web site hit counter Fire and Fury: The Allied Bombing of Germany, 1942-1945 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Fire and Fury: The Allied Bombing of Germany, 1942-1945

Availability: Ready to download

During the Second World War, Allied air forces dropped nearly two million tons of bombs on Germany, destroying some 60 cities, killing more than half a million German citizens, and leaving 80,000 pilots dead. But the terrible truth is that much of the bombing was carried out against the expressed demands of the Allied military leadership, leading to the needless deaths of During the Second World War, Allied air forces dropped nearly two million tons of bombs on Germany, destroying some 60 cities, killing more than half a million German citizens, and leaving 80,000 pilots dead. But the terrible truth is that much of the bombing was carried out against the expressed demands of the Allied military leadership, leading to the needless deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians. Focusing on the crucial period from 1942 to 1945, Fire and Fury tells the story of the American and British bombing campaign through the eyes of those involved: the military and civilian command in America, Britain, and Germany, the aircrews in the skies who carried out their orders, and civilians on the ground who felt the fury of the Allied attacks. Here, for the first time, the story of the American and British air campaigns is told-and the cost accounted for . . .


Compare

During the Second World War, Allied air forces dropped nearly two million tons of bombs on Germany, destroying some 60 cities, killing more than half a million German citizens, and leaving 80,000 pilots dead. But the terrible truth is that much of the bombing was carried out against the expressed demands of the Allied military leadership, leading to the needless deaths of During the Second World War, Allied air forces dropped nearly two million tons of bombs on Germany, destroying some 60 cities, killing more than half a million German citizens, and leaving 80,000 pilots dead. But the terrible truth is that much of the bombing was carried out against the expressed demands of the Allied military leadership, leading to the needless deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians. Focusing on the crucial period from 1942 to 1945, Fire and Fury tells the story of the American and British bombing campaign through the eyes of those involved: the military and civilian command in America, Britain, and Germany, the aircrews in the skies who carried out their orders, and civilians on the ground who felt the fury of the Allied attacks. Here, for the first time, the story of the American and British air campaigns is told-and the cost accounted for . . .

30 review for Fire and Fury: The Allied Bombing of Germany, 1942-1945

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    An involuntary surfer on the Fire and Fury wave. An involuntary surfer on the Fire and Fury wave.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    This is a really good and important book. Every WWII reader knows that the US Bombed Nazi Europe by Day, and the British Bomber Command bombed by Night. But this book traces the development and history of the entire Allied bombing effort in Europe. He details how the US proved that precision bombing is an effective tactic and strategy- and more importantly- HOW THE BRITISH EFFORT WAS NOWHERE NEAR AS EFFECTIVE. Area Bombing is simply not that useful in war. And yet it continued and was only discr This is a really good and important book. Every WWII reader knows that the US Bombed Nazi Europe by Day, and the British Bomber Command bombed by Night. But this book traces the development and history of the entire Allied bombing effort in Europe. He details how the US proved that precision bombing is an effective tactic and strategy- and more importantly- HOW THE BRITISH EFFORT WAS NOWHERE NEAR AS EFFECTIVE. Area Bombing is simply not that useful in war. And yet it continued and was only discredited after the war. A great read and something that any reader will find fascinating.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Fire and Fury by Randall Hansen is an excellent, well- written historical inquiry into the differing strategies of British Bomber Command and the USAAF in the bombing of Germany World War II. Very briefly, the British bombing plan was to carpet bomb entire German cities into rubble, causing as much destruction and death as possible. The announced intention was to destroy the morale of the German people. The American Strategic Air Forces plan was one of daylight precision bombing attacks on milita Fire and Fury by Randall Hansen is an excellent, well- written historical inquiry into the differing strategies of British Bomber Command and the USAAF in the bombing of Germany World War II. Very briefly, the British bombing plan was to carpet bomb entire German cities into rubble, causing as much destruction and death as possible. The announced intention was to destroy the morale of the German people. The American Strategic Air Forces plan was one of daylight precision bombing attacks on military targets such as aircraft factories, manufacturing facilities, oil installations and transportation hubs, all in order to eliminate the German ability to continue the war. I will not presume to re-tell Mr. Hansen's story here. That would not do justice to the research he did into his subject or to the masterful presentation of the facts leading to his conclusion. That conclusion seemed evident to me, but it may be controversial to some. There is not a dull page in this book; it is fascinating for any fan of WWII history. Facts are clearly presented, and conclusions clearly drawn. In the 297 pages ( photos, also) great battles are fought over Germany, and between the Allies, indeed, within the British command structure itself. I bought the book a few years ago, but I am sorry I waited so long to read it. If you are at all interested in the air war in Europe, read it. Fascinating, worthwhile, recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Martin Empson

    Randall Hansen's book is an important contribution to discussions of military history and World War Two. It is impossible to read it, in my view, and believe that Arthur Harris was not a war criminal, though others may disagree. However everyone who reads this can only conclude that the strategy of mass bombing of cities was an utter failure that probably prolonged the war. Full review: http://resolutereader.blogspot.co.uk/... Randall Hansen's book is an important contribution to discussions of military history and World War Two. It is impossible to read it, in my view, and believe that Arthur Harris was not a war criminal, though others may disagree. However everyone who reads this can only conclude that the strategy of mass bombing of cities was an utter failure that probably prolonged the war. Full review: http://resolutereader.blogspot.co.uk/...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael Gerald

    War is hell. This fact is graphically demonstrated by the bombing of Germany during the Second World War. But as the author amply explains, there is an important distinction between the Americans' preference for precision bombing and the British indiscriminate area bombing, which was really terror bombing. Not only was the deliberate bombing and destruction of German cities and towns by the British barbaric and inhumane, it was also INEFFECTIVE. The fact is, the precision bombing of oil and tran War is hell. This fact is graphically demonstrated by the bombing of Germany during the Second World War. But as the author amply explains, there is an important distinction between the Americans' preference for precision bombing and the British indiscriminate area bombing, which was really terror bombing. Not only was the deliberate bombing and destruction of German cities and towns by the British barbaric and inhumane, it was also INEFFECTIVE. The fact is, the precision bombing of oil and transportation, and the destruction of the Luftwaffe (the German Air Force), was vital in the crippling of the Nazi war effort in 1944-1945. While the British terror bombing only callously destroyed 60 magnificent German cities and killed almost 600,000 Germans.

  6. 5 out of 5

    John

    An interesting commentary on the British night area bombing and the US daytime (usually) precision bombing strategic air campaigns against Germany. It contrasts the American bombing of mainly industrial targets (oil, transportation, ball bearings) quite favourably against Harris, of the RAF's Bomber Command, and his obsession with obliterating German cities in a stated attempt to defeat morale. Hansen makes both the moral and effectiveness argument in favour of the US approach. A bit much of the An interesting commentary on the British night area bombing and the US daytime (usually) precision bombing strategic air campaigns against Germany. It contrasts the American bombing of mainly industrial targets (oil, transportation, ball bearings) quite favourably against Harris, of the RAF's Bomber Command, and his obsession with obliterating German cities in a stated attempt to defeat morale. Hansen makes both the moral and effectiveness argument in favour of the US approach. A bit much of the middle is taken up with the memo war between the wimpish Portal, trying to get Harris to bomb the industrial targets, and the seemingly insubordinate Harris. It is a useful companion to Tillman's "Whirlwind", where the Americans did use Harris' city-killing approach in fire-bombing Japanese civilians. Different race, different morality? Or were the Brits in favour of blowing Germany to bits in retaliation for the Blitz and V-1s and V-2s, and the Americans feeling the same after Pearl Harbor and other attacks directly on the US and its dependencies in the Pacific. Probably a bit of both.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    Not sure how to review this one, the book was a quick and easy read with plenty of detail, facts and eyewitness accounts of those who orchestrated the bombing campaign and those who survived being on the receiving end. I think the frustrating thing for me are the two pivotal personalities responsible for bomber command, Portal and Harris. I guess frustrating because I see the tactic of area or carpet bombing of cities as unethical and of less value to achieving military goals. This account clear Not sure how to review this one, the book was a quick and easy read with plenty of detail, facts and eyewitness accounts of those who orchestrated the bombing campaign and those who survived being on the receiving end. I think the frustrating thing for me are the two pivotal personalities responsible for bomber command, Portal and Harris. I guess frustrating because I see the tactic of area or carpet bombing of cities as unethical and of less value to achieving military goals. This account clearly illustrates Portals wavering and ambiguous dealings with a man under his command who was willing to flount his orders to carry out a campaign against German citizens rather than military targets. After all arguments are in it is clear to me that this period is a dark stain on the history of Britain and certainly of bomber command.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Berger

    This is a thorough and careful history of the Allied bombing campaign against Germany, and it doesn’t stint on analysis. There are two conclusions: 1. There was a very definite difference in intent between RAF’s Bomber Command and the USAAF campaign. Bomber Command preferred to kill civilians rather than bombing industrial targets, and often passed up the opportunity to do serious damage to German war production in order to kill a few more people. Meanwhile, the USAAF commanders were laser-focuse This is a thorough and careful history of the Allied bombing campaign against Germany, and it doesn’t stint on analysis. There are two conclusions: 1. There was a very definite difference in intent between RAF’s Bomber Command and the USAAF campaign. Bomber Command preferred to kill civilians rather than bombing industrial targets, and often passed up the opportunity to do serious damage to German war production in order to kill a few more people. Meanwhile, the USAAF commanders were laser-focused on German economic and war production targets, and did very little deliberate “area bombing.” 2. Bombing of economic targets was far the more effective strategy, besides being more moral. The text cites German documents to point out that, had Bomber Command unbent enough to follow up successful American raids on industry, the war would have been definitely shortened. Instead, Bomber Command actually prolonged the war by their campaign of frank terror bombing. The USAAF is almost single-handedly responsible for the defeat of the German Air Force, and that is due partly to their concentration on aircraft production-related targets, and partly to the deliberate strategy of drawing out German fighters in order to destroy them. The United States doesn’t have clean hands, even in the European theater, much less in Japan where carpet-bombing with incendiaries was the standard tactic. (In our own defense it should be noted that Japan built mostly with wood and paper, which is resistant to serious damage by high explosive, and the centers of industry were much more diffuse than in Germany.) Furthermore, perhaps 10% of USAAF bombing missions in Europe were deliberate area bombing, as opposed to inadvertent area bombing due to overcast or other poor targeting conditions. But the conclusion of this book is clear: the United States had the more effective bombing strategy, and the RAF’s Bomber Command actively obstructed that strategy by their preference for terror over the destruction of industrial targets.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Scott Martin

    (Audiobook) This is the second book titled "Fire and Fury" that I read this year, and this one is a better book than the other one (Michael Wolff's tabloid-style account of the early Trump White House). This one focuses on the Allied bombing campaign against Nazi Germany during World War II. It offers extensive detail of the people involved in the planning and execution of those campaigns, as well as those who dealt with the effects of that bombing. It can get a bit academic in reading, but not (Audiobook) This is the second book titled "Fire and Fury" that I read this year, and this one is a better book than the other one (Michael Wolff's tabloid-style account of the early Trump White House). This one focuses on the Allied bombing campaign against Nazi Germany during World War II. It offers extensive detail of the people involved in the planning and execution of those campaigns, as well as those who dealt with the effects of that bombing. It can get a bit academic in reading, but not a shock given the detail of sources. Hansen takes the stance that the bombing was ultimately ineffective in achieving its aims of bringing about the strategic defeat of Germany it promised to do (mirroring several key surveys in the immediate aftermath of the war). His is critical of all parties involved in the war, but does not blame the young men who executed those missions. The reader does okay with the material, which can get a bit dry at times. A book that should be read by airmen across the world at least once, but maybe not one to be reread.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Larry Warren

    This book presents the air war from three points of view. The German, world conquest. British, area bombing, I think this was based on revenge for the war that was brought to England. Then the American, precision daylight bombing. We came late to the fight, which we did not want, trying maintain the moral high ground. The author tries to show the difference in the British and American ideals and approach ending the war. From my point of view, being born in 1951, I thank the heroes of the Second w This book presents the air war from three points of view. The German, world conquest. British, area bombing, I think this was based on revenge for the war that was brought to England. Then the American, precision daylight bombing. We came late to the fight, which we did not want, trying maintain the moral high ground. The author tries to show the difference in the British and American ideals and approach ending the war. From my point of view, being born in 1951, I thank the heroes of the Second world War for the world I grew up in.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leo Mccarthy

    Disappointing read.....title would have been more aptly named the feud between Harris and Portal on bombing targets. Author spent the better part of the narrative with back and forth between Harris & Portal. I had expectations of reading about the exploits of the 8th air force and bomber command....I was wrong. Capping off this weak effort was the authors opinion of the morality of the European air war......and his opinion is wrong.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    This is an excellent narrative of the bombing campaigns in Europe and Japan. Hansen is an articulate author who has brought to life some very detailed research all the while giving voice to the human factor throughout these devastating times. The book keeps moving, is Immersive and entertaining to read and highly recommended for anyone wanting a balanced view of the horrors associated with the WWII bombing operations.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Goodwin

    An interesting, detailed account of the bombing of Germany during World War II and the different approaches taken by the British and the Americans. It reads like a novel, but is chock full of pertinent information and the disagreements of the two countries' approach to the air war. Highly recommended. An interesting, detailed account of the bombing of Germany during World War II and the different approaches taken by the British and the Americans. It reads like a novel, but is chock full of pertinent information and the disagreements of the two countries' approach to the air war. Highly recommended.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Worth reading Even when fighting an evil force like the Nazis, as this book makes clear, we should not check our morals at the door.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ben Prill

    Ok Read Book was alright, seemed to be more of a summary about the fighting between Harris and Portal than a bombing campaign lesson.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Overall a good book but a weak conclusion in my opinion.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lizz Edgecomb

    This book was very informative, like a high school history book. Also like a high school history book, it was long, dull, and completely unamusing. If you are looking for a dates and figures book, this is for you.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I’ll fess up now - this is NOT the book I read. I’m just trying to mess with Amazon’s algorithm. Besides, everyone’s reading that “other” Fire and Fury.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Josh Liller

    Excellent book about the strategic bombing of Germany. The author makes the argument about the usefulness of the American precision day bombing and the uselessness of the British area night bombing. I really liked the writing style and the author makes his argument without feeling too repetitive or browbeating the reader with his conclusion. He also presents the experiences of some German victims of area bombing. Bomber Harris' frequent arguments with his superior (Portal) over what he should be Excellent book about the strategic bombing of Germany. The author makes the argument about the usefulness of the American precision day bombing and the uselessness of the British area night bombing. I really liked the writing style and the author makes his argument without feeling too repetitive or browbeating the reader with his conclusion. He also presents the experiences of some German victims of area bombing. Bomber Harris' frequent arguments with his superior (Portal) over what he should be bombing and why are covered in detail. Unfortunately, I found this to be the one weak point of the book. The Portal-Harris arguments felt very repetitive, although this is probably a fault not as much of the writer as the history itself. I also felt some of the presentation was uneven between the American and English air forces. The argument is well made in the book but might have been even better with more coverage of the experiences and successes of American bombing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    The author does a magnificant job of giving the reader an unlimited amount of data so they can decide their own conclusions as to who was the real danger in the bombing of Germany during World War 2. The author introduces us to the men who made the decisions on who to bomb and when. Done in a writing style that lets your average reader follow the timelines and moments of clarity, the reader will see the views from both sides of the battles. Any fan of World War 2 books will enjoy reading this bo The author does a magnificant job of giving the reader an unlimited amount of data so they can decide their own conclusions as to who was the real danger in the bombing of Germany during World War 2. The author introduces us to the men who made the decisions on who to bomb and when. Done in a writing style that lets your average reader follow the timelines and moments of clarity, the reader will see the views from both sides of the battles. Any fan of World War 2 books will enjoy reading this book. As a bonus, there is a nice middle section of photos so you can put faces to the men you're reading about.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Beth/Chuck

    An excellent analysis of the different philosophies between the two major allies. To a degree,I could see where Harris was coming from. His country was bombed during the Blitz and later by the V1 and V2 weapons. Still, after the early results showed that area bombing was not having the effect they thought it would, Harris largely disregarded orders from his superior and kept up his firebombing attacks on population centers instead of military targets. Interesting too on how Allied leaders were co An excellent analysis of the different philosophies between the two major allies. To a degree,I could see where Harris was coming from. His country was bombed during the Blitz and later by the V1 and V2 weapons. Still, after the early results showed that area bombing was not having the effect they thought it would, Harris largely disregarded orders from his superior and kept up his firebombing attacks on population centers instead of military targets. Interesting too on how Allied leaders were concerned about world opinion then and how they would be viewed after the war. Highly recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ted

    The book is well written and a compelling read. But I was emotionally distraught by what Hansen says history shows. Especially the British, but the Americans as well to a far less extent, engaged in a bombing of Germany that knowingly targeted civilians. Hansen says the records show that it was known that the area bombing that was destroying German city after German city was not really hindering the Nazi war machine. The Americans engaged in a far more strategic bombing to destroy the German air The book is well written and a compelling read. But I was emotionally distraught by what Hansen says history shows. Especially the British, but the Americans as well to a far less extent, engaged in a bombing of Germany that knowingly targeted civilians. Hansen says the records show that it was known that the area bombing that was destroying German city after German city was not really hindering the Nazi war machine. The Americans engaged in a far more strategic bombing to destroy the German air force and to destroy German oil production and manufacturing. Hansen thinks this was the better contribution to ending the war.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    I'll confess, I didn't have much sympathy for the Germans' being carpet-bombed during the war until I read this book. Hansen makes a completely convincing argument that area bombing wasn't all that necessary after '44. His argument that it prolonged the war is a little less convincing--but only a little. But after reading about all the cities that the British flattened in '45, you really start to blanch in horror and realize that they just had it in for the Germans. It was absolutely horrific, a I'll confess, I didn't have much sympathy for the Germans' being carpet-bombed during the war until I read this book. Hansen makes a completely convincing argument that area bombing wasn't all that necessary after '44. His argument that it prolonged the war is a little less convincing--but only a little. But after reading about all the cities that the British flattened in '45, you really start to blanch in horror and realize that they just had it in for the Germans. It was absolutely horrific, and, in light of the evidence that Hansen provides, totally unnecessary.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jon Josserand

    Was fire-bombing effective? Did the US firebomb? This is a fascinating history of the evolution of the US and UK air campaign against Germany during WWII. Behind the scenes, there was an ongoing simmering battle between the US and UK relative to air strategies and priorities, as well as a struggle within the British bomber command itself. A good part of the sourcing for this book comes from the correspondence of these British military leaders. The book does not address the Pacific war, where the Was fire-bombing effective? Did the US firebomb? This is a fascinating history of the evolution of the US and UK air campaign against Germany during WWII. Behind the scenes, there was an ongoing simmering battle between the US and UK relative to air strategies and priorities, as well as a struggle within the British bomber command itself. A good part of the sourcing for this book comes from the correspondence of these British military leaders. The book does not address the Pacific war, where the US air tactics were distinctly different from those in Europe.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Sankey

    Analysis of the technology, people (Harris, Mitchell, Arnold, LeMay) and political considerations leading to the development of area and strategic bombing doctrine and practice 1942-1945, culminating in the bombing of Dresden. In general, it is not good to live next door to a ball bearing factory.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Duval

    An in depth study of the WW 2 bombing campaign of Germany. Compares the morality with the necessity of non military carpet bombing of German cities. It's very well written and easy to follow. I have never read a more unbiased study of a particular subject then this one. An in depth study of the WW 2 bombing campaign of Germany. Compares the morality with the necessity of non military carpet bombing of German cities. It's very well written and easy to follow. I have never read a more unbiased study of a particular subject then this one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Peter Rooijmans

    A concise history of the allied bombing campaign over Germany, exposing especially the irrationality of bombing cities, where the efforts were continued at all cost, without any reflection on their effectivity or morality.

  28. 5 out of 5

    William

    This volume lacks a purpose. I did use it once as a flyswatter, so perhaps that issue has been overcome.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kent Beck

    A disturbing and thorough history of the Allied strategic bombing campaign. The author condemns Harris for unnecessarily killing German civilians and lengthening the war.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Trent

    I appreciated reading the details of Allied bombing in WWII as I flew over Germany. It really helped me envision the situation more keenly. And it helped me appreciate my time in Germany even more.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.