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Eve Duncan and her adopted daughter, Jane Macguire, are pitted against the members of a secretive cult who have targeted Jane and have decided that she will be their ultimate sacrifice. In eight days they will come for her. In eight days, what Jane fears the most will become a reality. In eight days, she will die. It all begins with a painting that Jane, an artist, display Eve Duncan and her adopted daughter, Jane Macguire, are pitted against the members of a secretive cult who have targeted Jane and have decided that she will be their ultimate sacrifice. In eight days they will come for her. In eight days, what Jane fears the most will become a reality. In eight days, she will die. It all begins with a painting that Jane, an artist, displays in her Parisian gallery. The painting is called "Guilt" and Jane has no idea how or why she painted the portrait of the chilling face. But the members of a cult that dates back to the time of Christ believe that Jane's blasphemy means she must die. But first, she will lead them to an ancient treasure whose value is beyond price. This elusive treasure, and Jane's death, are all that they need for their power to come to ultimate fruition. With Eve's help, can Jane escape before the clock stops ticking?


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Eve Duncan and her adopted daughter, Jane Macguire, are pitted against the members of a secretive cult who have targeted Jane and have decided that she will be their ultimate sacrifice. In eight days they will come for her. In eight days, what Jane fears the most will become a reality. In eight days, she will die. It all begins with a painting that Jane, an artist, display Eve Duncan and her adopted daughter, Jane Macguire, are pitted against the members of a secretive cult who have targeted Jane and have decided that she will be their ultimate sacrifice. In eight days they will come for her. In eight days, what Jane fears the most will become a reality. In eight days, she will die. It all begins with a painting that Jane, an artist, displays in her Parisian gallery. The painting is called "Guilt" and Jane has no idea how or why she painted the portrait of the chilling face. But the members of a cult that dates back to the time of Christ believe that Jane's blasphemy means she must die. But first, she will lead them to an ancient treasure whose value is beyond price. This elusive treasure, and Jane's death, are all that they need for their power to come to ultimate fruition. With Eve's help, can Jane escape before the clock stops ticking?

30 review for Eight Days To Live

  1. 4 out of 5

    Audio Listener

    I think I am also going to give up on Iris Johansen. I really enjoyed Stalemate, Quicksand and Bloodgame. I thought this book would leave off with Joe and Eve dealing with her dead daughter Bonnie. Instead this book seem to be a follow up to Countdown, whichh in my opinion is probbaly Iris Johansen's worst book. Consequently, this one is awful also AND I've only gotten through with a couple of chapters. Iris, if you want to have a series about Jane McGuire, then call it the Jane McGuire series. S I think I am also going to give up on Iris Johansen. I really enjoyed Stalemate, Quicksand and Bloodgame. I thought this book would leave off with Joe and Eve dealing with her dead daughter Bonnie. Instead this book seem to be a follow up to Countdown, whichh in my opinion is probbaly Iris Johansen's worst book. Consequently, this one is awful also AND I've only gotten through with a couple of chapters. Iris, if you want to have a series about Jane McGuire, then call it the Jane McGuire series. Stop sucking your loyal fans into books that are supposed to be about Eve Duncan. She and Joe are more interesting than some young whinny abrasive brat who has now grown up to be a whinny abrasive woman.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I'm giving this book two stars because of my lingering respect for Iris Johansen, but I will say that she needs to step it up or my ratings will start falling to one star and then eventually I'm going to stop reading her. This book involves Eve Duncan but is concentrated on Jane MacGuire, her adopted daughter/friend. I'm pretty sure I wrote the same things about the last Johansen book, but good Lord, was this one hard to get through. Every once in a while Johansen's original, good writing would s I'm giving this book two stars because of my lingering respect for Iris Johansen, but I will say that she needs to step it up or my ratings will start falling to one star and then eventually I'm going to stop reading her. This book involves Eve Duncan but is concentrated on Jane MacGuire, her adopted daughter/friend. I'm pretty sure I wrote the same things about the last Johansen book, but good Lord, was this one hard to get through. Every once in a while Johansen's original, good writing would show up but then the crappy writing would jump back in and take command. Jane MacGuire spends THE WHOLE BOOK lamenting that everything is her fault, she's to blame, she's brought this on everyone, on and on and on. Mix that in with about three males who are completely smitten by her, will protect her no matter what, are devastatingly handsome (and rich), and are constantly reassuring her that it's not all her fault (it is), declaring they'll never let anything happen to her, that she is special, hovering over her while she snaps at them, tells them to go away, but is always calling them back and they come like the faithful servants they are. It's downright annoying. I started rolling my eyes about 8 pages into the book and by the end I was worried they'd be stuck that way. Literally the whole book is the same dialogue between Jane and her man-admirers just using new words. Johansen has some good material in the book but her characters weigh the whole thing down and her dialogue is nearly as bad. And the introduction of a new character, Lina, who is obviously going to be Jock's soulmate and is now bonded with Eve because Eve saved her life - this chick is going to be almost as annoying as Jane. She hates everyone (for good reason, sure) but you want to just smack her a good one. Also it seems that Johansen is going to start mixing in "psychic" goodies. Jane has now realized her penchant for story-like dreams is actually the ability to see the past (and the present - she "dreams" her way into Eve's reality). I think when your characters have gone so far that they are no longer interesting without sprinkling in some psychic abilities, you should close up shop. So my plea to Iris is - if you can't write what you used to, please retire. Maybe it's age that's doing you in, I don't know. But go out while the going is still good, I beg you.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    Ok - so after looking at some of the reviews I know it isn't just the audio book that sucks. This is soooo incredibly bad. I adore - LOVE - Iris Johansen but dude this is horrible. The reader is incredibly whiny. I have no empathy for Jane. I want to slap her. I almost hope the bad guys get her so this book will end. It is all about her. I understand that she is the main character and all that business but wow. Bad. This is 10 discs of bad. I am on the last disc and it hasn't improved. I keep ho Ok - so after looking at some of the reviews I know it isn't just the audio book that sucks. This is soooo incredibly bad. I adore - LOVE - Iris Johansen but dude this is horrible. The reader is incredibly whiny. I have no empathy for Jane. I want to slap her. I almost hope the bad guys get her so this book will end. It is all about her. I understand that she is the main character and all that business but wow. Bad. This is 10 discs of bad. I am on the last disc and it hasn't improved. I keep hoping it will but sadly it hasn't. Since I listen on the way to work, I am surprised I haven't engaged in road rage it is so annoying. To be fair - I have loved most of her other books. Thus it could be the reader. I believe she read another book I listened to - Silent Thunder. I haven't read the reviews of that but I found the main character whiny and annoying as well. And I swear - if I hear about them drinking coffee one more time I will lose it. okaybye Aimee

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erth

    In eight days they will come for her. In eight days, what Jane fears the most will become a reality. In eight days, she will die. It starts with an art show. Jane is exhibiting her paintings at her friend Celine's Paris gallery and having great success. However, one of her paintings - Guilt - has attracted the attention of a cult based on worship of Judas. Though the image of the man in the painting came to Jane in a dream, the cultists recognize it as Judas and feel that she is blaspheming him. In eight days they will come for her. In eight days, what Jane fears the most will become a reality. In eight days, she will die. It starts with an art show. Jane is exhibiting her paintings at her friend Celine's Paris gallery and having great success. However, one of her paintings - Guilt - has attracted the attention of a cult based on worship of Judas. Though the image of the man in the painting came to Jane in a dream, the cultists recognize it as Judas and feel that she is blaspheming him. The only thing that will satisfy them is Jane's death as the annual sacrifice. They give her eight days to live and the deaths start piling up around her. But Jane isn't alone. She is being protected by her old friend Jock and the formidable MacDuff. She also calls in the enigmatic Seth Caleb who has unusual talents and a need for Jane. Jane isn't at all sure about him and their relationship is a prickly one. But Jane will do anything that she has to do to protect the people she loves - especially Eve and Joe.

  5. 5 out of 5

    TJ

    I think I'm going to have to give up on Iris Johansen. Her first books are some of the best I have read. The last few, however, have been standard stock and depressingly formulaic. The plots are exactly the same from book to book and the characters are cookie cutter to the extreme and totally one dimensional. Her men (every single one of them) are strong, tough and pushy with a strong bent towards violence. Her females are ALL harsh, abrasive, blunt but with kind hearts (if you can find them.) In I think I'm going to have to give up on Iris Johansen. Her first books are some of the best I have read. The last few, however, have been standard stock and depressingly formulaic. The plots are exactly the same from book to book and the characters are cookie cutter to the extreme and totally one dimensional. Her men (every single one of them) are strong, tough and pushy with a strong bent towards violence. Her females are ALL harsh, abrasive, blunt but with kind hearts (if you can find them.) In "Eight Days to Live", reoccurring character, Jane McGuire (a favorite of mine in her original books) is beyond the usual harshness, she fluctuates from acting like a spoiled child who stomps her foot and demands her way all the time, to a smart-mouthed adolescent who will say anything just to be contradictory. The most annoying thing about her in this story, however, is that she comes across just plain mean. She doesn't have a kind word for anyone in the entire book! How does one find her a sympathetic heroine when Johansen has written her to be so offensive? The reader ends up feeling sorry for the men in her life, who put their lives on the line to save her only to be criticized and rejected by her. It makes it hard to care what happens and even harder to want to continue reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Annabelle

    This is a preposterous book, although I have read many of her earlier books, where the main protagonist was Eve, a forensic sculptor, and she has a feisty adopted daughter, Jane. She is now the main character, an artist with a show in Paris, who seems to psychically trance and paint pictures that have actually happened. There is a dark psychic guy Caleb who can push thoughts, and there is a lot of sexual tension between them, but no action. There is some ridiculous human sacrificial secret socie This is a preposterous book, although I have read many of her earlier books, where the main protagonist was Eve, a forensic sculptor, and she has a feisty adopted daughter, Jane. She is now the main character, an artist with a show in Paris, who seems to psychically trance and paint pictures that have actually happened. There is a dark psychic guy Caleb who can push thoughts, and there is a lot of sexual tension between them, but no action. There is some ridiculous human sacrificial secret society who worships Judas, and the coins he was paid enter in, plus the highland MacDuff and his former assassin son enter in. Eve and Joe come back. Everyone is fabulously rich and can get the CIA to do anything. I did care about Jane, a bit.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alex is The Romance Fox

    Synopsis: Number-one New York Times bestselling author Iris Johansen delivers a thriller that will chill you to the core: Eve Duncan’s adopted daughter Jane has been targeted by a mysterious cult who has decided that she has only eight days to live Eve Duncan and her adopted daughter, Jane Macguire, are pitted against the members of a secretive cult who have targeted Jane and have decided that she will be their ultimate sacrifice. In eight days they will come for her. In eight days, what Jane fea Synopsis: Number-one New York Times bestselling author Iris Johansen delivers a thriller that will chill you to the core: Eve Duncan’s adopted daughter Jane has been targeted by a mysterious cult who has decided that she has only eight days to live Eve Duncan and her adopted daughter, Jane Macguire, are pitted against the members of a secretive cult who have targeted Jane and have decided that she will be their ultimate sacrifice. In eight days they will come for her. In eight days, what Jane fears the most will become a reality. In eight days, she will die. It all begins with a painting that Jane, an artist, displays in her Parisian gallery. The painting is called “Guilt” and Jane has no idea how or why she painted the portrait of the chilling face. But the members of a cult that dates back to the time of Christ believe that Jane’s blasphemy means she must die. But first, she will lead them to an ancient treasure whose value is beyond price. This elusive treasure, and Jane’s death, are all that they need for their power to come to ultimate fruition. With Eve’s help, can Jane escape before the clock stops ticking? My thoughts: Eve Duncan has found a way into my heart from the moment I read The Face of Deception,, the 1st book in the Eve Duncan Series and I have become very attached to her and her family – I have seen her pain, her loss, her determination to find the body of her murdered daughter, Bonnie, and comforted in knowing that her relationship with Joe Quinn, which started in friendship has grown into love and them being together. Eight Days to Live, the 10th book in the series is Jane Maguire’s story and what a fabulous protagonist she turns out to be. The adopted daughter of Eve and Joe, she is now an up and coming artist, who has matured into a headstrong ,complex, beautiful, unpredictable and independent woman who just seems to draw mystery and intrigue into her life. From the first sentence - “She was laughing, Jack Millet thought, enraged. Even as Jane MacGuire had left the sidewalk café a lingering smile had remained on her lip” - I was so into the story that I couldn’t put the book down. The plot is intriguing, fast paced, filled with characters both good and evil, artifacts from the time of Jesus, incredible settings, romance, murders, mysterious religious cults that have you wanting to keep reading and reading. Jane has an exhibition of her paintings in Paris which will result in her and her friends and family being targeted to die by a mysterious group called Sang-Noir (I have to admit that at times the similarities between the fanatical quasi-religious group did remind me in a small way of Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code). It’s one of her paintings, Guilt, that she had dreamt about that will cause her to unravel the mystery in eight days before she’s captured and used as a human sacrifice in some kind of Judas fanatics. It becomes an incredible journey for Jane. Helping her is MacDuff, who lives in a castle in Scotland and believes she’s related to him, Jock Gavin with a very close connection to her and Seth Caleb, the mysterious, gorgeous and intriguing “hunter” who she first met when he helped Jane with a case in the previous book, Blood Games. It becomes such an incredible path for these three, joined by Eve, who is ultimately used as bait, Joe helping in the background, Millet, who has to be one of the most evil characters ever, Lina, translator of ancient writings and friend of Seth . You recognize the characters you have met along Eve’s journey and have grown to know and love. Travelling from England, Scotland, Switzerland, Syria and Israel, into mystical and biblical places, discovering what may be a relic that could cause controversy to the Catholic faith, the paranormal mystery is revealed making you realize that you had been holding your breath for a very very long time. At times the plot moved so fast that I felt a sense of unreality. What will happen next? I kept asking myself. How will they get out of this situation? Yes, Seth & Jock helping Jane ensured that she would not be the sacrifice for April 1. I loved seeing the growing relationship between Seth & Jane. He has fascinated me from the first time I met him. Who is he? What’s his story? I am so eager to know more about him and how he and Jane will be together – yes she still has commitment and trust issues – but the dream sequence at the end…omg…it was so fabulous and so incredible. I found Lina a very interesting character and somehow I think that we will have more of her and what I felt was something growing between her and Jock, who I really have grown to love. He’s such a beautiful and I think flawed character but I see a real deep soul there. This is another page-turner in the series and I absolutely loved it and I do hope Jane will continue in Eve’s life. Iris Johansen has been and will always be one of my favorite authors and I can’t wait for her next book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    Eight Days To Live, the next installment in the Eve Duncan series, takes a step back from the tale of Eve and Joe and focuses on a thrilling cat-and-mouse chase involving Jane Macguire, their daughter. Jane is being focused on in an art show in Paris when her friend and gallery owner Celine is brutally murdered. A personal threat is delivered to Jane the same evening and only the appearance of her old friend Jock Gavin keeps her safe. With a little investigation, Jane discovers than an ancient c Eight Days To Live, the next installment in the Eve Duncan series, takes a step back from the tale of Eve and Joe and focuses on a thrilling cat-and-mouse chase involving Jane Macguire, their daughter. Jane is being focused on in an art show in Paris when her friend and gallery owner Celine is brutally murdered. A personal threat is delivered to Jane the same evening and only the appearance of her old friend Jock Gavin keeps her safe. With a little investigation, Jane discovers than an ancient cult is targeting her for a blasphemy that they feel she commited when she painted a particular painting that was on display. This group is incredibly powerful and will stop at no costs to kill Jane and those she loves as a punishment to her unless she can defeat them first. This novel was a wonderful addition to the Eve Duncan series. Johansen takes the focus off of Eve and Joe for the first time in several books and it is a welcome distraction from their storyline which was beginning to feel a bit tiresome at best. Jane Maguire, their adopted daughter, is our leading lady and she is a terrific character. Both strong and beautiful, Jane is a well-rounded young woman who radiates power. Her relationships with the people surrounding her are honest and intelligent making her intriguing at all times. The supporting cast to this lovely heroine was fantastic as well. Some of our old favorites from previous books, namely Jock Gavin, Seth Caleb and our Laird MacDuff, are all present and accounted for to rally around Jane in her time of need. Visiting with these characters was like meeting old friends for a much-needed cup of coffee. They are engaging and charismatic driving the fast-paced plot with ease. A variety of locations make the settings in this book fun and the twists in the plot leave a reader guessing until a volatile climax at the end which is more than satisfying. Overall, I would highly recommend this book to fans of Johansen's series with the disclaimer that Johansen is back to her old form with this engaging read!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

    Courtesy of CK2S Kwips and Kritiques While I enjoyed Eight Days to Live, it did not quite live up to my expectations for a Johansen novel. Also be forewarned, while this book is billed as an Eve Duncan novel, it is really all about Jane. Eve plays such a small role it shouldn’t be classified as part of that series. After a successful art show in a Parisian gallery owned by a friend, Jane MacGuire is about to receive the surprise of a lifetime, and not a good one at that. A chilling portrait titled Courtesy of CK2S Kwips and Kritiques While I enjoyed Eight Days to Live, it did not quite live up to my expectations for a Johansen novel. Also be forewarned, while this book is billed as an Eve Duncan novel, it is really all about Jane. Eve plays such a small role it shouldn’t be classified as part of that series. After a successful art show in a Parisian gallery owned by a friend, Jane MacGuire is about to receive the surprise of a lifetime, and not a good one at that. A chilling portrait titled Guilt painted by Jane has attracted the unwanted attention of a dangerous cult who swears Jane only has Eight Days to Live. Not allowing something like a death threat to get in her way, Jane is determined to get to the bottom of the mystery and find these people who killed her friend and promised Jane to be next. Enlisting the help of John MacDuff, Jock Gavin, and Seth Caleb, along with her adoptive mother Eve Duncan, Jane is on an adventure across Europe and deep into the heart of Biblical legends and truths on a search for a priceless artifact that could turn the religious world upside down and inside out. The action was every bit as evident as always expected from a thriller by this author, and all of the major players are just as well rendered as usual. However, I feel like a few too many recurring characters were brought back, only confusing some of the story. I had a heck of a time remembering which of Jane’s men was in which scene and had what skills. I loved the mystery we are brought into in Eight Days to Live. It was thrilling and chilling, and more than a bit frightening in some parts. I was quite fascinated by the different portrayal Iris Johansen has of a few key players from the time of the birth of Christianity. Even more compelling and terrifying is how the cult has twisted ancient beliefs to suit their own desires and traditions. In spite of that, however, Eight Days to Live, while keeping me captive until I completed the novel , just didn’t quite meet my expectations. Jane was getting on my nerves very early on in the novel, with her refusal to listen to anyone’s advice and her stubbornness in doing things her own way, even when it puts everyone she cares about in danger. Jennifer van Dyck does a wonderful job, as always of performing Eight Days to Live. While she is a newer narrator to me, my first audio book she read only a couple years ago, she has fast become a favorite of mine. She has excellent timing and has distinctive voices for each character in the book. © Kelley A. Hartsell, August 2010. All rights reserved.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Wilson

    I am nearly ready to give up on Iris Johansen. Eight Days to Live features Jane MacGuire, the now-young woman who was taken in by Eve Duncan in Johansen's earlier works. The plot keeps things just interesting enough for one to be willing to endure the banal dialogue between nearly all the characters, especially between the principal players: Jane, Seth Caleb and Jock Gavin. Jane is now on the brink of stardom as an artist, with an unusually strong opening in her first solo gallery display. Atten I am nearly ready to give up on Iris Johansen. Eight Days to Live features Jane MacGuire, the now-young woman who was taken in by Eve Duncan in Johansen's earlier works. The plot keeps things just interesting enough for one to be willing to endure the banal dialogue between nearly all the characters, especially between the principal players: Jane, Seth Caleb and Jock Gavin. Jane is now on the brink of stardom as an artist, with an unusually strong opening in her first solo gallery display. Attention has been drawn to one of Jane's paintings in particular, Guilt, which she painted from her recurring dreams. Apparently, a religious cult believes that she has trespassed against their beliefs and must now face the consequences of those actions. Johansen teases us with laying the groundwork for a truly fascinating character in Jock, but then she manages to hide him even when he is in the scene. We yearn for the development of the relationship between Jock and Jane, or at least more banter between him and the mysterious Caleb. The author does succeed a little in letting the reader appreciate Lina Alsouk, a translator in Switzerland who just happens to keep an AK-47 around for protection. Adah Ziller is intriguing as well, with a history of double-crosses and her power of persuasion--the only trouble is that we only get to know her character after she's dead. One would think that the locales in Eight Days to Live, which include Paris, the Scottish isles, the Swiss Alps and excursions to the Holy Land would yield impressive descriptions. Here again, Johansen fails to even adequately set the scenes, letting the bland characters wallow in their bland surroundings. The plot would draw favorable comparisons to that of Dan Brown's Angels & Demons and The Da Vinci Code, but there is simply not enough detail or color in this book to come within a couple of brushstrokes of those flawed but enjoyable works.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Danica

    Even though this is considered part of the Eve Duncan series, this was told through the eyes of Jane, similar to some of the other books in this series. I almost like it better when it is told through her perspective, it gives it a different feel to the narrative. However, Iris Johansen got a little too weird for me in this book. In a previous novel she had made reference to a character with psychic powers who then released those powers onto another character (don't want to spoil anything), and Even though this is considered part of the Eve Duncan series, this was told through the eyes of Jane, similar to some of the other books in this series. I almost like it better when it is told through her perspective, it gives it a different feel to the narrative. However, Iris Johansen got a little too weird for me in this book. In a previous novel she had made reference to a character with psychic powers who then released those powers onto another character (don't want to spoil anything), and although it was weird and out of the loop I thought it would end there. In this book, she took it even further and it reminded me of the powers the characters in Twilight have and I just felt it didn't have a place in this crime fiction series. I don't object to fantasy books, I just don't feel that it fits right in this series which has a definite emphasis on practical,level-headed women. I also found the relationship between Jane and Caleb to have a whole lot of build up that resulted in a whole lot of nothing. I can only assume that it will carry on to another book, but for now it's just annoying. Overall, I rate it highly because I do appreciate the Jane viewpoint and I do still feel attached to the series and the characters in it (it is book #10 after all, how could I not?).

  12. 5 out of 5

    VLynch

    Good story, Great characters. I really like Caleb. But I have to admit, I am just not into the chase the historical item around the world readers. To Indiana Jones for me. So, if you like that kinda of book, this is an excellent book. The writing is great, and fast pace. The subject matter for me, is the only issue.

  13. 4 out of 5

    AudreyLovesParis

    Utterly unreadable. I feel sorry that trees were killed in the making of this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer G

    Only read this if you like thrillers with paranormal content. The story itself was fine, but one of the characters can see what is going on to other people in her dreams. And another character can kill people with his mind. That just ruined the book for me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bmquiram

    First book by iris Johansen that I have read. I hesitated to read it based on other reviews but I am so glad that I did. If the rest of her novels are even better like many reviewers stated, that I can't wait to read more of her work . First book by iris Johansen that I have read. I hesitated to read it based on other reviews but I am so glad that I did. If the rest of her novels are even better like many reviewers stated, that I can't wait to read more of her work .

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marla

    This series is jumping the shark. We some how went from a forensic sculptor to vampires and remote viewing dreams, and in between books featured talking to ghosts and finding the dead. Warning: This book is about Jane Macguire, not Eve Duncan. I have relegated this series to audio reads. I am not particularly fond of this narrator. Every sentence is so dramatic and menacing, I think it would help to have a male and female narrator. Worst, the villains and Seth Caleb all spoke slowly with drama, i This series is jumping the shark. We some how went from a forensic sculptor to vampires and remote viewing dreams, and in between books featured talking to ghosts and finding the dead. Warning: This book is about Jane Macguire, not Eve Duncan. I have relegated this series to audio reads. I am not particularly fond of this narrator. Every sentence is so dramatic and menacing, I think it would help to have a male and female narrator. Worst, the villains and Seth Caleb all spoke slowly with drama, in the same manner as the main villain calling to his overzealous followers. I also don't like Eve and Jane thinking they know best and rushing into what they feel like doing instead of considering safety or the ramifications of their unskilled presence. (view spoiler)[ Jane going to Roland's office was a stupid taunt. Then Jane thinking she needs to save Caleb was impetuous and silly. (hide spoiler)] The story of Jane having a deadline with death reminded me of Countdown where someone was hunting Jane. I used to really like this series, but I've been disappointed in the last several books. The good news is that Montalvo wasn't turning Eve's head and Joe and Eve weren't having marital issues. I don't like Jane and Eve rushing into danger without thinking. And this romantic suspense mystery has started introducing a mismatched variety of paranormal characters and abilities, sometimes it is major characters having undiscovered abilities. I could accept one person maybe having some paranormal ability, but it feels like Ms. Johansen is searching for things to keep us interested. I am going to take a break from this series, I'm tired of yelling at Eve and Jane for doing stupid things. Likes: * Because this book was about Jane, Montalvo love triangle wasn't in play & there was no dwelling on Bonnie * Jane is a successful artist * Jane's gallery owner and friend * Jane loving Eve Duncan & Joe (view spoiler)[ * Jock Gavin showing up with perfect timing * Lina being a interpreter extraordinaire * Lina's AK-47 * Judas coins were cool story element * Certain people quagmire to Seth Caleb's ability * Seth helping Jane sleep * 2 other coins given to freed Slave, Dominic * 2 missing coins supposedly mixed in with McDuff's treasure * Cult used sacrifice to get rid of rivals or enemies * Samson reference to destroying the temple (hide spoiler)] Dislikes: * Eve Duncan series, but really about Jane Macguire * Not enough romance * Never heard how Jane and Mark Trevor broke up * Adah Ziller's twisted sexual exploits and unsavory schemes * Judas made the ultimate sacrifice to enable Jesus to save the world * Judas feeling guilty is blasphemy to his cult * Religious cult dedicated to the martyrdom of Judas was distasteful * How Judas became a deity figure eclipsing Jesus and God was never really explained (view spoiler)[ * Seth Caleb is a vampire, can manipulate blood and conveniently influence people and read their minds * Seth Caleb would be cool if he was just a dangerous and sexy guy, this paranormal stuff is unnecessary * Seth is interested in Jane and she tingles when he makes suggestive remarks * Yearly human sacrifice, for what purpose? * Ritual sacrifice killings honored Judas * Little too convenient timing over and over again * Jane and Eve doing stupid, impulsive things * Didn't really feel the suspense about the countdown * Jane progressing from historic dreams to finding Eve in current time was a huge stretch (hide spoiler)] With-reservations: language, violence, murder, kidnapping, religious cult, sexual situation and innuendos

  17. 5 out of 5

    Toni

    Many of the other reviews have said this was the worst they've read from this author, but I thought it was good. If this was her worst, I will definitely read more from her. It had some supernatural and/or psychic elements that I think bothered people, but I like that genre also, so this was right up my alley. It wasn't what I was expecting based on her usual genre label, but like I said, I liked that aspect. I hope the main characters get a spin-off series of their own, outside the Eve Duncan s Many of the other reviews have said this was the worst they've read from this author, but I thought it was good. If this was her worst, I will definitely read more from her. It had some supernatural and/or psychic elements that I think bothered people, but I like that genre also, so this was right up my alley. It wasn't what I was expecting based on her usual genre label, but like I said, I liked that aspect. I hope the main characters get a spin-off series of their own, outside the Eve Duncan series. I would read a follow-up story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Where to start? Reading the Eve Duncan books are like watching the movie 2012 for me. I loved the movie! I thought it was thrilling and very fast paced and it kept my attention through the whole movie. However, throughout the whole movie, my husband and I were saying "yeah, right" and "how lucky can you get"? That is exactly how I feel about this book. It grabbed me from the very first sentence. I was totally into the book and nothing could distract me once I started reading. But, through the wh Where to start? Reading the Eve Duncan books are like watching the movie 2012 for me. I loved the movie! I thought it was thrilling and very fast paced and it kept my attention through the whole movie. However, throughout the whole movie, my husband and I were saying "yeah, right" and "how lucky can you get"? That is exactly how I feel about this book. It grabbed me from the very first sentence. I was totally into the book and nothing could distract me once I started reading. But, through the whole book I am thinking, "wow...how lucky can you get" or "how many times can you escape death that closely"? It was crazy how many times Jane MacGuire almost gets herself killed and at the last moment, escapes. It's also frusterating to me how spoiled and childish Jane acts (much like Eve Duncan in previous books). She has no thought for those who care about her. Everything is her fault and so she is the one (and the ONLY one) who can fix it and so she constantly is putting herself into danger. So, while I thought the book was fast paced, exciting and thrilling, I was not impressed with the childishness of the characters and the total unbelievability of the storyline.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marti

    The subtitle of this is An Eve Duncan Foresnsics Thriller. It is a thriller in some places, but Eve Duncan and her husband Joe are not in much of it. Instead, the book focuses on their adopted daughter, Jane MacGuire, a promising and talented artist. Early on, in Paris, the owner of the gallery where Jane's works have been hanging is crucified, and her sister decapitated. Things slow down for a while, and a number of deadly men threaten Jane because of a particular painting that she has done. Ja The subtitle of this is An Eve Duncan Foresnsics Thriller. It is a thriller in some places, but Eve Duncan and her husband Joe are not in much of it. Instead, the book focuses on their adopted daughter, Jane MacGuire, a promising and talented artist. Early on, in Paris, the owner of the gallery where Jane's works have been hanging is crucified, and her sister decapitated. Things slow down for a while, and a number of deadly men threaten Jane because of a particular painting that she has done. Jane has two rather talented and deadly men to guard her as she figures out some prophetic dreams and travels to interesting places. In this book, at least, I find Jane not to be as interesting a character as Eve Duncan--she seems one dimensional, cardboard, or cookie cutter. On page 217 of the hardcover edition, she pronounces, "With knowledge comes understanding." I almost had the impression that Iris Johansen needed another rewrite of this.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Barbara ★

    I really enjoyed this though it was more like a James Rollins or Dan Brown religious adventure than an Eve Duncan forensic mystery. Eve and Joe Quinn are very much in the background and I really don't think this should be included in the Eve Duncan series. Eve's adoptive daughter is targeted by a whacked out religious cult following the teachings of Judas. Jane's painting of Judas led the cult straight to her and now she has eight days to live. Jane enlists assassin Seth Caleb to help along with I really enjoyed this though it was more like a James Rollins or Dan Brown religious adventure than an Eve Duncan forensic mystery. Eve and Joe Quinn are very much in the background and I really don't think this should be included in the Eve Duncan series. Eve's adoptive daughter is targeted by a whacked out religious cult following the teachings of Judas. Jane's painting of Judas led the cult straight to her and now she has eight days to live. Jane enlists assassin Seth Caleb to help along with Jock Gavin and McDuff. It's a wild adventure spanning the globe (England, Jerusalem, Syria, Damascus, Scotland and Georgia) with lots of action and sexual tension between Jane and Seth. Seth's psychic gifts scare Jane half to death but it doesn't stop her from wanting him.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    If you're expecting a true Eve Duncan Forensics Thriller, this isn't one of them. The story itself was ok, but I was disappointed. And, I wish I had a dollar for every time they used the word bastard. I'd be heading out for a nice fancy dinner to celebrate the ending of the book :) haha! Anyway, I guess my rating may be skewed low because of my expectations of what I wanted to get out of it. The story is not about Eve, or Joe, or Bonnie. It's all about Jane. But, Eve & Joe are in it just enough If you're expecting a true Eve Duncan Forensics Thriller, this isn't one of them. The story itself was ok, but I was disappointed. And, I wish I had a dollar for every time they used the word bastard. I'd be heading out for a nice fancy dinner to celebrate the ending of the book :) haha! Anyway, I guess my rating may be skewed low because of my expectations of what I wanted to get out of it. The story is not about Eve, or Joe, or Bonnie. It's all about Jane. But, Eve & Joe are in it just enough to call it an "Eve Duncan Forensics Thriller". Others may enjoy the story for what it is.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This book was just okay. I like the fact that it was about Jane instead of the another story about Eve trying to find Bonnie's bodyand I like the male characters but there were things that happened that were just too unbelievable. I am willing to keep an open mind about the psychic stuff but the coins that survived intact from the time of Judas? Please. I haven't been wowed by one of her books in a while. This book was just okay. I like the fact that it was about Jane instead of the another story about Eve trying to find Bonnie's bodyand I like the male characters but there were things that happened that were just too unbelievable. I am willing to keep an open mind about the psychic stuff but the coins that survived intact from the time of Judas? Please. I haven't been wowed by one of her books in a while.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tamlyn

    Another disappointing read. This is NOT an Eve Duncan book; this is about her adopted daughter and some outrageous mystery of why she is being hunted. I only finished it because I like the Caleb character. But this was a completely unbelievable story and I didn't even like Jane's character. Another disappointing read. This is NOT an Eve Duncan book; this is about her adopted daughter and some outrageous mystery of why she is being hunted. I only finished it because I like the Caleb character. But this was a completely unbelievable story and I didn't even like Jane's character.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vannessa Anderson

    Eight Days to Live had the potential of being a five star rated book but I found the elements of surprise and maturity of the characters lacking, and though these elements are lacking, Eight Days to Live is still worth reading.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Chávez

    One of my favorite thrillers! This book is very rich in imagery and biblical references from a nonsectarian perspective. Easy to follow regardless of whether you've followed Johansen's Eve Duncan series or not (although it'll definitely make you want to read her other books). One of my favorite thrillers! This book is very rich in imagery and biblical references from a nonsectarian perspective. Easy to follow regardless of whether you've followed Johansen's Eve Duncan series or not (although it'll definitely make you want to read her other books).

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    Okay, here it is: My least-favorite Iris Johansen novel to date. Aren't you excited? As much as I disliked Jane MacGuire in "Countdown," I outright hated her in this book. Look, it takes me a lot to hate a heroine. I didn't even hate Bella from "Twilight" or Ana from "Fifty Shades of Grey." Now, Bella and Ana were kind of boring. And Johansen is definitely a more skilled writer than Stephenie Meyer and EL James. But Jane is all of the other Johansen heroines combined and put on steroids. Jane is o Okay, here it is: My least-favorite Iris Johansen novel to date. Aren't you excited? As much as I disliked Jane MacGuire in "Countdown," I outright hated her in this book. Look, it takes me a lot to hate a heroine. I didn't even hate Bella from "Twilight" or Ana from "Fifty Shades of Grey." Now, Bella and Ana were kind of boring. And Johansen is definitely a more skilled writer than Stephenie Meyer and EL James. But Jane is all of the other Johansen heroines combined and put on steroids. Jane is obnoxious. In "Eight Days to Live," Jane has painted a portrait she called "Guilt." When it's displayed at one of her shows in Paris, someone offers to pay a tremendous price to buy it. Jane declines, however, and shortly after, her agent and dear friend is found dead, pinned to Jane's door like a butterfly (hence, the book cover). As it turns out, there is a massive cult who recognizes and reveres the man in the picture Jane painted, and consider the title she gave the portrait to be blasphemous. Jane has eight days to get to the bottom of everything and take down the cult leaders before she is sacrificed on their altar. We're graced with the presence of several...um....beloved characters from previous books in this *cough* riveting tale. Honestly, this book could have been good. I'm fascinated by cults, and also by the historical character who is featured in "Eight Days." Sadly, Iris Jo picked the least likable heroine and love interest to star in this one. Yes, Seth Caleb is back, and he's just as disgusting and terrible as he was in "Blood Game." You know, the one where he forces Jane to feel sexually attracted to him without her consent? We also get to see Jock and MacDuff, because where Jock goes, MacDuff goes as well. I thought, at first, that Johansen was toying with the idea of pairing up Jock and Jane. Apparently, though, she just couldn't stand the thought of a woman being with a man her own age, and decided that Caleb's the better match. Jane is even more unbearable in this book than she was in "Countdown." She insists on being involved in every part of the plan to take down the cult. She refuses to let the people with more experience and skills be the ones to endanger their lives. She berates herself furiously for grieving like a normal person over her friend's death. Seriously, she's so shocked and disgusted with herself for crying that you'd think she was considering killing a toddler. I don't mind people who feel embarrassed for showing their emotions, but she's so angry--it's obvious she thinks only weak women cry. Here's the clincher, though: Along the way, they meet another "Strong Female Character" who, like Jane, is out for bloody revenge. But when she says she wants to risk her own life? NOPE. Jane won't let her. Jane is like "LIKE HELL I'LL LET YOU GO OUT THERE ALL ALONE AND GET YOURSELF KILLED." Jane, SHUT UP. She is exactly like you. If you're going to insist that people "respect" you enough to make your own decisions, you need to respect theirs, too. So on top of being obnoxious and rude, she's a hypocrite, too. I really wish Seth Caleb would die. I know that sounds mean, but he's a piece of human garbage. He clearly gets off torturing people--it's okay, somehow, when it's a "good guy" doing it--and even Jane is horrified by his actions. He has some sort of "gift" that enables him to make people feel whatever he wants them to feel, including pain. He seems to be able to have some effect on their bodies, too. You see him do this in both "Blood Game" and "Eight Days," although a bigger deal is made of it in this book. I will never understand why such sadistic bastards are portrayed as sexually desirable. I would be terrified of a man like Seth, but of course, Jane wants him. The next couple of issues I have with the book are spoilers. (view spoiler)[There's a dead woman Jane has to disguise herself as in order to access her Swiss bank account. I'm only putting this underneath a spoiler cut because the book makes a big deal out of it, but it turns out she was black. Now, if Seth's powers are so amazing, Johansen could have written him just convincing the guards that Jane was the dead woman, and left it at that. But no, they actually have Jane darken her skin to resemble the dead woman. I wasn't fond of this when Imriel did it in "Kushiel's Mercy" (different author), but at least that was a parallel universe. In "Eight Days," Jane is wearing actual blackface to impersonate a dead black woman. Gross. Finally--and this is the worst thing I've seen in any of Iris Jo's books that is portrayed as totes okay--Seth dream-rapes Jane at the end of the book. And no, I don't mean that she dreams about him raping her. Well, she does, and it's not treated like rape, but basically, Seth invades this lucid dream she has, where both of them can control their actions. The two of them are naked and turned on, and then Seth gets ready to have sex with her. Jane starts "Wait, I don't--" and Seth completely ignores her and penetrates her anyway. This is rape. Hearing someone express a concern and ignoring them, continuing sex when they said to stop, is rape. I know we don't know exactly what Jane was going to say. It probably had nothing to do with "I don't want to have sex with you." But there's no way Seth could know that. And even if he could magically read her mind, it's not the same as getting consent from someone. Think about it this way: I'm with a hot guy and I want to have sex with him, but I choose not to for whatever reason (I'm not on birth control, I don't know him well enough, whatever). If he were psychic, he could read my mind and know that I want to have sex with him. However, I am not consenting to have sex with him. In a world where rape victims and survivors are accused of "wanting it," this kind of portrayal is hurtful. And of course, the whole thing's played for laughs, and the book ends with Jane being like, "I know you're out there, dammit! Seth!" It reminds me of movies where a man takes advantage of a drunk woman, and it's played for laughs. Or the ending to "40 Days and 40 Nights," where the main character's ex rapes him and it's played for laughs. Jane's and Caleb's obnoxiousness combined with the rape-totally-not-treated-as-rape scene at the end really turned me off to this book. At the last minute, I am turning the two-star rating into one star. I'm angry all over again. (hide spoiler)] "Eight Days" is one of Johansen's darker fics, with lots of blood, as well as torture and a rape scene. Unless, for some weird reason, you really, really like Jane MacGuire, I can't recommend this book to anybody.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dwayne Wojtowicz

    I have always been a fan of Iris Johansen. Her writing style has continuously captivated me. When I decided to read “Eight Days to Live,” I was hoping for a home run. I was wrong and definitely disappointed. Iris Johansen refers to “Eight Days to Live” as an Eve Duncan Forensics Thriller, when in reality it is not. Eve does not appear, or even mentioned, until a fourth of the way in on the novel. Jane MacGuire is the main character in this novel, and she does more the Eve does. Jane’s tenacity an I have always been a fan of Iris Johansen. Her writing style has continuously captivated me. When I decided to read “Eight Days to Live,” I was hoping for a home run. I was wrong and definitely disappointed. Iris Johansen refers to “Eight Days to Live” as an Eve Duncan Forensics Thriller, when in reality it is not. Eve does not appear, or even mentioned, until a fourth of the way in on the novel. Jane MacGuire is the main character in this novel, and she does more the Eve does. Jane’s tenacity and sarcasm is true to be Eve; however, Jane is her own person. Now do not get me wrong, but I enjoyed many of Iris Johansen’s novels. I understand the characters, and how they were developed and carried over into subsequent novels. Johansen’s plot style is to the point and hopes to hook the reader within the first few minutes of reading. “Eight Days to Live” didn’t do this to me. I found the beginning of the novel hard to follow; there were too many characters thrown at the reader. After some weeding out of the characters, and almost halfway through the novel, the plot began to pick up and move along at a rapid pace. Additionally, I had a hard time keeping track of Millet, Roland and their crew, along with MacDuff and his crew. Overall, I wasn’t too happy with “Eight Days to Live.” I feel that “Eight Days to Live” can be recommended for a read, but it comes with a warning: do not hold your breath; it is not the same as the others.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    Eve Duncan's adopted daughter Jane Macguire has a showing in a prestigious art gallery in Paris. Everyone is fascinated by a painting Jane calls "Guilt." Somehow Jane can't let the painting go and it's marked for display only. The gallery owner is thrilled by the success of the show and tries to convince Jane to sell the painting. An astronomical offer is on the table but Jane turns it down. The face in the painting is from her dreams but she feels there's something more. The gallery owner is mur Eve Duncan's adopted daughter Jane Macguire has a showing in a prestigious art gallery in Paris. Everyone is fascinated by a painting Jane calls "Guilt." Somehow Jane can't let the painting go and it's marked for display only. The gallery owner is thrilled by the success of the show and tries to convince Jane to sell the painting. An astronomical offer is on the table but Jane turns it down. The face in the painting is from her dreams but she feels there's something more. The gallery owner is murdered and Jane receives cryptic threats that tell her she has only eight more days to live. A cult believes the face in the painting is Judas, Christ's betrayer, the Judas worshippers believe that by revealing his face, Jane has committed the ultimate sin and must die at one of their ceremonies for the crime. They are determined to capture and torture her before killing her. Jane's family and friends are just as determined to keep her safe. If you've read the other Eve Duncan books featuring Jane Mcguire, you will be pleased to see Eve, Joe, the McDuff's and of course, Seth Caleb.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    "It all begins with a painting called Guilt. Eve Duncan's daughter, Jane, has no idea why she painted the portrait of the chilling face that now hangs in a Paris gallery. But those who belong to a powerful cult—one that dates back to the time of Christ—know both the face and the significance behind it… They believe that Jane must die—when the moment is right, and not an instant before she leads them to an ancient treasure whose value and power are beyond price. But for now, they target those clo "It all begins with a painting called Guilt. Eve Duncan's daughter, Jane, has no idea why she painted the portrait of the chilling face that now hangs in a Paris gallery. But those who belong to a powerful cult—one that dates back to the time of Christ—know both the face and the significance behind it… They believe that Jane must die—when the moment is right, and not an instant before she leads them to an ancient treasure whose value and power are beyond price. But for now, they target those close to Jane, killing without mercy or conscience. From Paris to the Scottish isles to the Holy Land, Jane finds herself in a desperate race against time to unravel the mystery surrounding her painting…and save her own life. Even with Eve's help, can she possibly succeed before her time is up?" Another dip into the paranormal, except with a religious cult and powerful figures around the world. Caleb makes a return for this one. At least there's no fighting between Eve and Joe.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sally Good

    I got on Goodreads to read reviews about Eight Days to Live because I thought I was being overly critical. But so many others agree, the writing here--not to mention the editing!!!--is pretty bad. On the technical side, there are misspelled names and bad word choices, like "'----,' she said with irony." (Editors! You should have caught this!) The lack of description makes this bland (except for the murders, which seem sensationalized) and the only really likable character in my opinion is Jock. U I got on Goodreads to read reviews about Eight Days to Live because I thought I was being overly critical. But so many others agree, the writing here--not to mention the editing!!!--is pretty bad. On the technical side, there are misspelled names and bad word choices, like "'----,' she said with irony." (Editors! You should have caught this!) The lack of description makes this bland (except for the murders, which seem sensationalized) and the only really likable character in my opinion is Jock. Using "An Eve Duncan thriller" as a hook to capture the Eve Duncan audience is misleading; she is barely a minor character and doesn't even make an appearance until late in the book. I might go back and read some IJ books I have missed in the past, but I doubt I will read anything published after this one, unless other critics say they think she's got her game back.

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