web site hit counter The Armageddon Blues (Limited Edition) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Armageddon Blues (Limited Edition)

Availability: Ready to download

Jalian, a silver-eyed huntress from 700 years in the future, travels back to the 20th century in an attempt to save her world from the ravages of nuclear destruction. A stunning tour-de-force of love and adventure sweeping along a timeline of infinitely possible worlds.


Compare

Jalian, a silver-eyed huntress from 700 years in the future, travels back to the 20th century in an attempt to save her world from the ravages of nuclear destruction. A stunning tour-de-force of love and adventure sweeping along a timeline of infinitely possible worlds.

30 review for The Armageddon Blues (Limited Edition)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    I'm glad this wasn't my first book from Daniel Keys Moran. It might have been my last. I can see the beginnings of the "Continuing Time" universe but it is so disjointed it's hard to make out. The saving grace of this book was it's characters. They aren't perfect or great just oddly interesting enough to keep me wanting to turn pages. "Emerald Eyes" was my first Moran book and it is a very good place to start. The characters are better and the the plot line is 'continuous'. I'm glad this wasn't my first book from Daniel Keys Moran. It might have been my last. I can see the beginnings of the "Continuing Time" universe but it is so disjointed it's hard to make out. The saving grace of this book was it's characters. They aren't perfect or great just oddly interesting enough to keep me wanting to turn pages. "Emerald Eyes" was my first Moran book and it is a very good place to start. The characters are better and the the plot line is 'continuous'.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bryn (Plus Others)

    Oh, Daniel Keys Moran, how I used to adore your books! This one was my second favourite, after The Long Run -- I read all of them in 1994 and 1995 and they were beloved in my social/gaming circle and we would have long conversations about the smallest details of them and copy the aesthetics and generally behave like the fannish young people we were. And I even read this one a few times since then, but not for a very long time -- I just took the time to look and it was 1997 the last time, and bot Oh, Daniel Keys Moran, how I used to adore your books! This one was my second favourite, after The Long Run -- I read all of them in 1994 and 1995 and they were beloved in my social/gaming circle and we would have long conversations about the smallest details of them and copy the aesthetics and generally behave like the fannish young people we were. And I even read this one a few times since then, but not for a very long time -- I just took the time to look and it was 1997 the last time, and both I and the world have changed so much since then. So perhaps I should have expected that the book would no longer work for me, but I was still surprised by how poorly it hangs together; it is a very young book from a very particular time and place and I am not that person nor in that place. I did enjoy reading it, but as a piece of my past and as a piece of frozen time, rather than as a story now. It is a book about loving travel on freeways and classic movies and rock music in a way I see as very male, a book about the particular shape that fear of nuclear war took in the 1980s, a book that wants to respect women but still needs men to fix all the problems. It's passionate in that way of young people, every single scene is wrought to a fever pitch so that the reader is just skating along on the top of high emotions on each page, like a movie that is all the beating hearts and very little to connect them. I see exactly why I loved it in 1994, having been young and newly in love with cities and having grown up marinated in that particular 80s fear, and full of fervent hope that computers and the Internet would somehow save us all, and I respect it for what it meant to me then, but I am not certain I will reread it again.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rob Gates

    I've read this previously but am re-reading my entire Daniel Keys Moran collection, reminding myself how brilliant his books are. I've read this previously but am re-reading my entire Daniel Keys Moran collection, reminding myself how brilliant his books are.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Warren Rochelle

    I've always loved his books--this one is no exception. I've always loved his books--this one is no exception.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John Todd

    I read the first part, "All The Time In The World," in the May 1982 issue of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, and I'm not sure any single piece of writing left a more lasting impression on mine. I didn't find out about the rest until much later. I'm still working through it, but I give it five stars just from that first few thousand words. I read the first part, "All The Time In The World," in the May 1982 issue of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, and I'm not sure any single piece of writing left a more lasting impression on mine. I didn't find out about the rest until much later. I'm still working through it, but I give it five stars just from that first few thousand words.

  6. 4 out of 5

    David

    This was okay. There’s a whole lot going on here, from the person who reverses entropy to the time traveler to the meditations on warfare and impending doom. It was hard to really pin down what the characters were actually trying to do, and why.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Nice love story

  8. 5 out of 5

    James

    I honestly wanted to give this 5 stars, because very few books so brilliantly illustrate the concept of linear vs. nonlinear time. "It's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly... time-y wimey... stuff." Sorry, couldn't resist. What works, and sometimes doesn't is the various threads of people interacting isn't clear, and when everything is pulled together...I still don't understand everything that happened, and that's what cost it a fifth star. Why did Georges Mordreaux kill himself? This could ea I honestly wanted to give this 5 stars, because very few books so brilliantly illustrate the concept of linear vs. nonlinear time. "It's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly... time-y wimey... stuff." Sorry, couldn't resist. What works, and sometimes doesn't is the various threads of people interacting isn't clear, and when everything is pulled together...I still don't understand everything that happened, and that's what cost it a fifth star. Why did Georges Mordreaux kill himself? This could easily be my own failure, and not the authors, but there were a lot of the character interactions I just didn't GET, which diminished the effect of the awful, onrushing day of Armageddon.

  9. 4 out of 5

    James Ellis

    Not one of his stronger works. A little choppy and discordant in structure. Reminded me in some respects of the Terminator 2 storyline crossed with Drakon. Not one of his stronger works. A little choppy and discordant in structure. Reminded me in some respects of the Terminator 2 storyline crossed with Drakon.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    i liked this book more than i expected to. by the end though i was getting a bit confused about who was on whose side and what was happening. perhaps i was just too tired?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Terry

  12. 5 out of 5

    Roger

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura Eilers

  14. 5 out of 5

    RTWAP

  15. 5 out of 5

    Harold Ogle

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  17. 4 out of 5

    K

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Zoop

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark Baker

  20. 4 out of 5

    James

  21. 5 out of 5

    Darcy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kris

  23. 4 out of 5

    Desha

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jonas

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laurence

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Alderete

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roger

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.