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The Rocketeer and The Rocketeer: Cliff's New York Adventure are collected for the first time as a deluxe, oversized volume. With completely re-mastered art and coloring, Dave Stevens' masterpiece soars off the page as it never has before-and looks as stunningly beautiful as it always should have. This collection contains more than 130 pages of supplemental material: sketche The Rocketeer and The Rocketeer: Cliff's New York Adventure are collected for the first time as a deluxe, oversized volume. With completely re-mastered art and coloring, Dave Stevens' masterpiece soars off the page as it never has before-and looks as stunningly beautiful as it always should have. This collection contains more than 130 pages of supplemental material: sketches, preliminaries, character designs, script pages, photographs, and original art pages, as well as commentary by Dave Stevens and several of his peers, who occasionally assisted him on The Rocketeer. The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures Deluxe Edition was honored with three Harvey Awards and won the 2010 Eisner Award for Best Archival Collection/Project-Comic Books.


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The Rocketeer and The Rocketeer: Cliff's New York Adventure are collected for the first time as a deluxe, oversized volume. With completely re-mastered art and coloring, Dave Stevens' masterpiece soars off the page as it never has before-and looks as stunningly beautiful as it always should have. This collection contains more than 130 pages of supplemental material: sketche The Rocketeer and The Rocketeer: Cliff's New York Adventure are collected for the first time as a deluxe, oversized volume. With completely re-mastered art and coloring, Dave Stevens' masterpiece soars off the page as it never has before-and looks as stunningly beautiful as it always should have. This collection contains more than 130 pages of supplemental material: sketches, preliminaries, character designs, script pages, photographs, and original art pages, as well as commentary by Dave Stevens and several of his peers, who occasionally assisted him on The Rocketeer. The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures Deluxe Edition was honored with three Harvey Awards and won the 2010 Eisner Award for Best Archival Collection/Project-Comic Books.

30 review for The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Down and out pilot Cliff Secord finds a rocket pack in his plane. Will it be his ticket to the big time or a one way trip into a pine box? I saw the movie version of The Rocketeer in the theater in the dim past and liked it quite a bit. After recently watching it on Disney+, I decided it was time to finally read the comics. The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures collects all the Rocketeer material written and drawn by Dave Stevens. Sadly, it's only 148 pages, comprising two long tales and various Down and out pilot Cliff Secord finds a rocket pack in his plane. Will it be his ticket to the big time or a one way trip into a pine box? I saw the movie version of The Rocketeer in the theater in the dim past and liked it quite a bit. After recently watching it on Disney+, I decided it was time to finally read the comics. The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures collects all the Rocketeer material written and drawn by Dave Stevens. Sadly, it's only 148 pages, comprising two long tales and various covers and pinups. The tales in the Rocketeer are both pulpy adventure tales featuring secret agents, government stiffs, heavies, Hollywood phonies, and Cliff's knockout girlfriend Betty. There's also a guest appearance by a certain mystery man disguised as a man about town. The stories are fun but the real star here is the art, naturally. Stevens had a slick style that reminds me somewhat of Alex Toth The art holds up very well despite being almost 40 years old at this point. I have to think the Big Two were courting Dave pretty hard at the time. Also, the guy could really draw a gorgeous dame. Betty was spectacular. Why was she with a mug like Secord anyway? The movie version of Cliff is more likeable than the version presented here. Movie Cliff seems like a naive guy with a good heart. This Cliff is just a couple steps away from being a back robber. I think the story in the movie flows better than either tale in this collection as well. That being said, this was still a fun read and I can see why some people revere it as much as they do. Also, Jennifer Connelly was a great pick to play Betty. The Rocketeer: The Complete Adventures is a gorgeous book. It's a damn shame Dave Stevens didn't produce more Rocketeer material during his time on Earth. Four out of five rocket packs.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I shoulda known something was up when the story opened with a dog fart joke... What the hell was this even about?! Yes, the art is gorgeous, but there is literally no real plot. Nothing in the entire thing made any sense! I kept thinking that somehow everything would tie together at the end, but noooooo. After I finished it last night, I kept flipping through the pages to see if I missed something. Like maybe more pages would magically appear, and the light bulb would go off. Ah-ha! I get it now! I shoulda known something was up when the story opened with a dog fart joke... What the hell was this even about?! Yes, the art is gorgeous, but there is literally no real plot. Nothing in the entire thing made any sense! I kept thinking that somehow everything would tie together at the end, but noooooo. After I finished it last night, I kept flipping through the pages to see if I missed something. Like maybe more pages would magically appear, and the light bulb would go off. Ah-ha! I get it now! As if the whole rocket-pack story line wasn't silly enough, about halfway through this, a circus serial killer is introduced. What the f%#@?! He's going to kill everyone from the old circus troupe, because Teena the midget (no, I'm not making her name up) tried to do a stunt and died? Really?! And then there's the Shadow knock-off who is randomly placed in the middle of everything. Wha..? What did any of that stuff have to do with the rocket? Not that Cliff ever really did anything memorable with his stolen gear. Well, nothing that he wasn't basically forced into doing. He just sort of flew (I'm being generous here) around crashing into stuff. Why the hell did he keep strapping this thing to his back? Why not just give it back to the government? Basically it's the story of a retarded hick who finds a jet pack and won't let it go. For no reason. This is one of the Stupidest Stories Ever. EVER. I can't believe they managed to make a movie out of this! I almost want to go rent it, just to see if it's as idiotic as the book. Gah! *bangs head on desk* It's pissing me off just writing this! 1 star for the beautiful art NO [email protected]$*ing stars for the dumb-ass plot

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jared Millet

    "The Rocketeer" is an infuriating graphic novel, because it makes you realize two things: 1) Dave Stevens is dead, and 2) he didn't produce very many comics when he was alive. As a period-piece pulp action adventure, the Rocketeer is astounding, and the artwork is breathtaking. This was truly one of the great hidden gems of the 80's independent comic scene - a little too well hidden, in my opinion. I was a comic book fiend when the movie came out in 1991, and I didn't learn until years later tha "The Rocketeer" is an infuriating graphic novel, because it makes you realize two things: 1) Dave Stevens is dead, and 2) he didn't produce very many comics when he was alive. As a period-piece pulp action adventure, the Rocketeer is astounding, and the artwork is breathtaking. This was truly one of the great hidden gems of the 80's independent comic scene - a little too well hidden, in my opinion. I was a comic book fiend when the movie came out in 1991, and I didn't learn until years later that it was actually based on a comic. I see that a lot of reviewers on Goodreads complain about the lack of story. The problem is that collecting all the various Rocketeer strips into a single bound volume puts them in the wrong context - that of a unified graphic novel. These started out as 12-page backup comics that appeared in a variety of anthologies from an assortment of publishers, with an incredibly uneven and inconsistent publication schedule. In those conditions, Stevens had no way to know if the "next" chapter following any given issue would even see print, and had to assume that any given chapter was the first that an individual reader had come across. As such, he had to keep the narrative as simple as possible and throw everything he could into the art and the sense of adventure, which he did. The Rocketeer ends abruptly, and it's obvious that Stevens had more stories to tell. Thank God and Dark Horse that the final chapter collected here finally did see print in 1995 (six years after the cliffhanger that led into it) or the Rocketeer may have truly been relegated to the dusty 25c-bins of history.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    I grew up on Disney, and I think I remember seeing The Rocketeer on video as a kid, though I don't remember much about it. Still, as a lifelong fan of pretty much any media associated with the House of Mouse, I saw this at a library near me and decided to pick it up. Boy, was I disappointed. The artwork is gorgeous, but, that's what I've come to expect from comics, as many as I've read. While the content was clean in some areas--as strong as the language gets is "heck"--the lone female character i I grew up on Disney, and I think I remember seeing The Rocketeer on video as a kid, though I don't remember much about it. Still, as a lifelong fan of pretty much any media associated with the House of Mouse, I saw this at a library near me and decided to pick it up. Boy, was I disappointed. The artwork is gorgeous, but, that's what I've come to expect from comics, as many as I've read. While the content was clean in some areas--as strong as the language gets is "heck"--the lone female character is seen in various states of undress, including naked (albeit with critical areas obscured). There was also some blood, and one rather freaky scene involves a theme park ride that is supposed to emulate perdition. None of that seems very Disney-esque; at least, not in the style of the productions with which I grew up. Not only that, but, too many pages of these "complete adventures" are mere filler; alternate covers, postcard artwork, etc. Such material wouldn't be as problematic if this "omnibus" had more actual content, and wasn't such a thin book. As much as I love the House of Mouse--especially their live-action movies and shows--now, I'm debating whether or not I should see the film version of this. Maybe the reason I don't remember it that well was because we turned it off or something.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Classic fun that never got enough love while Stevens was alive.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Arlie

    I don't know that I'd call my self a graphic novel aficionado, but I've certainly read a lot of them. That said, this one doesn't number among my favourites. It seems most people are enthralled with Stevens' art, and while it certainly is 'luscious' (this word comes up many times, including on the back of the book itself'), I found the representation of Betty offensive. Perhaps I'm too much of a feminist or something, but it seemed to me objectification of the female form. Apart from the nudity, I don't know that I'd call my self a graphic novel aficionado, but I've certainly read a lot of them. That said, this one doesn't number among my favourites. It seems most people are enthralled with Stevens' art, and while it certainly is 'luscious' (this word comes up many times, including on the back of the book itself'), I found the representation of Betty offensive. Perhaps I'm too much of a feminist or something, but it seemed to me objectification of the female form. Apart from the nudity, there was also a bit on one of the covers showing her butt with the caption, 'The best side of Betty'. It made me angry, and also made me feel like people must enjoy this kind of thing in comics because they live in their basements and have trouble talking to women in real life. Which I'm sure isn't true. But I prefer to read adventures where women are respected, even if they choose to be scantily clad. I didn't find Secord much of an improvement on Marco (or whatever his name is). They were both just using her. Shallow characters and a shallow plot couldn't provide me with any depth of enjoyment.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Dave Steven's "The Rocketeer" is held in very high regard amongst comic book (or graphic novel if you prefer) aficionados, so this might seem like heresy to some, but the storytelling is paper thin. The art is stunning - no doubt about it - but there isn't that much that is memorable about the actual plot, and no matter how graphically beautiful it may be, it sorely lacks a good story. Sad but true. Dave Steven's "The Rocketeer" is held in very high regard amongst comic book (or graphic novel if you prefer) aficionados, so this might seem like heresy to some, but the storytelling is paper thin. The art is stunning - no doubt about it - but there isn't that much that is memorable about the actual plot, and no matter how graphically beautiful it may be, it sorely lacks a good story. Sad but true.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shazza Maddog

    I had seen the Disney movie many times and really enjoyed it, so when I spotted the collected graphics, I snatched it right up. Cliff Secord is a barnstormer who can't catch a break, except he has an absolutely beautiful girlfriend, Betty, and a terrific mechanic, Peevy. When guys running from the law ditch a weird pack in Cliff's Gee Bee plane, Cliff discovers he's hit a gold mine as well as nothing but trouble. The pack is a jetpack, and Peevy's clever enough to design a helmet that allows the I had seen the Disney movie many times and really enjoyed it, so when I spotted the collected graphics, I snatched it right up. Cliff Secord is a barnstormer who can't catch a break, except he has an absolutely beautiful girlfriend, Betty, and a terrific mechanic, Peevy. When guys running from the law ditch a weird pack in Cliff's Gee Bee plane, Cliff discovers he's hit a gold mine as well as nothing but trouble. The pack is a jetpack, and Peevy's clever enough to design a helmet that allows the person wearing the pack to steer in the sky. Cliff's first attempt to use the pack winds up with him saving a drunken pilot who picked up the Gee Bee and was about to crash it. That attracts the attention of the Russians who stole the pack in the first place, as well as the Feds, who are also trying to find the pack. In the mean time, Cliff's and Betty's relationship is on the rocks, and Betty is considering leaving Hollywood to go to Paris. This is a fun book. The art style is beautiful, and in particular, Betty practically glows. The storyline harkens back to cliffhanger movies, with a science fiction/fantasy leaning, and even a crossover with The Shadow in the second half of the book. Sadly, Dave Stevens, the writer/artist, passed away in 2008, so there won't be more of the Rocketeer. This collection shows how amazing his style was, and he will be missed.

  9. 5 out of 5

    [Name Redacted]

    A brilliant homage to the old movie serials of the 1930s & 40s; the old pulp comics & radio-serials (the Shadow appears, unnamed, as a major character in the second half) of the same era; the late, great pin-up Bettie Page (after whom the character Betty is modeled); and the work of pre-madness Howard Hughes. It's a period piece which proves faithful to its period, so if you can't stand works that don't reflect your modern views and attitudes then I would recommend steering clear. Otherwise, thi A brilliant homage to the old movie serials of the 1930s & 40s; the old pulp comics & radio-serials (the Shadow appears, unnamed, as a major character in the second half) of the same era; the late, great pin-up Bettie Page (after whom the character Betty is modeled); and the work of pre-madness Howard Hughes. It's a period piece which proves faithful to its period, so if you can't stand works that don't reflect your modern views and attitudes then I would recommend steering clear. Otherwise, this is one of the highlights of 20th century comicry, a loving (but not uncritical) tribute to what came before.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    A. Because I will read almost any story-oriented graphic thing between two covers that I find in our library collection. B. Because I saw the movie based on this character in the theater in 1991 or 1992, and while it made little impression, there's still a tenuous connection. A part of me. C. It has pictures. Lots of colorful pictures. D. I gave up on it because it seemed puerile and could barely capture my interest to turn the page. A. Because I will read almost any story-oriented graphic thing between two covers that I find in our library collection. B. Because I saw the movie based on this character in the theater in 1991 or 1992, and while it made little impression, there's still a tenuous connection. A part of me. C. It has pictures. Lots of colorful pictures. D. I gave up on it because it seemed puerile and could barely capture my interest to turn the page.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Reid

    I'll be talking about this one on the podcast this week! I'll be talking about this one on the podcast this week!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Dave Stevens created a really fun comic. The colors are bright, the art is clean and engaging, the characters - though not deep - are fun, and the storylines have the quick, absurd driving forces that made comics fun in the first place. Here's the premise: A down-and-out pilot gets his hand on a rocket pack, has his friend build him a helmet, and then gets into all sorts of trouble with gangsters, Nazis, the US government, and even carnies as he attempts to save his relationship with his Betty P Dave Stevens created a really fun comic. The colors are bright, the art is clean and engaging, the characters - though not deep - are fun, and the storylines have the quick, absurd driving forces that made comics fun in the first place. Here's the premise: A down-and-out pilot gets his hand on a rocket pack, has his friend build him a helmet, and then gets into all sorts of trouble with gangsters, Nazis, the US government, and even carnies as he attempts to save his relationship with his Betty Page look-a-like girlfriend, Betty. The whole thing smacks of the "futuristic" comics of the 30s and 40s, while at the same time keeping a modern day sensibility with its coloring and pacing. Stevens even went so far as to have the actions of the various characters talked about in panels - little action boxes that modern audiences tend to never see, but that were still a welcome sight in this book, as they really helped plant the story in the era it was set in. I was especially a fan of The Rocketeer himself, and his friend Peevy. I heard Peevy's voice immediately, and knew exactly who he was - an older mechanic that stands by his friends and does right by them, because they're friends. And a genius with an engine. Cliff (the man who became The Rocketeer) was a little harder to get right in my mind, but not by much. He's a man who loves to fly and can't imagine living life any other single way, and he'll do what it takes to keep flying. He never loses his feeling of being a regular, vulnerable guy. He just becomes a regular, vulnerable guy with a rocket pack. How can you not like him? The only thing that almost annoyed me at first was Betty. She seemed so absurdly unrealistic it was bothering me a bit. She was drawn the way voluptuous women were always drawn in the 30s and 40s (and in many cases still are - I'm looking at you, superhero comics), with the chest thrust out and the butt thrust back and the back in some uncomfortable looking angle. However, I did a little reading, and discovered that Betty was very specifically modeled after Betty Page, and the point of her was to evoke all of that. Apparently Stevens and Page became friends afterwards, and there was a whole resurgence of public interest in Page because of The Rocketeer. So with that in mind, I was quite willing to roll with Betty being Betty. After all, it did fit. Really, in the end, The Rocketeer is just pure, delightful fun. The colors, the art style, even the dialogue and the way the characters move in the panels, just jumps out at you and takes you along for the ride. It almost made me miss an entire era I was never even alive for. It certainly made me want to read more bright, fun comics. So in conclusion: if you need a break from the dark misanthropic superhero comics that seem to litter the landscape, or if you just want something fun and bright to read, The Rocketeer is right up your alley. Go check it out when you have a chance. You'll be thanking me later.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alger

    One of my all time favorite memories of elementary school was going to see the movie "The Rocketeer" with my friend Kevin Malloy. The saturday matinee serial feel to it was captivating even to a kid who grew up sixty years after that genre of entertainment was popular. As an adult, finding out that it was based off of a comic and reading said comic was like a trip back into the mindset of that awe-struck 8 year old. The stories were just as rich, if not richer given it was the wellspring of the One of my all time favorite memories of elementary school was going to see the movie "The Rocketeer" with my friend Kevin Malloy. The saturday matinee serial feel to it was captivating even to a kid who grew up sixty years after that genre of entertainment was popular. As an adult, finding out that it was based off of a comic and reading said comic was like a trip back into the mindset of that awe-struck 8 year old. The stories were just as rich, if not richer given it was the wellspring of the film, and delivered the whole package of excellence one hopes to find in graphic fictions. I have already attested that the storyline follows the zeitgeist of what the 30's serial was to the most quintessential degree, and truly that is all one needs to say in that respect. What captivates your attention though, and really draws you fully into the intrigue and brilliance of the plot is the artwork of the author, Dave Stevens. If I didn't know that these were written in the 80's I wouldn't believe it. Most of the comic art I have seen from that decade have been decent and common to a certain general style, but the artwork in this series looks more modern like that which is currently seen in comic books. That said, Stevens was far ahead of his time and visionary in the scope of his creation. Possibly the greatest praise I can give any writer, artist, or creator of any discipline, is that they are someone who has the ability to draw from the past with keen fidelity to the bygone, while at the same innovating with their gaze toward the future of their medium. Stevens was one of those visionaries and I truly lament that he is unable to receive the praise he so aptly deserves from people like myself who are just realizing his genius through the legacy of his art in the written and the drawn mediums.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bjoern

    I've always been a fan of the 1991 movie of the same name and fame and so i was very interested when a german comic book publisher announced the first time ever omnibus hardcover edition of the original comic book series. Okay, it's at the upper edge of my usual comic/graphic novel budget but as the book is made up really beautiful it was well worth the price. As to the contents... i was astonished how good much of the art was. Some pictures of Betty e.g. had almost pin up oil painting quality an I've always been a fan of the 1991 movie of the same name and fame and so i was very interested when a german comic book publisher announced the first time ever omnibus hardcover edition of the original comic book series. Okay, it's at the upper edge of my usual comic/graphic novel budget but as the book is made up really beautiful it was well worth the price. As to the contents... i was astonished how good much of the art was. Some pictures of Betty e.g. had almost pin up oil painting quality and many of the panels were not far behind that. Add to this that the story is truly retro-pulp worth of all the 1930s series, comics and fiction books it sees as it's predecessors and great idol the read has been quite an experience. Okay, it's not nobel prize worthy, so what? Comics should not be too text heavy or too heavyset from the storyline as they are a meld between picture stories and texts.This the Rocketeer does masterfully. Finally the background information included in this edition was really interesting. A little bit about the author/artist, some about the said pulp stories that inspired the rocketeer and a little bit about the movie. Okay a little bit cause for grief is also included and that does lie in the german translation... why the heck would ANYBODY want to translate the word "tower" when talking about an airport control center with the german "Turm"? It's never been widespread as equivalent and this is a 2010 edition for pity's sake! there are some other rather annoying faults in the translation, meaning that as a german which knows a little bit of english you can tell what the original meaning of a sentence was before Mr overeager translator got his hands on it, and those have always been my very special pet peeves with books... but as it's maybe six errors in 160 pages it's still on the okay side.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    Stevens writes The Rocketeer as a love letter of sorts to the pulp heroes of the '30s and '40s. I won't pretend to any objectivity here: I love those characters as well. I was lucky enough to have the chance to embrace the likes of Doc Savage and the Shadow at a very young age and my affection for them has never truly waned. I would bet good money that Dave Stevens felt much the same as I do. Like George Lucas before him, whose Indiana Jones movies were a heartfelt homage to the adventure serial Stevens writes The Rocketeer as a love letter of sorts to the pulp heroes of the '30s and '40s. I won't pretend to any objectivity here: I love those characters as well. I was lucky enough to have the chance to embrace the likes of Doc Savage and the Shadow at a very young age and my affection for them has never truly waned. I would bet good money that Dave Stevens felt much the same as I do. Like George Lucas before him, whose Indiana Jones movies were a heartfelt homage to the adventure serials he grew to cherish so much as a child, Stevens uses his creation to pay tribute to the characters who helped shape his creativity. He goes so far as to give the Shadow an unnamed guest-starring role in one of the stories. Stevens' Rocketeer is a joy to read, plain and simple. Every single panel bursts with vitality and humor. The fact that this work was a labor of love could not be clearer. Some readers could have problems with some of the material, I suppose. The cheesecake factor with Betty is unquestionably high. However, Stevens is only continuing the artistic traditions of Alberto Vargas and Gil Elvgren and many others like them who worked in that era. Every depiction of Betty, in whatever state of dress or undress she might be found in, is obviously rendered lovingly (no accident, as she was modeled on the real-life Bettie Page, who ended up befriending Stevens). While concerns about beauty and the objectification of it are certainly valid, I can't imagine the dim spirit a reader must have if they were to encounter this book and come away completely nonplussed. There's just too much to enjoy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christian McKay

    The Rocketeer has not stopped zooming around my brain since I first saw the movie when I was nine years old. Why? That's taken me a while to suss out. Why be obsessed with a superhero who's not so super nor heroic and whose only power is that some toughs accidentally left a rocket pack in his garage? Reading these OG comics gave me some answers. First of all, Cliff Secord is about as human as you can get. He's handsome but he ain't too bright, and all he wants it serious star power so his hottie The Rocketeer has not stopped zooming around my brain since I first saw the movie when I was nine years old. Why? That's taken me a while to suss out. Why be obsessed with a superhero who's not so super nor heroic and whose only power is that some toughs accidentally left a rocket pack in his garage? Reading these OG comics gave me some answers. First of all, Cliff Secord is about as human as you can get. He's handsome but he ain't too bright, and all he wants it serious star power so his hottie centerfold girlfriend won't leave him for a rich photographer. While definitely a unique situation, it feels more relatable than most superhero secret identities. Selfish characteristics aside, I love how fallible the jet pack is. It runs out of gas. It malfunctions. It explodes. It's really difficult to land after taking off. It can easily be stolen by the nazis . . . or the US government . . . or anyone who wants to try it out. I was delighted with the first Iron Man movie whenever Tony Stark's suit shorted out or plummeted or broke into a hundred pieces. The writers were definitely taking notes from Dave Stevens' work. Alas, while the setup is there in The Rocketeer, the story also sort of sputters and plummets shortly after it has taken off. I'd like to see The Rocketeer rebooted with more honest relationships and current international threats. Actually, no. I don't want to see that. I want to write it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Relstuart

    A fun book with great art deco 1930s style time frame. The idea of the character of the Rocketeer was invented by the author when someone told him they had 6 pages available and needed a comic story to fill it. They told him he could do whatever he wanted. So he invented the Rocketeer. He drew the character first and then invented a story to go around him. Interestingly, though this is the whole of the author's work with the Rocketeer there is no end to the story and there are serious plot threa A fun book with great art deco 1930s style time frame. The idea of the character of the Rocketeer was invented by the author when someone told him they had 6 pages available and needed a comic story to fill it. They told him he could do whatever he wanted. So he invented the Rocketeer. He drew the character first and then invented a story to go around him. Interestingly, though this is the whole of the author's work with the Rocketeer there is no end to the story and there are serious plot threads left. The Nazis of the movie are at work but that is not resolved. The actual story probably takes up less than 100 of the pages in this book. And yet, for an obscure character in the last 6 pages of a non-mainstream comic book the Rocketeer won acclaim because of the artwork and the era the author/artist in Mr. Stevens that he was able to evoke with his short stories. Bettie Page, a 50's pin up icon was the ideal behind the Rocketeer's girlfriend. This comic originally came out in the 1980s. It helped revitalize interest in her. The author's efforts on her behalf led to her receiving compensation for her likeness being used on many popular things. Note: the comic does have some fairly racy images of her. Apparently there is talk of Disney doing another Rocketeer movie. I approve of the idea. Can we have Christopher Nolan direct? =)

  18. 5 out of 5

    James

    I was one of the few people who was lucky enough to see the movie when I was a kid, but for the longest time I never knew it was based on a comic. Having read it now I can say that while the film adaption is slightly superior, the comic is well worth your time. First of all, the art by Dave Stevens is gorgeous. His affection for 1940s pin-up art is immeadiately obvious the first time you see Betty, modeled after the queen of pin-ups herself. His action sequences are quite good too and there's a t I was one of the few people who was lucky enough to see the movie when I was a kid, but for the longest time I never knew it was based on a comic. Having read it now I can say that while the film adaption is slightly superior, the comic is well worth your time. First of all, the art by Dave Stevens is gorgeous. His affection for 1940s pin-up art is immeadiately obvious the first time you see Betty, modeled after the queen of pin-ups herself. His action sequences are quite good too and there's a ton of high-flying adventure. The main weakness of the comic is the plot, namely there isn't much of one. You can see the parallels to the plot of the film, but there's no central villian. The second half is a bit stronger even if the plot between Betty and Cliff barely factors into it. I imagine if Dave Stevens got a chance to continue with series he would have kept improving with his plotting, but sadly he was taken from us too soon. Still for only eight issues of Rocketeer, we've gotten a whole lot out of it. From the follow up comics written by greats like Kurt Busiek and Mark Waid, to what is still one of the best comic book adaptions by Hollywood. This is where it all begins, and while there are some rough edges to it you can see how it inspired other people to soar.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    Like many people, I first encountered the Rocketeer through the 1991 movie. The character seemed so pitch-perfect that I took it for granted that he dated back to the golden age of pulp, so it was surprising to find out that his first appearance was as late as 1982. This volume collects the entirety of the all-too-brief comic series, cut short by creator Dave Stevens's death from leukemia at 52. And it's great, my only complaint it that there isn't more of it. The pace is fast, the action excitin Like many people, I first encountered the Rocketeer through the 1991 movie. The character seemed so pitch-perfect that I took it for granted that he dated back to the golden age of pulp, so it was surprising to find out that his first appearance was as late as 1982. This volume collects the entirety of the all-too-brief comic series, cut short by creator Dave Stevens's death from leukemia at 52. And it's great, my only complaint it that there isn't more of it. The pace is fast, the action exciting, and the whole tone of the series is exhilarating and fun. I especially appreciated the sly references to pulp heroes like The Shadow, distinctive horror actor Rondo Hatton, and pinup queen Bettie Page. The artwork, complete with remastered color, is stunning as well. Highly recommended to pulp adventure fans.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marco

    I knew the Rocketeer from his early-nineties movie (which I still like a lot) and the fact that Marvel sued because they once used the name for some characters in a defunct comic book about a then-licensed character they no longer hold the rights to. This volume contains all the stories his creator, the late Dave Stevens, wrote and drew. Stevens did storyboards for Raiders of the Lost Ark and Michael Jackson's Thriller music video, so his art is impeccable (and his style a lot to my liking) and t I knew the Rocketeer from his early-nineties movie (which I still like a lot) and the fact that Marvel sued because they once used the name for some characters in a defunct comic book about a then-licensed character they no longer hold the rights to. This volume contains all the stories his creator, the late Dave Stevens, wrote and drew. Stevens did storyboards for Raiders of the Lost Ark and Michael Jackson's Thriller music video, so his art is impeccable (and his style a lot to my liking) and the stories herein (which amount to...two) not bad, but sadly, it felt all a bit thin.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Wow! I was skeptical about the prospect of seeing these comics with more modern coloring, but I should have had more faith in Dave's choices and the talents of Laura Martin. She did an amazing job of making the books look like I remember them, blending current technology with the classic aesthetic so that it doesn't jar old-time fans while still looking in the now. The bonus pages in this big edition are also a great gift to Dave Stevens fans. Bravo! Wow! I was skeptical about the prospect of seeing these comics with more modern coloring, but I should have had more faith in Dave's choices and the talents of Laura Martin. She did an amazing job of making the books look like I remember them, blending current technology with the classic aesthetic so that it doesn't jar old-time fans while still looking in the now. The bonus pages in this big edition are also a great gift to Dave Stevens fans. Bravo!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Allen Stucker

    I am a big fan of the Rocketeer movie and I wasn't disappointed with the comic that inspired the movie. The story is a rollicking good time including Nazis, circus folk, Doc Savage, and the Shadow. Wow just typing that gave me a little chill. The art is fantastic and the women are gorgeous. This is a great book and I highly suggest you give it a try. I give the story a 5 out of 5 and the art a 5 out of 5. I am a big fan of the Rocketeer movie and I wasn't disappointed with the comic that inspired the movie. The story is a rollicking good time including Nazis, circus folk, Doc Savage, and the Shadow. Wow just typing that gave me a little chill. The art is fantastic and the women are gorgeous. This is a great book and I highly suggest you give it a try. I give the story a 5 out of 5 and the art a 5 out of 5.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    A fun read. I fell in love with the movie when I was a kid and absolutely loved the high flying adventures of Cliff. I like the action of the story...the initial story arc is my favorite of the two stories in this single volume. Stevens' women are beautiful especially Betty. Cliff is an arrogant jealous type which makes him a fun character to read about and see. I wonder if Stevens wrote more about the Rocketeer. A fun read. I fell in love with the movie when I was a kid and absolutely loved the high flying adventures of Cliff. I like the action of the story...the initial story arc is my favorite of the two stories in this single volume. Stevens' women are beautiful especially Betty. Cliff is an arrogant jealous type which makes him a fun character to read about and see. I wonder if Stevens wrote more about the Rocketeer.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tony Calder

    There is a new series of The Rocketeer being published now, but if you're a fan, this is a book you have to own. The stories are ok, they certainly have a pulp feel to them, and Cliff is regularly an arse, but it's the artwork that sets the original series apart. Dave Stevens made this such a joy to read - his artwork is just gorgeous. There is a new series of The Rocketeer being published now, but if you're a fan, this is a book you have to own. The stories are ok, they certainly have a pulp feel to them, and Cliff is regularly an arse, but it's the artwork that sets the original series apart. Dave Stevens made this such a joy to read - his artwork is just gorgeous.

  25. 5 out of 5

    to'c

    A fun little graphic novel and a definite homage to the pulp paperbacks of the 1940s, complete with cameos of nods to, if not the actual, characters from those pulps. You life might not be better for reading it but you'll enjoy the ride. A fun little graphic novel and a definite homage to the pulp paperbacks of the 1940s, complete with cameos of nods to, if not the actual, characters from those pulps. You life might not be better for reading it but you'll enjoy the ride.

  26. 4 out of 5

    JoeK

    Why should it take so long to read a book that has the word count of two short stories? Because it's just so damn beautiful! You could stare at some of these pages for hours. I'm a pulp fiction aficionado. I'd say maybe a quarter of what I read every year originally appeared in pulp magazines (dated from the twenties into the early fifties, not the crappy paperbacks from the fifties onward that people think are pulp thanks to that dink , Quentin Tarantino). Up until 1981, the best of the pulps w Why should it take so long to read a book that has the word count of two short stories? Because it's just so damn beautiful! You could stare at some of these pages for hours. I'm a pulp fiction aficionado. I'd say maybe a quarter of what I read every year originally appeared in pulp magazines (dated from the twenties into the early fifties, not the crappy paperbacks from the fifties onward that people think are pulp thanks to that dink , Quentin Tarantino). Up until 1981, the best of the pulps were relegated to poor reprints, and occasional popular resurgences (like Doc Savage, thanks to the stellar cover paintings by James Bama). In 1981, George Lucas and Steven Spielberg released "Raiders of the Lost Ark", and it changed everything. I didn't even want to go see the movie, it looked like a jungle movie from TV. "It was made by the guy who did 'Star Wars'!" is was what sold me on seeing it. Raiders was just like a Doc Savage book, but live and 3-D. It was amazing, and everything I could hope for in an era action movie. Up until this point, pulp characters had never translated to comic books the way they had to film, but one of the guys who did production art for Raiders changed that. Dave Stevens created The Rocketeer on a whim as a side-project to his real job working in film and animation, but boy did he capture the spirit and look of the times like no one ever has or probably will again. At this time of my life I still had the disposable income of the young and foolish. The owner of the comic shop I frequented told me to look at the latest issue of "Starslayer". I never really liked Mike Grell's work and was underwhelmed when I picked up this issue. The owner told me to look at the back cover. BAM. I really should have bought all the copies he had. Anyway, I could go on and on about this. I read the first story serially as they came out (infrequently by many different publishers) and I bought the subsequent issues, but never had time to do more that give them a quick look. In exchange for an art job for a friend, I asked for a stack of books in lieu of payment. I've read most of those almost immediately on receiving them, but never did more than glance at this volume. Well I finally sat down and read the thing cover-to-cover. It still holds up. Cliff and Betty have a complicated relationship (because they're both young and stupid) and the adventure and subtle cameos really punch it up for us pulp fans. This edition however is quite beautiful. On quality paper, recoloured in a way that could not be printed on cheap comic book paper, and larger that the originals so you can see every detail. This was well worth the wait. Highly recommended for everything that it puts on display. Thanks to all the people who put together this legacy piece for Dave Stevens, who died far too young with too much left to do.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    Cliff Secord is a jerk. Honestly, I spent most of this book kind of hoping our protagonist would fail because his every interaction with other people he is rude, close-minded, denigrating, and generally unpleasant. There's a point where you start to wonder if the 'hero' deserves to win, and Cliff flew by that in the first few pages of the collection. Still, the story is enjoyable, as he finds the rocket pack, stumbles into some high-flying action, and ultimately crosses the country to chase down Cliff Secord is a jerk. Honestly, I spent most of this book kind of hoping our protagonist would fail because his every interaction with other people he is rude, close-minded, denigrating, and generally unpleasant. There's a point where you start to wonder if the 'hero' deserves to win, and Cliff flew by that in the first few pages of the collection. Still, the story is enjoyable, as he finds the rocket pack, stumbles into some high-flying action, and ultimately crosses the country to chase down his love Betty (only to utterly blow it when he finally catches up to her). Honestly, Betty (here an obvious homage to Betty Page) deserves a lot better. The art is crisp and well colored, although it gets a little edgy in its cheesecake presentation of Betty; this isn't quite a family-targeted book. There's a strange crossover in the second series, and some of the plot points don't really make much sense, but the panel-to-panel story is enjoyable enough. As a fan of the movie, this is interesting to see how the character started, but the changes the movie made from this character actually made him more enjoyable; be warned that you won't get the same feel reading this that you did from the film.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Suresh S

    My introduction to the adventures of The Rocketeer was through the lovely movie adaptation by Joe Johnston. Soaking in its nostalgic recreation of the pulpy 30's adventure serials, I was drawn to picking up the source comic book and found it equally entertaining. It is in certain aspects different from the film, mainly in the characterization of the leads. Here The Rocketeer / Cliff Secord is more brash and abrasive (and has notable jealousy management issues) and his girl Betty is a spectacular My introduction to the adventures of The Rocketeer was through the lovely movie adaptation by Joe Johnston. Soaking in its nostalgic recreation of the pulpy 30's adventure serials, I was drawn to picking up the source comic book and found it equally entertaining. It is in certain aspects different from the film, mainly in the characterization of the leads. Here The Rocketeer / Cliff Secord is more brash and abrasive (and has notable jealousy management issues) and his girl Betty is a spectacularly endowed pin-up girl who poses for "artistic photographs", a far cry from the sweet ingénue Jennifer Connelly played. But otherwise it's all here, the adventure, the humor, the thrills, the swinging style. One little niggle is that although this collection has all the comics written by Stevens, they do leave you with a feeling of incompleteness since several characters and plotlines are left for future adventures. But better quality than quantity and for the money this is an excellent buy with good re-read value.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Monsieurh

    THE ROCKETEER has been a reading itch that I have wanted to scratch in a long time. In my much younger days, I was entrapped by a similar figure fighting against evil on TV and older serials. Now to see that Dave Stevens has created his own version -- I was enraptured again. Dave's beautiful art and pulpy fiction set a wonderful tone for the entire run. I immediately recognized, Doc, Monk and the Shadow without any help. Bettie was her beautiful self. Disney's Blu-Ray does the character some jus THE ROCKETEER has been a reading itch that I have wanted to scratch in a long time. In my much younger days, I was entrapped by a similar figure fighting against evil on TV and older serials. Now to see that Dave Stevens has created his own version -- I was enraptured again. Dave's beautiful art and pulpy fiction set a wonderful tone for the entire run. I immediately recognized, Doc, Monk and the Shadow without any help. Bettie was her beautiful self. Disney's Blu-Ray does the character some justice even thought there are a few aspects of changed story line to The Rocketeer's background.It is an enjoyable, nostalgic and fun Chris Secord adventure. Get it and you won't be let down. I wasn't

  30. 5 out of 5

    JohnIV

    Beautiful and lovingly crafted collection of Dave Stevens' Rocketeer! Deluxe Slipcase Edition: This is a beautifully and lovingly crafted collection of Dave Steven's Rocketeer!. I bought the first run towards the end of my comic collecting days in the mid-80s and loved his art. I was delighted to find in this book the New York Adventure which I hadn't known existed; seeing it finish off the original story. The glossy paper quality and coloring in this edition are outstanding too compared to the o Beautiful and lovingly crafted collection of Dave Stevens' Rocketeer! Deluxe Slipcase Edition: This is a beautifully and lovingly crafted collection of Dave Steven's Rocketeer!. I bought the first run towards the end of my comic collecting days in the mid-80s and loved his art. I was delighted to find in this book the New York Adventure which I hadn't known existed; seeing it finish off the original story. The glossy paper quality and coloring in this edition are outstanding too compared to the original work and subsequent collected TPBs. While some may complain about the perceived thread-bare plot, I think it's a rather quaint product that succeeds in mirroring its time of the serials in the late 30s. The art is the star though, especially Betty of course. Lots of preliminary sketches and storyboard layouts and notes from the author. Highly recommended.

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