. I always wondered what Phil's reac I honestly never knew they made a sequel to Marvels - one of my favorite mini-series. Excellent sequel that most definitely holds up to its predecessor. It was great to see Maggie again. The events of the second issue always had a profound effect on me. Phil throwing the brick when he finds himself in the mob, and of course, Maggie's disappearance and all the unanswered questions it resulted in. It was also cool to see them go through another couple of decades. I always wondered what Phil's reaction to characters like the The Punisher would have been. I also like how they brought up werewolves and vampires - referring to Marvel's in-continuity horror comics. That was a great segue into the next series I started - Marvel's Tomb of Dracula.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Marvels is brilliant. This is a decent book, but it simply doesn't live up to its predecessor. I'm not sure I can put my finger on why, exactly, that is. Maybe it's because the subject matter just isn't as awe-inspiring. Instead of the birth of the cornerstones of the Marvel universe, this is the nitty gritty, what makes it run decade in and decade out: the distrust of normal people. And while that was a major plot point in the original, there were other things going on there. This is basically Marvels is brilliant. This is a decent book, but it simply doesn't live up to its predecessor. I'm not sure I can put my finger on why, exactly, that is. Maybe it's because the subject matter just isn't as awe-inspiring. Instead of the birth of the cornerstones of the Marvel universe, this is the nitty gritty, what makes it run decade in and decade out: the distrust of normal people. And while that was a major plot point in the original, there were other things going on there. This is basically all about that. Which makes it pretty repetitive. Superhero does something great, has one second of praise, is almost immediately framed or smeared, is cleared, lather, rinse, repeat. And while that is, the ebb and flow of the Marvel universe, especially anything related to mutants, seeing it reduced like this is just depressing. But if you've been wondering about the fate of Maggie, and I think we almost all have, it's a relief to get to finally know the rest of her story.

  5. 4 out of 5

    B

    If you like superheroes, you owe it to yourself to find a copy of the original Marvels book. This is only for completionists who read the first one. This is very good. It's ultimately a little too long, so the emotion kind of cycles around a few times because there's nowhere to progress. The back-material explains that this story was really just going to be an epilogue to the original. That's right. It's the Hemingway conclusion. Here, we see how Marvels would have ended if brought to its real en If you like superheroes, you owe it to yourself to find a copy of the original Marvels book. This is only for completionists who read the first one. This is very good. It's ultimately a little too long, so the emotion kind of cycles around a few times because there's nowhere to progress. The back-material explains that this story was really just going to be an epilogue to the original. That's right. It's the Hemingway conclusion. Here, we see how Marvels would have ended if brought to its real end. Touching, but not pleasant.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    A respectable follow-up to Marvels but not quite as good. It's a little confusing, though, because unlike the original, in which events in the Marvel universe happen in-universe in the same years the comics were published, this uses a sliding timescale that compresses Marvel universe events from the mid-sixties to the late eighties into less than ten years. For example, the main character's daughter who was an elementary schooler in the first series when the X-Men debut (1961) is a teen learning A respectable follow-up to Marvels but not quite as good. It's a little confusing, though, because unlike the original, in which events in the Marvel universe happen in-universe in the same years the comics were published, this uses a sliding timescale that compresses Marvel universe events from the mid-sixties to the late eighties into less than ten years. For example, the main character's daughter who was an elementary schooler in the first series when the X-Men debut (1961) is a teen learning to drive during the events of 1988's Fall of the Mutants crossover.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    I loved the original, but I just couldn't get into this one. In the beginning it didn't feel like a sequel and I was bored to tears. "If it ain't broke don't fix it" is what they say and I think this book was completely unnecessary. Marvels did not need a sequel. I loved the original, but I just couldn't get into this one. In the beginning it didn't feel like a sequel and I was bored to tears. "If it ain't broke don't fix it" is what they say and I think this book was completely unnecessary. Marvels did not need a sequel.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nazary

    An interesting story about the age of "Marvels" through the eyes of a photographer in the 70s/80s. I love stuff like this. Seeing the effects of all those super heroes on everyday folks. It's a solid read that reveals a new side of the Marvel U An interesting story about the age of "Marvels" through the eyes of a photographer in the 70s/80s. I love stuff like this. Seeing the effects of all those super heroes on everyday folks. It's a solid read that reveals a new side of the Marvel U

  9. 5 out of 5

    Frank Byrns

    OK, not great sequel to the fantastic MARVELS mini-series. Read that one instead, if you haven't. OK, not great sequel to the fantastic MARVELS mini-series. Read that one instead, if you haven't.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sara J. (kefuwa)

    Review pending. Atm, am still vacillating between 4 and 5 on this... but I've never read the first Marvels. Soooo... hmm... Review pending. Atm, am still vacillating between 4 and 5 on this... but I've never read the first Marvels. Soooo... hmm...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This series--five or six, I think--is a follow-up to the sublime Marvels. It wasn't quite as good as the original story, but still worth reading. I love the idea of telling superhero stories from the point of view of an observer (in this case, a newspaper photographer in New York City). Phil, the main character, spends his entire career capturing shots of the iconic events from Marvel history. During this time, he lives his life like a regular person: he fall in love, gets married, has children, This series--five or six, I think--is a follow-up to the sublime Marvels. It wasn't quite as good as the original story, but still worth reading. I love the idea of telling superhero stories from the point of view of an observer (in this case, a newspaper photographer in New York City). Phil, the main character, spends his entire career capturing shots of the iconic events from Marvel history. During this time, he lives his life like a regular person: he fall in love, gets married, has children, works, and eventually retires. Through it all, the Marvels exist around him, and it is his changing view of them that drives the narrative. Phil seems like a real person to me: he gets too caught up in his work, he questions whether or not he's made a difference in the world, or if he's made the right choices about his life and his family. It's good stuff. Very different take on superheroes and comic books. Highly recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rocky Sunico

    While still in the same general tone as the other Marvels book, there's something about Eye of the Camera that just felt a little off, like we had taken this story a little too far and there wasn't as much to explore. Sure, Busiek still has a way with words that his distinctly his own and this book feels right at home with the rest of them, but maybe it's hard to be all that invested in this photographer's story any more? And it took a while for the book to really get to its focus, which turned o While still in the same general tone as the other Marvels book, there's something about Eye of the Camera that just felt a little off, like we had taken this story a little too far and there wasn't as much to explore. Sure, Busiek still has a way with words that his distinctly his own and this book feels right at home with the rest of them, but maybe it's hard to be all that invested in this photographer's story any more? And it took a while for the book to really get to its focus, which turned out to be the rise of the mutants. There was a clear effort to touch on the progression of time like when it highlighted the rise of more horrific, monster style heroes and villains and then the back and forth drama of heroes both in and out of costume. Still, it was an interesting enough piece and quite beautifully illustrated with some amazing spreads all worthy of becoming posters themselves.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Willie

    I went through a lot of trouble to put hands on this book. My library inevitably had to order it from another library four states away. It seemed worth the trouble because I really wanted to know what happened to the mutant in the first book. I later discovered I really DIDN'T want to know what happened to her, it was a better story if you don't know, not because the result of what happened was boring or uninteresting, but because wondering what happened and drawing your own conclusion was the m I went through a lot of trouble to put hands on this book. My library inevitably had to order it from another library four states away. It seemed worth the trouble because I really wanted to know what happened to the mutant in the first book. I later discovered I really DIDN'T want to know what happened to her, it was a better story if you don't know, not because the result of what happened was boring or uninteresting, but because wondering what happened and drawing your own conclusion was the most interesting part of the story. If you want to read a great love letter to comics through the seventies to probably the early nineties (I had a slightly hard time with the timeline as some of these stories referenced were more obscure.) then this is a great book to read. But don't read it to find out what happens to Maggie, you'll leave dissapointed.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    I did not expect to enjoy this as much as Marvels but I did. Every bit as much. The juxtaposition of Phil's real life amidst the wonders of the Marvel Universe was perfect. I did miss Alex Ross' wonderful art but the art here was nothing to sneeze at. I would highly recommend both the original Marvels and this! Especially to someone wanting to get a feel for Marvel's past without having to read all of it. I did not expect to enjoy this as much as Marvels but I did. Every bit as much. The juxtaposition of Phil's real life amidst the wonders of the Marvel Universe was perfect. I did miss Alex Ross' wonderful art but the art here was nothing to sneeze at. I would highly recommend both the original Marvels and this! Especially to someone wanting to get a feel for Marvel's past without having to read all of it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Luci

    Marvels was really good. This one, not so much. It's very sad and almost bitter at times. The art is good and it's cool to see a lot of those characters from another viewpoint but this was a very sad and almost underdeveloped sequel. Marvels was really good. This one, not so much. It's very sad and almost bitter at times. The art is good and it's cool to see a lot of those characters from another viewpoint but this was a very sad and almost underdeveloped sequel.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Scott wachter

    marvels is a goods thing. this followup is fine. but could we get something like it for modern comics instead of revolving around x-men from the the 80s

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bruno Rio

    This take on Marvels leads us through a very human journey. Life. How small and fragile we are comparing to theses gods among us. Beautiful art and touching story...👍❤

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jordi Arozamena

    Good sequel. Not as brilliant as the original, still a great work, and I'd be down for another sequel. Good sequel. Not as brilliant as the original, still a great work, and I'd be down for another sequel.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    Pretty sad story

  20. 5 out of 5

    Des Fox

    This is a tough one to rate, but in truth, it pales before the original Marvels in every way. Now, the origins of this book would suggest as much, and Busiek outs it forward honestly as a thirty-page epilogue stretched out into a six-issue mini at the behest of Marvel higher-ups. Busiek is not alone on writing duties either, with Roger Stern picking up the slack as the collaborative script-writer. Another massive hurdle here is Alex Ross' absence from the project all together. Anacleto's art is This is a tough one to rate, but in truth, it pales before the original Marvels in every way. Now, the origins of this book would suggest as much, and Busiek outs it forward honestly as a thirty-page epilogue stretched out into a six-issue mini at the behest of Marvel higher-ups. Busiek is not alone on writing duties either, with Roger Stern picking up the slack as the collaborative script-writer. Another massive hurdle here is Alex Ross' absence from the project all together. Anacleto's art is at times gorgeous, and at others, muddy and anatomically jarring. The timeline faced by Eye of the Camera is the darker, 70s and 80s of Marvel history, when it was difficult to tell the good guys from the bad guys, and the X-books were really making their dent on the market. Because of this, there's less joy and excitement to be had at the iconic moments represented throughout. While the original had the pleasure of retracing Marvel's famous roots, this one makes a bunch of references to things I imagine nobody really remembers. Die-hards might, but the steam is ripped away from the themes of the book when you're counting on that hardcore audience, getting all of your book's many very clever references. At it's heart, the story of Phil and his cancer is just sort of a bummer. Not much is really said about Marvel or the industry that hasn't been said before as Phil struggles with his book. His mood swings feel atonal, and his family is barely characterized. There's also some janky lettering and at least a couple errors in script that really drag the quality of this book down. I don't feel like a wasted my time though, and this story was worth telling. I just imagine it might have fit better as its intended epilogue to the original rather than a sequel. It was fun to go down memory lane with the handful of moments I recognized, and I enjoyed Phil as a character, but in no way does this book live up to Marvels. Read that book, and only follow up with this one with lowered expectations.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Topher Marsh

    Beautiful art, but the story quality falls short of the original Marvels, which worked well as a stand alone. This sequel lacks the historic arc and significance of the original story. It covers much of the Marvel hero stories I read in the 70's with a few references to some of the Captain America comics I still own. However, this story does less than the original to place Marvel heroes in their historic context and lacks the original Marvel's real world feel. In the oroginal Marvels, Phil is mu Beautiful art, but the story quality falls short of the original Marvels, which worked well as a stand alone. This sequel lacks the historic arc and significance of the original story. It covers much of the Marvel hero stories I read in the 70's with a few references to some of the Captain America comics I still own. However, this story does less than the original to place Marvel heroes in their historic context and lacks the original Marvel's real world feel. In the oroginal Marvels, Phil is much more an observer. In this one, he is brought too close into the Marvel hero story lines. Nevertheless, this is still a good read. Comparing it to the original Marvels is unfair. That story is in a class of it's own compared to all other Marvel stories.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jack Haringa

    3.5 stars. The original MARVELS was an amazing achievement: the intersection of original perspective, sharp writing, vibrant and dynamic art, real purpose, and an understanding of comics and their historical context. In "Eye of the Camera," Busiek and Stern attempt to bottle lightning a second time, and they come up a little short. The references become less iconic and more fannish, the sense of history less imminent. The narrative voice is also logically problematic--while some aren't bothered 3.5 stars. The original MARVELS was an amazing achievement: the intersection of original perspective, sharp writing, vibrant and dynamic art, real purpose, and an understanding of comics and their historical context. In "Eye of the Camera," Busiek and Stern attempt to bottle lightning a second time, and they come up a little short. The references become less iconic and more fannish, the sense of history less imminent. The narrative voice is also logically problematic--while some aren't bothered by this, it's one of my pet peeves. And while Jay Anacleto is a very talented artist whose work I admire, he's not Alex Ross. In all, there's something insufficient about "Eye of the Camera," each element coming up a little short and so the whole becoming less than the sum of its parts.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    The premise (a non-superhero photojournalist reflects on the exploits of the Marvel universe in his twilight years) was initially intriguing. Growing up, I loved a good cross-over comic story as much as the next geek, so it should have been a delight when everyone from the X-Men to The Submariner to She-Hulk are brought into the same "storyline." Sadly, not so. The text weighs down the story, rather than weaving it together. The protagonist's unpredictable and unwarranted mood swings don't furth The premise (a non-superhero photojournalist reflects on the exploits of the Marvel universe in his twilight years) was initially intriguing. Growing up, I loved a good cross-over comic story as much as the next geek, so it should have been a delight when everyone from the X-Men to The Submariner to She-Hulk are brought into the same "storyline." Sadly, not so. The text weighs down the story, rather than weaving it together. The protagonist's unpredictable and unwarranted mood swings don't further the plot, they just seem like temper tantrums. The story tries, unsuccessfully, to explore the "dark" and "light" sides of superhero-ness. "The Watchmen" this ain't.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sean Kennedy

    (3.5 / 5) The original Marvels was a masterpiece, so of course any kind of follow up is going to have to have a hard time living up to it. This book tries its best, but the storyline is far more disjointed and the pieces of Marvel history don't seem to be as successfully integrated as they were in the original, nor do they seem to have the same kind of impact. Often the story gets lost in trying to keep up with the events of the heroes, when it should be focusing on the small intimate story of th (3.5 / 5) The original Marvels was a masterpiece, so of course any kind of follow up is going to have to have a hard time living up to it. This book tries its best, but the storyline is far more disjointed and the pieces of Marvel history don't seem to be as successfully integrated as they were in the original, nor do they seem to have the same kind of impact. Often the story gets lost in trying to keep up with the events of the heroes, when it should be focusing on the small intimate story of the family who frames them. However, there is a truly poignant ending that makes it all worth it, and reminds you of the beauty of the comic book format and why we love them all so much.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This was a miss for me. I can see the good sense in publishing a sequel to Marvels that attempts to do for the 1970's and '80's what the original mini-series did for the 1960's, but the first Marvels mini had a lot going for it beyond the concept that helped the book catch lightning in a bottle. Eye of the Camera feels forced in a way that Marvels never did, and although there are some interesting bits here or there (I enjoyed Phil Sheldon being dispatched to cover the destruction of the Rockies This was a miss for me. I can see the good sense in publishing a sequel to Marvels that attempts to do for the 1970's and '80's what the original mini-series did for the 1960's, but the first Marvels mini had a lot going for it beyond the concept that helped the book catch lightning in a bottle. Eye of the Camera feels forced in a way that Marvels never did, and although there are some interesting bits here or there (I enjoyed Phil Sheldon being dispatched to cover the destruction of the Rockies) by and large I wasn't a huge fan of this sequel.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    For the most part, I didn't like this one quite as much as its predecessor, Marvels. Marvels was almost perfect as a stand-alone entity, and Eye of the Camera's vaguely mangled timeline and slightly weaker plot meant that this one comes off second best. (Especially since this one doesn't have Alex Ross' gorgeous paintings.) However, Eye of the Camera was still worth the read, and the ending made me tear up a bit. For the most part, I didn't like this one quite as much as its predecessor, Marvels. Marvels was almost perfect as a stand-alone entity, and Eye of the Camera's vaguely mangled timeline and slightly weaker plot meant that this one comes off second best. (Especially since this one doesn't have Alex Ross' gorgeous paintings.) However, Eye of the Camera was still worth the read, and the ending made me tear up a bit.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    The follow-up to Marvels, although unnecessary, continues the Phil Sheldon story satisfactorily, but it never really evolves into anything new, or revolutionary as the first did. It tells the story of the darkening of Marvel comics, and the newer anti-hero genre of heroes, and how Sheldon interacts with this new breed of hero. The artwork is spectacular, and the script is well executed, but the story is lacking. It seems to emulate the original story, but never seeks to break into it's own. The follow-up to Marvels, although unnecessary, continues the Phil Sheldon story satisfactorily, but it never really evolves into anything new, or revolutionary as the first did. It tells the story of the darkening of Marvel comics, and the newer anti-hero genre of heroes, and how Sheldon interacts with this new breed of hero. The artwork is spectacular, and the script is well executed, but the story is lacking. It seems to emulate the original story, but never seeks to break into it's own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    "The long-awaited sequel to the award-winning publishing sensation that made Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross into stars!" Well, no, not really. They could have let Marvels well enough alone and I would have been just fine with that. As it is, this story just lessens the impact and the value of the original. I like to round out my ratings to the next higher level, so it gets a 3 stars... but it deserves no more than 2,5 "The long-awaited sequel to the award-winning publishing sensation that made Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross into stars!" Well, no, not really. They could have let Marvels well enough alone and I would have been just fine with that. As it is, this story just lessens the impact and the value of the original. I like to round out my ratings to the next higher level, so it gets a 3 stars... but it deserves no more than 2,5

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell

    A comic book for old people. A pretty impressive followup to Marvels. It is nice to see the Marvel Universe laid out as a history that might have made some sense. This one is certainly even darker than the first one and yet it shows a life of general normalcy among the superhero craziness. A comic book for old people. A pretty impressive followup to Marvels. It is nice to see the Marvel Universe laid out as a history that might have made some sense. This one is certainly even darker than the first one and yet it shows a life of general normalcy among the superhero craziness.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    Full disclosure: as someone who has cancer, story lines involving it move me perhaps more than other people. That being said, I'd like to think I'm somewhat impartial when I say I think this is a worthy follow up to Marvels. It brings the story into the 1980s very well, looking at how comics changed in that time while remaining a human story tied to Phil Sheldon. Beautiful. Full disclosure: as someone who has cancer, story lines involving it move me perhaps more than other people. That being said, I'd like to think I'm somewhat impartial when I say I think this is a worthy follow up to Marvels. It brings the story into the 1980s very well, looking at how comics changed in that time while remaining a human story tied to Phil Sheldon. Beautiful.

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