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Science Fiction Audiences: Watching Star Trek and Doctor Who

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Science Fiction Audiences examines the astounding popularity of two television "institutions" - the series Doctor Who and DEGREESStar Trek. Both of these programmes have survived cancellation and acquired an following that continues to grow. The book is based on over ten years of research including interviews with fans and followers of the series. In that period, though th Science Fiction Audiences examines the astounding popularity of two television "institutions" - the series Doctor Who and DEGREESStar Trek. Both of these programmes have survived cancellation and acquired an following that continues to grow. The book is based on over ten years of research including interviews with fans and followers of the series. In that period, though the fans may have changed, and ways of studying them as "audiences" may have also changed, the programmes have endured intact, with Star Trek for example now in its fourth television incarnation. John Tulloch and Henry Jenkins dive into the rich fan culture surrounding the two series, exploring issues such as queer identity, fan meanings, teenage love of science fiction, and genre expectations. They encompass the perspectives of a vast population of fans and followers throughout Britain, Australia and the US, who will continue the debates contained in the book, along with those who will examine the historically changing range of audience theory it presents. and continue to attract a huge community of fans and followers. Doctor Who has appeared in nine different guises and Star Trek is now approaching its fourth television incarnation.Science Fiction Audiences examines the continuing popularity of two television 'institutions' of our time through their fans and followers. Through dialogue with fans and followers of Star Trek and Dr Who in the US, Britain and Australia, John Tulloch and Henry Jenkins ask what it is about the two series that elicits such strong and active responses from their audiences. Is it their particular intervention into the SF genre? Their expression of peculiarly 'American' and 'British' national cultures. Their ideologies and visions of the future, or their conceptions of science and technology? Science Fiction Audiences responds to a rich fan culture which encompasses debates about fan aesthetics, teenage attitudes to science fiction, queers and Star Trek, and ideology and pleasure in Doctor Who. It is a book written both for fans of the two series, who will be able to continue their debates in its pages, and for students of media and cultural studies, offering a historical overview of audience theory in a fascinating synthesis of text, context and audience study.


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Science Fiction Audiences examines the astounding popularity of two television "institutions" - the series Doctor Who and DEGREESStar Trek. Both of these programmes have survived cancellation and acquired an following that continues to grow. The book is based on over ten years of research including interviews with fans and followers of the series. In that period, though th Science Fiction Audiences examines the astounding popularity of two television "institutions" - the series Doctor Who and DEGREESStar Trek. Both of these programmes have survived cancellation and acquired an following that continues to grow. The book is based on over ten years of research including interviews with fans and followers of the series. In that period, though the fans may have changed, and ways of studying them as "audiences" may have also changed, the programmes have endured intact, with Star Trek for example now in its fourth television incarnation. John Tulloch and Henry Jenkins dive into the rich fan culture surrounding the two series, exploring issues such as queer identity, fan meanings, teenage love of science fiction, and genre expectations. They encompass the perspectives of a vast population of fans and followers throughout Britain, Australia and the US, who will continue the debates contained in the book, along with those who will examine the historically changing range of audience theory it presents. and continue to attract a huge community of fans and followers. Doctor Who has appeared in nine different guises and Star Trek is now approaching its fourth television incarnation.Science Fiction Audiences examines the continuing popularity of two television 'institutions' of our time through their fans and followers. Through dialogue with fans and followers of Star Trek and Dr Who in the US, Britain and Australia, John Tulloch and Henry Jenkins ask what it is about the two series that elicits such strong and active responses from their audiences. Is it their particular intervention into the SF genre? Their expression of peculiarly 'American' and 'British' national cultures. Their ideologies and visions of the future, or their conceptions of science and technology? Science Fiction Audiences responds to a rich fan culture which encompasses debates about fan aesthetics, teenage attitudes to science fiction, queers and Star Trek, and ideology and pleasure in Doctor Who. It is a book written both for fans of the two series, who will be able to continue their debates in its pages, and for students of media and cultural studies, offering a historical overview of audience theory in a fascinating synthesis of text, context and audience study.

54 review for Science Fiction Audiences: Watching Star Trek and Doctor Who

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    Well, I was looking more for a book about fandom: what makes a fan, that sort of thing. This isn't it. Parts of it are marginally interesting - I do like Henry Jenkins' work with Star Trek - but overall, media theory is not my cup of tea and there's no better way to make Doctor Who boring than discussing it with sociology students. Maybe I'll finish it before it's due back, or maybe I'll just pick through the interesting bits and leave the rest for another time. Well, I was looking more for a book about fandom: what makes a fan, that sort of thing. This isn't it. Parts of it are marginally interesting - I do like Henry Jenkins' work with Star Trek - but overall, media theory is not my cup of tea and there's no better way to make Doctor Who boring than discussing it with sociology students. Maybe I'll finish it before it's due back, or maybe I'll just pick through the interesting bits and leave the rest for another time.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Cutler-Broyles

    Loved this. All my favorite things in one place. (Not a review / that comes later. Just opinion.)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nettie

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul Booth

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elodie Vidal

  6. 5 out of 5

    Esther

  7. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  9. 4 out of 5

    Justine P

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dezz

  11. 5 out of 5

    Monica

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessika Griffin

  13. 5 out of 5

    nyota

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rullsenberg

  15. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Fure

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jenni

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jo

  20. 5 out of 5

    John

  21. 4 out of 5

    Neil Shurley

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul Doody

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jana

  24. 4 out of 5

    Saskia

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sophie Hembise

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nick Cox

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alice

  30. 5 out of 5

    E.c.

  31. 5 out of 5

    Paul Doody

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  33. 4 out of 5

    J.M. Frey

  34. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  35. 5 out of 5

    Briony

  36. 5 out of 5

    Chris Parnell

  37. 5 out of 5

    Rt

  38. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  39. 4 out of 5

    Bsam

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Fure

  42. 4 out of 5

    Opal Trelore

  43. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  44. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Janssen

  45. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  46. 4 out of 5

    Julie Buyer

  47. 5 out of 5

    Graham

  48. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Carey

  49. 5 out of 5

    Anna Hutson

  50. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

  51. 4 out of 5

    Char

  52. 5 out of 5

    Didi

  53. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  54. 4 out of 5

    Unwordy

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