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The Last Camel Died at Noon

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Bestselling author Peters brings back 19th-century Egyptologist Amelia Peabody and her entourage in a delicious caper that digs up mystery in the shadow of the pyramids.


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Bestselling author Peters brings back 19th-century Egyptologist Amelia Peabody and her entourage in a delicious caper that digs up mystery in the shadow of the pyramids.

30 review for The Last Camel Died at Noon

  1. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Elizabeth Peters takes a slightly different direction in her sixth book and pays homage to Sir Henry Rider Haggard. Thus The Last Camel Died at Noon (you have to love that title!) is a romantic adventure in the style of King Solomon's Mines. It is great! Of course we are still treated to Amelia's personal opinions of her actions which I always feel are very much her own view and maybe not based in reality! The relationship between the Emersons is as delightful as ever as is their constantly enter Elizabeth Peters takes a slightly different direction in her sixth book and pays homage to Sir Henry Rider Haggard. Thus The Last Camel Died at Noon (you have to love that title!) is a romantic adventure in the style of King Solomon's Mines. It is great! Of course we are still treated to Amelia's personal opinions of her actions which I always feel are very much her own view and maybe not based in reality! The relationship between the Emersons is as delightful as ever as is their constantly entertaining repartee. Ramses is an absolute gem. And now it appears he might be gaining a sister. As usual I am already looking forward to the next book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    HBalikov

    Let me tell you a bit about that 19th Century fictional feminist Amelia Peabody. “…I always try to become friendly with the women, in hope of instructing them in the rights and privileges to which their sex is morally entitled.” She spins her recollections in the first person with an almost encyclopedic knowledge of Egyptology and archeology. And let Peabody tell you about her brilliant and pretentious husband. "Professor Radcliffe Emerson, F.R.S., F.B.A., LL.D. (Edinburgh), D.C.L. (Oxford), Mem Let me tell you a bit about that 19th Century fictional feminist Amelia Peabody. “…I always try to become friendly with the women, in hope of instructing them in the rights and privileges to which their sex is morally entitled.” She spins her recollections in the first person with an almost encyclopedic knowledge of Egyptology and archeology. And let Peabody tell you about her brilliant and pretentious husband. "Professor Radcliffe Emerson, F.R.S., F.B.A., LL.D. (Edinburgh), D.C.L. (Oxford), Member of the American Philosophical Society, et cetera, preeminent Egyptologist of this or any other era, was frequently to be encountered in unusual, not to say peculiar, surroundings. Will I ever forget that magical moment when I entered a tomb in the desolate cliffs bordering the Nile and found him delirious with fever, in desperate need of attentions he was helpless to resist? The bond forged between us by my expert nursing was strengthened by the dangers we subsequently shared; and in due course, Reader, I married him. Since that momentous day we had excavated in every major site in Egypt and written extensively on our discoveries. Modesty prevents me from claiming too large a share of the scholarly reputation we had earned, but Emerson would have been the first to proclaim that we were a partnership, in archaeology as in marriage." Emerson, also known as “The Father of Curses,” their son, Ramses, and a new cast of characters are off up the Nile to Nubia. The plot involves both an old acquaintance who was last heard from fourteen years previously, and the opportunity to look at some ancient sites. Treasure was not the objective as Ramses explains: “The goal of proper excavation…is not treasure but knowledge. Any scrap of material, no matter how insignificant, may supply an essential clue to our understanding of the past. Our primary purpose here is to establish the original plan, and, if possible, the relative chronology…” Barbara Mertz got her degree in Egyptology from the University of Chicago about the time I was born. She seems to have had a fascination for mysteries and crime and her books (20) about Amelia Peabody were written with the pen-name Elizabeth Peters. Each book (in order) is intended to represent one yearly expedition in search of knowledge of antiquities. They begin in the last two decades of the 19th Century. There is plenty of opportunity for “Peters” to share her knowledge of the various Egyptian dynasties; their customs; their gods; their dress; their cosmetics; their eating habits; their social organization; etc. For the most part, this enhances her stories. There was more thriller than mystery to this novel and, for me, that was just fine. I enjoy these journeys into antiquity but once every decade or so is enough to satisfy. 3.5*

  3. 5 out of 5

    ✨ Gramy ✨

    .. Mrs. Amelia "Peabody' Emerson demonstrates her charming wit and eccentric humor. This series produced such a comically, vivid picture of this family with their superior attitudes, geological adventures, and warped mystery-solving spats. that they each had me laughing out loud. I have finally found a clean book series that provides me with wit, humor, and tons of new words to devour. This is a historical book in the series is a stand-alone mystery which can be read without previous knowledge. I .. Mrs. Amelia "Peabody' Emerson demonstrates her charming wit and eccentric humor. This series produced such a comically, vivid picture of this family with their superior attitudes, geological adventures, and warped mystery-solving spats. that they each had me laughing out loud. I have finally found a clean book series that provides me with wit, humor, and tons of new words to devour. This is a historical book in the series is a stand-alone mystery which can be read without previous knowledge. I am enjoying this clean book series immensely, This is the sixth book of the series and by this time, Ramses was ten years old.  This amazingly precocious child accompanied his active and intelligent parents on another trip to Egypt for the winter season, where they are personally acquainted with many of the locals. This child is so advanced, that he knows more about the secret place than his highly educated parents if not more sometimes, which is totally incomprehensible, but extremely entertaining. Of course, let's not forget that each book includes a young pair of lovers that need assistance, at least in Amelia's mind. But this time, they were on a mysterious mission to locate a well-known married couple that had disappeared in that general area many years ago, which is how the Emerson family became captives in an unknown city Yet they were treated like royalty the majority of their visit there. The mystery leads to suspense and intrigue to the adventure, focusing on the Emerson families unique relationships in helping them deal with their circumstances. This historical mystery delivers clean and wholesome entertainment with a cast of quirky characters. Amelia has the utmost respect, desire, and love for her dear husband, Emerson, even though they enjoy their witty banter and try to outdo one another. This book revealed an adventure in an unknown city in Egypt, where the Emersons were held hostage. In the end, there was a disgusting display of savagery when there was a bloody battle of swords. Her mental powers were increased by the tension and her clarity of the situation became clear. The author expresses herself so dramatically that it captures the reader's attention and keeps you enrapt. Just when you may begin to feel a little lost or bored, her personal outburst, usually toward Emerson or Ramses, will recapture your attention, or she might strike someone with her trusty parasol and then, just continue the story.  She has a distinct way of portraying each intrinsically humorous experience, giving the reader a unique and uncommon perspective to observe. What a unique experience being held hostage with her husband and the inspector this time. Ms. Peters is the only one who could aptly describe it the way she was able to. In my opinion, any romantic insinuations were referred to as charmingly in a discreet manner.  Although this book does not always follow the social protocol, instead of taking leaps in many directions, the entertainment delivers great entertainment. The sparkling gems of dry wit were fabulous and plenty to be had!  Oddly enough, there will most assuredly be reviews all over the chart for this writing, depending on the different perspectives from multi-faceted readers. I listened to this gem of a story through Hoopla, which I access through my local library. It is thrilling when I discover that a series I enjoy in audio as much as I did this one, by the talented and versatile narrator, Susan O'Malley. Elizabeth Peters is quite the storyteller and expresses herself so dramatically that it captures the reader's attention and compels them to journey on. Just when you may begin to feel a little lost or bored, her personal outburst will recapture your attention, or she might strike someone with her trusty umbrella, defend those she loves with her pistol, or slash away at whatever offends.   I was delighted with the notes within the book to the reader to explain what the author was trying to convey.  I hope you enjoy this experience s much as I did! You may be interested in more of this author's many other novels in the future.  She writes under her pen names Elizabeth Peters, Barbara Michaels, and her real name - Barbara Mertz.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This was another great installment in the Amelia Peabody series! Usually, my favourite part is the snappy reparte between Amelia and Emerson, with whatever mystery or mayhem they're trying to solve being secondary. But in this outing, the actual story was pretty fascinating. The Emerson family become caught up in the mystery involving a long-ago friend of Emerson's who disappeared with his young, beautiful wife years ago, while trying to find a lost civilization. A note has been delivered to the This was another great installment in the Amelia Peabody series! Usually, my favourite part is the snappy reparte between Amelia and Emerson, with whatever mystery or mayhem they're trying to solve being secondary. But in this outing, the actual story was pretty fascinating. The Emerson family become caught up in the mystery involving a long-ago friend of Emerson's who disappeared with his young, beautiful wife years ago, while trying to find a lost civilization. A note has been delivered to the family, suggesting that they are still alive after all this time. Through a typically convoluted set of circumstances, the Emersons end up leading the expedition to find and rescue them. But, as is always the case when the Emersons are involved, things go awry. The Emersons - including Ramses, who continues to be hilariously precocious and a thorn in his mother's side - not only find the lost civilization, but become either guests or captives - depending on who you listen to. In order to leave, they must figure out the complicated politics and intrigues related to the competition for who will become the next king of the civilization. Needless to say, both Amelia and Emerson are in their usual fine, interfereing form as they attempt to not only help the right king to ascend, but to figure out a way to not be put to death and get to go home to England. As always, Elizabeth Peters writes a wonderful story, with the main characters on full display with all their delightful quirks, and the supporting characters interesting, likeable and well-developed. I loved this story!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Collins

    The plot of this one didn't do much for me, but I nonetheless enjoyed another expedition with the Emerson-Peabodys. They continue to amuse me, and there's a particularly touching bit when the family has a closer than usual brush with death. And of course, the Egyptian scenery is always interesting. I like that this book begins at a crisis point, then flashes back to tell how the family arrived there. It was a nice departure from the usual linear storytelling in this series. I hope to one day see R The plot of this one didn't do much for me, but I nonetheless enjoyed another expedition with the Emerson-Peabodys. They continue to amuse me, and there's a particularly touching bit when the family has a closer than usual brush with death. And of course, the Egyptian scenery is always interesting. I like that this book begins at a crisis point, then flashes back to tell how the family arrived there. It was a nice departure from the usual linear storytelling in this series. I hope to one day see Ramses tell his mother (once, anyway) to shut up and let him finish a sentence.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Golly, I’d forgotten what a masterpiece this is (even better read by Barbara Rosenblat.) Amelia et famille undertake a Rider Haggard plot to find a missing treasure hunter/archaelogist, Willie Forth, reluctantly. Peters plays with those adventure novel plots magnificently, and though the book can be read without knowing those trash classics, it’s SO MUCH BETTER when you have some background as to why we hang around for so long before things get going, have odd mystical elements, and The Ceremoni Golly, I’d forgotten what a masterpiece this is (even better read by Barbara Rosenblat.) Amelia et famille undertake a Rider Haggard plot to find a missing treasure hunter/archaelogist, Willie Forth, reluctantly. Peters plays with those adventure novel plots magnificently, and though the book can be read without knowing those trash classics, it’s SO MUCH BETTER when you have some background as to why we hang around for so long before things get going, have odd mystical elements, and The Ceremonies, The vaguely-Racist-but-certainly-Colonialist view of the Other, etc. This is the best Amelia Peabody of the series to that point, even if it eschews mystery for adventure, because Peters was so very careful with just about everything. I’m so glad to be repeating these (hopefully in “chronological” rather than published order) on audio. They are pure joy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ruthiella

    This is the sixth book in the Amelia Peabody series. I found it a little long. I listened to it on audio, read by Susan O’Malley who is fine, but cannot hold a candle to Barbara Rosenblat. Alas, I am subject to what is available via Overdrive and Hoopla. In a nod to the novels of H. Rider Haggard, we find the Emersons in a “lost” civilization somewhere in the desert of Nubia. In this oasis, a British adventurer and his wife are believed to have found rescue some 14 years earlier. Others believe This is the sixth book in the Amelia Peabody series. I found it a little long. I listened to it on audio, read by Susan O’Malley who is fine, but cannot hold a candle to Barbara Rosenblat. Alas, I am subject to what is available via Overdrive and Hoopla. In a nod to the novels of H. Rider Haggard, we find the Emersons in a “lost” civilization somewhere in the desert of Nubia. In this oasis, a British adventurer and his wife are believed to have found rescue some 14 years earlier. Others believe the couple are dead. The rest is pretty much like any Amelia Peabody mystery. They are very formulaic. I can only read them a year at a time, otherwise the sameness would be too overwhelming for me personally. I also echo goodreads reviewer Jamie Collins in the hope that someday Ramses is able tell his mother to shut up and let him finish a sentence

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    I really liked this story. I think it is my favorite one too. It seemed more complex and there was a lot of Egyption archeology information going on throughout. Lots of difficult names to keep track of, was the only complaint I had. There were some great lines between Amelia and her husband!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    The Emersons journey into H. Rider Haggard territory in this wonderful romp of a book. Very little actual Egyptology in this one, although Peters draws on her encyclopedic knowledge of the ancient world to create a lost civilization that speaks ancient Meroitic and observes many of the customs and living practices of the ancient Egyptians. Unconstrained by actual events, Peters gives free rein to her imagination and Emerson gets to burst his shirt buttons even more than usual as he fights actual The Emersons journey into H. Rider Haggard territory in this wonderful romp of a book. Very little actual Egyptology in this one, although Peters draws on her encyclopedic knowledge of the ancient world to create a lost civilization that speaks ancient Meroitic and observes many of the customs and living practices of the ancient Egyptians. Unconstrained by actual events, Peters gives free rein to her imagination and Emerson gets to burst his shirt buttons even more than usual as he fights actual battles (superbly, of course). I missed the Egyptian settings and the archeology, but who can resist a lost city? I really must read King Solomon's Mines and She: A History of Adventure and then read this one AGAIN to have a good giggle at how much Peters has drawn from the Haggard books. And of course this is where we meet Nefret. In this book she's little more than a two-dimensional character, but since this is a re-read I know what's coming. I must say that re-reading this series is even more fun than reading it the first time and I can't wait to get started on The Snake, the Crocodile and the Dog. Perfect escapism in the pandemic of 2020.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    I pecked away at the first half of this novel, dutifully reading a few pages a day—not high praise for a mystery novel. Of the various elements that can keep a reader engaged, (plot, character, theme, etc.), the only one that worked for me was setting. I was intrigued with insights into problems of survival in the Sahara, as well as information regarding ancient Egypt and archeology (which I presume was, to some degree, authentic). The plot picked up toward the end, and I was able to get engaged I pecked away at the first half of this novel, dutifully reading a few pages a day—not high praise for a mystery novel. Of the various elements that can keep a reader engaged, (plot, character, theme, etc.), the only one that worked for me was setting. I was intrigued with insights into problems of survival in the Sahara, as well as information regarding ancient Egypt and archeology (which I presume was, to some degree, authentic). The plot picked up toward the end, and I was able to get engaged enough to finish the book. However, I found Amelia too self-congratulatory, her husband Emerson a brutish bore, and their son Ramses pedantic and unrealistic. I had no particular desire to get to know the characters well and very little emotional investment in their survival. In the first chapters, no plausible reason was given for why several camels dropped dead, one after another, and it occurred to me they might have died of boredom. Elizabeth Peters’ books fill considerable shelf space at my favorite used book store, so I can only assume that she has an audience. The chemistry just isn’t right for me, though, and I doubt if I’ll pick up another of her books any time soon.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Suburbangardener

    In this book, the author has taken a departure from her usual style to pay homage to her heroine's favorite author, Rider Haggard, who wrote such classics as "King Solomon's Mines." It's a fun romp through the desert with less archeology than adventure. In this book, the author has taken a departure from her usual style to pay homage to her heroine's favorite author, Rider Haggard, who wrote such classics as "King Solomon's Mines." It's a fun romp through the desert with less archeology than adventure.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sue Moro

    This book, for me, is were the series took a downward turn. I did not like the introduction of Nefret, and the plot was a departure from the usual archaeology driven story lines of the previous books in the series.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emma Rose Ribbons

    This was one of my favourites in the series. The stakes are incredibly high and the scene referenced in the title moved me so much. I don't think I've seen Amelia, Emerson and Ramses in such peril before but the humour makes it all safe and cozy - even in the most desperate of situations, our beloved characters find a way to be funny and that's what I love most about this series. Incredibly well done. This was one of my favourites in the series. The stakes are incredibly high and the scene referenced in the title moved me so much. I don't think I've seen Amelia, Emerson and Ramses in such peril before but the humour makes it all safe and cozy - even in the most desperate of situations, our beloved characters find a way to be funny and that's what I love most about this series. Incredibly well done.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jammin Jenny

    This is one of the more humorous Amelia Peabody books in my opinion. I love all the adventures Ramses finds himself in, and in this book he escapes through hidden tunnels when his parents are being held "hostage" by one of the villains in the story. Great historical Egypt locations too. And Emerson and Amelia are still hot for each other. Love it. This is one of the more humorous Amelia Peabody books in my opinion. I love all the adventures Ramses finds himself in, and in this book he escapes through hidden tunnels when his parents are being held "hostage" by one of the villains in the story. Great historical Egypt locations too. And Emerson and Amelia are still hot for each other. Love it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I’m not sure this is really 4 Stars, I just enjoy the light-heartedness of the series so much

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laurel Hicks

    Campy and twee. Great fun!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    This one didn't seem to flow like the others I've read. Like the author tried to pack in too much history and lost the storyline...(or maybe it was just me who lost it. Hard to say :) ) This one didn't seem to flow like the others I've read. Like the author tried to pack in too much history and lost the storyline...(or maybe it was just me who lost it. Hard to say :) )

  18. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    I am keeping my first review because I feel like, essentially, it gets to how I feel about this novel. However, this read through, I picked up on a few things that I didn’t before and was a lot more sympathetic to poor Ramses, who took me a long time to warm up to the first time around. This novel deviates from the first five novels in the series by taking us to three separate locations and adding elements of the fantastical into the normally cut and dry mysteries. While there is always the hint I am keeping my first review because I feel like, essentially, it gets to how I feel about this novel. However, this read through, I picked up on a few things that I didn’t before and was a lot more sympathetic to poor Ramses, who took me a long time to warm up to the first time around. This novel deviates from the first five novels in the series by taking us to three separate locations and adding elements of the fantastical into the normally cut and dry mysteries. While there is always the hint of the mystical or supernatural, this novel takes a couple pages out of fantasy novels with the mystery of the hidden oasis. Still, at it’s core, this is still the same witty and engaging adventure that we have come to expect from the Emersons. Amelia is a little more excitable and dramatic in this novel and lacks a bit of insight compared to the previous installments. As she is the first person narrator, that isn’t surprising, but it’s almost as if Peters realized that Amelia could be more flawed and the readers would still enjoy her voice. These flaws were most evident with how she treats Reggie and Ramses. While Amelia has always had a contentious relationship with her offspring, her inability to listen to him in this novel changed from understandable to verging on ridiculous. However, it is nice for the main character to have faults, even if it is frustrating at times. I do want to point out how refreshing it is to have a married couple that is madly in love with each other and continue to be madly in love with each other through an extended series. While Emerson and Amelia have spirited debates, they are in love and will protect one another to the death. While there has been a little lack of faith in both parties in earlier books in the series, there is this current of unwavering love out of mutual respect that I adore and would love to see in more entertainment. You don’t need to cheat, argue, and hate one another for there to be drama. While there is not the normal archaeological dig that are a staple of the novels, this novel does dig deeper into the practices of ancient Egypt in a very interesting and compelling way. There is also the added elements of political intrigue and thrust into an environment that leave the Emersons off balance, something that doesn’t happen to the family all that often due to Emerson’s number of old acquaintances. This novel is very different than the others in the series, which is a good thing in a long running mystery series. The Last Camel Died at Noon marks a turning point in the Amelia Peabody series I believe. It showcases that Ramses is no longer just a little boy and is even more formidable than he had been shown previously. It introduces a new character who becomes a central figure throughout the rest of the series and the Emerson’s lives. It also shows a change in how Peters writes Amelia, making her more fallible and in a more obvious way. I just adore this novel and this series. **First Review** I have to say this is my favorite Amelia Peabody novel after the very first one. I don't know what exactly it is about this novel, maybe it is the fact that it is the first one in the series I ever read, that makes me love it but it is one of my favorite. Amelia and Emerson are as amazing, brilliant, and funny as ever, but I think the fact that we see some weakness in them is another reason that I love this novel so much. They need outside help to get them out of their situation this time and I love that. Ramses also is much more likable in this novel and not at all annoying. Also I love that the setting for most of the novel is a fantastical place instead of the ruins of some old temple as the last novels were. Of course part of the charm of the Amelia Peabody novels is that they could, hypothetically, happen, but this lost oasis story line was so full of mystery and the allure of ancient Egypt. Two princes fighting for the throne and all the other people caught in the cross hairs. Everything in this story was absolutely amazing and a great story line with great characters.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shiloah

    I’m always sad to say goodbye to Amelia and company.

  20. 5 out of 5

    JenniK

    I actually had to join Good Reads just to review this book. I have frequently read reviews on here and appreciate the reviews in general. In the case of this book, I do not understand the great reviews for The Last Camel..which is many times cited as being the 'best of the series.' For perspective, I love mysteries of all kinds and historical fiction. I never met a Barbara Michaels book which I did not LOVE. Hard to believe this is the same author. This book was just boring to me. It seemed as i I actually had to join Good Reads just to review this book. I have frequently read reviews on here and appreciate the reviews in general. In the case of this book, I do not understand the great reviews for The Last Camel..which is many times cited as being the 'best of the series.' For perspective, I love mysteries of all kinds and historical fiction. I never met a Barbara Michaels book which I did not LOVE. Hard to believe this is the same author. This book was just boring to me. It seemed as if the same thing happened over and over (mysterious, dangerous journeys down dark passages where nothing important ever happened.) Several times I thought I had lost my place and was rereading a previous chapter, but No, the scenarios were just too similar. I actually like the premise of the story and the setting was interesting, but the plot toooo slowing and repetitive. Then there are the characters. I am sorry, but I found them obnoxious and ridiculous. I have to question the author's own happiness and self confidence because it seems the entire novel was devoted to proving how sexually alluring the heroine was. A man, married many years to the same woman, who daily spews forth constant declarations of how his wife is the most wonderful, amazing, sexy woman in the world is hard to believe. Then there is the fact that he absolutely cannot keep his hands off her and that sex is the only thing on their minds, even when their own child is missing and in grave danger....? Let's not worry about our 10 year old son, whom the King has decided to kill, let's hurry to our room and have sex because Emerson's muscles looked so masculine in his sweaty struggle.??? A mother who NEVER acts out of concern for her child, but only out to concern for herself and her husband is not only difficult to believe, but also difficult to like and to tolerate. The only reason I kept going with this book is because people here loved it so much, but I never 'got to the good part' as another reader so aptly put it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Palfrey

    This is the Elizabeth Peters tribute to H. Rider Haggard. She's chosen to do what Arthur Ransome did a few times: to take her familiar set of characters and put them into a fantasy situation, for fun and variety. It's a relatively mild fantasy, there's nothing supernatural about it, but she allows the Emerson family to be led into a mad quest for long-missing persons in the desert, where they almost die of thirst before finding themselves captives of a lost ancient civilization hidden in obscure This is the Elizabeth Peters tribute to H. Rider Haggard. She's chosen to do what Arthur Ransome did a few times: to take her familiar set of characters and put them into a fantasy situation, for fun and variety. It's a relatively mild fantasy, there's nothing supernatural about it, but she allows the Emerson family to be led into a mad quest for long-missing persons in the desert, where they almost die of thirst before finding themselves captives of a lost ancient civilization hidden in obscure African mountains. There is conflict between rival factions of the lost civilization, and much intrigue and peril ensues before they eventually escape. Looking at some other reviews of this book, I notice that some people seem to have picked it up without having read any of the others. Folks, if you're going to read a series of books, it's advisable to start at the beginning! I would also comment that this whole series of books is not supposed to be taken seriously. Least of all this one. I can't say it's one of my favourite books, but it's quite fun, and it introduces a new regular character to the series, of whom more will be heard later.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linniegayl

    UPDATE: May 22, 2019. This is my second re-listen to the book and the following review still holds. This is the first time I've re-read this sixth entry in the Amelia Peabody mystery series. While in love with the series by the time I first read this book, it wasn't one of my favorites, so I was a bit nervous about it in an audio re-read. As always, the narrator Barbara Rosenblat is fantastic, giving each character a unique, appropriate voice. The beginning of the book dragged a bit for me, as it UPDATE: May 22, 2019. This is my second re-listen to the book and the following review still holds. This is the first time I've re-read this sixth entry in the Amelia Peabody mystery series. While in love with the series by the time I first read this book, it wasn't one of my favorites, so I was a bit nervous about it in an audio re-read. As always, the narrator Barbara Rosenblat is fantastic, giving each character a unique, appropriate voice. The beginning of the book dragged a bit for me, as it retraces how the Emersons got to the point of being without water, dehydrated, with all of their camels dead in the middle of the desert. However, once the family gets to the mysterious mountain city, my interest picked up. Parts of the remainder of the story are reminiscent of over-the-top old adventure stories, but it held my interest. And the last 20% or so was wonderful. In this book we're first introduced to a young Nefret, who comes to play a pivotal role in the remainder of the series. Overall, I'd give this a B-, and can recommend it to fans of the series. NOTE: Another audio re-listen finished on 06/23/20. My review still stands.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    I read a bunch of these cozy mysteries when I was a kid. For a reading challenge, I needed something published in 1991 and, for my commute, I needed that book to be available on audio from my library. I spotted this and thought it might be fun to revisit this series. The narrator did a great job with the book and made this a fun and easy listen. I had completely forgotten (or maybe didn't notice) just how much sex there is here. None of it is explicit -- it's all innuendo and side comment -- but I read a bunch of these cozy mysteries when I was a kid. For a reading challenge, I needed something published in 1991 and, for my commute, I needed that book to be available on audio from my library. I spotted this and thought it might be fun to revisit this series. The narrator did a great job with the book and made this a fun and easy listen. I had completely forgotten (or maybe didn't notice) just how much sex there is here. None of it is explicit -- it's all innuendo and side comment -- but much more going on between Amelia and Emerson than I picked up on as a young reader. In any event, this is an adventure story set in Egypt. The plot is rather fanciful and far-fetched, but does involve discovery of a lost city where people are still living (somewhat) as they did in ancient Egypt. Overall, the plot carries the story forward, but the heart of the book is reading the interactions between the characters and the amusement to be had from watching these proper British archaeologists blunder about.

  24. 5 out of 5

    BJ Rose

    Instead of solving a mystery that develops as they're excavating, Amelia & Emerson are off to find out what happened years ago to a missing archaeologist and his wife. There is much mention of H. Rider Haggard and King Solomon's Mines. After a grueling trek through the desert, which almost kills Amelia, there is a hidden city and of course information about the missing archaeologist (did we ever doubt that they would be successful?!) An interesting conclusion to their search, and of course Ameli Instead of solving a mystery that develops as they're excavating, Amelia & Emerson are off to find out what happened years ago to a missing archaeologist and his wife. There is much mention of H. Rider Haggard and King Solomon's Mines. After a grueling trek through the desert, which almost kills Amelia, there is a hidden city and of course information about the missing archaeologist (did we ever doubt that they would be successful?!) An interesting conclusion to their search, and of course Amelia insists that she knew the truth before Emerson did. Ramses plays a big part in the adventures; his doting mama, of course, is torn between pride at his abilities and chagrin at being upstaged. Love that Ramses!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    I love this series, which is the book equivalent of comfort food for me. I've been steadily rereading them. In this novel, Elizabeth Peters pays homage to H. Rider Haggard. It was a fun romp, with the usual tongue in cheek style, and laugh out loud moments. Here we are introduced to the character of Nefret for the first time, who of course plays such an integral role in the later books of the series. Ultimately, this and the later book which also takes place at the lost oasis were not my favouri I love this series, which is the book equivalent of comfort food for me. I've been steadily rereading them. In this novel, Elizabeth Peters pays homage to H. Rider Haggard. It was a fun romp, with the usual tongue in cheek style, and laugh out loud moments. Here we are introduced to the character of Nefret for the first time, who of course plays such an integral role in the later books of the series. Ultimately, this and the later book which also takes place at the lost oasis were not my favourites, but still great fun.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    2019 reread via Recorded Books audiobook narrated by Barbara Rosenblat. I think that I liked this book even more this time around since I have now read several H. Rider Haggard books, including She which was referred to repeatedly. The plot is very much a tribute to that author! 2019 reread via Recorded Books audiobook narrated by Barbara Rosenblat. I think that I liked this book even more this time around since I have now read several H. Rider Haggard books, including She which was referred to repeatedly. The plot is very much a tribute to that author!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    This is one of my favorite books by Elizabeth Peters. I have read it many times as I have the series. I treasure my books. I miss my visits with Amelia and family. I learned a lot aBout the times and Egypt.

  28. 4 out of 5

    John Frankham

    A still very enjoyable 2020 re-read. The usual ebullient Amelia Peabody diary, this time of an expedition in 1897 to an unknown wadi and civilisation in Nubia. For aficionados of this series (as I am), this sixth book is a key episode. The first appearance of the fourth, key, character.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Giese Witherspoon

    This is my new favorite Amelia Peabody book, the best so far in the series. Funny and intriguing.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kim Dennis

    These are such fun books and Barbara Rosenblat is a fantastic narrator. She brings the characters to life. This book was very different from the others in that they are not trying to find a killer. One of the things that I'm loving about Peters is that she is able to write a series of mysteries that are all so different. At least so far, I haven't felt like the story is just a regurgitated form of another story. I find myself smiling when I'm listening. (Sometimes when I'm walking the dog I wond These are such fun books and Barbara Rosenblat is a fantastic narrator. She brings the characters to life. This book was very different from the others in that they are not trying to find a killer. One of the things that I'm loving about Peters is that she is able to write a series of mysteries that are all so different. At least so far, I haven't felt like the story is just a regurgitated form of another story. I find myself smiling when I'm listening. (Sometimes when I'm walking the dog I wonder if people think I'm a little weird.) :) It's great!

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