web site hit counter Harriette Wilson's Memoirs: The Greatest Courtesan of Her Age - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Harriette Wilson's Memoirs: The Greatest Courtesan of Her Age

Availability: Ready to download

19th century London produced a fine flowering of eccentrics and individualists. Chief among them was Harriette Wilson, whose patrons included most of the distinguished men of the day, from the Duke of Wellington to Lord Byron. She held court in a box at the opera, attended by statesmen, poets, national heroes, aristocrats, members of the beau monde, and students who hoped 19th century London produced a fine flowering of eccentrics and individualists. Chief among them was Harriette Wilson, whose patrons included most of the distinguished men of the day, from the Duke of Wellington to Lord Byron. She held court in a box at the opera, attended by statesmen, poets, national heroes, aristocrats, members of the beau monde, and students who hoped to be immortalized by her glance. She wrote these memoirs in middle age, when she had fallen out of favor, and she advised her former lovers that 200 of them would be edited out. The result is an elegant, zestful, unrepentant memoir, which offers intimately detailed portraits of the Regency demimonde.


Compare

19th century London produced a fine flowering of eccentrics and individualists. Chief among them was Harriette Wilson, whose patrons included most of the distinguished men of the day, from the Duke of Wellington to Lord Byron. She held court in a box at the opera, attended by statesmen, poets, national heroes, aristocrats, members of the beau monde, and students who hoped 19th century London produced a fine flowering of eccentrics and individualists. Chief among them was Harriette Wilson, whose patrons included most of the distinguished men of the day, from the Duke of Wellington to Lord Byron. She held court in a box at the opera, attended by statesmen, poets, national heroes, aristocrats, members of the beau monde, and students who hoped to be immortalized by her glance. She wrote these memoirs in middle age, when she had fallen out of favor, and she advised her former lovers that 200 of them would be edited out. The result is an elegant, zestful, unrepentant memoir, which offers intimately detailed portraits of the Regency demimonde.

53 review for Harriette Wilson's Memoirs: The Greatest Courtesan of Her Age

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I have to admit that this is not a book I would've picked up on my own. I like history but prefer the Middle Ages and the Tudor period. This book came in a set about women in history. I wanted the other books in the set. It's very entertaining. It is impossible not to like Wilson. At times, she is funny. She writes, "I have one advantage over other bad females writers and prosing ladies, which is, that I do not think myself agreeable". Sometimes she is very modern in her comments on how society s I have to admit that this is not a book I would've picked up on my own. I like history but prefer the Middle Ages and the Tudor period. This book came in a set about women in history. I wanted the other books in the set. It's very entertaining. It is impossible not to like Wilson. At times, she is funny. She writes, "I have one advantage over other bad females writers and prosing ladies, which is, that I do not think myself agreeable". Sometimes she is very modern in her comments on how society sees women, "She is a bad woman the moment she has committed fornication, be she generous, charitable, just, clever, domestic, affectionate, and ever ready to sacrifice her own good to serve and benefit those she loves, still her rank in society is with the lowest hired prostitute". Still, at times, one wonders if Wilson isn't playing a final game with her readers, giving them what they want instead of the truth.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kecia

    Wow! What a life! Harriette Wilson was the most promiment curtesan of her day. She was not a kept woman, but rather she kept men! I think the most fun thing about it is that she wrote her memoirs as blackmail...so she tells the most scandalous tales while still maintaining dignity. Her family, friends, true loves, bad lovers, and even Lord Byron all leap from the page out of the past and into your heart. A fun look into regency England.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Reily

    This memoir was scatter-brained, unorganized, and very real. I found it refreshing, almost like listening to someone chat about their day. Hariette is real, she shows her life as she experienced it. I would be interested in comparing Hariette's version of events to other people who knew her and the people and places she talks about. Her stories and accounts of the people around her are interesting and often funny or tragic. As intriguing as her stories are, they are based primarily on her perso This memoir was scatter-brained, unorganized, and very real. I found it refreshing, almost like listening to someone chat about their day. Hariette is real, she shows her life as she experienced it. I would be interested in comparing Hariette's version of events to other people who knew her and the people and places she talks about. Her stories and accounts of the people around her are interesting and often funny or tragic. As intriguing as her stories are, they are based primarily on her personal opinion. I would like to read any other personal accounts of the people described, just to compare impressions and understand the their personalities better. I found myself very invested in Harriete's story. I didn't agree with her, or even understand her completely, but I liked her. She wanted to be happy, to be independent, she wanted to be admired but not controlled. Throughout her story she opens up about her feelings, disappointments, amusements, and about her personal relationships. At the same time she never fully says everything, there is an undercurrent of reserve, of hiding how much certain losses affected her. She says what happened, sometimes she shows sadness, but usually with just a blunt acknowledgement of facts. I believe, having finished reading her memoirs, that she had to be strong, move forward, for so long that she can't focus for too long on her past sadness. Harriete talks a lot about her arguements with her families and "protectors". Though occasionally she claims fault and shows regret, overall she believes herself in the right, or less at fault than others. There are a couple of people that she obviously cares about throughout her life, people that Hariette could count on and trust, they are discussed with love and portrayed well. Those who betrayed her trust, left her badly, or hurt her are portrayed in a much more negative or ridiculous light. There is no doubt in my mind that is she is biased, but who isn't when telling their own story? I had to use both the book's biographical notes as well as other research material due to my lack of knowledge of the period, people, and events. A downside to the chatty, confiding air of the book is that the author takes it for granted that the reader will know about the people, places, and events going on around her. These memoirs are a unique look into Regency England. This isn't a book to read if you want to learn specific dates or facts, but it gives an idea of personalities, emotions, and the social day to day interactions of the courtesans and the ton. Even though her facts aren't exact Hariette Wilson was there, she lived in those times, met those people, and experienced that life.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura Leilani

    It was surprising that this was written in the 19th century. In many ways Harry ( Harriette) seems so modern. Her lack of interest in getting married and her firm belief that women should have the same rights to fun as men. She isn't a prostitute. She is what we would call a girlfriend. She decided to write these memoirs as a way, since she was penniless, middle aged, and had been cheated out of her retirement money. Before publishing, she offered all her ex boyfriends a chance to buy themselves It was surprising that this was written in the 19th century. In many ways Harry ( Harriette) seems so modern. Her lack of interest in getting married and her firm belief that women should have the same rights to fun as men. She isn't a prostitute. She is what we would call a girlfriend. She decided to write these memoirs as a way, since she was penniless, middle aged, and had been cheated out of her retirement money. Before publishing, she offered all her ex boyfriends a chance to buy themselves out of her book. I thought this showed class. I did not take this as blackmail, as some people have. I think she was only asking 200£ which is very modest. Sadly, we have no way of knowing who all bought themselves out of the book. What is left though, was really good. Harry isn't sleazy at all in her memoirs. Her writing style is intimate, like sharing secrets with a friend. She was a free spirit! She did not choose her men strictly by money or looks or titles. Once chosen, she was very faithful to them. When marriage was offered, she always declined. She said she liked her freedom too much. She kept her boyfriends until they crossed the line by going to another woman or by not giving her money to live on, then she just moved on to someone else. She liked good looking men, but liked them able to hold a conversation and make her laugh. She abhorred stupid men. She had a crazy sense of humor and was mischievous. One time a guy in his 60's wanted to meet her at a hotel. She was only 18! So she sent her old nurse, who was in her 60's, to meet the guy. He must have been so embarrassed! There were some descriptions of what life was like then; traveling for instance; and life with servants. I would have liked more details in certain aspects of her life, but as she says herself" This is not a complete confession but merely a few anecdotes of my life and some light sketches of the characters of others, with little regard to dates or regularity, written at odd, in very ill health." Anyone who wants to know what life was like in the 19th century for the popular people,( the ton), I would highly recommend this book. There is also a mini dossier in the back, a fascinating intro and sketches and cartoons included.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    From BBC Radio 4: Nancy Carroll stars as Harriette Wilson, one of the most infamous and talked-about women of the early 19th century. Her lovers included aristocrats, adventurers and even the Duke of Wellington himself. And when they all ceased to support her after her retirement, she had a simple bargain for them - 'pay up, and I'll keep you out of my memoirs'. From BBC Radio 4: Nancy Carroll stars as Harriette Wilson, one of the most infamous and talked-about women of the early 19th century. Her lovers included aristocrats, adventurers and even the Duke of Wellington himself. And when they all ceased to support her after her retirement, she had a simple bargain for them - 'pay up, and I'll keep you out of my memoirs'.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jaymi Boswell

    I don't know how or why I came into posession of this book. I took a very long time reading it. I kept it by my bed and would just read a page or two at night. The story itself is charming and cute. I love that period in history. She is the most adorable little tart who always has a new drama to talk about. I don't know how or why I came into posession of this book. I took a very long time reading it. I kept it by my bed and would just read a page or two at night. The story itself is charming and cute. I love that period in history. She is the most adorable little tart who always has a new drama to talk about.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Robin Braysher

    It only took one episode of Bridgerton to make grab this book off my shelf. Harriette is a charming and witty companion who tells a great story. She's not a great author, but this book is an act of revenge and blackmail, rather than an attempt at literature. It is sort of chronological, but I could only identify a few specific periods: 1808, before the Duke of Wellington (or Sir Arthur Wellesley as he was at the time) sailed to the Peninsula for the first time, 1809 when he returned to the Penin It only took one episode of Bridgerton to make grab this book off my shelf. Harriette is a charming and witty companion who tells a great story. She's not a great author, but this book is an act of revenge and blackmail, rather than an attempt at literature. It is sort of chronological, but I could only identify a few specific periods: 1808, before the Duke of Wellington (or Sir Arthur Wellesley as he was at the time) sailed to the Peninsula for the first time, 1809 when he returned to the Peninsula and 1814/15 during Bonaparte's sojourn on Elba and subsequent escape. Most of my reading on the period over the past fifty years has been on the Napoleonic wars, so it's been good to take a look at the 'home front', albeit a rather less respectable view of it than you get from Jane Austen! The war does actually intrude on Harriette's story, inasmuch as it directly affects her when various 'gentlemen' depart for the wars, although there is an extended section relating to the 10th (PWO) Hussars in Brighton, which is interesting. She certainly was a remarkable woman who had quite a degree of independence for those times although, at the bottom of it, she was still reliant on the 'protection' of aristocratic gentlemen who, in spite of all their romantic declarations, could drop her like a ton of bricks, when a 'proper' marriage beckoned. She seems under few illusions, though, and is quite disarming about her mode of life and has a wicked sense of humour; take this example as she describes a handsome admirer: "Really all these things, and thirty thousand a year besides, were enough to melt a heart of stone ...". I suspect I will be joining Wellington back on campaign before too long, but I am unlikely to forget Harriette's description of him as looking like a rat catcher!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Brooke

    Somewhat interesting from an historical viewpoint, only moderately interesting as a narrative (although written well and charmingly). Rich and famous men chase after Harriette and vice versa. She likes some of her sisters and not the others. Think Jane Austen with no plot and more sex. Wilson's actual writing is a good example of the fact that a great deal of description or concrete imagery is not necessary to create interest. The men and women here come alive with only a few deft words — that is Somewhat interesting from an historical viewpoint, only moderately interesting as a narrative (although written well and charmingly). Rich and famous men chase after Harriette and vice versa. She likes some of her sisters and not the others. Think Jane Austen with no plot and more sex. Wilson's actual writing is a good example of the fact that a great deal of description or concrete imagery is not necessary to create interest. The men and women here come alive with only a few deft words — that is the real strength of the book, the people who inhabit it. But with no particular point, it can become tedious after a while. More that anything else, I find this memoir an excellent source as a writer. Not so much for the historical detail, though there is some of that, but for the characters and relationships. Harriette's little observations and insights on personalities are invaluable. There is plenty to steal! As a look into a time, a way of life, and a rather interesting person, Harriette Wilson's memoir is worth reading — and entertaining, as well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    It's a shame Harriette Wilson wasn't discovered as a writer in her youth. It was only when she became famous as a courtesan and published her memoirs that people seemed to care what she wrote. Wilson's writing is witty and funny, although she is, I think, somewhat arrogant about her desirability among men. My only hang-up so to speak was her constant French conversations that she did not bother to translate. I had this problem with the book, The Courtesans, as well. Perhaps the authors assume th It's a shame Harriette Wilson wasn't discovered as a writer in her youth. It was only when she became famous as a courtesan and published her memoirs that people seemed to care what she wrote. Wilson's writing is witty and funny, although she is, I think, somewhat arrogant about her desirability among men. My only hang-up so to speak was her constant French conversations that she did not bother to translate. I had this problem with the book, The Courtesans, as well. Perhaps the authors assume that we, who wish to read about courtesans, can all read French. In Harriette Wilson's defense, since she was living in 19th century England, she probably did believe that all her readers knew at least some French. All and all, I found the book rather entertaining.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jenna Gareis

    Henry Louis Gates Jr. "discovered" this autobiographical novel in 1981. For decades, it was believed to be the first work of published fiction written by a woman of color in North America. It was usurped by a woman named Hannah Crofts after Gate's Jr. "discovered" her novel, A Bondswoman's Narrative. Its original publication predates that of Our Nig and we'll read it as our 2002 selection as that was the year it was rediscovered. Both of our Harriet/tes surprised me but Our Nig surprised me most Henry Louis Gates Jr. "discovered" this autobiographical novel in 1981. For decades, it was believed to be the first work of published fiction written by a woman of color in North America. It was usurped by a woman named Hannah Crofts after Gate's Jr. "discovered" her novel, A Bondswoman's Narrative. Its original publication predates that of Our Nig and we'll read it as our 2002 selection as that was the year it was rediscovered. Both of our Harriet/tes surprised me but Our Nig surprised me most of all. In the story, Mag Smith (why are the downtrodden in these books so often called Maggie? My mind runs to insidious disdain for the Irish but that makes me sad and disappointed in humanity.) finds herself in the difficult position of being an unwed mother. Her child dies and she takes off looking for a place to resettle where no one knows her or her past. It's important to note that Mag is a white woman living in the North because at this point she's going to give in to the love of a kind black man named Jim. He loves her and she'd love to not have to become a beggar and so she marries him. That's right, interracial marriage in an 1859 novel written by a black woman. That's pretty shocking, but it's not what shocked me most! They have two children and then Jim dies. Feeling incapable of sustaining herself and her children financially (hard times to be a woman ya'll!) she takes on one of Jim's business partners as her common-law husband. When it becomes necessary to travel in search of work Mag's husband suggests they leave her daughter, Frado (who, I must confess, I read as Frodo more often than not) with a neighboring white family. On the pretense that she'll only be visiting for a few days Mag does just that, and then never returns for her. Frado lives a strange kind of half-life here. She is frequently beaten, does many of the menial chores, lives in an unfinished room above the kitchen and freely interacts with all the members of the household, attends school, and receives gifts. She is, the reader feels, neither slave nor free. One thing is certain, however, and that is that she not happy. When she turns 18 she is sent to work, sewing, for another poor white family and this seems to be her lot in life - being passed by fate and circumstance from one poor white family to the next, free from being owned by another human being but enslaved to poverty. None of this surprised me though. What surprised me was that the book was not well received in its time. In 1859, it was considered by abolitionists in the north to be a pro-slavery novel. Yes, a pro-slavery novel written by a black woman. See, the novel directly challenges the economy of the north and criticizes it for instituting a type of slavery while parading about with their banner of freedom and equality for all. The north snubbed their noses at this book because it called them out in a most remarkable way. It called direct attention to the problem of poverty - regardless of skin color. It posited that in the bright and shining north - that bastion of freedom - anyone could be enslaved for a lifetime by the cruel reality of economic poverty perpetuated by a social system that relied on the free and unending labour of the poor. Three and a half decades earlier and a continent away - another Harriette was struggling with the possibilities of poverty in her own way. Born into a family of 15 children in Mayfair, London, her father owns a small shop. He was quite fastidious and while they were not poor - they were also not wealthy and the girls "went" to work at quite young ages. If Harriette's memoirs are to be taken at their word (and there is some debate now and was in her own day about how precisely they stick to truth) then Harriette first became a mistress in 1801 at age 15. She would make her living and reputation on these financially lucrative relationships. However, when she reached old age her former suitors stopped paying their arranged dues and so she used the only weapon she had - that mighty pen and paper. She told them all to pay up or become immortalized in her memoirs. It worked with many of these high profile politicians and military men. the likes of The Duke of Wellington and George IV (who begged her not to mention what she knew of his final mistress - not what she knew of him) do not feature although they could have and many of the men that do feature, do not feature kindly. Those who paid what they owed are free from mention. Two different women. Two different time periods. Two different skin colors. Two different continents, both enslaved by societies that provide no clear way for them to be anything other. They both used, to the best of their abilities, any and all tools available to them to work the systems in which they found themselves to their favor as best they could with varying levels of success. It is striking to me though, how so many of the titles I've read thus far center around some sort of poverty-driven oppression. Reading these two Harriettes (1825, 1859), Ourika (1823), A New England Tale (1822), and Such a Fun Age (2020) together in January - demonstrated a 200 year set of bookends of conversations about unique forms of human bondage from the perspective of women. The conversations twists and turns but continues on.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Bettie's Books Bettie's Books

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Jennings

    Oh, wonderful, terrible, hilarious Harriette. Such a readable memoir, affectionate and scathing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Going to DNF this, at least for now, but I still have the book so I can pick it up if I want to again. I really want to get through this book but it is SO LONG. And as a memoir, there's really no structure... I can't tell what the plot is besides a stream of consciousness as Harriette recalls gossip. And it's super depressing. Two of her sisters were also courtesans and one of them hated her (and she hated her back) and they tortured each other. Her sister (and sometimes she and her other friends Going to DNF this, at least for now, but I still have the book so I can pick it up if I want to again. I really want to get through this book but it is SO LONG. And as a memoir, there's really no structure... I can't tell what the plot is besides a stream of consciousness as Harriette recalls gossip. And it's super depressing. Two of her sisters were also courtesans and one of them hated her (and she hated her back) and they tortured each other. Her sister (and sometimes she and her other friends) were also mean to men. They just all seem like villains and I know there's a reason... because they had to be advantageous in who they gave their affections to because they relied on that man to pay for their upkeep... but gosh, it is so depressing to read. Also, I feel so bad for her "ugly friend" Julia who apparently never gets invited anywhere because she's not beautiful! And then the man she was mistress for threw her over after having 9 of his kids?! Ugh there are no HEA's here.

  14. 5 out of 5

    S H

    Think of this memoir as a mix between Mean Girl’s burn book and Sex & the City gossip column. I love all things Regency and always knew that it was the custom for those of the ton to have mistresses, but reading about it from the viewpoint of said mistress was very eye opening. Harriette really was a clever writer and I would have loved it if she could have written more, preferably novels. She was incredibly progressive for her time and I easily saw a lot of 2019 cultural attitude within her pag Think of this memoir as a mix between Mean Girl’s burn book and Sex & the City gossip column. I love all things Regency and always knew that it was the custom for those of the ton to have mistresses, but reading about it from the viewpoint of said mistress was very eye opening. Harriette really was a clever writer and I would have loved it if she could have written more, preferably novels. She was incredibly progressive for her time and I easily saw a lot of 2019 cultural attitude within her pages. I didn’t give it a full 5-stars, just because of the French and constantly having to translate part of the dialogue got old quickly. That being said, she probably wasn’t anticipating someone 200 years later reading her memoir.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Van Leadam

    The memoirs of this successful courtesan are interesting only historically - not because they describe important persons and their private lives but as an early version of tabloid kiss-and-tell nonsense. Who cares about the liaisons of this irritating woman with aristocratic idlers (with the exception of Wellington who despite Wilson's clear dislike from the start comes across rather more humane than the rest)? About the period we learn little and as for the life of a courtesan, I cannot say I h The memoirs of this successful courtesan are interesting only historically - not because they describe important persons and their private lives but as an early version of tabloid kiss-and-tell nonsense. Who cares about the liaisons of this irritating woman with aristocratic idlers (with the exception of Wellington who despite Wilson's clear dislike from the start comes across rather more humane than the rest)? About the period we learn little and as for the life of a courtesan, I cannot say I have managed to form a coherent picture from this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    John Newcomb

    I found it hard work at first, reading a gossip column/kiss and tell about folk I had little knowledge of. However with perseverance, this is a witty and intelligent account of a courtesan's life by a self taught woman writing in the style of Voltaire. I grew to love and admire Harriette and she was as good as her word. Her Wiki entry names four Prime Ministers and the Prince of Wales amongst her lovers, but only two Prime Ministers are named as such, they obviously failed her when she requested I found it hard work at first, reading a gossip column/kiss and tell about folk I had little knowledge of. However with perseverance, this is a witty and intelligent account of a courtesan's life by a self taught woman writing in the style of Voltaire. I grew to love and admire Harriette and she was as good as her word. Her Wiki entry names four Prime Ministers and the Prince of Wales amongst her lovers, but only two Prime Ministers are named as such, they obviously failed her when she requested support. It was not what I was expecting but it was an enjoyable read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I read this a couple of years ago for a paper that I wrote for a class on prostitution (gender history) and enjoyed it immensely. I found it absolutely fascinating to read how Harriette reflects upon herself and her life and to see how she positions herself as an independent woman in a patriarchal society. In general it fascinates me how 19th century courtisanes bended the rules of femininity in their time, constantly trying to find a balance between female virtues and vices.

  18. 4 out of 5

    D.G. Rampton

    I really enjoyed reading this book for research purposes, however, I would not call it a thrilling page turner. The language of the period is a little laborious and the 'in jokes' are 200 years old, and yet there is a charm to Harriette Wilson's writing which stands the test of time. If you're a Regency aficionado, you'll revel in the period detail. I really enjoyed reading this book for research purposes, however, I would not call it a thrilling page turner. The language of the period is a little laborious and the 'in jokes' are 200 years old, and yet there is a charm to Harriette Wilson's writing which stands the test of time. If you're a Regency aficionado, you'll revel in the period detail.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    I just couldn't get through this book and have quit trying. The introduction by Lesley Blanch is very interesting but I think Harriette Wilson and Julia Johnson should have stuck with that which they did best. I just couldn't get through this book and have quit trying. The introduction by Lesley Blanch is very interesting but I think Harriette Wilson and Julia Johnson should have stuck with that which they did best.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Celia Crotteau

    As I mentioned on my Facebook site - an edgy "Pride and Prejudice"! As I mentioned on my Facebook site - an edgy "Pride and Prejudice"!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Harriette Wilson's Memoirs: The Greatest Courtesan of Her Age (Paperback) by Harriette Wilson 1-89879-967-9 bought 10/23/2016 FBL Harriette Wilson's Memoirs: The Greatest Courtesan of Her Age (Paperback) by Harriette Wilson 1-89879-967-9 bought 10/23/2016 FBL

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kristin-Leigh

    It should not have been so much fun to read this! Wilson is pithy, witty, and detailed in her recollection of life in elite society.

  23. 4 out of 5

    else fine

    Only made it halfway through.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Liesl

    This charming book is like a slightly naughty Jane Austen novel.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  26. 4 out of 5

    L

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jordynn Marie Schmitt

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shelle

  29. 5 out of 5

    Scamble13

  30. 4 out of 5

    TeresaFL

  31. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  32. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

  33. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Rosado

  34. 5 out of 5

    siouxzee

  35. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  36. 4 out of 5

    Juliana Philippa

  37. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  38. 5 out of 5

    Katya Littleton

  39. 5 out of 5

    Judith Weshinskey-Price

  40. 4 out of 5

    Annabella

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jo

  42. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

  43. 4 out of 5

    Cherry Ragamuffin

  44. 4 out of 5

    Trish Ward

  45. 4 out of 5

    Gertie

  46. 5 out of 5

    Angelc

  47. 4 out of 5

    Summer

  48. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

  49. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  50. 5 out of 5

    Jodi Ralston

  51. 4 out of 5

    southpaw285

  52. 4 out of 5

    Jady

  53. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Powell

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.