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Number Freak: From 1 to 200- The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed

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A compulsively readable look at the secret language of numbers- their role in nature, movies, science, and everything in between. What do Fight Club, wallpaper patterns, George Balanchine's Serenade, and Italian superstitions have in common? They're all included in the entry for the number 17 in this engaging book about numbers- detailing their unique properties, patterns, A compulsively readable look at the secret language of numbers- their role in nature, movies, science, and everything in between. What do Fight Club, wallpaper patterns, George Balanchine's Serenade, and Italian superstitions have in common? They're all included in the entry for the number 17 in this engaging book about numbers- detailing their unique properties, patterns, appeal, history, and lore. Author Derrick Niederman takes readers on a guided tour of the numbers 1 to 300-covering everything from basic mathematical principles to ancient unsolved theorems, from sublime theory to delightfully arcane trivia. Illustrated with diagrams, drawings, and photographs, plus 50 challenging mathematical brainteasers (with answers), this book will fascinate and engage readers of all levels of mathematical skill and knowledge. Includes such gems as: ? There are 42 eyes in a deck of cards, and 42 dots on a pair of dice ? In order to fill in a map so that neighboring regions never get the same color, one never needs more than four colors ? Hells Angels use the number 81 in their insignia because the initials H and A are the eighth and first numbers in the alphabet respectively


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A compulsively readable look at the secret language of numbers- their role in nature, movies, science, and everything in between. What do Fight Club, wallpaper patterns, George Balanchine's Serenade, and Italian superstitions have in common? They're all included in the entry for the number 17 in this engaging book about numbers- detailing their unique properties, patterns, A compulsively readable look at the secret language of numbers- their role in nature, movies, science, and everything in between. What do Fight Club, wallpaper patterns, George Balanchine's Serenade, and Italian superstitions have in common? They're all included in the entry for the number 17 in this engaging book about numbers- detailing their unique properties, patterns, appeal, history, and lore. Author Derrick Niederman takes readers on a guided tour of the numbers 1 to 300-covering everything from basic mathematical principles to ancient unsolved theorems, from sublime theory to delightfully arcane trivia. Illustrated with diagrams, drawings, and photographs, plus 50 challenging mathematical brainteasers (with answers), this book will fascinate and engage readers of all levels of mathematical skill and knowledge. Includes such gems as: ? There are 42 eyes in a deck of cards, and 42 dots on a pair of dice ? In order to fill in a map so that neighboring regions never get the same color, one never needs more than four colors ? Hells Angels use the number 81 in their insignia because the initials H and A are the eighth and first numbers in the alphabet respectively

30 review for Number Freak: From 1 to 200- The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed

  1. 5 out of 5

    James Carter

    Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is chockful of information about every natural number from 1 to 200 inclusive. My only gripe about it is that...what am I going to do with the trivial information? I'm not sure if I can do anything with a Keith number or a Vampire number. All in all, Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is good, but all of that information can be googled. Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is chockful of information about every natural number from 1 to 200 inclusive. My only gripe about it is that...what am I going to do with the trivial information? I'm not sure if I can do anything with a Keith number or a Vampire number. All in all, Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is good, but all of that information can be googled.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark Schnitzius

    Mostly superficial, but there were some interesting bits.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Johnston

    If you like numbers, you’ll like this entertaining book. If you don’t like numbers you’ll find this is still an enjoyable book to read, for the trivia if nothing else. The book title says it best, but don’t let math-phobia keep you from the fascinating world of numbers,...there are more surprises than you’d think!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mdaly

    A book that can be dipped into for obscure and quirkly maths related to the numbers from 1 to 200.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emma S.

    When I was reading the entry for 200 in the math book Number Freak, I saw that it contained "a little bit of everything, sort of like this book." Derrick Niederman put together a spontaneous collection of numbers and their properties where he lists each number and shows its significance in the everyday world, from 1 to 200. Overall, I found it entertaining, but that about half of the book's entries (from 101 to 200) were short and contained little information. There is no plot, as this is a non-f When I was reading the entry for 200 in the math book Number Freak, I saw that it contained "a little bit of everything, sort of like this book." Derrick Niederman put together a spontaneous collection of numbers and their properties where he lists each number and shows its significance in the everyday world, from 1 to 200. Overall, I found it entertaining, but that about half of the book's entries (from 101 to 200) were short and contained little information. There is no plot, as this is a non-fiction and mathematical book, but there is a sense of Niederman's humor in all of the numbers mentioned. Although I must say that the entries for the numbers start as longer, and then progressively grow shorter, converging towards a fixed limit (say, 1-2 paragraphs.) Sometimes, two consecutive numbers shared an entry, because of their shared properties. And some entries weren't even worth reading. For example, the entry for the number 138 states that: (view spoiler)["Until the punk band the Misfits came out with their song 'We are 138' in 1982, there was absolutely nothing to say about this number. In some sense there still isn't." (hide spoiler)] It doesn't compare very well to other math books like Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension, but that was mostly because this one tries to put a fun spin on things. Although amused, I felt that the book could have had more depth. I would recommend this to anyone who wants some sort of proof that numbers are more fun than they appear. I'm not sure what the age range should be for this book, as it was written for slightly older audiences, but has the fun elements that slightly younger audiences would be interested in.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Examining special properties of the numbers 1 -200 is a pretty cool idea. If this stopped at 100 I would have really loved it, but the book just keeps on going. At some point, knowing the 16th triangular number is really just not that much more exciting than knowing 15th. Great book for a disjointed read, making it an excellent school book or bathroom pick up. And even though this book may not be the best around, I must admit my admiration for Niederman. It took a lot of research, a lot of math an Examining special properties of the numbers 1 -200 is a pretty cool idea. If this stopped at 100 I would have really loved it, but the book just keeps on going. At some point, knowing the 16th triangular number is really just not that much more exciting than knowing 15th. Great book for a disjointed read, making it an excellent school book or bathroom pick up. And even though this book may not be the best around, I must admit my admiration for Niederman. It took a lot of research, a lot of math and a lot of patience to put this book together. I appreciate his efforts to entertain us few math dorks out there.

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Orman

    If you are into Numbers, this is the Number One book for you! Each number from 1 through 200 is given a write-up describing its significance. Not much on 138, but 137 is of course physics' fine-structure constant. And 42 is one of the most important numbers ever, being the Ultimate Answer to the Great Question of Life, the Universe and Everything in "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy." Or you can view it as the number worn by baseball great Jackie Robinson. All depends on how view the numbers game. If you are into Numbers, this is the Number One book for you! Each number from 1 through 200 is given a write-up describing its significance. Not much on 138, but 137 is of course physics' fine-structure constant. And 42 is one of the most important numbers ever, being the Ultimate Answer to the Great Question of Life, the Universe and Everything in "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy." Or you can view it as the number worn by baseball great Jackie Robinson. All depends on how view the numbers game.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James Carter

    Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is chockful of information about every natural number from 1 to 200 inclusive. My only gripe about it is that...what am I going to do with the trivial information? I'm not sure if I can do anything with a Keith number or a Vampire number. All in all, Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is good, but all of that information can be googled. Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is chockful of information about every natural number from 1 to 200 inclusive. My only gripe about it is that...what am I going to do with the trivial information? I'm not sure if I can do anything with a Keith number or a Vampire number. All in all, Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is good, but all of that information can be googled.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    If you love numbers, this is the book for you. "Number Freak" definitely lives up to its name and contains lots of random information about the numbers from 1 to 200. Did you know for example that 69 equals 105 in base 8, while 105 equals 69 in hexadecimal and that the same is true for the numbers from 64 through 69? Or that there are numbers called vampire numbers? If not, this is the book for you, and even if you did you'll probably find out something new and surprising. If you love numbers, this is the book for you. "Number Freak" definitely lives up to its name and contains lots of random information about the numbers from 1 to 200. Did you know for example that 69 equals 105 in base 8, while 105 equals 69 in hexadecimal and that the same is true for the numbers from 64 through 69? Or that there are numbers called vampire numbers? If not, this is the book for you, and even if you did you'll probably find out something new and surprising.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Gould

    Outside of the review of math classes from my past, most of the "hidden language" revolved around run-of-the-mill "fun" facts: history, games, sports, politics, and other tired standards you get from the male perspective. There wasn't a single sentence that came close to blowing my mind, unless you counted that there were two numbers between 1 and 200 (176 and 183 to be precise) where Niederman failed to find anything to say at all. Outside of the review of math classes from my past, most of the "hidden language" revolved around run-of-the-mill "fun" facts: history, games, sports, politics, and other tired standards you get from the male perspective. There wasn't a single sentence that came close to blowing my mind, unless you counted that there were two numbers between 1 and 200 (176 and 183 to be precise) where Niederman failed to find anything to say at all.

  11. 5 out of 5

    James Carter

    Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is chockful of information about every natural number from 1 to 200 inclusive. My only gripe about it is that...what am I going to do with the trivial information? I'm not sure if I can do anything with a Keith number or a Vampire number. All in all, Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is good, but all of that information can be googled. Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is chockful of information about every natural number from 1 to 200 inclusive. My only gripe about it is that...what am I going to do with the trivial information? I'm not sure if I can do anything with a Keith number or a Vampire number. All in all, Number Freak: From 1 to 200, The Hidden Language of Numbers Revealed is good, but all of that information can be googled.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This a great book for a Math geek or someone who has an interest in math and has also taken higher level math courses - if you haven't this is definitely not the book for you. I may revisit this book when I am old and lonely.. It's a thinking book and I just don't have the energy to sit down and think. This a great book for a Math geek or someone who has an interest in math and has also taken higher level math courses - if you haven't this is definitely not the book for you. I may revisit this book when I am old and lonely.. It's a thinking book and I just don't have the energy to sit down and think.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cat.

    Fun. I didn't finish it, because it's really super-overdue, but in spite of all the math stuff that I didn't understand--not a surprise that there's math in a book about numbers, eh?--this was a fun read. Fun. I didn't finish it, because it's really super-overdue, but in spite of all the math stuff that I didn't understand--not a surprise that there's math in a book about numbers, eh?--this was a fun read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Rosen

    Not the best "numerical trivia" book I've read, and there are some fundamental proofreading errors that really mar the book -- in a book about math, it's important that you get your example equations right, especially when it's simple addition. Not the best "numerical trivia" book I've read, and there are some fundamental proofreading errors that really mar the book -- in a book about math, it's important that you get your example equations right, especially when it's simple addition.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    This was a fun little book about numbers, but the subtitle is misleading - no revealed hidden language, nothing that mysterious. But still, interesting tidbits about where numbers occur both in mathematical equations and outside of them. A lot of the math was way over my head.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Very interesting, if you like random factoids about numbers and math, which I do. Doesn't explain anything in depth but it would be easy enough to find a new subject to be interested in these pages and then explore it more fully elsewhere! Very interesting, if you like random factoids about numbers and math, which I do. Doesn't explain anything in depth but it would be easy enough to find a new subject to be interested in these pages and then explore it more fully elsewhere!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Eh. Not as entertaining as I was hoping - a lot of the "facts" were kind of a stretch, and the writing style was pretty meh. Overall, interesting in that bathroom-reader sort of way. Eh. Not as entertaining as I was hoping - a lot of the "facts" were kind of a stretch, and the writing style was pretty meh. Overall, interesting in that bathroom-reader sort of way.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    138 is a boring number

  19. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    Fascinating stuff. Unfortunatly it's just such information overload almost none of it is retainable. Great for trivia hunters or losers. The author is funny throughout, no easy task I'm sure. Fascinating stuff. Unfortunatly it's just such information overload almost none of it is retainable. Great for trivia hunters or losers. The author is funny throughout, no easy task I'm sure.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    I never read this whole book from cover to cover, but it was really fun to flip through and learn interesting facts about different numbers.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John

    I confess that I did not finish this book. Some of the entries were interesting, but most are deep in the weeds of advanced mathematics.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vashti

    I'm surprised how much I learned about cultural and mathematical nooks and crannies. This book gave me a different view of numbers. I'm surprised how much I learned about cultural and mathematical nooks and crannies. This book gave me a different view of numbers.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Harold

    Interesting, loved the social security section, it is right on target

  24. 5 out of 5

    Annee Dyer

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sej Patel

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

  27. 4 out of 5

    Danny Seipel

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steve Lindsey

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  30. 5 out of 5

    Heather

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