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Spawn Origins, Volume 2

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Featuring the stories and artwork by Spawn creator, Todd McFarlane, that laid the groundwork for the most successful independent comic book ever published. Spawn Origins Volume 2 includes classic Spawn stories written by Alan Moore and Frank Miller, as well as the introduction of memorable characters into the Spawn universe. Collects Spawn #7, 8, 11-14.


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Featuring the stories and artwork by Spawn creator, Todd McFarlane, that laid the groundwork for the most successful independent comic book ever published. Spawn Origins Volume 2 includes classic Spawn stories written by Alan Moore and Frank Miller, as well as the introduction of memorable characters into the Spawn universe. Collects Spawn #7, 8, 11-14.

30 review for Spawn Origins, Volume 2

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Vote: ☆☆☆1/2/☆☆☆☆ if you are one of the lucky owners of issue #9 by Neil Gaiman (luckly I'm one of them because it was reprinted inside my 90s italian edition of this collection *evil grin*), sadly Dave Sim's issue #10 was never reprinted by author's will. Lots of the episodes collected here are 100% 90s crap: cyborgs (a prototype of Overt-kill character was created by by Rob Liefeld and Todd McFarlane, under direction from Stan "The Man" Lee, you can watch the video here: https://m.youtube.c Vote: ☆☆☆1/2/☆☆☆☆ if you are one of the lucky owners of issue #9 by Neil Gaiman (luckly I'm one of them because it was reprinted inside my 90s italian edition of this collection *evil grin*), sadly Dave Sim's issue #10 was never reprinted by author's will. Lots of the episodes collected here are 100% 90s crap: cyborgs (a prototype of Overt-kill character was created by by Rob Liefeld and Todd McFarlane, under direction from Stan "The Man" Lee, you can watch the video here: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=WaJhpqA...), big guns, ultra-violence, over-abused symbiotic suits and almost not existing storylines. Frank Miller's story was just awful (and he's one of my most favourite authors ever), but McFarlane's artworks are real good ones, the two issues by Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman (with first appearances ever of Violator's brothers, Angela and Medieval Spawn) are two little world-building gems, and the final two parts tale about Violator battling the Dark Ages Spawn is a real black humour jewel.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    I wasn't able to read this before volume 3 because for a long time this was out of stock. However, found a copy for 3 bucks. YAY! So this one is a jumbled mess. I mean spawn has a hard time keeping a straight storyline to begin with but this one is ALL over the place. You have one pretty interesting story with Spawn dealing with his past and talking to his bum buddies. However the rest are just typical 90's, over the top action, blood, and gore. This is the weakest of the series so far and I'ma I wasn't able to read this before volume 3 because for a long time this was out of stock. However, found a copy for 3 bucks. YAY! So this one is a jumbled mess. I mean spawn has a hard time keeping a straight storyline to begin with but this one is ALL over the place. You have one pretty interesting story with Spawn dealing with his past and talking to his bum buddies. However the rest are just typical 90's, over the top action, blood, and gore. This is the weakest of the series so far and I'ma have to land it at a 2/5.

  3. 5 out of 5

    JL Shioshita

    So now we get some actual, bonafide writers thrown into the mix and as soon as they show up, you can really see a jump in quality. It's still an interesting premise, and this volume shows that under the right direction it had the potential to go places. Alan Moore's issue is superb. Neil Gaiman's issue is a little abrupt, but off course introduces Angela. Frank Miller's issue is...well about what you'd expect from Frank Miller. No big revelations, no big forward momentum in the overall story, ju So now we get some actual, bonafide writers thrown into the mix and as soon as they show up, you can really see a jump in quality. It's still an interesting premise, and this volume shows that under the right direction it had the potential to go places. Alan Moore's issue is superb. Neil Gaiman's issue is a little abrupt, but off course introduces Angela. Frank Miller's issue is...well about what you'd expect from Frank Miller. No big revelations, no big forward momentum in the overall story, just some self-standing tales that when combined into a collection make for a better read than the first volume.

  4. 4 out of 5

    MissAnnThrope

    04 February 2013 Ahh... now, this is the Spawn I remember falling in love with. Spawn: Origins Collection, Volume 2 brings more action and an awesomely pissed off Spawn, making this volume a gazillion times more kick-ass than the first volume. The addition of stories written by comic gods Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, and Frank Miller certainly upped the ante as well. This volume was thrilling, contained lots of interesting backstories, and made me wish I, too, had some loyal hobo friends. Most importa 04 February 2013 Ahh... now, this is the Spawn I remember falling in love with. Spawn: Origins Collection, Volume 2 brings more action and an awesomely pissed off Spawn, making this volume a gazillion times more kick-ass than the first volume. The addition of stories written by comic gods Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore, and Frank Miller certainly upped the ante as well. This volume was thrilling, contained lots of interesting backstories, and made me wish I, too, had some loyal hobo friends. Most importantly, the person who killed Spawn is revealed and a fun battle ensues. You just know a future payback will be in order, so we no doubt have an awesome fight to look forward to. I love the artwork. I think Spawn has one of the coolest costumes. I just can't get enough of his cape. This was a fun re-read and I'm very much looking forward to the next volume. On a side note, this volume contains issues 7-9, and 11-14. Issue 10 is missing, but surprisingly doesn't detract from the flow of the story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I LOVE the several of these issues were written by Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore and Frank Miller- makes it all the more kick ass! Volume 2 of Spawn includes issues 7-9 and 11-14. Issue 10 is not included so just make a note because there will be a small gap in the story. I cannot fathom why issue 10 isn't included, but it's ok. We meet Billy Kincaid again, which is so disturbing. I never wanted to see so much of this guys nakedness- bluh! However, we did get some history of Spawn's human death, and t I LOVE the several of these issues were written by Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore and Frank Miller- makes it all the more kick ass! Volume 2 of Spawn includes issues 7-9 and 11-14. Issue 10 is not included so just make a note because there will be a small gap in the story. I cannot fathom why issue 10 isn't included, but it's ok. We meet Billy Kincaid again, which is so disturbing. I never wanted to see so much of this guys nakedness- bluh! However, we did get some history of Spawn's human death, and the betrayal with it. I can feel a awesome battle brewing with this one! I still love this series- I think it has some good depth and the images are stunning. I look forward to what is coming next and can't wait to read the series over again!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jacob A. Mirallegro

    This volume had stuff I liked more than the last one but only a little bit. Overall this series feels like it has such a disjointed plot development and it's so awkward that guest writers did more for the lore than the creator. The Alan Moore issue made it clear how hell works in this universe and how hellspawns come to be. And the Neil Gaiman issue developed that spawns have been around for a while and that heaven has angels that fight them. But then it just kinda ends with Spawn dying or somet This volume had stuff I liked more than the last one but only a little bit. Overall this series feels like it has such a disjointed plot development and it's so awkward that guest writers did more for the lore than the creator. The Alan Moore issue made it clear how hell works in this universe and how hellspawns come to be. And the Neil Gaiman issue developed that spawns have been around for a while and that heaven has angels that fight them. But then it just kinda ends with Spawn dying or something and their has to be awkward dialogue in a later issue explaining what happened to him. Frank Miller's issue was about Spawn protecting bums which is a nice idea but it felt very weird and random. Then nothing happens for a couple issues, we learn who killed Spawn to begin with, which honestly I didn't care about at all. This wasn't something that needed two issues to explain it wasn't some crazy big reveal, we already knew most of the information given to us. I feel like there's been virtually no development with his exwife or how to control his powers or what he plans to do at all and that's all more interesting to me than some random assassin guy. There's also a lot of pages that just repeat stuff we already know because I guess he wanted to make it accessible to new readers. But it just takes me out of it and makes me more tired than I already am. There's some pretty epic, hardcore, kick ass artwork though.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This one is a bit of a mixed bag— the Frank Miller issue was just stupid. Angela issue was cool, as was the return of the Violator. The Issue by Alan Moore was okay, I liked the peek into hell. McFarlane’s art is incredible for Spawn and all the other fantasy horror stuff, but everyday people are a little silly looking at times, especially the women with huge in-your-face boobs and perky nipples.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jessyca Bryan

    I’m loving this series! It’s my first read-through, and I’ve really liked the illustrations and the storyline. Sometimes there’s a bit that I don’t understand, and that’s why I’ve given it 4 stars instead of 5.

  9. 5 out of 5

    CoolNameGuy

    Definitely more scattered than the first few issues, introducing characters with mixed significance, but still has really awesome moments and Spawn always looks amazing

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    I was in the process of putting together a podcast about people reading through Spawn. What they enjoyed. What didn't work for them. Ultimately, I was trying to find some sort of positive about this comic that I pre-emptively disliked based on conversations with people who enjoyed it, and the type of customer it has attracted to comics. I wanted to be wrong. This volume has issues written by Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Dave Sim, and Frank Miller, in addition to continuing McFarlane's own work. That's I was in the process of putting together a podcast about people reading through Spawn. What they enjoyed. What didn't work for them. Ultimately, I was trying to find some sort of positive about this comic that I pre-emptively disliked based on conversations with people who enjoyed it, and the type of customer it has attracted to comics. I wanted to be wrong. This volume has issues written by Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Dave Sim, and Frank Miller, in addition to continuing McFarlane's own work. That's a Who's Who of 1990s writers. Sure, I wouldn't go anywhere near any of their work now, except for Gaiman's, but most of them were still close to their peak when they worked on Spawn. And yet, apart from Sim's work, there isn't a good issue in the bunch. Gaiman's is comparatively good, but it doesn't stack up well against his own output. Miller puts out a bottom of the barrel Streets Of Gotham-style story that fits with McFarlane's mystique and storyline, but it's not Good. And Moore's story is dull even by the standards of recent Moore comics. I'm annoyed that Sim's is the only good one. While Moore and Miller have been problematic in the past, each has also addressed it, and Miller has even apologized, and agrees how hateful his 2000s/2010s output was. Sim has embraced his role as homophobic mysoginist shitbag who can no longer write nor draw (the fact that he's injured and can't draw is a crime, he was always a top notch penciler, even if he is a low bar human, and an excruciatingly arrogant and shitty writer). But his Spawn story wasn't just Potentially Interesting as Gaiman and Miller's were, it's a Good Issue. The best Spawn issue I've read. Which is, admittedly, a low bar. When McFarlane took over he basically threw out all the ideas better writers germinated for him, except for Miller's. And since he'd already been stealing from Miller in his first few issues, it read as the same old crap that he was already writing. Like volume one, there are some good ideas in this book, but none of them are ever expounded on in interesting ways. McFarlane just isn't a good writer. If you like his work, great. I also like a few terrible writers. McFarlane has NO idea what's happening in this series, and if you're two years into your run on a superhero you created and you don't know what his powers are, what his backstory is, what the supporting casts' motivation is, what the villain's endgame is, or what statement you're trying to make, maybe it's time to make Hockey Figures full-time. I skipped way ahead after reading this to see if there was an improvement in the storytelling, and there just isn't. Spawn is awful. Not because it's poorly written (though it is) or poorly drawn (which it is not) but because pretty much every story element is thrown at a wall, constantly rearranged, but never allowed to lead the reader to a satisfying point. Being a fan of Spawn takes patience, a love of McFarlane's art (which is very pretty for 90s superhero art), and a willingness to invest yourself in a story that the storyteller doesn't seem to know anything about. And yet, boy oh boy are there walls of text explaining every thought in every character's head that McFarlane can conjure up. I don't recommend this. I know some people love this. Right now, the store that I work at is selling more Spawn titles than virtually anything else. So if you want to invest your time checking this series out, and you end up liking it. Congratulations. But I can not think of a Type Of Person who would willingly read this. I lost three potential podcast cohosts who just couldn't stand the writing, and eventually, I bowed out, too. It is fascinating to me that there are over three hundred issues of this, and yet, no real story, aside from the spin-offs. (Sam and Twitch: The Writer) is leagues above any other Spawn issue I've ever read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    James Big Cat

    Well for the most part it answered my complaints about the end of the last TPB. The story cohesion is still kinda a mess but the art is great

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jack Herbert Christal Gattanella

    Two very good issues, one from Alan Moore, where we track a character named Billy Kincade (who I remembered as the child killer from the first season of the HBO show), and another from Frank Miller, which is just a balls-out action set-piece as one issue. Actually, the Moore one I think is probably better just because of its placement in this volume. Taken aside from it, it's just alright, at least compared to similar work from the Swamp Thing series, where characters also get put into nightmari Two very good issues, one from Alan Moore, where we track a character named Billy Kincade (who I remembered as the child killer from the first season of the HBO show), and another from Frank Miller, which is just a balls-out action set-piece as one issue. Actually, the Moore one I think is probably better just because of its placement in this volume. Taken aside from it, it's just alright, at least compared to similar work from the Swamp Thing series, where characters also get put into nightmarish underworld scenarios. And Miller's issue... that's just fun. McFarlane as an artist is just all over the place - some of it is cool to look at, and other times I just feel like the art bleeds over into other shit too much. I almost wonder if I went back to the HBO series, which I LOVED as a youth, I would look at it differently. I mention Moore and Miller specifically since, well, McFarlane has an eye for drawing and detail, though far from anywhere near my favorites... but as a writer, he's abyssmal. I couldn't finish the rest of the book, and honestly you'd just be better off picking up Moore and Miller's issues separately. It was a nice experiment for me to read this, and now... I can go on with the rest of my life.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Another great collection. This one is stacked. In addition to the amazing Todd McFarlane, we also have issues written by Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman and Frank Miller. What?! This is like a supergroup featuring the best and most celebrated writers of the 90s. The results are as expected. Angela’s superawesome Image debut, Overt-Kill, Chapel, Vindicator and more Violator action. We also get to see Medieval Spawn. The whole thing rules. Art? Still stellar. I love Todd’s work. So many great splash poses o Another great collection. This one is stacked. In addition to the amazing Todd McFarlane, we also have issues written by Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman and Frank Miller. What?! This is like a supergroup featuring the best and most celebrated writers of the 90s. The results are as expected. Angela’s superawesome Image debut, Overt-Kill, Chapel, Vindicator and more Violator action. We also get to see Medieval Spawn. The whole thing rules. Art? Still stellar. I love Todd’s work. So many great splash poses of Spawn with his cape flowing, often armed to the teeth. The gore rules. The action is epic. This is even better than the first trade volume. ***Oddly, Spawn #10 was skipped when compiling these issues. I ended up reading it on the Image app (just to maintain continuity.) It ended up being a fascinating meta issue where Todd McFarlane sends Spawn to this level of hell where all the DC and Marvel heroes are in prison because their “creators sold them.” It’s basically him talking shit to the big two.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Arturo

    While the first volume had little going on, with McFarlane's wordy dialogue yet little movement on plot. This volume contains issue #7 a fight with Overt-Kill. #8 a story by Alan Moore. #9 is not included but should be sought after, it's a story of Angela by Neil Gaiman. #10 is also not included but its a story by Dave Sim with his Cerebus character plus tiny bonus of Marvel and DC characters's .. Arms sticking out of prison bars. Not a big deal but I remember when I was little someone pointing While the first volume had little going on, with McFarlane's wordy dialogue yet little movement on plot. This volume contains issue #7 a fight with Overt-Kill. #8 a story by Alan Moore. #9 is not included but should be sought after, it's a story of Angela by Neil Gaiman. #10 is also not included but its a story by Dave Sim with his Cerebus character plus tiny bonus of Marvel and DC characters's .. Arms sticking out of prison bars. Not a big deal but I remember when I was little someone pointing it out to me and how cool it was .. At the time. The story was a commentary on creators characters copyrights. #11 is by Frank Miller with craziness. #12-13 we have McFarlane again with Youngblood's Chapel playing a key role in Spawns origin. #14 is a story of And by Violator of his fight with Medieval Spawn, only part 1 of 2 is included. Overall I recommend it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    The best story here is the one by Alan Moore, which follows a child killer and his journey into hell and all it's nightmarish scenarios. There's another by Frank Miller, which is pure unadulterated violence, but rather yawn boring other than one or 2 cool scenes. On the whole this was disappointing, McFarlane's art is superb one minute and just not at all captivating the next. His writing leaves a lot to be desired too. How this was the most successful independent comic ever makes me wonder... Thou The best story here is the one by Alan Moore, which follows a child killer and his journey into hell and all it's nightmarish scenarios. There's another by Frank Miller, which is pure unadulterated violence, but rather yawn boring other than one or 2 cool scenes. On the whole this was disappointing, McFarlane's art is superb one minute and just not at all captivating the next. His writing leaves a lot to be desired too. How this was the most successful independent comic ever makes me wonder... Though I did also enjoy the final story which pitted a Medieval Hellspawn against Violator, told from Violator's twisted POV.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shane Kiely

    Despite being familiar with the broad strokes of what happens in this series (through a combination of seeeing the underrated animated series & the deservedly derided live action film) this story (well at his separate stories) was quite entertaining to delve into. Still amazes me how similar the original Spawn comic book universe is to Marvel/DC etc. The art style can be a little hectic at times making things difficult to follow but it's good looking material nonetheless. I'm not the biggest rea Despite being familiar with the broad strokes of what happens in this series (through a combination of seeeing the underrated animated series & the deservedly derided live action film) this story (well at his separate stories) was quite entertaining to delve into. Still amazes me how similar the original Spawn comic book universe is to Marvel/DC etc. The art style can be a little hectic at times making things difficult to follow but it's good looking material nonetheless. I'm not the biggest reader of comics but I definitely think I'll continue my exploration of this series in the future.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Eli Poteet

    this volume really sets up space for spawn through the ages and dimensions which really allows flexibility in the spawn universe. the last issue in this volume is one I read as a child. I am relieved to find this long lost memory from grade school, when I read it I devoured the images, choking down rhetoric beyond my youths comprehension. I totally "get" it now and can easily piece it into MacFarlanes collection. this volume really sets up space for spawn through the ages and dimensions which really allows flexibility in the spawn universe. the last issue in this volume is one I read as a child. I am relieved to find this long lost memory from grade school, when I read it I devoured the images, choking down rhetoric beyond my youths comprehension. I totally "get" it now and can easily piece it into MacFarlanes collection.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Edmonds

    The lower-end of a 3.5. Not quite as pretentious as the first volume and there seems to now be the cohesiveness of a story forming. While I'm sure my younger self was blown away by this story, my older self can the flaws and whatnot now, but it seems to be holding up ok. The lower-end of a 3.5. Not quite as pretentious as the first volume and there seems to now be the cohesiveness of a story forming. While I'm sure my younger self was blown away by this story, my older self can the flaws and whatnot now, but it seems to be holding up ok.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Kind of an uneven hodgepodge of stories that slightly broaden the Spawn mythology. Weird they don't include issue #10. Kind of an uneven hodgepodge of stories that slightly broaden the Spawn mythology. Weird they don't include issue #10.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Todd

    The Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman issues pulled this up. The rest is already showing signs of slowing. But I'm enjoying it as mindless entertainment. The Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman issues pulled this up. The rest is already showing signs of slowing. But I'm enjoying it as mindless entertainment.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Even as I child, when I was reading the series issue by issue and didn't pay much attention to the credits, I noticed the shifting quality after issue six. Here is my recount, since the comic follows a very loose narrative, these might as well be one-offs: #7 "Payback Part Two": pretty meh, Spawn kills Overt-Kill, big whoop. I think this is where the trend of hyper-buff bad guys set up as major threats and then killed off the next issue started. #8 "In Heaven" by Alan Moore: oh boy, this issue wa Even as I child, when I was reading the series issue by issue and didn't pay much attention to the credits, I noticed the shifting quality after issue six. Here is my recount, since the comic follows a very loose narrative, these might as well be one-offs: #7 "Payback Part Two": pretty meh, Spawn kills Overt-Kill, big whoop. I think this is where the trend of hyper-buff bad guys set up as major threats and then killed off the next issue started. #8 "In Heaven" by Alan Moore: oh boy, this issue was metal. So many amazing ideas squeezed into 24 pages. #9 "Angela" by Neil Gaiman: here is my controversial take - as much as I loved the concepts, the issue doesn't have a satisfying payoff, since it's just a setup for the following Cerebus-crossover, which isn't even contained in this collection. It feels utterly pointless. It's ridiculous that McFarlane almost went bankrupt over this due to his copyright dispute with Gaiman. #11 "Home" by Frank Miller: another pointless story of a turf-war between two high-tech gangs slaughtering each other, Spawn't hobo camp caught in the middle. If this was supposed to be a commentary on gang violence and street riots, then it's the worst one I have read yet. #12-13 "Flashback" by Todd McFarlane: squeezing Chapel, a Rob Liefeld creation into the origin story of Spawn felt a bit heavy handed, but otherwise this was a great two-parter. The art is getting noticeably more grotesque compared to the first issues which I'm okay with, but others' mileage may vary. #14 "Myths" by Todd McFarlane: interesting storytelling experiment, where the visual narrative is purposely at odds with the narrator. It's super clunky, but at least deepens Violator's characterization. If the Violator needed deeper characterization at all, that's another question.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John

    There was a time comics had a future that looked promising. They were becoming literate, respected and capable of great things. Then the Image Revolution happened and comics become puerile juevenalia. And it forced comics into gimmicks, superheroes and variant covers for a decade. The popularity of Image led comics finest (Moore, Millar, Gaiman, Sim and Morrison) to be poached with lofty salaries for slum work. These writers were clearly writing for what they thought the audience wanted, not wha There was a time comics had a future that looked promising. They were becoming literate, respected and capable of great things. Then the Image Revolution happened and comics become puerile juevenalia. And it forced comics into gimmicks, superheroes and variant covers for a decade. The popularity of Image led comics finest (Moore, Millar, Gaiman, Sim and Morrison) to be poached with lofty salaries for slum work. These writers were clearly writing for what they thought the audience wanted, not what the audience needed. Yet they still pulled the character up and brought some layers. I've never been a Spawn fan--other than David Hine's Armageddon arc. However, this "In Heaven" was pure spectacle over substance. Moore's Issue was basically a satirization of the Dark Age of comics, not a superhero story, doesn't feature Spawn and a bit of Dante's Inferno riff. He expands the Hellscape tremendously. Gaiman's Issue was a beatifully illustrated issue that introduced Angela--which introduced the "Heaven"ly equivalent of Hellspawn. Dave Sim's Issue was basically a feel bad/feel good morality on Creator-Owned rights and characters. Fran Miller's Issue was SUPER DUMB. Like Cavemen waving their penises at each other. Morrison's run (he got three issues) was a bit of fun with the "Anti-Spawn"--and the idea that it was a war that was large than Heaven and Hell. And it literally ends with "It goes dark. But I'm ok, I'm used to it...Darkness is my home now". Spawn/Batman The Mark Millar/Joe Quesada/Post-Warren Ellis era of the 2000s may have actually begun in 1993, when these writers tried to pander to an audience he didn’t fully understand. The House of Millar and Ennis were built on this vibe. Dumb, ridiculous fun--with a bit of intelligence.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kirk

    Some of the issues contained herein I already read in the original Vol 1 collection, before they did these shorter “Origins” volumes. Comixology has the missing issues (9 and 10) so that was nice. I downloaded those single issues for free and read the issues in order, unbroken, for the first time in my life. I was also surprised to find that I had not read the last few issues in this collection. I had thought I was a pretty devout follower of Spawn, but the truth is, I read issues when I found the Some of the issues contained herein I already read in the original Vol 1 collection, before they did these shorter “Origins” volumes. Comixology has the missing issues (9 and 10) so that was nice. I downloaded those single issues for free and read the issues in order, unbroken, for the first time in my life. I was also surprised to find that I had not read the last few issues in this collection. I had thought I was a pretty devout follower of Spawn, but the truth is, I read issues when I found them on newsstands (about three times a year) and then just talked about Spawn with friends. I never got past the first original volume when it came to reading the series unbroken (and even then a few issues were missing due to legal battles). I read a few issues here and there, then bought issues 100-102 or so and dropped the series altogether. So I’m going back to read it now until I’m sick of it. My first reaction was that Spawn has aged . . . fairly well. The art is always awesome. Some of the dialog is corny. Storyline overall is good. Sometimes the edginess seems contrived, but I loved it when I was 11 or 12 and never stopped loving it until I got out of comics for a long stretch. Anyway, this collection was nice. Probably one of the few things from the 90s I can enjoy without feeling . . . off. Something about those years makes me uncomfortable, but not Spawn. Spawn’s okay, albeit a little awkward in retrospect. On to Vol 3.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sean Newgent

    This collection takes us up to issue fifteen while omitting issue eleven due to copyright issues (Cerebus shows up in that one for whatever reason). At this point its obvious Todd McFarlane had a good idea and a few storylines but has no idea where the hell to go with it. The majority of this collection is poorly introduced backstory for Spawn's of previous times and the how Hell works in McFarlane's universe. There's some exploration of Spawn's interactions with the homeless community as well a This collection takes us up to issue fifteen while omitting issue eleven due to copyright issues (Cerebus shows up in that one for whatever reason). At this point its obvious Todd McFarlane had a good idea and a few storylines but has no idea where the hell to go with it. The majority of this collection is poorly introduced backstory for Spawn's of previous times and the how Hell works in McFarlane's universe. There's some exploration of Spawn's interactions with the homeless community as well as a story where he confronts his killer. When Volume 2 focuses on Spawn and McFarlane is at the helm it's fine. But when we're reading about other characters I tended not to care. Youngblood is not interesting at all so that fell flat, Spawn's mental breakdown wasn't as well conceived as it could have been (Even Dave Sims omitted issue where Cerebus guides Spawn through this uniquely Cerebus style dreamscape wasn't nearly as good as I wish it had been). Frank Miller does an issue and it's absolutely awful. This is a bad collection of books and I wish there was some kind of storyline here worth caring about. I hope that Volume 3 gets things back on track, there's only so much of the Violator telling boring pointless stories that I can take.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed this edition of spawn origins, but not nearly as much as I enjoyed volume 1. In this volume, spawn searches for the man who killed him and plots his revenge. He also fights several different enemies, most of which are cyborgs, which is a 90’s cliche. The reason this gets a three is because the violator pops up near the end and this edition and it ended on somewhat of a cliffhanger, which piques my interest. Otherwise, this would have been a two. Overall, a decent read, but be warned, it’s I enjoyed this edition of spawn origins, but not nearly as much as I enjoyed volume 1. In this volume, spawn searches for the man who killed him and plots his revenge. He also fights several different enemies, most of which are cyborgs, which is a 90’s cliche. The reason this gets a three is because the violator pops up near the end and this edition and it ended on somewhat of a cliffhanger, which piques my interest. Otherwise, this would have been a two. Overall, a decent read, but be warned, it’s all over the place. Lots of flashbacks that can be confusing. Lots of violence as well with over the top action. Spawn also connects with the street people in the volume, which I enjoyed as well. Hoping volumes 3 and 4 are a bit better.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The second one was good. The battle with The Nerds was kinda boring. Funny to see Spawn singing the Flinstones theme song with the homeless! Makes him human. :) The scene with him and Grannie Blake was so touching. I’m shocked that she recognized him with his burned face! And Violator’s story of how he defeated the evil Spawn wizard? It was ironic that Violator narrates himself as the hero and Spawn as the Villian when the images shows quite the opposite of the two! Gotta laugh how these two are The second one was good. The battle with The Nerds was kinda boring. Funny to see Spawn singing the Flinstones theme song with the homeless! Makes him human. :) The scene with him and Grannie Blake was so touching. I’m shocked that she recognized him with his burned face! And Violator’s story of how he defeated the evil Spawn wizard? It was ironic that Violator narrates himself as the hero and Spawn as the Villian when the images shows quite the opposite of the two! Gotta laugh how these two are complete foils. Haha! Ready for the next issue!

  27. 5 out of 5

    GreenScreenGrin

    Just okay. One-shot stories, mainly. The art is getting better. It is nice to see the evolution of McFarlane’s work in these pages. The writing, however, has way too much exposition, and McFarlane is trying to fit too much backstory into a small time frame. Two stars just because I didn’t like this volume, and it reminded me why I got bored with these particular issues. I finished it, but it is not something I’ll read again.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bob Dawson

    Disjointed While the main storyline moves slowly along, it is disjointed, and has several breaks that are swept aside without explanation. More is explained about Spawn's history, and there is a bit of character development, but it is painfully slow with too many sidebars. I'm hoping they will go somewhere, so I'll read the next volume to find out, but the storytelling is growing thin. Disjointed While the main storyline moves slowly along, it is disjointed, and has several breaks that are swept aside without explanation. More is explained about Spawn's history, and there is a bit of character development, but it is painfully slow with too many sidebars. I'm hoping they will go somewhere, so I'll read the next volume to find out, but the storytelling is growing thin.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Was there improvement? Sure, a little. But, all in all, either you can accept that early Spawn basically acted like a weekly television show or you can't. It jumps around, most episodes have the introspective montage pages, and Spawn's going to whine about the same stuff. But it looks so good. Also, things start to get more cohesive near the end of this even though we skip issue 10...which I'm guessing has to do with copyrights. Was there improvement? Sure, a little. But, all in all, either you can accept that early Spawn basically acted like a weekly television show or you can't. It jumps around, most episodes have the introspective montage pages, and Spawn's going to whine about the same stuff. But it looks so good. Also, things start to get more cohesive near the end of this even though we skip issue 10...which I'm guessing has to do with copyrights.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robert Timmons

    I gave the second volume to Spawn a try despite not enjoying volume 1 because Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore and Frank Miller wrote some of the stories but sadly the Neil Gaiman issues were omitted from this collection and the other two could not save the series for me. 1 star and I won't read any more volumes of this I gave the second volume to Spawn a try despite not enjoying volume 1 because Neil Gaiman, Alan Moore and Frank Miller wrote some of the stories but sadly the Neil Gaiman issues were omitted from this collection and the other two could not save the series for me. 1 star and I won't read any more volumes of this

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