web site hit counter Mrs. Pringle of Fairacre - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Mrs. Pringle of Fairacre

Availability: Ready to download

Through the eyes of many Fairacre friends, we trace Mrs. Pringle’s life and her stormy standing as the redoubtable cleaner of the town’s school. However maddening she is, life at Fairacre would be poorer without her.


Compare

Through the eyes of many Fairacre friends, we trace Mrs. Pringle’s life and her stormy standing as the redoubtable cleaner of the town’s school. However maddening she is, life at Fairacre would be poorer without her.

30 review for Mrs. Pringle of Fairacre

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carol Bakker

    A visit to the Cotswolds is always a gentle bit of joy, even when the main character is morose, maudlin, and miserable. Mrs. Pringle is a retrospective of earlier Fairacre books, a rewriting of the source material. I anticipated a cliche--when we discover Mrs. Pringle's back story we'll come to love the curmudgeon; she transforms into a ray of sunshine. Happily, I was wrong. This is a book for people who like to read the word jollification; for folks who like to read about vicars and jumble sales A visit to the Cotswolds is always a gentle bit of joy, even when the main character is morose, maudlin, and miserable. Mrs. Pringle is a retrospective of earlier Fairacre books, a rewriting of the source material. I anticipated a cliche--when we discover Mrs. Pringle's back story we'll come to love the curmudgeon; she transforms into a ray of sunshine. Happily, I was wrong. This is a book for people who like to read the word jollification; for folks who like to read about vicars and jumble sales; for patient readers who enjoy vignettes of daily life without a sizzling plot. It occurred to me as I read, that Miss Read books are particularly suited for followers of Charlotte Mason (an English educator). Not for precepts, but for the atmosphere. Nature walks where the kids collect empty shells, rook feathers, and catkins. I'll end with a quote: He had that knack of making any woman feel that she was the only person in the world that interested him. He had a way of gazing intently into one's face, and although I was pretty sure that it was because he was short-sighted and too vain to wear spectacles, the result was still very pleasant.

  2. 4 out of 5

    LauraT

    My love, my breath of fresh air, when mostly needed! We all agreed that the weather was unseasonably mild - and quoted: 'a green Christmas makes a full churchyard' - but what a blessing there was no snow! (Who, apart from Bing Crosby, we said, wanted a white Christmas?) He was a friendly soul, and the vicar soon became grateful to him for his ease with figures and his willingness to straighten out some church accounts which had become sadly entangled by our highly literate, but completely innumera My love, my breath of fresh air, when mostly needed! We all agreed that the weather was unseasonably mild - and quoted: 'a green Christmas makes a full churchyard' - but what a blessing there was no snow! (Who, apart from Bing Crosby, we said, wanted a white Christmas?) He was a friendly soul, and the vicar soon became grateful to him for his ease with figures and his willingness to straighten out some church accounts which had become sadly entangled by our highly literate, but completely innumerate, vicar. - ME!!!!! 'My mum at Springbourne has 'em Friday afternoons. She does the ironing from the Manor then. She irons lovely.' 'Lovelily,' I corrected automatically, ever the teacher. It did not sound right. 'Beautifully,' I amended hastily. 'That's right. Lovely,' agreed Minnie. I let it pass. - Do I remember someone????

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    I have always been a true fan of the Fairacre novels; I found I enjoyed them even more than Miss Read's beloved Thrush Green novels. Mrs. Pringle, however, is the literary equivalent of a television clip show: One-half to two-thirds of the material in this book has already appeared in greater detail and written in a more interesting fashion in previous Fairacre novels. It's marginally worth reading for a few of the new tales about Mrs. Pringle, particularly a few about Mrs. Pringle's miscreant gi I have always been a true fan of the Fairacre novels; I found I enjoyed them even more than Miss Read's beloved Thrush Green novels. Mrs. Pringle, however, is the literary equivalent of a television clip show: One-half to two-thirds of the material in this book has already appeared in greater detail and written in a more interesting fashion in previous Fairacre novels. It's marginally worth reading for a few of the new tales about Mrs. Pringle, particularly a few about Mrs. Pringle's miscreant girlhood. But, if you decide to skip this one, you can pick up in the next book without having missed anything.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    Public library copy. I wasn't sure I would like a book all about Mrs. Pringle, but as usual Miss Read does an excellent job of weaving tales of Mrs. Pringle into the daily living of the schoolmistress and the village. Really enjoyed it. No spoilers. You should read it too. Public library copy. I wasn't sure I would like a book all about Mrs. Pringle, but as usual Miss Read does an excellent job of weaving tales of Mrs. Pringle into the daily living of the schoolmistress and the village. Really enjoyed it. No spoilers. You should read it too.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Shropshire

    Some of the Mrs. Pringle stories are repeats from other Fairacre books, but I enjoyed the snippets about her childhood and young adulthood. I especially liked the last story about a very cold, snowy spell in Fairacre. No reason other than the fact it is August and we’re going into the third week of an extended heatwave with triple-digit and near-triple-digit temps. A bit of shivering in frigid winds and slipping on the ice sounds quite refreshing at the moment! A visit to Fairacre or Thrush Green Some of the Mrs. Pringle stories are repeats from other Fairacre books, but I enjoyed the snippets about her childhood and young adulthood. I especially liked the last story about a very cold, snowy spell in Fairacre. No reason other than the fact it is August and we’re going into the third week of an extended heatwave with triple-digit and near-triple-digit temps. A bit of shivering in frigid winds and slipping on the ice sounds quite refreshing at the moment! A visit to Fairacre or Thrush Green is always worth at least 4 stars!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Laura Bang

    Well, as pointed out by others, this book is the equivalent of a TV series "clips show" — lots of recycled content from other books, not stitched together particularly well. Fairacre is Fairacre, though, and it's always nice to visit the village, even when faced with the dreaded Mrs Pringle. Well, as pointed out by others, this book is the equivalent of a TV series "clips show" — lots of recycled content from other books, not stitched together particularly well. Fairacre is Fairacre, though, and it's always nice to visit the village, even when faced with the dreaded Mrs Pringle.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    This was less successful than most of the other books for me because it was a rehash of all the Mrs. Pringle stories told in the earlier books. I would probably have liked it better if I were not doing an intensive start to finish read of the series. But I am.

  8. 5 out of 5

    gloriabluestocking

    This book gives and gives to the reader without asking much in return. Definitely not a thrilling, plotty story, but I was kept interested by the perceptive sketches of true-to-life characters and goings-on in a small town. I listened to this on audio each night this week. As I cozied up under the blankets, I felt like I was overhearing perhaps a grandmother and auntie chatting together of bygone days until sleep overtook me. Charming.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Iru Sai

    A little below my expectations. A lot of it comprised of stuff shared in the earlier Fairacre books. It was more like brushing up whatever I had read of Miss Pringle, so far. If you wish to, you can certainly go ahead and skip this one. You really won’t miss on anything substantial.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Miss Read's books about Thrush Green and Fairacre don't particularly have plots to follow--it's more the ebb and flow of village life in the Cotswolds in the 1950s and 60s. This book is primarily narrated by Miss Read, the head teacher of the two-teacher village school at Fairacre, and gives lip service to the title by relating various stories of the doughty and disagreeable Mrs. Pringle, the school cleaner whose bad leg only acts up when she takes umbrage at something (so has a permanent limp). Miss Read's books about Thrush Green and Fairacre don't particularly have plots to follow--it's more the ebb and flow of village life in the Cotswolds in the 1950s and 60s. This book is primarily narrated by Miss Read, the head teacher of the two-teacher village school at Fairacre, and gives lip service to the title by relating various stories of the doughty and disagreeable Mrs. Pringle, the school cleaner whose bad leg only acts up when she takes umbrage at something (so has a permanent limp). Many other stories about life in Fairacre creep through, however, in the gentle flow of your grandmother telling you about her early days. While Mrs. Pringle is the local grouch and sometimes hearing about her is unpleasant, still, these books make good bedtime reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    I very much enjoyed this book. It was the first I have read by author Miss Read (Dora Saint), so I had not encountered the tales of Mrs. Pringle that I have heard appeared in some previous Fairacre or Thrush Green stories. Nevertheless, this is a charming spinning-out of anecdotes about Mrs. Pringle and other Cotswold village characters.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dixie

    Great audio book to listen to while painting a fence.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Cheyne

    Newly hired teacher Miss Read is being shown around Fairacre School by the vicar when she first encounters the intrepid Mrs. Pringle. Their lives intersect almost daily since Mrs. Pringle cleans the school and mans the stoves that keep them warm. She is a force to be reckoned with. The villagers know this as they take turns telling stories of their personal experiences with the woman who grew up nearby and now lives among them. This book also describes the changing seasons, long-lasting friendsh Newly hired teacher Miss Read is being shown around Fairacre School by the vicar when she first encounters the intrepid Mrs. Pringle. Their lives intersect almost daily since Mrs. Pringle cleans the school and mans the stoves that keep them warm. She is a force to be reckoned with. The villagers know this as they take turns telling stories of their personal experiences with the woman who grew up nearby and now lives among them. This book also describes the changing seasons, long-lasting friendships and joys of teaching at a one room school. A pleasant escape between two covers recommended for readers of Jan Karon's Mitford books.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    The whole centers around Mrs. Pringle, my least favorite character. It goes back in time to when Miss Read first met Mrs. Pringle and how things developed thereafter. Miss Read also meets Mr. Willet and Miss Claire for the first time. Arthus Coggs is also introduced as the 'drunk, lazy, stupid thief' that he is. She learns about Minnie Pringle who cannot read or write. Mrs. Pringle ends up in the hospital and later gets in an actual physical fight with Mrs. Fowler, a woman even more annoying that The whole centers around Mrs. Pringle, my least favorite character. It goes back in time to when Miss Read first met Mrs. Pringle and how things developed thereafter. Miss Read also meets Mr. Willet and Miss Claire for the first time. Arthus Coggs is also introduced as the 'drunk, lazy, stupid thief' that he is. She learns about Minnie Pringle who cannot read or write. Mrs. Pringle ends up in the hospital and later gets in an actual physical fight with Mrs. Fowler, a woman even more annoying that herself. We then get to see a lot of the backstory of the major characters in the series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    A lovely pleasant book of a country teacher. Miss Read tells us of her dealings with Mrs. Pringle. If you needed your home or school to sparkle Mrs. Pringle was the lady you wanted. She made everything spic and span. The lady had a unique way of not appreciating others work. She was the first to let you know if she disapproved. Miss Read tries her best to avoid Mrs. Pringle and her sarcastic tongue. Miss Read throughout the story lets us know about Mrs. Pringle's background. This is a relaxing r A lovely pleasant book of a country teacher. Miss Read tells us of her dealings with Mrs. Pringle. If you needed your home or school to sparkle Mrs. Pringle was the lady you wanted. She made everything spic and span. The lady had a unique way of not appreciating others work. She was the first to let you know if she disapproved. Miss Read tries her best to avoid Mrs. Pringle and her sarcastic tongue. Miss Read throughout the story lets us know about Mrs. Pringle's background. This is a relaxing read about a woman in Fairacre who represents people that you may know in your own life. People in a small village are not really much different from people in the big city. That is how Miss Marple solved many of the crimes she observed.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    One of Miss Read's best books - I love that she devoted an entire novel to the life story of the redoubtable Mrs. Pringle, who was always a fixture (though a somewhat one-dimensional one) in her Fairacre books. This novel gives the reader so much more on Mrs. Pringle and what makes her tick - it's a great story and a must-read for Miss Read fans. One of Miss Read's best books - I love that she devoted an entire novel to the life story of the redoubtable Mrs. Pringle, who was always a fixture (though a somewhat one-dimensional one) in her Fairacre books. This novel gives the reader so much more on Mrs. Pringle and what makes her tick - it's a great story and a must-read for Miss Read fans.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leila Kern

    The more that I read this series, the more that I enjoy meeting the townspeople. This seventeenth book tells the story of Mrs. Pringle, Miss Read’s school and house cleaner. Underneath Mrs. Pringle’s crusty exterior, there is a caring person (sort of). I love knowing the backgrounds of Fairacre and the surrounding villages. Fun read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    When all else pals try Miss Read. I find this quiet life a soothing balm when politics and religion get me down. It’s not perfection with no pain but it does reflect the supposed national character of just keeping on. There is pain and suffering, hunger and cold, fights and squabbles and sometimes an acceptance that nothing can or will change. But life goes on and so must we.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Regina Pride

    The book started at at time around WWII. The first teaching job of a woman in a small town recalls her experiences in a small town, mainly focusing around the character, Mrs. Pringle. It was an interesting throwback to British life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    A delightful story about the less than delightful Mrs. Pringle, school cleaner, who has a growl for everyone she meets. Some people are just grumpy for the sake of being grumpy and that is Mrs. Pringle. Audio book, great narrator.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dan Sexton

    Well written and authentic early English school life A fun read, most of us know a Mrs. Pringle! Like Miss Read, we, too, tolerate and make allowances for their bad behavior and mistreatment to us... shame, isn't it? Well written and authentic early English school life A fun read, most of us know a Mrs. Pringle! Like Miss Read, we, too, tolerate and make allowances for their bad behavior and mistreatment to us... shame, isn't it?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    Loved This book!!! At times I was literally laughing out loud! Written by Miss Read, its a realistic depiction of the tenuous relationship between a teacher and custodial help. Mrs. Pringle has a role In the other books, but she is the main character here. Very enjoyable!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Reading Fury

    Mrs. Pringle includes a lot of reminiscences from previous books with some new background to the inimitable title character. She does grow on you a tiny bit, but Mrs. Pringle really doesn't care if we like her, she remains true to her own self. As always, a Fairacre installment is a joyful read. Mrs. Pringle includes a lot of reminiscences from previous books with some new background to the inimitable title character. She does grow on you a tiny bit, but Mrs. Pringle really doesn't care if we like her, she remains true to her own self. As always, a Fairacre installment is a joyful read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Burkhart

    I have enjoyed every Miss Read book that I have read. This was no exception. Life in a small English village with its charms, trials joys and daily life provide an enjoyable read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sheree Norman

    Cute comforting story. A light read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Warnock

    It is always good to visit Fairacre, and Mrs. Pringle is one of its most interesting citizens!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Whistlers Mom

    As much as I love the Fairacre series, I almost passed on this book. Miss Read herself may harbor an undeserved fondness for the grumpy cleaner who puts her heart into polishing stoves and making everyone around her miserable, but I think a little of Maud goes a long way. I wasn't up for reading a whole book about her, nor for having the author attempt to make her a "sympathetic character" by showing the early hardships that turned her bitter. My fears were groundless. Sensible Dora Saint shows M As much as I love the Fairacre series, I almost passed on this book. Miss Read herself may harbor an undeserved fondness for the grumpy cleaner who puts her heart into polishing stoves and making everyone around her miserable, but I think a little of Maud goes a long way. I wasn't up for reading a whole book about her, nor for having the author attempt to make her a "sympathetic character" by showing the early hardships that turned her bitter. My fears were groundless. Sensible Dora Saint shows Mrs. Pringle as a child, but she was a child who created her own "hardships." Some people are born with a grudge against the world and there's nothing to be done with such people except avoid them when you can and put up with them when you can't. The child who would grow up to become the Terror of Fairacre was convinced that everyone was out to get her and she delighted in causing trouble for other kids. Later she delighted in causing trouble for other young people. And she was good at it, too. Thank God, there's not much more about Mrs. Pringle in this book than in any other book in the series. The book does give a fascinating account of Miss Read's early days in Fairacre, when she arrived as a young woman who had just been appointed the first female Head of Fairacre school. She suspected (correctly) that many in the conservative community would believe a woman not capable of leadership, but she found that most soon overcame their prejudices and welcomed her as a neighbor. The exception was (of course) Mrs. Pringle. Described by the gentle vicar as "difficult", but "dillgient and honest", by out-spoken Bob Willet as "a proper wild Tartar", and by Miss Read's friend Amy as "that wicked old harridan", Mrs. Pringle was a shock to the young school teacher, who hoped for the best. Quickly giving up the idea that she and Mrs. Pringle would ever be friends or even civil co-workers, Miss Read cheerfully decided that the crotchety old lady was "a mere fly in the ointment" in her wonderful new life. But there's nothing fly-like about Maud Pringle and her innate ability to take advantage of the frailties of her enemies makes her an ever-present danger to all around her. From the first fight-to-the-death over Miss Read's insistence on lighting the stoves to prevent the students from freezing to death, the battle continues for years. At it's best, the relationship achieves what Miss Read calls "a precarious truce", but warfare is never far away. Maud Pringle likes to stir up trouble and she'll do it with or without provocation. Typically, this book follows a year in Fairacre, from Christmas to Christmas, with time out for Miss Read and others to recall past rumbles with Mrs. Pringle. Of particular interest are the war-time years when the bombing of London brought swarms of refugees to live in Fairacre. Whereas her country neighbors avoid conflict with Mrs Pringle, the saucy Londoners are as tough and cunning as she is and much more humorous. The Cockneys endeared themselves to Fairacre by throwing themselves into joyous battle and Mrs. Pringle usually emerged the loser. For all that, even Maud Pringle has her soft spots. Typical is her attitude toward little Joe Coggs. Knowing his ne're-do-well father and feckless mother, she's inclined to bully him even more than she does the other children. Yet when the small boy is seen out on a bitterly cold day with no gloves, it's Mrs. Pringle who knits him a pair. And is embarrassed when her generosity is discovered. And when Miss Read is ill, she knows that her old frenemy will be there with invalid food and a strong right arm. I love the Fairacre books because the author feels no need to sugar-coat the realities of life. Some people ARE unpleasant and dealing with them is a hassle. Perhaps they're put on earth to make us appreciate each other more. Let's hope so because they're not going away.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mark Sutcliffe

    Always great to read

  29. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    Not one of Miss Read’s better novels. The plot is very thin, which is pity.

  30. 5 out of 5

    AFMasten

    You'll rue that. But you'll notice the corners of her mouth lift a little when she sees the small bouquet of spring flowers you brought her. You'll rue that. But you'll notice the corners of her mouth lift a little when she sees the small bouquet of spring flowers you brought her.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...