web site hit counter Sojourn - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Sojourn

Availability: Ready to download

Far above the merciless Underdark, Drizzt Do'Urden fights to survive the elements of Toril's harsh surface. The drow begins a sojourn through a world entirely unlike his own--even as he evades the dark elves of his past. Far above the merciless Underdark, Drizzt Do'Urden fights to survive the elements of Toril's harsh surface. The drow begins a sojourn through a world entirely unlike his own--even as he evades the dark elves of his past.


Compare

Far above the merciless Underdark, Drizzt Do'Urden fights to survive the elements of Toril's harsh surface. The drow begins a sojourn through a world entirely unlike his own--even as he evades the dark elves of his past. Far above the merciless Underdark, Drizzt Do'Urden fights to survive the elements of Toril's harsh surface. The drow begins a sojourn through a world entirely unlike his own--even as he evades the dark elves of his past.

30 review for Sojourn

  1. 5 out of 5

    Evgeny

    Drizzt the Dark Elf comes to the surface world and tries to find his place in there. Nobody wants a dark elf living among people (wood elves, dwarves, etc.) due to firm belief dark elves are up to no good. There, I just gave you away the plot of the whole book, all 300 pages of it. Does it sound boring? If it does it is because the book is boring; the most boring one of the trilogy. When I started on this one I was excited. I hoped to see interesting interactions between Drizzt and the surface d Drizzt the Dark Elf comes to the surface world and tries to find his place in there. Nobody wants a dark elf living among people (wood elves, dwarves, etc.) due to firm belief dark elves are up to no good. There, I just gave you away the plot of the whole book, all 300 pages of it. Does it sound boring? If it does it is because the book is boring; the most boring one of the trilogy. When I started on this one I was excited. I hoped to see interesting interactions between Drizzt and the surface dwellers. I hoped to see how Drizzt would fit in the new society. Well, he did not fit and all the interactions I saw was people - I am using this term in a broad sense - sending him away from yet another city gates. This was not-so-subtle message about racial prejudice (Drizzt is a dark elf, get it?). I also thought about the following while reading: It did not help any that Drizzt was on practically non-stop guilt trip for something which was not his fault in the least: Somehow I missed the moment where a badass guy who survived all the double-crossings of the Drow society became Mary Sue, or Gary Stu if you wish. His character became one-dimensional in his goodness and misery. It is shame as the beginning of the book was quite good. Imagine one of the best - if not the best - fighters of the society where practically all males are raised to be ones. This guy is accompanied by his pet panther, the grown-up version of the guy below: These are very efficient predators, by the way. So which non-magical force in the Universe can make these two run away? Simple: This particular episode was hilarious and made me laugh out loud. Unfortunately the book could not keep up with the fairly exciting beginning. It was still a decent read, 3-star decent which did not kill my interest in further Drizzt's adventures in the least. So as I already mentioned this is good enough but not great novel and the conclusion of the Drizzt origin trilogy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    Drizzt Do'Urden attempts to find himself on the surface; arguably a more fascinating journey of self-exploration than all the young and rich Westerners who go to find themselves in Thailand or India (no offense to Thailand or India). Anyway, Sojourn is another enjoyable instalment in the saga of Drizzt. This one wraps up the trilogy neatly, takes it into more interesting territories of storytelling, and sets everything up for where Salvatore's story all began: Icewind Dale. Drizzt Do'Urden attempts to find himself on the surface; arguably a more fascinating journey of self-exploration than all the young and rich Westerners who go to find themselves in Thailand or India (no offense to Thailand or India). Anyway, Sojourn is another enjoyable instalment in the saga of Drizzt. This one wraps up the trilogy neatly, takes it into more interesting territories of storytelling, and sets everything up for where Salvatore's story all began: Icewind Dale.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    This final book in the Dark Elf trilogy got off to a flying start for the first third of the book and then rather disappointingly stagnated. I thought Drizzt hitting the surface world would be a ton of fun, and the early stages were promising with a few hilarious interactions and plenty of drama. The story arc involving the farm family Drizzt encounters was excellent. Unfortunately it was all downhill after that with Drizzt just aimlessly plodding around fighting random monsters. Which was actual This final book in the Dark Elf trilogy got off to a flying start for the first third of the book and then rather disappointingly stagnated. I thought Drizzt hitting the surface world would be a ton of fun, and the early stages were promising with a few hilarious interactions and plenty of drama. The story arc involving the farm family Drizzt encounters was excellent. Unfortunately it was all downhill after that with Drizzt just aimlessly plodding around fighting random monsters. Which was actually a major flaw of the second book that was not rectified! There was a multitude of villains, and despite a few horrifying acts, none of them ever managed to come across as equals of the Dark Elves we meet in the fabled Underdark city of Menzoberranzan. The supporting cast was also rather disappointing. Drizzt found few friends and the only one who got much screen time was the aging Montolio. He was a likable enough guy who sought to help Drizzt, but there is no hiding from the fact that the time Drizzt spent with him was utterly boring. Things picked up a bit towards the very end so that hints at more promising happenings for the next book in the series. Rating: 3 stars. Audio Note: Victor Bevine gave another good performance.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Choko

    *** 4.55 *** "...In a world so filled with danger, where orcs and trolls loom, seemingly, around every bend in the road, he who can fight is most often hailed as the hero and given generous applause. There is more to the mantle of “hero,” I say, than strength of arm or prowess in battle. Mooshie was a hero, truly, because he overcame adversity, because he never blinked at unfavorable odds, and mostly because he acted within a code of clearly defined principles. Can less be said of Belwar Dissengu *** 4.55 *** "...In a world so filled with danger, where orcs and trolls loom, seemingly, around every bend in the road, he who can fight is most often hailed as the hero and given generous applause. There is more to the mantle of “hero,” I say, than strength of arm or prowess in battle. Mooshie was a hero, truly, because he overcame adversity, because he never blinked at unfavorable odds, and mostly because he acted within a code of clearly defined principles. Can less be said of Belwar Dissengulp, the handless deep gnome who befriended a renegade drow? Or of Clacker, who offered his own life rather than bring danger to his friends? ....None of these warriors, though, outshines a young girl I came to know when I first traveled across Ten-Towns. Of all the people I have ever met, none has held themselves to higher standards of honor and decency than Catti-brie. She has seen many battles, yet her eyes sparkle clearly with innocence and her smile shines untainted. Sad will be the day, and let all the world lament, when a discordant tone of cynicism spoils the harmony of her melodic voice...." R.A. Salvatore, Sojourn

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kaora

    I didn't like this as much as the other two. I believe the first in this trilogy was my favorite, and then it slowly started going down hill from there. Drizzt Do'Urden has travelled out of the caves into the surface world. He struggles to find his place in a world where dark elves are feared, and where very few can get past the color of his skin. This book was very slow moving to me. As Drizzt works hard in order to overcome prejudices, there was a lot of down time. He spent the majority of this b I didn't like this as much as the other two. I believe the first in this trilogy was my favorite, and then it slowly started going down hill from there. Drizzt Do'Urden has travelled out of the caves into the surface world. He struggles to find his place in a world where dark elves are feared, and where very few can get past the color of his skin. This book was very slow moving to me. As Drizzt works hard in order to overcome prejudices, there was a lot of down time. He spent the majority of this book attempting to get to know the difference races of the surface, usually unsuccessfully. When he does find a friend, the majority of their time is spent learning/teaching rather than anything else, and while I was glad he found a friend, it just seemed to drag on. I was bored. Disappointing after the exciting world of the Underdark.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Connor

    So I definitely don't recommend reading the epilogue because now I feel like I've been spoiled for the next trilogy in the world. I decided to read these in chronological order, so don't read that epilogue if you're doing the same as I am. Other than that last little bit, I really enjoyed Sojourn. These books are nothing crazy deep, but they're really fun, enjoyable reads packed with a lot of fighting and action scenes. Here, Drizzt has made it to the surface and is attempting to find a place wh So I definitely don't recommend reading the epilogue because now I feel like I've been spoiled for the next trilogy in the world. I decided to read these in chronological order, so don't read that epilogue if you're doing the same as I am. Other than that last little bit, I really enjoyed Sojourn. These books are nothing crazy deep, but they're really fun, enjoyable reads packed with a lot of fighting and action scenes. Here, Drizzt has made it to the surface and is attempting to find a place where he belongs. His struggles were pretty on par for what I thought this book would tackle. I liked the different side characters he meets especially Mooshie because Mooshie has his dark side. The monks he interacts with also made me laugh out loud, so overall I just had a great time. I hope the ones that are alive at the end of the book pop back into the story at some point. I'm looking forward to seeing where Drizzt's adventure goes next in the Icewind Dale Trilogy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    CalebCW

    It's been a long time Drizzt. I still hold to the belief that you need an animated series like Castlevania after this. Sojourn is Drizzt's pilgrimage. He's trying to find a place he can call home outside of that ugly little cave he crawled out of. I don't remember much of the other books outside of i really enjoyed them. I remember his matron mother and his psycho sisters, then him having to face his reanimated dad and his Dwarven friends but beyond that, nope. For most of this book, because of D It's been a long time Drizzt. I still hold to the belief that you need an animated series like Castlevania after this. Sojourn is Drizzt's pilgrimage. He's trying to find a place he can call home outside of that ugly little cave he crawled out of. I don't remember much of the other books outside of i really enjoyed them. I remember his matron mother and his psycho sisters, then him having to face his reanimated dad and his Dwarven friends but beyond that, nope. For most of this book, because of Drizzt's drow heritage alone, he gets no love. In fact every single character he encounters is skeptical of his presence even though they've never met a drow. Eventually most of them warm up to the guy but damn, why does it take a threat against life and limb to do it? Like I generally show kindness to most people who offer a warm conversation and the willingness for a hug. I'm a hugger, although I will settle for a handshake. I don't wait until I'm threatened by a burly man with a blood drenched axe and his giant leech named fluffy, people get the benefit of the doubt. I feel like Drizzt just needs a damn hug, the guy is a puppy with swords. He just wants a community and laughter is that too much to ask? I liked the cast of characters he met but it felt like this one wanted to give too much too quick. There are really three stories with this one in 300 pages, with one conflict being the major drive that ties them all together. This one didn't have the danger of the first two, there's conflict and danger but it takes a back seat to loneliness. And the need to plant Drizzt in a specific spot for the next book. There's also a plot hole that I felt really needed to be resolved and never did, not from elves or the ranger buddy and that kind of irritated me. As it is this definitely felt like the weakest of the three but I still enjoyed it and I'd still recommend it. I'll still continue to read them as well. Plus there are dragons now, I'm a sucker for dragons. There it is and there you have it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Here ends the Dark Elf Trilogy and I couldn’t be more excited to start the next series! This was one wild ride—from the evil society of Menzoberranzan, to the grim tunnels of the Underdark, then finally to the surface! In Sojourn, Drizzt still seeks out a place to call home. He leaves the Underdark and emerges on the surface where people flee before him believing him to be like his kin. He encounters creatures he’s never seen from gnolls (which are just disgusting hyena things) to dragons!! I real Here ends the Dark Elf Trilogy and I couldn’t be more excited to start the next series! This was one wild ride—from the evil society of Menzoberranzan, to the grim tunnels of the Underdark, then finally to the surface! In Sojourn, Drizzt still seeks out a place to call home. He leaves the Underdark and emerges on the surface where people flee before him believing him to be like his kin. He encounters creatures he’s never seen from gnolls (which are just disgusting hyena things) to dragons!! I really liked all of the supporting characters and I loved Montolio. I loved how each of these supporting characters somehow influenced Drizzt’s character into an even better person. When Drizzt left his home he had a lot of guilt and shame but characters like Belwar and Montolio helped ease that burden. It seems strange to say that all the antagonists in these books were well rounded and awesome. From Matron Malice to Roddy, all of the minions in these books were just plain cool. I wanted to hate them but I just couldn’t get past how badass they were. I loved this series and Drizzt has become one of my favorite fantasy characters of all time. I hope you enjoy(ed) these books as much as I have.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.com Only the third book in and I'm still loving Drizzt Do'Urden! In this book Drizzt is trying to live in the real world now and no longer in the Underdark. He is trying to learn how to live in the sunlight without going blind so to speak and traverse this strange new world. He still has his wonderful black panther friend, Guenhwyvar. Together they have to find a place they can call home while fighting off giants, orcs, bad humans, etc. Drizzt finds some good peopl www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.com Only the third book in and I'm still loving Drizzt Do'Urden! In this book Drizzt is trying to live in the real world now and no longer in the Underdark. He is trying to learn how to live in the sunlight without going blind so to speak and traverse this strange new world. He still has his wonderful black panther friend, Guenhwyvar. Together they have to find a place they can call home while fighting off giants, orcs, bad humans, etc. Drizzt finds some good people along the way that he becomes friends with and stays with for some time. I really loved Montolio. He was an old blind ranger living in the mountains, he trains Drizzt in the human language and about things in the world. He was such a great friend and a friend to animals, which I loved of course :) I could not stand Roddy who pursued Drizzt to the end of the book! He was a jerk complaining about something that Drizzt did to him, well you attack someone they fight back! Get a clue! I liked how the book ended with Drizzt finding a home with some new friends, including Catti-brie who was fearless in taking up for him, and she was just a little girl. Through the eyes of babes right? I recommend to anyone that likes this kind of fantasy novel.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Allison ☾

    There was a lot going on in this one. Drizzt spends like 7 years on the surface through a series of tragic events and misunderstandings. He finds acceptance (though from afar) from one of his surface elf kin and a very old blind human ranger. He defeats an Orc leader and tricks a dragon along the way, all while getting chased by bounty hunter Roddy McGristle, a crazed and less imposing version of John Wick. "He killed my dog!" Roddy growled. "Don't look dead to me," Bruenor quipped, drawing chu There was a lot going on in this one. Drizzt spends like 7 years on the surface through a series of tragic events and misunderstandings. He finds acceptance (though from afar) from one of his surface elf kin and a very old blind human ranger. He defeats an Orc leader and tricks a dragon along the way, all while getting chased by bounty hunter Roddy McGristle, a crazed and less imposing version of John Wick. "He killed my dog!" Roddy growled. "Don't look dead to me," Bruenor quipped, drawing chuckles from every corner. "My other dog," Roddy snarled. Drizzt heads to Icewind Dale, a "place for rogues", thinking he can find some acceptance. Drizzt sets up camp near a Dwarven hall and finds contentment here. After a last confrontation with Roddy, he finally finds his "home" alongside dwarven king Bruenor and his adopted human daughter, Cattie-brie. My favorite part of this book was Cattie-brie. Drizzt and Cattie-brie are sweet cinnamon rolls and I want to read more about them immediately. Cattie-brie's energy and zest for life verily bubbled over. In her presence, the drow could not recall his haunting memories, could only feel good about his decision to save the elven child those many years before. Cattie-brie's singsong voice and the careless way she flipped her flowing hair about her shoulders lifted the burden of guilt from Drizzt's back as surely as a giant could have hoisted a rock. So precious.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jarek "the Mistborn" Dąbrowski

    Awesome conclusion to the first trilogy. Just what you would expect from this kind of novel. Quick, easy with enough action and world/character building to keep you interested, leaving room for the many books that come after. 4 stars

  12. 5 out of 5

    daisy

    20.1.19: Rating lowered. RTC!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    Of the Drizzt “origins” trilogy this one moved me the most, and contained the most surprises. You can tell Salvatore in this book is relieved to get out of the underdark. He fills the book with lush descriptions of the woods, streams, the loneliness and beauty of the wild places. He also describes the pioneer spirit of a community on the outskirts of civilization. He brings Drizzt agonizingly close to becoming accepted by a real family, only to in complete shocker and his best plot surprise to Of the Drizzt “origins” trilogy this one moved me the most, and contained the most surprises. You can tell Salvatore in this book is relieved to get out of the underdark. He fills the book with lush descriptions of the woods, streams, the loneliness and beauty of the wild places. He also describes the pioneer spirit of a community on the outskirts of civilization. He brings Drizzt agonizingly close to becoming accepted by a real family, only to in complete shocker and his best plot surprise to date, have them murdered in cold blood. Reading the book felt like I was watching a western where the natives wipe out a border family. Several characters in the book leap from the pages as being if not original, then freshly described. Roddy McGristle is every redneck bully I have ever met. He lives in my town and can be seen at a local bar on Friday and Saturday nights or walking his hunting dogs down the street and daring people not to get out of his way. He schemes for his financial gain all in the name of protecting and serving his community. He uses Drizzt’s people, not his person, as an excuse to hunt him down (for a handsome reward). In the end he gets his comeuppance but not before he causes damage. He makes things hard for an outsider because that is the only way he can ever be accepted. Another description is the mountain man Montolio who befriends Drizzt and with whom Drizzt serves the apprenticeship as a Ranger. In a twist Montolio is blind as a bad from a battle, and old, around seventy. To make him believable with his disablity was feat I didn’t think Salvatore could pull of but to my surprise he did. This was his sixth published Drizzt book and you can see him developing as writer. The best way to describe the characters movement from isolation to acceptance, and the way salvatore describes it, is to show him getting close to building a relationship with people only to lose it time and again. Sometimes through fate, other times through the sheer maliciousness of others. When the family that Drizzt observes is wiped out you can feel your heart dropped because you sensed an opportunity for acceptance. You are also kind of surprised at the way Salvatore doesn’t pull punches and kills of characters he was at pains to describe. That has to be hard for a novelist. Invest so much time and energy into a character and then have to wipe them out in the service of a plot. Ouch. And there are the comic scenes too. The pranks the young boy plays on Drizzt, the tricks montolio plays. The farm family’s games with each other. By this book he has learned how to alternate such scenes for comic effect. I also was moved by the way Drizzt serves his apprenticeship and learns to become useful. And then he becomes useful to the townspeople of the Ten Towns as a Ranger guardian. In so many ways Drizzt grows. He gains trust and friendship andlearns to give back in return without too much expectation. He’s not a fool, but he knows how to give help. Im not that certain that he knows how to receive help. Other characters and situations from the books that stand out: the sprite who is every thirteen year old know it all Ive ever had to work with. Cattie Brie who is so tender and just a girl in this book trying to understand the world around her. It moves me the way she takes to Drizzt. And Bruenor’s acceptance of him. That was a surprise.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dancce

    Liked less because the Underdark suddenly went somewhere, and - a blind goodly ranger with a whole heap of animal friends? Come on. AND a major thing. Drizzt has always seemed to be a fighter as far as I'm concerned. No ranger-thing there. It's just weird. He rarely shows any ranger skills at all, except for sneaking around - and that's something any light-weight rogue/fencer can do. Plus, he's a drow, for goodness's sake. He could never have grasped the scope of the Surface's fauna and flora th Liked less because the Underdark suddenly went somewhere, and - a blind goodly ranger with a whole heap of animal friends? Come on. AND a major thing. Drizzt has always seemed to be a fighter as far as I'm concerned. No ranger-thing there. It's just weird. He rarely shows any ranger skills at all, except for sneaking around - and that's something any light-weight rogue/fencer can do. Plus, he's a drow, for goodness's sake. He could never have grasped the scope of the Surface's fauna and flora that quickly. Plus, he cannot see well during the day. Just... come on. I could continue. This is all a pile of improbability... I like my daily plate of logic, thank you very much.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party

    "Sojourn" is the last book in the Dark Elf Trilogy, and what an epic conclusion it is! This book has a much different tone than the first two. Whereas the first two books took place in underground worlds, this book brings Drizzt Do'Urden to the surface. R. A. Salvatore does a magnificent job portraying Drizzt in a sympathetic light as the dark elf tries desperately to assimilate into his new home. From his bumbling attempts to befriend a family of farmers, to his fear while experiencing his very "Sojourn" is the last book in the Dark Elf Trilogy, and what an epic conclusion it is! This book has a much different tone than the first two. Whereas the first two books took place in underground worlds, this book brings Drizzt Do'Urden to the surface. R. A. Salvatore does a magnificent job portraying Drizzt in a sympathetic light as the dark elf tries desperately to assimilate into his new home. From his bumbling attempts to befriend a family of farmers, to his fear while experiencing his very first winter, Drizzt's pain and loneliness made me truly feel for him. Also, Drizzt shows a lot more personality in this book (the first book was more about Drizzt's dysfunctional family, while the second book portrayed him almost as a primal beast), which made him all the more likeable as well. And speaking of likeable characters, I found the blind ranger Montolio to be a welcome addition to the mythos. While the last book was a little too grim for my tastes, Drizzt's growing friendship with Montolio allowed Salvatore to inject more of his trademark humor this time around. The relationship between the two friends is very touching and reveals more facets to Drizzt's character. I do have one minor complaint, however. While I thought the villains of the last two books were phenomenal adversaries, I did feel the antagonists of "Sojourn" were nowhere near as compelling as Drizzt's twisted family members were. Don't get me wrong, there's plenty of action and excitement in these pages, and Salvatore finds a whole slew of opponents to send after Drizzt, but none of them were quite as entertaining or as complex as the villains from the last 2 books. Again, a small quibble, but one that kept this from being my favorite entry of the trilogy. So, if I had to rank the books in the Dark Elf Trilogy from favorite to least favorite, the order would be "Homeland", "Sojourn", 'Exile". Still I would highly recommend them all! Now, onward to the Icewind Dale Trilogy for me!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kells Next Read

    Actual Ratings: 4.75 RTC

  17. 4 out of 5

    Doug Winenger

    So many writers regurgitate the same themes, ideas, and characters in their books that the lack of original ideas or thoughts is often disappointing. The Dark Elf Trilogy uncovers the previously unveiled world known as "The Underdark". While many creatures in this realm are fierce, barbaric, or evil, none compare to the race known as "Dark Elves". The depth of their savagery, brutality, and cunning is inspired by generations of purely evil practices. In the Underdark, you either kill or be killed So many writers regurgitate the same themes, ideas, and characters in their books that the lack of original ideas or thoughts is often disappointing. The Dark Elf Trilogy uncovers the previously unveiled world known as "The Underdark". While many creatures in this realm are fierce, barbaric, or evil, none compare to the race known as "Dark Elves". The depth of their savagery, brutality, and cunning is inspired by generations of purely evil practices. In the Underdark, you either kill or be killed, you watch your own back because no one else will, and your worst enemy might just be a member of your own family. Insert into this environment, Drizzt, a character with an inner sense of morality, justice, and and even a concept of love, mostly due to a recognition of its absence. Drizzt is a dark elf born into the most unusual of circumstances. While he cannot put name to the traits he finds so lacking around him, he knows that the dark elf race is evil, and he eventually discovers that he doesn't belong. This trilogy is the story of Drizzt's journey as he grows through his early years, trains in the weapons and tactics of his race, and learns ultimately that he can not live among them for fear of compromising or losing altogether his sense of good and his recognition of evil. He leaves everything he knows and ventures into the Underdark where he discovers another challenge to his identity. While Drizzt, at this point in his life, is an unparalleled fighter and master of weaponry, the primal creature he is forced to become to remain alive in the underdark is no better than what he believed he would have become living amongst his race. Finally, Drizzt finds his way to the surface in an effort to escape his past and build some semblance of a life based on the ideals he inherently senses. But, instead of escaping his dark elf heritage, he is forced to combat their stereotypes at every turn. As a voracious reader of several hundred fantasy and science fiction books, I find the original environment introduced in Salvatore's Dark Elf Trilogy enchanting while his twist on the age-old good vs. evil theme enticing. This trilogy remains one of my favorites since the first time I read it over 10 years ago.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    Third volume of back-story for Drizzt Do’Urden, drow fighter extraordinaire. This is the volume that connects to the Icewind Dale novels which Salvatore wrote before the Dark Elf Trilogy. Our hero makes the shift from living as an exile in the Underdark to an existence in the unfamiliar world above ground. While he wasn’t accepted in his birth society because of his sense of morality, he is now judged according to his racial background by those who he meets along the way. Can he find people who w Third volume of back-story for Drizzt Do’Urden, drow fighter extraordinaire. This is the volume that connects to the Icewind Dale novels which Salvatore wrote before the Dark Elf Trilogy. Our hero makes the shift from living as an exile in the Underdark to an existence in the unfamiliar world above ground. While he wasn’t accepted in his birth society because of his sense of morality, he is now judged according to his racial background by those who he meets along the way. Can he find people who will acknowledge that he is not an evil drow? Will he finally find someone to call friend and assuage his life-long loneliness? Once again, the plot is driven by fight sequences, something which Salvatore seems to prefer writing. There’s a lot of dark brooding, but not much real self-reflection by the characters. Perfect for the brooding teen, not so great for the non-brooding older woman. Still, the books are fun to read and short enough to be ideal for a quiet evening at the end of a work-week. Book 276 of my Science Fiction & Fantasy reading project.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Basia

    Well, I read the first 3 books in this series in just under 2 weeks, I think. And that was effortless, as these books just WANT to be consumed! I cannot believe there are 11 more to read! This book, like the 2 before it, was fun to read, did a great job of continuing the story, and had such a colorful cast of characters (referring to the species that appeared throughout this book, AND the series so far, as well as how they were portrayed). That was one of the coolest points about the reading expe Well, I read the first 3 books in this series in just under 2 weeks, I think. And that was effortless, as these books just WANT to be consumed! I cannot believe there are 11 more to read! This book, like the 2 before it, was fun to read, did a great job of continuing the story, and had such a colorful cast of characters (referring to the species that appeared throughout this book, AND the series so far, as well as how they were portrayed). That was one of the coolest points about the reading experience here, I think. All the creatures I grew up imagining from various fantasy faerie tales, etc., were in these pages. It was fascinating, too, how their world was built. Anyway, a great and relaxing set of stories! 4.5 ✨ for the book. Happy reading, everyone!!!!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Micheal

    More rhetoric. So I got to the Drizzt story I really wanted to read in the first place, and this series has lost momentum for me. The Crystal Shard (the next book in the series) sits unread on my ipad and I don't know if i'll get to it or not. Sojourn had its intriguing segments; Im still interested in the fundamental concept of Drizzt. But once again, I was put off by Salvatores style and presentation. Ultimately unsatisfying. Im left to wonder at the state of fantasy literature (using that term l More rhetoric. So I got to the Drizzt story I really wanted to read in the first place, and this series has lost momentum for me. The Crystal Shard (the next book in the series) sits unread on my ipad and I don't know if i'll get to it or not. Sojourn had its intriguing segments; Im still interested in the fundamental concept of Drizzt. But once again, I was put off by Salvatores style and presentation. Ultimately unsatisfying. Im left to wonder at the state of fantasy literature (using that term lightly) when authors like Salvatore and Terry Goodkind consistently churn out best sellers in this genre. Of course, what do I know?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 stars. Good, solid sword and sorcery novel set in the Forgotten Realms. The part I really liked about this novel is the plethora of interesting characters and races including the Barghest whelps (Goblin werewolves) and the winter wolves (larger wolves with human-like intelligence) were very cool. Unfortunately, I did not find the plot as interesting as I would have liked and didn't think the background of interesting creatures (strengths/weaknesses, etc) were explored enough to make them mor 3.0 stars. Good, solid sword and sorcery novel set in the Forgotten Realms. The part I really liked about this novel is the plethora of interesting characters and races including the Barghest whelps (Goblin werewolves) and the winter wolves (larger wolves with human-like intelligence) were very cool. Unfortunately, I did not find the plot as interesting as I would have liked and didn't think the background of interesting creatures (strengths/weaknesses, etc) were explored enough to make them more then two dimensional. In the end, it was pretty good just not great.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alex Janzon

    I didn't expect anything from this trilogy and I started reading it without really knowing anything about the book or the world, but I must say I was surprised by how good it was! I am really excited for book four! I didn't expect anything from this trilogy and I started reading it without really knowing anything about the book or the world, but I must say I was surprised by how good it was! I am really excited for book four!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I'm really enjoying the world. I'm really enjoying the world.

  24. 4 out of 5

    David

    The trilogy is complete. I am pleased that I have now earned the right to safely ignore all R.A. Salvatore recommendations for the rest of my life.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bradley Woodall

    Good book, much less action then the previous and with a bit of angst drizzled throughout. This author sure knows how to make a villain hate worthy though, that damn quickling and bounty hunter had me getting angry at a book. Another strong title if albiet not quite as strong as the previous two

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bookteafull (Danny)

    Definitely an improvement from the last novel. Was it spectacular? No, at least not in terms of plot. This is very much a character driven novel were the sole purpose is for Drizzt to come into his own and find a place he can call home. That's it. That's the entirety of the novel but it was written extremely well. Sojourn showcases the difficulties of navigating a world that, for the most part, is against you. Dark elves are evil and commit atrocities on a daily bases, so it's no surprise that D Definitely an improvement from the last novel. Was it spectacular? No, at least not in terms of plot. This is very much a character driven novel were the sole purpose is for Drizzt to come into his own and find a place he can call home. That's it. That's the entirety of the novel but it was written extremely well. Sojourn showcases the difficulties of navigating a world that, for the most part, is against you. Dark elves are evil and commit atrocities on a daily bases, so it's no surprise that Drizzt, in his pursuit of happiness and a new home, is immediately confronted with discrimination and hostility. There is literally no known kind and compassionate Drow before Drizzt - so the reactions he receives are completely understandable albeit frustrating. "I have played this game many times. Who will welcome a Drow, even one who has forsaken his people and desires nothing more than peace?" It sucks. As the reader you know Drizzt is a BAMF cinnamon roll. He doesn't deserve to be prosecuted for being born a specific species, but showing any hesitancy with other dark elves would most likely have you killed in a heartbeat. The personal stuggle is real here. Anyways, some specific highlights for me were: - Montolio. BLESS HIM for existing when Drizzt most needed him. Excellent first surface mentor and friend. Drizzt studying to be a ranger under his tutelage was great, as was his exploration of religion. - Drizzt channeling his inner Bilbo Baggins and outsmarting a dragon. This entire scene gave me SO MANY FEELS. - Cattie-Brie. ADORABLE HUMAN GIRL AND SASS MASTER. Also, the first to give Drizzt a hug. There wasn't anything I particularly disliked in this novel, but as I mentioned before, the lack of plot was something I couldn't ignore.

  27. 5 out of 5

    F.T.

    I love these books. Sojourn makes an interesting contrast to Book 2, Exile. In that one, Drizzt is prowling around the vast Underdark in survival mode, a force unto himself, fighting a fantastic array of monsters and fiends while being stalked by Matron Malice and her spirit wraith. It was gloomy, creepy, and his loneliness and isolation are heartbreaking. If not for a brighter foray with the gnomes, he'd have fallen into something purely instinctual and predatory. In Exile, he goes above into t I love these books. Sojourn makes an interesting contrast to Book 2, Exile. In that one, Drizzt is prowling around the vast Underdark in survival mode, a force unto himself, fighting a fantastic array of monsters and fiends while being stalked by Matron Malice and her spirit wraith. It was gloomy, creepy, and his loneliness and isolation are heartbreaking. If not for a brighter foray with the gnomes, he'd have fallen into something purely instinctual and predatory. In Exile, he goes above into the bright world, and the neatest thing about this story is how he adjusts to that, having to learn about basic things like day and night, season changes, wildlife, the different races and of course, a whole new raft of monsters and fiends. In keeping with Drizzt's tormented nature, this book is no less heartbreaking; he starts to lose his magic, and he gets his ass kicked in more ways than one. But he keeps evolving, makes an excellent friend and learns to be a ranger, just his kind of thing. This book doesn't end where it seems it should, but keeps going to set up the next part of the series. This is a bit weird, but it did give me closure on some things.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Traci

    Honestly. Eh, kind of meh. I started this set of Drizzt books thinking they were favorites but I find myself looking more forward to stuff that is coming up. Homeland was great fun and gave good insight into the Drow....well homeland. Exile was okay but mainly for the ongoing struggles of the Do'Urden clan. The whole purpose of the book to get Drizzt to finally leave the underdark. And again this book, Sojourn, all lead up to the last fifty pages or so. To the meeting of the two most important p Honestly. Eh, kind of meh. I started this set of Drizzt books thinking they were favorites but I find myself looking more forward to stuff that is coming up. Homeland was great fun and gave good insight into the Drow....well homeland. Exile was okay but mainly for the ongoing struggles of the Do'Urden clan. The whole purpose of the book to get Drizzt to finally leave the underdark. And again this book, Sojourn, all lead up to the last fifty pages or so. To the meeting of the two most important people in Drizzt's life. The dwarf Bruenor and the dwarf's adoptive human daughter Catti-brie (who is only eleven here reminding me uncomfortably of The Thornbirds). The rest is just forgettable filler. Uninteresting villain. I did enjoy Dove, Fret, and Kellindil and their hunt for the truth behind the Drow. In my opinion an entire book from this point of view would have been interesting. After reading so many dark books I have to admit it's been nice reading uncomplicated optimistic books. Where good is good. And evil is evil.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Enjoyed this more than the first two - probably due to the setting, after all those subterranean passages of the first two, nice to finally get above ground!! Not a great deal of story as such, but a nice easy and enjoyable read (I read it in a day!)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sydneroo

    Rating: 2.86/ 10.00 | 🌕🌕🌑🌑🌑 This just isn’t the series for me. I will not be continuing after the Dark Elf Trilogy.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.