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An Exploration of Old Testament Quotations, Allusions, and Echoes Occurring from Matthew through Revelation "This really is a new sort of commentary! For the first time we are given a continuous exegetical reading of the way each New Testament book quotes, alludes to, and evokes the Old Testament Scriptures. This volume will be an immensely useful resource for all kinds of An Exploration of Old Testament Quotations, Allusions, and Echoes Occurring from Matthew through Revelation "This really is a new sort of commentary! For the first time we are given a continuous exegetical reading of the way each New Testament book quotes, alludes to, and evokes the Old Testament Scriptures. This volume will be an immensely useful resource for all kinds of study of the New Testament." —Richard Bauckham, University of St. Andrews "Every scholar would profit by having a copy of this thorough and judicious work on his or her desk. The authors have collected for us an immense amount of material and insight in a relatively short space, and many of us will be grateful for their efforts. This commentary is a profound witness to the unity of the Testaments in the mystery of Christ." —Francis Martin, Sacred Heart Seminary "Finally a volume that surveys the use of the Old Testament in each book of the New Testament. Written by top-tier scholars with unsurpassed expertise in New Testament exegesis, these essays model sound engagement with Scripture that quotes Scripture. This excellent collection is a must-read for all who wish to understand how the New Testament writers understood and used their Bible. This long-awaited volume deserves to become a standard text that will hopefully launch a new stage of fresh work in biblical research." --Karen H. Jobes, Wheaton College "More than a generation ago, C. H. Dodd and a few other scholars began sowing the seeds of a new and fruitful approach to reading Scripture, by studying the New Testament writers' use of Old Testament texts. The present commentary thus represents the harvest of decades of research into the relationship between the Old and New Testaments. By carefully observing various factors, ranging from the textual to the theological, each contributor shows how the New Testament writers were not only careful readers of the Old Testament but also profound theologians themselves. The scholars on this superb team assembled by Beale and Carson distill many new and remarkable insights for exegesis and theology, all of which serve to demonstrate the explanatory power of this approach for the present and the future. This landmark volume should prove to be an invaluable resource for both the church and the academy--for pastors, teachers, and students alike, whether Protestant or Catholic--and for anyone wanting to go deeper into the heart of sacred Scripture. Indeed, Beale and Carson are to be thanked and congratulated for a momentous accomplishment." --Scott Hahn, Franciscan University of Steubenville "Finally we have a work that examines the use of the Old Testament in the New Testament and covers the entirety of the New Testament in a single volume. Pastors, students, and scholars will profit from the careful attention to both the Old and New Testament contexts in which the citations occur, and they will be enriched by the theological depth represented in this important book." --Thomas R. Schreiner, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary "Few areas of New Testament study are as often discussed as the New Testament's use of the Old. There has long been a need for a careful case-by-case treatment, since the use we see in the New Testament is so varied and diverse. This commentary meets that need admirably. It is thorough yet concise, clear yet detailed. All will be led into helpful reflection on this important area of study. Well done to the editors and authors of this useful and unique commentary." --Darrell L. Bock, Dallas Theological Seminary


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An Exploration of Old Testament Quotations, Allusions, and Echoes Occurring from Matthew through Revelation "This really is a new sort of commentary! For the first time we are given a continuous exegetical reading of the way each New Testament book quotes, alludes to, and evokes the Old Testament Scriptures. This volume will be an immensely useful resource for all kinds of An Exploration of Old Testament Quotations, Allusions, and Echoes Occurring from Matthew through Revelation "This really is a new sort of commentary! For the first time we are given a continuous exegetical reading of the way each New Testament book quotes, alludes to, and evokes the Old Testament Scriptures. This volume will be an immensely useful resource for all kinds of study of the New Testament." —Richard Bauckham, University of St. Andrews "Every scholar would profit by having a copy of this thorough and judicious work on his or her desk. The authors have collected for us an immense amount of material and insight in a relatively short space, and many of us will be grateful for their efforts. This commentary is a profound witness to the unity of the Testaments in the mystery of Christ." —Francis Martin, Sacred Heart Seminary "Finally a volume that surveys the use of the Old Testament in each book of the New Testament. Written by top-tier scholars with unsurpassed expertise in New Testament exegesis, these essays model sound engagement with Scripture that quotes Scripture. This excellent collection is a must-read for all who wish to understand how the New Testament writers understood and used their Bible. This long-awaited volume deserves to become a standard text that will hopefully launch a new stage of fresh work in biblical research." --Karen H. Jobes, Wheaton College "More than a generation ago, C. H. Dodd and a few other scholars began sowing the seeds of a new and fruitful approach to reading Scripture, by studying the New Testament writers' use of Old Testament texts. The present commentary thus represents the harvest of decades of research into the relationship between the Old and New Testaments. By carefully observing various factors, ranging from the textual to the theological, each contributor shows how the New Testament writers were not only careful readers of the Old Testament but also profound theologians themselves. The scholars on this superb team assembled by Beale and Carson distill many new and remarkable insights for exegesis and theology, all of which serve to demonstrate the explanatory power of this approach for the present and the future. This landmark volume should prove to be an invaluable resource for both the church and the academy--for pastors, teachers, and students alike, whether Protestant or Catholic--and for anyone wanting to go deeper into the heart of sacred Scripture. Indeed, Beale and Carson are to be thanked and congratulated for a momentous accomplishment." --Scott Hahn, Franciscan University of Steubenville "Finally we have a work that examines the use of the Old Testament in the New Testament and covers the entirety of the New Testament in a single volume. Pastors, students, and scholars will profit from the careful attention to both the Old and New Testament contexts in which the citations occur, and they will be enriched by the theological depth represented in this important book." --Thomas R. Schreiner, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary "Few areas of New Testament study are as often discussed as the New Testament's use of the Old. There has long been a need for a careful case-by-case treatment, since the use we see in the New Testament is so varied and diverse. This commentary meets that need admirably. It is thorough yet concise, clear yet detailed. All will be led into helpful reflection on this important area of study. Well done to the editors and authors of this useful and unique commentary." --Darrell L. Bock, Dallas Theological Seminary

30 review for Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    This is not the kind of book I read from cover but rather reference as I come across a passage that I need some help with. That being said, the parts that I have read so far are fantastic! Often times people come across an Old Testament passage in one of the Gospels or an epistle and think that Jesus or Paul are merely "proof texting" (ripping something out of context and hijacking the words to bolster their argument), but this commentary is helpful for realizing that it's not that simple. There This is not the kind of book I read from cover but rather reference as I come across a passage that I need some help with. That being said, the parts that I have read so far are fantastic! Often times people come across an Old Testament passage in one of the Gospels or an epistle and think that Jesus or Paul are merely "proof texting" (ripping something out of context and hijacking the words to bolster their argument), but this commentary is helpful for realizing that it's not that simple. There is, more often than not, much more going on below the surface. This is an area of study that has fascinated me for a long time and this commentary is a wealth of help in navigating the topic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Parker

    A useful commentary on the use of the New Testament in the Old Testament. This will be one of my first reference works of choice when I need to compare the New Testament's use of the Old Testament. A useful commentary on the use of the New Testament in the Old Testament. This will be one of my first reference works of choice when I need to compare the New Testament's use of the Old Testament.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    I use this commentary more than any other. One key reason is that D. A. Carson is one of its major contributors and editors, so I know it's expertly done. But the most important reason is: this volume carefully comments in detail on how and why the NT writers use the OT in the manner in which they do. NT writers such as Paul do not use the OT in strictly literal, predictable ways - sometimes, they really throw us for a loop, if you look back to the context of the passage they are using or refere I use this commentary more than any other. One key reason is that D. A. Carson is one of its major contributors and editors, so I know it's expertly done. But the most important reason is: this volume carefully comments in detail on how and why the NT writers use the OT in the manner in which they do. NT writers such as Paul do not use the OT in strictly literal, predictable ways - sometimes, they really throw us for a loop, if you look back to the context of the passage they are using or referencing. Why? This volume is eye-opening and essential if you want to read Scripture with a more thorough understanding of the continuity/dicontinuity that exists between the Old and New Covenants. It has helped me understand more about interpreting the OT, as I have been able to more closely understand how the NT writers interpreted OT Scriptures.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

    What makes this more than just another reference book, another oversize collection of homogeneous material collecting dust on a shelf? First, the editorial introductions, both to the book as a whole and to each book of the Bible, keep the reader aware of method and instill a sense of readability that most reference works lack. Second, the entries are focused enough that the reader actually gets the content he or she is looking for, rather than limp overviews of passages. Third, the entries hit a What makes this more than just another reference book, another oversize collection of homogeneous material collecting dust on a shelf? First, the editorial introductions, both to the book as a whole and to each book of the Bible, keep the reader aware of method and instill a sense of readability that most reference works lack. Second, the entries are focused enough that the reader actually gets the content he or she is looking for, rather than limp overviews of passages. Third, the entries hit a sweet spot in terms of size. This is the rare reference work that one is tempted to read through like a book. My only caution is that all the contributors are fairly conservative evangelicals, and so bring certain assumptions to how the New Testament authors "must have" or "should have" used the Hebrew Bible. Not all readers will accept the limitations of this framework.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Coyle

    I'm marking this book as "read", though I haven't technically "read" it from cover to cover (which, btw, is 1200+ double-columned pages!). What I have read is the introduction and several selections from it as I've needed to reference them. Overall, it's an excellent reference to use for a very specific purpose. It is exactly what the title says, a commetary on how the New Testament uses the Old Testament. The book (the parts I've read and used so far, anyway) is useful and relatively clear, if I'm marking this book as "read", though I haven't technically "read" it from cover to cover (which, btw, is 1200+ double-columned pages!). What I have read is the introduction and several selections from it as I've needed to reference them. Overall, it's an excellent reference to use for a very specific purpose. It is exactly what the title says, a commetary on how the New Testament uses the Old Testament. The book (the parts I've read and used so far, anyway) is useful and relatively clear, if a bit more information than most non-academics are really going to need. Having said that, I've found it very useful in thinking through some of the difficult citations in the New Testament, especially when it seems like the author is making a bit of a stretch in quoting a specific passage.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Robinson

    I read through most of this commentary awhile back when I originally got it. I continually find myself going back and back over the years to it as a reference. This book has a ton of the most important resources and relevant information for reviewing any NT texts that utilize the OT. Since I have been going through Hebrews, a hard book to thoroughly study through, it has single-handedly the best resource I have had for understanding the historical context, cross references, textual issues, etc. E I read through most of this commentary awhile back when I originally got it. I continually find myself going back and back over the years to it as a reference. This book has a ton of the most important resources and relevant information for reviewing any NT texts that utilize the OT. Since I have been going through Hebrews, a hard book to thoroughly study through, it has single-handedly the best resource I have had for understanding the historical context, cross references, textual issues, etc. Every Christian who seeks thorough study on these matters should have a copy of this on their shelf.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Cox

    Incredibly helpful! One of the best commentaries out there!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Doug Connell

    Excellent reference book for those who already have a bible dictionary or a one-volume commentary; faithful to the broad scope of evangelical scholarship but not so technical that the layperson won’t benefit from it

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    Overall, pretty good stuff. Each book of the Bible is handled by a different author with varying levels of competency.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Coram Deo Church

    Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament is not currently available at local libraries.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This book is a must have for every theology professor, pastor, seminary student, or motivated layman in general. This is not a book that enters the debates over how the NT uses the OT, it is just a bunch of cherry-picked scholars offering their commentary on how the NT use of the OT. The scholars are awesome. I was particularly pleased that they got Brian Rosner, quickly becoming one of my favorite exegetes and biblical theologian, to comment on I Corinthians. His thoughts and commentary in I Co This book is a must have for every theology professor, pastor, seminary student, or motivated layman in general. This is not a book that enters the debates over how the NT uses the OT, it is just a bunch of cherry-picked scholars offering their commentary on how the NT use of the OT. The scholars are awesome. I was particularly pleased that they got Brian Rosner, quickly becoming one of my favorite exegetes and biblical theologian, to comment on I Corinthians. His thoughts and commentary in I Cor.5 are invaluable for paedobaptists who hold to an internal/external distinction on the covenant. And his specialty is ethics, specifically NT and Pauline ethics. That's just a personal hi-light of mine. I could mention many more: Beale, Blomberg, Carson, Kostenberger, Silva, etc. Besides the I Cor. 5 I pointed out (cf. Rosner's Paul, Scripture, and Ethics for a more rigorous and thorough exegesis of I Cor. 5), the commentary on Hebrews is also supportive of paedobaptist internal/external distinctions. Again, something I'm hi-lighting. The purpose of the commentary isn't even to support paedobaptism, I just draw on their work. And, there's much more here for everyone. Basically, this book comments on every book in the NT and its use of the OT (either explicitly or implicitly), I can't laud it enough.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peter Krol

    This is an amazing commentary. It's HUGE, and priced well under most comparably sized tomes. I keep this one on my desk at all times for ready reference whenever I'm studying a New Testament book or passage. I like to read commentaries. I've read a whole bunch. When I study a book of the Bible seriously, I usually read 2-3 commentaries with it. Unfortunately, I have rarely read a NT commentary that carefully examines OT quotations in their original context. This commentary does just that - for the This is an amazing commentary. It's HUGE, and priced well under most comparably sized tomes. I keep this one on my desk at all times for ready reference whenever I'm studying a New Testament book or passage. I like to read commentaries. I've read a whole bunch. When I study a book of the Bible seriously, I usually read 2-3 commentaries with it. Unfortunately, I have rarely read a NT commentary that carefully examines OT quotations in their original context. This commentary does just that - for the entire New Testament! The commentary examines every OT quote or allusion found in the NT, and often considers the following six concerns: >Context/argument of NT passage >Context/flow of thought of OT quote >Use of OT passage in rabbinic Judaism >Textual matters (why does the quote look so different when I look it up in the OT?) >Hermeneutic lessons (what do we learn about how to read the OT?) >Theological lessons (what does the quote teach us more generally?) So far, I've only read portions of the commentary on Acts, Matthew, and John, and the entirety of Ephesians and 1 Peter. I don't have time to read the entire volume before reviewing it. I simply can't recommend it any more highly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    This will definitely become one of my main reference volumes for cross-checking OT?NT texts. It is organized in a very easy-to-follow format. Each of the various contributors followed the same format, so the volume feels like the work of one person. On the down side, many portions of the book seem plagued by Liberal presuppositions. I am forever perplexed by the simultaneous profession of belief in the Doctrine of the Divine Inspiration of Scripture with the constant assertion/assumption that the This will definitely become one of my main reference volumes for cross-checking OT?NT texts. It is organized in a very easy-to-follow format. Each of the various contributors followed the same format, so the volume feels like the work of one person. On the down side, many portions of the book seem plagued by Liberal presuppositions. I am forever perplexed by the simultaneous profession of belief in the Doctrine of the Divine Inspiration of Scripture with the constant assertion/assumption that the authors of Scripture were reliant upon other sources for their content. If Inspiration means what I think it does, this appears to be rubbish. If Inspiration means anything, it means that God chose the content and ordained its inclusion in the Sacred Writ. For this reason, one cannot profess to hold to the Protestant doctrine of Inspiration while maintaining that the Apostles were ripping off rabbinic sources and traditions. Not all portions of this volume suffer from this defect, hence I recommend it. But one may find one's patience tried on a number of occasions as one encounters the aforementioned assumptions.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andre

    This is probably one of my favorite books in my library. This was the Christianity Today Academic Book of the Year, for 2007. This book tracks every citation or allusion of the OT found in the NT and gives you the following: context of how it was used in the OT, context of how it was used in the NT, any significant manuscript information (whether the Septuagint differs from the Masoretic Text), and how the Jewish rabbis interpreted the passage historically. Each chapter is written by the person This is probably one of my favorite books in my library. This was the Christianity Today Academic Book of the Year, for 2007. This book tracks every citation or allusion of the OT found in the NT and gives you the following: context of how it was used in the OT, context of how it was used in the NT, any significant manuscript information (whether the Septuagint differs from the Masoretic Text), and how the Jewish rabbis interpreted the passage historically. Each chapter is written by the person hand picked by Beale and Carson, definitely no slouches allowed theologically. In reading the forward, one realizes that it took ten years for the book to be completed and it is definitely worth all of the time. One drawback, you need a Bible to follow along, the text of Scripture is not printed. However, I do understand why. The book checks out at 1238 pages, I can only imagine how big it would be if the text was printed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dmcconkey

    Finally finished a 18 month project - read through the commentary as reading throw the corresponding scriptures. Took a while but well worth the effort. This is an excellent commentary that attempts to show the NT use of the OT. Each other follows a basic approach (some more than others) of looking at the Passage: NT Context - OT Context - Use in Jewish Sources/ Judaism - Textual Background/ Matters - Hermeneutic Employed - Theological Use. Commenting on each section as appropriate. It is an fan Finally finished a 18 month project - read through the commentary as reading throw the corresponding scriptures. Took a while but well worth the effort. This is an excellent commentary that attempts to show the NT use of the OT. Each other follows a basic approach (some more than others) of looking at the Passage: NT Context - OT Context - Use in Jewish Sources/ Judaism - Textual Background/ Matters - Hermeneutic Employed - Theological Use. Commenting on each section as appropriate. It is an fantastic textbook on seeking to understand how the NT writers used and interpreted the OT. This book's greatest strength is not so much the conclusion reached but the discipline of seeking through the sources and motivating the reader tho think Biblically and apply to hermeneutic practice and theologically. Should be close by for every pastor to consult and aid in working through passages. Every seminary student should have high on the list of books to purchase & most important to use.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    This is a must-have reference for all who study the Bible. Until receiving this book, one of the greatest challenges for me was making sense of how NT writers were quoting the OT. Frankly, I often ignored such passages. Now I realize what wealth of information I have been missing! Where I used to interpret the OT with the NT, this book has taught me to do the reverse: to interpret the NT with the OT. After all, the NT writers are trying to explain what Jesus and the Gospel are all about with OT This is a must-have reference for all who study the Bible. Until receiving this book, one of the greatest challenges for me was making sense of how NT writers were quoting the OT. Frankly, I often ignored such passages. Now I realize what wealth of information I have been missing! Where I used to interpret the OT with the NT, this book has taught me to do the reverse: to interpret the NT with the OT. After all, the NT writers are trying to explain what Jesus and the Gospel are all about with OT language. One of the striking discoveries I made was that Dispensational theologians seem to ignore how the NT is using the OT.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    This is a good start on a great topic - explaining how the New testament writers make use of Old testament passages. They don't often use them in the sense we think they are. THis is a verse-by-verse exhaustive commentary on all NT references to OT passage and some commentary on why it was done and how they are using it. It still in my opinion does not deal with Matthew's tendency to say non-prophetic things were "fullfilled." This is a good start - but more work needs to be done! This is a good start on a great topic - explaining how the New testament writers make use of Old testament passages. They don't often use them in the sense we think they are. THis is a verse-by-verse exhaustive commentary on all NT references to OT passage and some commentary on why it was done and how they are using it. It still in my opinion does not deal with Matthew's tendency to say non-prophetic things were "fullfilled." This is a good start - but more work needs to be done!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Luke Miller

    Fascinating work. I am consistently floored by how frequently the N.T. authors' use of the O.T. is ignored or dismissed. This book (although lengthy and tedious at times) is an incredible resources for pastors and teachers who want to get a feel for how the Bible fits together. It's like a massive apostolic study Bible. Incredible. I will be referencing this as a regular part of my sermon prep. Fascinating work. I am consistently floored by how frequently the N.T. authors' use of the O.T. is ignored or dismissed. This book (although lengthy and tedious at times) is an incredible resources for pastors and teachers who want to get a feel for how the Bible fits together. It's like a massive apostolic study Bible. Incredible. I will be referencing this as a regular part of my sermon prep.

  19. 5 out of 5

    BJ

    A very scholarly work and an important one for understanding both Testaments of God's Word better. The two editors of this commentary, and many others represented, are a gift of God to the church. I don't believe there are many other commentaries of its kind. One I am glad to have in my reference library. A very scholarly work and an important one for understanding both Testaments of God's Word better. The two editors of this commentary, and many others represented, are a gift of God to the church. I don't believe there are many other commentaries of its kind. One I am glad to have in my reference library.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    I use this book often, one of my 'go to' books no matter where I am studying in the NT... also a great tool when studying in the OT, to see how that OT passage was used by NT authors... It is incredibly helpful in coming to a right & proper interpretation of Scripture when you see how a passage is used not only in it's context, but in the panoply of the entire Bible. I use this book often, one of my 'go to' books no matter where I am studying in the NT... also a great tool when studying in the OT, to see how that OT passage was used by NT authors... It is incredibly helpful in coming to a right & proper interpretation of Scripture when you see how a passage is used not only in it's context, but in the panoply of the entire Bible.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael Babcock

    A very good and useful commentary of the New Testament. Of course it is not the only one you'd want to read, but it's strength lies in how the particular passage relates to the Old Testament passages the are either quoted, cited, or alluded to. It helps you to understand how the apostles and early church understood how prophecy and types of the OT were fulfilled by Christ. A very good and useful commentary of the New Testament. Of course it is not the only one you'd want to read, but it's strength lies in how the particular passage relates to the Old Testament passages the are either quoted, cited, or alluded to. It helps you to understand how the apostles and early church understood how prophecy and types of the OT were fulfilled by Christ.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Chelpka

    This book contains very detailed examinations of the New Testament's use of the Old Testament. It even describes how those passages are used in Judaism more broadly. The depth often goes beyond what you'll find in other commentaries and is therefore very helpful. I use it often. This book contains very detailed examinations of the New Testament's use of the Old Testament. It even describes how those passages are used in Judaism more broadly. The depth often goes beyond what you'll find in other commentaries and is therefore very helpful. I use it often.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Mccallum

    Real heavy content. I haven't read enough to know what I think about their conclusions. Real heavy content. I haven't read enough to know what I think about their conclusions.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chad Barnes

    A scholarly, seemingly exhaustive commentary on the the New Testament use of the Old Testament. Recommended only for the serious student of Scripture.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pete Foley

    Excellent source book for any serious Bible student trying to understand the many, complex NT references back to the OT.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Waugh

    A very informative resource! Heavy on the extra-biblical references, but collectively impressive in its overall outlook on the use of the Old in the New.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    An invaluable tool for exegetes

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jimi-carol Benton

    I was required to read it for a class, other wise I would not have picked it up. I found it was very informative and I learned a lot that I did not know about the bible.

  29. 4 out of 5

    James McAdams

    I say I've read it... I've probably read less than a 5th of it, but that's part of the nature of the book. It's stunning, though! I say I've read it... I've probably read less than a 5th of it, but that's part of the nature of the book. It's stunning, though!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Barton

    One of my go-to commentaries.

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