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In 1897, the world changed forever when our planet came under attack from Martian invaders. The world's greatest detective, Sherlock Holmes, along with his friend Professor Challenger embark on one of their most dangerous adventures to date... to discover the nature and intent of their extra-terrestrial attackers. In 1897, the world changed forever when our planet came under attack from Martian invaders. The world's greatest detective, Sherlock Holmes, along with his friend Professor Challenger embark on one of their most dangerous adventures to date... to discover the nature and intent of their extra-terrestrial attackers.


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In 1897, the world changed forever when our planet came under attack from Martian invaders. The world's greatest detective, Sherlock Holmes, along with his friend Professor Challenger embark on one of their most dangerous adventures to date... to discover the nature and intent of their extra-terrestrial attackers. In 1897, the world changed forever when our planet came under attack from Martian invaders. The world's greatest detective, Sherlock Holmes, along with his friend Professor Challenger embark on one of their most dangerous adventures to date... to discover the nature and intent of their extra-terrestrial attackers.

30 review for The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: War of the Worlds

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    First writen way back in 1968 & published in 1975 this American classic over 50ys ago sees Holmes not with Watson but with Professor Challenger from Doyle's lost world. They give great discretion of him. But this lacks the sprit of Holmes as we have no mystery nore do we have any Watson . H.G Well's is talked about but that is it. What gets me most is that Holmes is not right he wouldn't have not told Watson he would have told Challenger to except him too. I find that this book has dated too as w First writen way back in 1968 & published in 1975 this American classic over 50ys ago sees Holmes not with Watson but with Professor Challenger from Doyle's lost world. They give great discretion of him. But this lacks the sprit of Holmes as we have no mystery nore do we have any Watson . H.G Well's is talked about but that is it. What gets me most is that Holmes is not right he wouldn't have not told Watson he would have told Challenger to except him too. I find that this book has dated too as we now no lot more about Mars than in 1968 when Patrick Troughton's Ice Warriors were the Martian warriors Then comes the final straw that brakes the camel's back that makes this utterly wrong Holmes .Mrs Hutson & Holmes have being having a steamy sex affair for over 25 years but she is still Married to Mr. Hutson ! I have seen movie years ago with Rodger Moore as Holmes (he was nealy as bad as Tom Baker or Charleston Hestston ) were had two children by Irena Adler! Mrs Hutson comes across as older so did that make Holmes a Toy boy? I find the rest of it OK, as it has the song Forever Autumn when your not here , in my head from musical War of the World's. My song with my late wife always makes me sad thinking of her. You need to know the song , it's special like Bright eyes. Shame the book isn't The next part deals with Challenger 's Martian story which is also useless if have not read the Lost World .I always thought Challenger was to good to be true & not Doyle's best at all , bit silly.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I found this book almost by chance and it has been a pleasant surprise. The novel tell the events described in the book "The War of the Worlds" by HG Wells, experienced by two of the most famous characters of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger. It's interesting to see how these men, followers of logic and science, face a similar threat, although I'm convinced that Holmes's fans might turn up their noses. Indeed, there are some aspects in the personality of Holmes, bu I found this book almost by chance and it has been a pleasant surprise. The novel tell the events described in the book "The War of the Worlds" by HG Wells, experienced by two of the most famous characters of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger. It's interesting to see how these men, followers of logic and science, face a similar threat, although I'm convinced that Holmes's fans might turn up their noses. Indeed, there are some aspects in the personality of Holmes, but not only, that don't meet properly the original style. (view spoiler)[See, for example, the relationship between Holmes and Mrs. Hudson (hide spoiler)] . Professor Challenger, in contrast, is portrayed in all its arrogance, competence and lack of humility, as always. Many funny scenes in this story resulted from comparing the personalities of these two men. Apart from that, it's an enjoyable book that lets to examine, from an interesting point of view, the novel of Wells and where the author is described so unflattering. Note that in the book appears, though in one scene, another character of Doyle, (view spoiler)[Lord John Roxton (hide spoiler)] .

  3. 4 out of 5

    James

    Pleasantly surprised, was a pretty interesting read. 3.5 stars maybe 4.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

    I was really hoping for more from Holmes story but it didn't quite work for me. Holmes doesn't have a whole lot to do in this and Watson comes across as a little too dumb for my liking. Plus, I don't feel like I know nearly enough about Arthur Conan Doyle's other classic character, Professor Challenger, to really get this. I would like to read more about him in the future though. I was really hoping for more from Holmes story but it didn't quite work for me. Holmes doesn't have a whole lot to do in this and Watson comes across as a little too dumb for my liking. Plus, I don't feel like I know nearly enough about Arthur Conan Doyle's other classic character, Professor Challenger, to really get this. I would like to read more about him in the future though.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Austin

    With his recent surge in local popular culture, Sherlock Holmes is bound to need some new challenges in his storied detective career. In The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: War of the Worlds, Manly and Wade Wellman take Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s popular character (as well as his Professor Challenger from The Lost World) into a battle for survival while E.T. reigns down destruction in London. The story follows a parallel story line to H.G. Wells’ classic novel but makes clear and distinctiv With his recent surge in local popular culture, Sherlock Holmes is bound to need some new challenges in his storied detective career. In The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: War of the Worlds, Manly and Wade Wellman take Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s popular character (as well as his Professor Challenger from The Lost World) into a battle for survival while E.T. reigns down destruction in London. The story follows a parallel story line to H.G. Wells’ classic novel but makes clear and distinctive turns in it’s plot that allow a new perspective on the classic invasion tale as well as taking shots at Mr. Wells throughout the novel for his sensationalism of the invasion as well as the ignoring of Sherlock Holmes‘ involvement. In the novel we get looks at former characters out of the original Holmes’ stories as well as new characters that fit right in with Holmes and Watson with really no noticeable issues. The biggest issue I have with the novel is the dumbing down of Watson as well as the authors’ shaping Holmes a bit more “normal” than Doyle has him painted in his novels. We must keep in mind that Holmes is a genius and an eccentric one at that but this book has him a more centered then I’m used to seeing as well as giving him a James Bond quality of magnetism over Mrs. Hudson doesn’t fit the character profile. I am not familiar with Professor Challenger but from what I’ve read, most agree that he has lost his hard edge in this book as well. Still a very enjoyable read especially when the invasion picks up about a third of the way through the book and moves briskly thought the last plot twist is shoe horned in to make one more tie to the original mythology. The book is a part of a series of novels from Titan books that has different writers taking Sherlock Holmes and pitting him against a variety of Victorian-Era nemesis. Overall: a nice light book but look elsewhere if you’re a Holmes purist.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Charles van Buren

    Not much for Holmes to do in this one Verified Purchase(What's this?) This review is from: The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: War of the Worlds (Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (Paperback)) (Kindle Edition) I admire Manly Wade Wellman's stories of John the Balladeer aka Silver John (these can be found in the e-book version of MOUNTAIN MAGIC. The hard copy has different stories). However this Sherlock Holmes story just doesn't work. Perhaps the Wellmans were too constrained by the H. G Not much for Holmes to do in this one Verified Purchase(What's this?) This review is from: The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: War of the Worlds (Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (Paperback)) (Kindle Edition) I admire Manly Wade Wellman's stories of John the Balladeer aka Silver John (these can be found in the e-book version of MOUNTAIN MAGIC. The hard copy has different stories). However this Sherlock Holmes story just doesn't work. Perhaps the Wellmans were too constrained by the H. G. Wells story upon which it is based. Essentially, Holmes and Professor Challenger don't do much of anything except survive and think. They contribute virtually nothing to the war with the aliens. Watson is away for most of the book and was sorely missed by this reader. The Wellmans do introduce a surprising love interest for Holmes. This review is from the kindle edition sold by Amazon Digital Services.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy Sturgis

    This book traces the events described in H.G. Wells's brilliant The War of the Worlds and the related "The Crystal Egg" (both 1897) from the perspective (and involvement) of characters from Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger universes. It unfolds as a series of stories told either by Edward Dunn Malone (the reporter for the London newspaper The Daily Globe who features in and sometimes narrates the Professor Challenger tales) or Dr. John H. Watson, Holmes's friend and b This book traces the events described in H.G. Wells's brilliant The War of the Worlds and the related "The Crystal Egg" (both 1897) from the perspective (and involvement) of characters from Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger universes. It unfolds as a series of stories told either by Edward Dunn Malone (the reporter for the London newspaper The Daily Globe who features in and sometimes narrates the Professor Challenger tales) or Dr. John H. Watson, Holmes's friend and biographer. These include 1: The Adventure of the Crystal Egg (by Malone), 2: Sherlock Holmes Verses Mars (by Malone), 3: George E. Challenger Verses Mars (by Malone), 4. The Adventure of the Martian Client (by Watson), 5: Venus, Mars, and Baker Street (by Watson), and perhaps the most entertaining of them all, the Appendix, which is Watson's strongly-worded letter pressing H.G. Wells to revise his erroneous account of the Martian invasion. As a response to The War of the Worlds, this is a satisfying novel. The Wellmans know the original text well and fit their narrative into it seamlessly -- except when challenging Wells's account, which they do with cleverness. The Wellmans clearly know their Holmesian canon, too; they offer new theories about the origins of Mrs. Hudson that fit into Doyle's chronology, solve the problem of Mr. Hudson, and fold a new generation of the Moran family into Wells's narrative. Perhaps the most striking aspect of the novel is the depiction of a long-standing and discreet romance between Holmes and Mrs. Hudson, a relationship to which Watson remains completely oblivious. Holmes and Challenger both approach the subject of the crystal egg and the invasion it foretells with the scientific rigor and intellectual curiosity one would expect. The drawback to this tale is the centrality of Challenger's character. He never rises above an annoying, cartoonish, single-note figure here, a grating contrast to the rest of the work, and I couldn't help but wish the mystery of the Martians had been left to Holmes and Watson alone. Overall, this represents a fun premise achieved with skill, but I had hoped to enjoy it more than I did.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bev

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The War of the Worlds, Manly W. Wellman and Wade Wellman have taken the Sherlock Holmes we all know and love and joined him up with Doyle's other brilliant character, Professor Challenger. These two analytical men investigate and try to come up with a response to the alien invasion previously chronicled in H. G. Wells' War of the Worlds. There are several startling revelations...one in particular about Holmes and a few that "set the record straight" In The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The War of the Worlds, Manly W. Wellman and Wade Wellman have taken the Sherlock Holmes we all know and love and joined him up with Doyle's other brilliant character, Professor Challenger. These two analytical men investigate and try to come up with a response to the alien invasion previously chronicled in H. G. Wells' War of the Worlds. There are several startling revelations...one in particular about Holmes and a few that "set the record straight" (as Watson would put it) about the events In London during the attack. Overall, the Wellmans do an adequate job of telling their story and incorporating the worlds of Doyle and Wells. It is a bit disjointed in places...evidence that the novel was originally published as several "articles" which were meant to tell the "truth" about the Martian invasion. I think the portions which focus on the Professor's and Watson's point of view work best. Some of the writing from Holmes' point of view don't ring quite as true. I definitely enjoyed the interactions between Holmes and Challenger, and I am now eager to read the works that feature the egotistical professor. ***Spoiler Alert*** My major quibble with the story is the supposed romance between Holmes and Mrs. Hudson. There is no way that anyone will get me to believe that Watson, dull as he is sometimes portrayed, would have missed that relationship's reality. AND, given the good doctor's inclination to describe and have great sympathy for the beautiful women who employ Holmes as clients, you can't tell me that he wouldn't have mentioned that Mrs. Hudson was a youngish (30-ish), blonde, blue-eyed, statuesque, beauty. If there's anything the doctor notices, it's a pretty face.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    IN SHORT What Holmes got up to when the Martians were invading. THINGS TO LIKE A better premise for a steampunk novel simply cannot be imagined. Because the world of Sherlock Holmes is so familiar, the reader can experience some of the thrill in its destruction that the original readers of The War of the Worlds must have felt. The lesser known Professor Challenger is also bought into the mix and there is a wonderfully cheeky revelation about Holmes' private life. THINGS NOT TO LIKE The authors have t IN SHORT What Holmes got up to when the Martians were invading. THINGS TO LIKE A better premise for a steampunk novel simply cannot be imagined. Because the world of Sherlock Holmes is so familiar, the reader can experience some of the thrill in its destruction that the original readers of The War of the Worlds must have felt. The lesser known Professor Challenger is also bought into the mix and there is a wonderfully cheeky revelation about Holmes' private life. THINGS NOT TO LIKE The authors have taken all this potential and done absolutely nothing with it. Separated and alone, Challenger and Holmes simply wonder around following the exact events described in Wells' book and understand them. That is pretty much it. The bombastic and arrogant Challenger should be a joy to write for. But, as he is alone he has nobody to be bombastic and arrogant to. Holmes conducts no experiments, makes no deductions. He just understands what is happening because he is so clever. You would at least expect some sparks when the men are finally bought together, but no. It is just mutual appreciation. Even the cheeky idea about Homes' private life is handled in the most boring way imaginable. The reader is just told what it is near the beginning of the story. I suspect that the authors were just too timid to add anything, but in places it feels as if they are actually trying to be dull. THINGS IT IS LIKE The War of the Worlds by HG Wells The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle Edison's Conquest of Mars, by Garrett P. Serviss War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches by Kevin J Anderson

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elliott

    I was really disappointed by this book for two textual reasons and a score of stylistic concerns. The first in my edition is on page 41 when Challenger refers to H.G. Wells as having "some rather sketchy scientific background, along with a bizarre imagination." The second is eight pages forward. Watson and Holmes are discussing H.G. Wells when Watson refers to him as "A sensation-mongering hack, suspiciously revolutionary in his notions..." These two instances marked for me the point of no retur I was really disappointed by this book for two textual reasons and a score of stylistic concerns. The first in my edition is on page 41 when Challenger refers to H.G. Wells as having "some rather sketchy scientific background, along with a bizarre imagination." The second is eight pages forward. Watson and Holmes are discussing H.G. Wells when Watson refers to him as "A sensation-mongering hack, suspiciously revolutionary in his notions..." These two instances marked for me the point of no return for this novel. I could reasonably accept (though very grudgingly mind you) the heresy of having Holmes be romantically involved since I feel he works better as the perpetual bachelor married to his job both as a certain barometer of Victorianism and for his own character (though his romance with Irene Adler in the new film versions works very well I will admit), as well I could accept the clunky dialogue. But the comments about Wells I found completely unnecessary to the plot and indeed quite malicious. They did not serve the plot in the least and indeed at least to me really hampered it. Being a big H.G. Wells fan I was completely alienated before page 50, the remaining portion never redeeming itself from these initial jabs.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katya

    It's so much fun to read a TEOTWAWKI story that isn't focused on terrifying the reader! This is more like- yep, alien invaders are bad, but let's use scientific deduction instead of freaking out. The events of the original War of the Worlds are divided up into smaller stories in this book. First, "The Adventure of the Crystal Egg" tells how Holmes and Challenger received advanced warning of the invasion. Next, "Sherlock Holmes versus Mars" is about how Sherlock survived the opening attack of the It's so much fun to read a TEOTWAWKI story that isn't focused on terrifying the reader! This is more like- yep, alien invaders are bad, but let's use scientific deduction instead of freaking out. The events of the original War of the Worlds are divided up into smaller stories in this book. First, "The Adventure of the Crystal Egg" tells how Holmes and Challenger received advanced warning of the invasion. Next, "Sherlock Holmes versus Mars" is about how Sherlock survived the opening attack of the creatures and how he returned to London. Then, "George E. Challenger versus Mars" shares how the professor saw his wife off to safety and returned to the city in search of Holmes. Finally, Watson gets to chip in with "The Adventure of the Martian Client", "Venus, Mars, and Baker Street", and a few short follow-up letters. I thought it was really entertaining to read a mash-up of these two older stories. Plus, c'mon, who wouldn't want to see Sherlock Holmes mull over creatures from another planet?!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jc

    The Wellmans combine the world's of Doyles' two main protagonists, Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger, with the England of H.G.Wells War of the Worlds (adding bits from Wells' short story, "The Crystal Egg"). An entertaining read, with some fun bits, but don't expect any revelations or major changes to the Wells story. Basically, this is an en bloc retelling of the original but through the eyes of Doyle's characters. For the picky Holmesian, the Sh.H. depiction is a little weak, but otherw The Wellmans combine the world's of Doyles' two main protagonists, Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger, with the England of H.G.Wells War of the Worlds (adding bits from Wells' short story, "The Crystal Egg"). An entertaining read, with some fun bits, but don't expect any revelations or major changes to the Wells story. Basically, this is an en bloc retelling of the original but through the eyes of Doyle's characters. For the picky Holmesian, the Sh.H. depiction is a little weak, but otherwise the story and characters mostly work.

  13. 4 out of 5

    j_ay

    The mash-up idea of Sherlock Holmes and War of the Worlds (not too mention the inclusion of another Doyle character: Professor Challenger), has an immense amount of potential. Sadly the Wellmans achieve nothing even close to interesting, not even coming close to having a grasp of the essential character of Holmes (pairing him off romantically with the Landlady, let alone saying shit like he thinks of himself as a perfectionist kisser (!) is so contrary to the character and just a waster of pages The mash-up idea of Sherlock Holmes and War of the Worlds (not too mention the inclusion of another Doyle character: Professor Challenger), has an immense amount of potential. Sadly the Wellmans achieve nothing even close to interesting, not even coming close to having a grasp of the essential character of Holmes (pairing him off romantically with the Landlady, let alone saying shit like he thinks of himself as a perfectionist kisser (!) is so contrary to the character and just a waster of pages) and merely writing off the Well's characters as idiots...what is the point? Unreadable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fred Hughes

    Lots of deducting but not much action as Holmes and Watson face an invasion of London launched from the planet Mars. Holmes meets his equal in intelligence in Mr Challenger (nice twist on the name) who is the first to tell you how smart he is. While there is investigation, the results on the invasion rest squarely with the invaders; and Holmes and Watson are merely bystanders. Throw in H.G. Wells, which the author did, and you get an entertaining read

  15. 5 out of 5

    Salvatore

    A very good, interesting story. I like that i uses HG Wells War of the Worlds and places Holmes and another Doyle character, Professor Challenger and incorporates them into the story. I like how Watson is upset that Wells has misrepresented the true facts of the invasion and left out key contributions of Challenger and Holmes. This one made me smile.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bmj2k

    In short, with a premise like Sherlock Holmes and the War of the Worlds this book should have been fun. Instead it was boring and tedius and not at all engaging. A complete and utter disappointment. It soured me on reading any more of this range.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey Yost

    Utterly boring, Watson is off somewhere else for most of the book, Mr Challenger is annoying and adds nothing, Mrs Hudson is moved from a background character to Holmes' lover (which I find disturbing and frankly gross). Not a fan at all of this story. Utterly boring, Watson is off somewhere else for most of the book, Mr Challenger is annoying and adds nothing, Mrs Hudson is moved from a background character to Holmes' lover (which I find disturbing and frankly gross). Not a fan at all of this story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    There are so many things to enjoy about The War of the Worlds. But first let's clarify: I am not speaking of HG Well's original SF classic, though I am certain there is plenty to enjoy there too. Rather this is a different novel with the same title. It is written by Many Wade Wellman and his son Wade Wellman. The senior Wellman was an esteemed pulpmeister from way back, and he penned a series of excellent novels and stories regarding Silver John AKA John the Balladeer. These were true originals There are so many things to enjoy about The War of the Worlds. But first let's clarify: I am not speaking of HG Well's original SF classic, though I am certain there is plenty to enjoy there too. Rather this is a different novel with the same title. It is written by Many Wade Wellman and his son Wade Wellman. The senior Wellman was an esteemed pulpmeister from way back, and he penned a series of excellent novels and stories regarding Silver John AKA John the Balladeer. These were true originals featuring what I will call "Backwoods magic" taking place in the Appalachians, and they are fantastic works of fiction. I had no idea Wellman had ever written anything featuring Sherlock Holmes so already this book had a lot going for it before I even cracked the cover. And there's more. In addition this book also features Professor Challenger, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's OTHER series character. Challenger appears in a number of Doyle's tales, most notable of which is The Lost World. The original stories featuring Holmes remain worth reading today, and so too does The Lost World. Challenger is a very different sort of person than Holmes-they never meet in Doyle's fiction but it seems a logical development and it is fun to see them interact. There are also cameos from other supporting Holmes and Challenger characters such as Lord John Roxton, Inspector Stanley Hopkins, and of course Doctor John Watson. The principal idea behind this book should be evident (one might even say elementary.) Holmes' career spans the time of the Martian invasion HG Wells chronicles in his original novel The War of the Worlds. So what happens when Martian technology comes up against the two greatest intellects of the age? Read the book. But before you do there is one more thing I have to mention. It is why this book, despite all its' good points, only rates two stars. Both Wellmans in their respective introductions declare that they are dedicated Sherlockians. So the idea that these two dedicated Sherlockians would concoct a plot in which Holmes is carrying on a torrid love affair with Mrs. Hudson who is actually really hot boggles the mind. I never picked up on this while reading the original Holmes stories. I find it more than a little amusing that I can not bat an eye at Holmes encountering extraterrestrials, but I take great exception to the idea that he is shagging the housekeeper. Even more ridiculous: Watson is completely oblivious to this affair. The Wellmans have fallen into the old trap a lot of people who write these Holmes pastiches do: they assume John Watson is a dolt and he is not. And that's why this book barely gets three stars.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rob Hopwood

    This is a pastiche crossover novel featuring Arthur Conan Doyle's two characters Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger, and H.G. Wells' novel The War of the Worlds. The stories within were published separately in magazines in the late 1960s, and were afterwards brought together into this single volume in 1975. The stories work well together because they recount the same events from three different perspectives, namely those of Sherlock Holmes, Professor Challenger and Doctor Watson. Eventuall This is a pastiche crossover novel featuring Arthur Conan Doyle's two characters Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger, and H.G. Wells' novel The War of the Worlds. The stories within were published separately in magazines in the late 1960s, and were afterwards brought together into this single volume in 1975. The stories work well together because they recount the same events from three different perspectives, namely those of Sherlock Holmes, Professor Challenger and Doctor Watson. Eventually, these three come together to deal with the alien menace. I was prepared to be disappointed when I started this book. However, I must say that I was pleasantly surprised by the execution. Although the story intentionally departs from some of what Doyle and Wells wrote, this is done in a way that makes the reader feel like they are gaining insights into previously undisclosed details regarding what occurred during the alien invasion. Having said that, I thought the Holmes character was a little weaker than the other two, and I am pretty sure Sherlock Holmes purists would find him a little hard to swallow. If the reader comes to this novel without any knowledge of the stories it is based on, they will probably miss many of the finer points. It would therefore be a good idea at least to read the short story The Crystal Egg and the novel The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells before starting on this one. Other reading could include a couple of the original Sherlock Holmes adventures, and a story or two featuring Professor Challenger. Although a few Americanisms present in the text were not spotted by the editors, the narrative is nevertheless a largely successful attempt to write in the style of late nineteenth-century England. And while the novel is not deep or introspective, it is certainly a well-told and enjoyable tale of deduction and adventure.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gary Van Horn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I had a copy of this book in storage for several years without knowing I had it. I was excited to read it because it was cowritten by Manly Wade Wellman and I knew that Wellman was a favorite author of one of my favorites, Karl Edward Wagner. I've only ever read one other thing by Wellman and that was a Silver John short story in a collection. I also love the idea of crossovers like this. Adding Professor Challenger was a plus. I was put off early on though because of the bizarre depiction of Hol I had a copy of this book in storage for several years without knowing I had it. I was excited to read it because it was cowritten by Manly Wade Wellman and I knew that Wellman was a favorite author of one of my favorites, Karl Edward Wagner. I've only ever read one other thing by Wellman and that was a Silver John short story in a collection. I also love the idea of crossovers like this. Adding Professor Challenger was a plus. I was put off early on though because of the bizarre depiction of Holmes having a clandestine affair with his landlady which the author's decided Doctor Watson somehow never noticed. I've read every Holmes story written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and while I don't consider myself an expert, I always pictured his landlady as a dowager type and an unlikely love interest. Also the only woman that ever seemed to intrigue Holmes was Irene Adler, who's intellect he admired. It was also a little insulting to depict Watson as too obtuse to notice the relationship. Watson was NOT an idiot. I've only read the Lost World vis a vis George Edward Challenger but he seemed a little too volatile and blustery here as well. Another thing that was off-putting was the disparagement of H.G. Wells throughout the book. You're borrowing his concepts to write an adventure story. Why would you trash talk the man just to push the idea that the invaders weren't really native Martians? Otherwise it was well written and the things I brought up are why it only gets three stars from me. This book was cowritten by Wellman's son Wade Wellman so it may have been that these bizarre changes were his idea.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Van Roberts

    "Sherlock Holmes's War of the Worlds" qualifies as abysmal. The only redeeming facet of the Wellmans' fanciful narrative is his use of H.G. Wells' short story "The Crystal Egg." Imaginatively, the Wellmans have linked the short story with the novel, something Wells never did in his lifetime. Unfortunately, the Wellmans have goofed in their description of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous character Professor George Edward Challenger. Doyle gave the odious professor grey eyes, whereas the Wellmans have "Sherlock Holmes's War of the Worlds" qualifies as abysmal. The only redeeming facet of the Wellmans' fanciful narrative is his use of H.G. Wells' short story "The Crystal Egg." Imaginatively, the Wellmans have linked the short story with the novel, something Wells never did in his lifetime. Unfortunately, the Wellmans have goofed in their description of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous character Professor George Edward Challenger. Doyle gave the odious professor grey eyes, whereas the Wellmans have changed the color of those eyes from grey to blue! This is gross negligence! Furthermore, they have changed radically the character of the venerable Mrs. Hudson. Now, she is far younger, and Holmes, and she enjoy a romantic relationship. Moreover, they conclude their narrative with attacks on Wells for supposedly misrepresenting what actually happened. First, they argue that the alien invaders didn't come from Mars, but from somewhere else in the galaxy, and later they show these aliens landing on Venus and faring no better than they did on Earth. I regret having wasted my time reading this contemptible garbage by a couple of hack writers exploiting a classic masterpiece of science fiction! I don't think that Wells would have cared very much for their version of the events that he created.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    The premise of this book was enough to make me buy it - Sherlock Holmes and War of the Worlds were both written around the same time, so what if they were both connected? Amazing idea, yes! Amazing book? Unfortunately, no. The problem is, this book is made up of four short stories and it doesn't feel like one single narrative. Although the same characters appear in all four stories, we shift perspective and sometimes go off in frustrating diversions when we really want to be dealing with the alien The premise of this book was enough to make me buy it - Sherlock Holmes and War of the Worlds were both written around the same time, so what if they were both connected? Amazing idea, yes! Amazing book? Unfortunately, no. The problem is, this book is made up of four short stories and it doesn't feel like one single narrative. Although the same characters appear in all four stories, we shift perspective and sometimes go off in frustrating diversions when we really want to be dealing with the aliens. Read alone, on their own merit these stories may have something interesting to say, but in this case the whole is not greater than the sum of the parts. The book's biggest problem is it adds very little to either Sherlock's mythology or WotW. The characters are passive, and spend most of the book just observing what's happening from the periphery, which means they're not actually affecting the course of the story in any way. Holmes throws out some theories about the aliens based on their behaviour, but this isn't like him investigating a crime. He doesn't have clues to follow of suspects to interrogate, so his powers of deduction are next to useless against the alien threat. Very disappointing.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kieran McAndrew

    Sherlock Holmes joins forces with Professor Challenger to help repel a Martian invasion. The Wellmans' novel has a good starting conceit, but is spread rather thin. By far the best part of this novel is thrown in almost as an afterthought with their revelations about the enigmatic Mrs Hudson. Sherlock Holmes joins forces with Professor Challenger to help repel a Martian invasion. The Wellmans' novel has a good starting conceit, but is spread rather thin. By far the best part of this novel is thrown in almost as an afterthought with their revelations about the enigmatic Mrs Hudson.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    didn't care for the writing style and gave up on it. not going to give it a star rating as that wouldn't be fair as I couldn't honestly review it. can't say that the book is good or bad; just not for me. didn't care for the writing style and gave up on it. not going to give it a star rating as that wouldn't be fair as I couldn't honestly review it. can't say that the book is good or bad; just not for me.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was a bit taken aback by Wellman's portrayal of a romance between Mrs. Hudson and Holmes until I realized that he was keeping it secret from everyone. Well played, Mr. Wellman, well played. I was a bit taken aback by Wellman's portrayal of a romance between Mrs. Hudson and Holmes until I realized that he was keeping it secret from everyone. Well played, Mr. Wellman, well played.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Meh. I was hoping for better. A lot better. This could've been awesome. It was decidedly Not. Meh. I was hoping for better. A lot better. This could've been awesome. It was decidedly Not.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Excellent literary smash up. Impossible to put down.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mike Glaser

    Enjoyable read with a different perspective on the “Martian” invasion. Entertaining and recommended.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rich

    This print edition from Titan Books is littered with typographical errors. Without those errors it would be still a terrible read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Great blend of classic Sherlock and edge of your seat Science Fiction.

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