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The ideal introduction to the genius of Ernest Hemingway, The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories contains ten of Hemingway's most acclaimed and popular works of short fiction. Selected from Winner Take Nothing, Men Without Women, and The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories, this collection includes "The Killers," the first of Hemingway's mature stories to be The ideal introduction to the genius of Ernest Hemingway, The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories contains ten of Hemingway's most acclaimed and popular works of short fiction. Selected from Winner Take Nothing, Men Without Women, and The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories, this collection includes "The Killers," the first of Hemingway's mature stories to be accepted by an American periodical; the autobiographical "Fathers and Sons," which alludes, for the first time in Hemingway's career, to his father's suicide; "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber," a "brilliant fusion of personal observation, hearsay and invention," wrote Hemingway's biographer, Carlos Baker; and the title story itself, of which Hemingway said: "I put all the true stuff in," with enough material, he boasted, to fill four novels. Beautiful in their simplicity, startling in their originality, and unsurpassed in their craftsmanship, the stories in this volume highlight one of America's master storytellers at the top of his form.


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The ideal introduction to the genius of Ernest Hemingway, The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories contains ten of Hemingway's most acclaimed and popular works of short fiction. Selected from Winner Take Nothing, Men Without Women, and The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories, this collection includes "The Killers," the first of Hemingway's mature stories to be The ideal introduction to the genius of Ernest Hemingway, The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories contains ten of Hemingway's most acclaimed and popular works of short fiction. Selected from Winner Take Nothing, Men Without Women, and The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories, this collection includes "The Killers," the first of Hemingway's mature stories to be accepted by an American periodical; the autobiographical "Fathers and Sons," which alludes, for the first time in Hemingway's career, to his father's suicide; "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber," a "brilliant fusion of personal observation, hearsay and invention," wrote Hemingway's biographer, Carlos Baker; and the title story itself, of which Hemingway said: "I put all the true stuff in," with enough material, he boasted, to fill four novels. Beautiful in their simplicity, startling in their originality, and unsurpassed in their craftsmanship, the stories in this volume highlight one of America's master storytellers at the top of his form.

30 review for The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories (Scribner Classics)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories, Ernest Hemingway The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories is a collection of short stories by Ernest Hemingway, published in 1961. The title story is considered by some to be the best story Hemingway ever wrote. All the stories were earlier published. The collection includes the following stories: "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" "A Day's Wait" "The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio" "Fathers and Sons" "In Another Country" "The Killers The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories, Ernest Hemingway The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories is a collection of short stories by Ernest Hemingway, published in 1961. The title story is considered by some to be the best story Hemingway ever wrote. All the stories were earlier published. The collection includes the following stories: "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" "A Day's Wait" "The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio" "Fathers and Sons" "In Another Country" "The Killers" "A Way You'll Never Be" "Fifty Grand" "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" عنوانها: برفهای کلیمانجارو؛ برفهای کیلیمنجارو؛ برفهای کیلیمنجارو و داستانهای دیگر؛ برفهای کلیمانجارو و چند داستان کوتاه؛ برفهای کلیمانجارو و داستانهای دیگر؛ برفهای کلیمانجارو و شانزده داستان دیگر؛ انتشاراتیها: (پژواک، تجربه، نشر الکترونیک، پژواک کوکبیان، جامی، لیان، ناژ، افق)؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 1975 میلادی عنوان: برفهای کلیمانجارو؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: جواد شمس؛ تهران، نشر پژواک؛ 1352، در 59 ص، چاپ دیگر: تهران، پژواک، آبان، 1352، در 228 ص؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی - سده 20 م عنوان: برفهای کیلیمنجارو و داستانهای دیگر؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: نجف دریابندری؛ تهران، تجربه، 1378، در 40 ص؛ شابک: 9646481647؛ چاپ دیگر: تهران، نشر الکترونیک، در سال 1394؛ در 41 ص؛ شابک: 9786008075325؛ عنوان: برفهای کلیمانجارو و چند داستان کوتاه؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: پژواک کوکبیان؛ تهران، پژواک کوکبیان، 1380؛ در 100 ص؛ شابک: 9643609170؛ عنوان: برفهای کلیمانجارو و داستانهای دیگر؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: شجاغ الدین شفا؛ تهران، جامی، 1388، در 239 ص؛ شابک: 9789642575596؛ عنوان: برفهای کلیمانجارو و شانزده داستان دیگر؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: عباس سعیدی؛ تهران، لیان، 1389، در 193 ص؛ شابک: 9789648608229؛ عنوان: برفهای کلیمانجارو؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: ناهید شهبازی مقدم؛ تهران، ناژ، 1393، در 207 ص؛ شابک: 9786006110080؛ عنوان: برفهای کلیمانجارو؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: ناهید شهبازی مقدم؛ تهران، افق، 1395، در 58 ص؛ شابک: 9786003532199؛ نقل از متن: دور و بر هر چادری از این پرنده ها پیدا میشود. منتها کسی به آنها توجهی نمیکند، آدم تا دست از خودش برندارد، نمیمیرد. پایان نقل. برف های کلیمانجارو اندیشه ها، و ترسهای «همینگوی»، درباره ی مرگ است، ترسی که به کارهای ناتمام ایشان، در زندگی شخصی خویش، بازمیگردد ...؛ به داستانهای نانوشته اش، و بازتاب این اندیشه ها را، در شخصیت اصلی داستان میبینیم. در جایی از داستان مینویسند: «اگر درست از کار درمیآورد ممکن بود همه را فشرده کند، و در چند جمله به زبان بیاورد»؛ و بعد روایتهای کوتاهش را آغاز میکند، با جملات کوتاه و سریع و بدون اضافات...؛ روایتهایی که هرچه پیش میرویم، تکان دهنده تر، و تلختر میشوند، و ضربه هایشان را بیرحمانه، به خوانشگر وارد میکنند. به نظرم «برفهای کلیمانجارو» زندگینامه ی جذابی از «همینگوی» است، کاش لحظه مرگ هم، برای «همینگوی» همانقدر آرام و آنقدر شیرین بوده باشد، که ایشان آرزویش را داشتند. ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brina

    I enjoy reading short stories, either in collections or as stand alones. When I look back at what I have read in the last two years, I notice many books under two hundred pages. Because I have a tendency to go into a proverbial reading slump in between quality novels, these short stories serve the purpose of preventing a slump and keeping my reading mind fresh. As in previous years, a square on classics bingo is to read a classic short story. Having read Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea last I enjoy reading short stories, either in collections or as stand alones. When I look back at what I have read in the last two years, I notice many books under two hundred pages. Because I have a tendency to go into a proverbial reading slump in between quality novels, these short stories serve the purpose of preventing a slump and keeping my reading mind fresh. As in previous years, a square on classics bingo is to read a classic short story. Having read Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea last year, a Pulitzer winner that moved me, I selected The Snows of Kilimanjaro to fulfill this square. In this short work, Hemingway once again proves that his writing is Nobel worthy. First written in 1936, The Snows of Kilimanjaro features a writer named Harry who has gone on an African safari with his wife, or perhaps girlfriend. While in Africa, he scratches his knee on a thorn and develops gangrene in his right leg. As Harry's condition deteriorates toward death, he looks back at the key moments in his life which lead him to being at the present in Africa. With enough material to fill an entire book, Hemingway moves from Harry's past to present interspersed with his significant other's reminiscing as he leaves his readers hanging for the duration of this short tale. While reading, one can only hope that Hemingway would have followed up this story by revisiting Harry with a full length novella discussing his life and stories in more minute details. Like Hemingway, Harry is a writer. As he reflects on the life passing before his eyes, he reflects on his army service in World War I, his convalescence, flashbacks, time in Paris, up until the present in Africa. With the gangrene poisoning setting in, one does not know if Harry is living in the present or the past. Meanwhile, his significant other reflects on her own past: her first husband, his tragic death, her children; in sum, a life worthy of the lifestyles of the rich and famous. Harry detests the rich and yet the two ended up together in a relationship that saved them both from the throes of depression. Both were on the verge of turning the corner when Harry contracted gangrene. Hemingway leaves the reader to imagine what will happen to his significant other moving forward. At the story's onset, Hemingway, or perhaps an editor, notes that Kilimanjaro is the highest peak in Africa. On the summit's western edge, there lies a leopard carcass and no one can fathom what a leopard was doing at that altitude. Like Harry, perhaps the leopard was near death or had come to Kilimanjaro to reflect on his life flashing before his eyes. One never learns the purpose of the leopard in the story as this opening note is its only mention. In just thirty short pages, a reader can experience Hemingway's brilliance, leaving one compelled to reach for one of his full length novels. As I try to vary my reading, it may be awhile until I revisit Hemingway again although suffice it to say this will not be the last time I read his work. A true story telling master, Hemingway's work is always a treat to read, regardless of its length. 5 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Florencia

    It was never what he had done, but always what he could do. (6) Air. Fresh air. Clarity for the mind. A pause. Another view. Many things. Many things can be found in a white landscape. The snow hides many secrets. The beginning and the end of everything, there, on the top of Kilimanjaro. Harry knows it now. A little too late. Wait, it is never too late, you say? Nonsense. Sometimes it is too damn late. A couple, Harry and Helen. They are in Africa. He is dying of gangrene; she is by his side, taki It was never what he had done, but always what he could do. (6) Air. Fresh air. Clarity for the mind. A pause. Another view. Many things. Many things can be found in a white landscape. The snow hides many secrets. The beginning and the end of everything, there, on the top of Kilimanjaro. Harry knows it now. A little too late. Wait, it is never too late, you say? Nonsense. Sometimes it is too damn late. A couple, Harry and Helen. They are in Africa. He is dying of gangrene; she is by his side, taking care of him. This is my first Hemingway and I really enjoyed it. His writing—at least in this short story—has the ability of conveying the inner process of one conflicted soul. He described feelings and memories with such beauty and acuity that I felt completely captivated. I do not care so much about the plot if you let me see what is inside somebody's mind by following the inextricably fascinating rhythm of your prose. Hemingway wrote. I followed. I got hurt, then healed while staring at the ceiling with that dreadful book next to me. I did not know what to expect, to be honest. I do not know if this was the best short story to start my journey with this writer (whose work has also been described as... “painful”; I am officially afraid of his novels now). But I saw it. I felt it. During the whole time I was reading this story, I felt the air getting heavier. It was filled with nostalgia and regret: powerful things that can choke you to death. Death. It does not sound so scary when you start thinking about regret. The story you could have written. The call you should have made. The kiss you should have given. The confession you could have shared. The vulnerability you should not have hidden. The words you could have said; the words you should have swallowed. The life you should have lived. To the fullest. Whatever that is. Death cannot be avoided. But regret... that unbearable weight upon your chest. That stubborn attitude of waiting for tomorrow knowing there are limits. Unforgivable. I have no excuse to justify mine. No good excuse, at least. “Never look back.” “I don't regret anything”. Is that possible? Is that even human? We are swinging between the avoidable and our humanity. Some riddles cannot be answered. You kept from thinking and it was all marvellous. You were equipped with good insides so that you did not go to pieces that way, the way most of them had, and you made an attitude that you cared nothing for the work you used to do, now that you could no longer do it. But, in yourself, you said that you would write about these people... But he would never do it, because each day of not writing, of comfort, of being that which he despised, dulled his ability and softened his will to work so that, finally, he did no work at all. (5) You cannot stop death. He kindly stops for you, a poet once wrote. He awaits by your side, resting his head on the foot of your bed while contemplating the setting sun. A bicycle policeman. A bird. A hyena. But regret chokes. Slowly. Inexorably. Taking away all trace of existence while you are still breathing. The hunger for living. The desire of doing. Stillness. A bundle of miserable contradictions. There are few things so human as regret. March 31, 15 * Also on my blog.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ree

    Reading Hemingway, for me, feels like panning for gold. At the beginning I am really enthusiastic. People have told me about the gold, I believe in the gold, and I want to find it. After the first couple stony pages, my excitement starts to waver. Where is this aforesaid treasure? My attention wanders off. My interest is fading. I'm almost inclined to call it off. There's nothing there for me. But I keep panning, because of this disbelief that I may not be able to discover what so many have befo Reading Hemingway, for me, feels like panning for gold. At the beginning I am really enthusiastic. People have told me about the gold, I believe in the gold, and I want to find it. After the first couple stony pages, my excitement starts to waver. Where is this aforesaid treasure? My attention wanders off. My interest is fading. I'm almost inclined to call it off. There's nothing there for me. But I keep panning, because of this disbelief that I may not be able to discover what so many have before me. And then - suddenly - I see a glimmer at the pebbly bottom of the river. The tiniest crumb of gold, I've found it. It's really there! Then it's back to stones and pebbles. Stones and pebbles. Stones and pebbles. What's that? Something shiny? You don't think - gold again?! Indeed! Several crumbs! A nugget! My first assessment was too hasty. There's gold in Hemingway. You just gotta be patient. How wonderful that my endeavours have paid off! I'm converted, the gold rush is justified! But why are the nuggets getting so rare again? Are they simply slipping my attention? Are they really there? And why is panning getting so frigging boring again? Maybe the gold was just an illusion. Maybe I just don't see it. Maybe it's not the right time. I don't know.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    I picked up this collection of ten Ernest Hemingway short stories when I was looking for Literature (with a capital L) to suggest to my real-life book club for its monthly read (whoever is hosting book club that month is responsible for nominating 5 or 6 books, and then everyone in attendance votes). Poor Hemingway was a no-vote-getter; North and South won in a landslide. But since (a) I'd already brought this book home from the library, (b) I like short stories, and (c) I felt like I needed to I picked up this collection of ten Ernest Hemingway short stories when I was looking for Literature (with a capital L) to suggest to my real-life book club for its monthly read (whoever is hosting book club that month is responsible for nominating 5 or 6 books, and then everyone in attendance votes). Poor Hemingway was a no-vote-getter; North and South won in a landslide. But since (a) I'd already brought this book home from the library, (b) I like short stories, and (c) I felt like I needed to add more Hemingway to my life than the one or two short stories I'd read in the past, I decided to read this book anyway. These stories were written in the 1920s and 1930s. Ernest was a good-looking guy when he was young: Maybe his good looks and intelligence and talent made it more difficult for him to be happy and satisfied in life; I don't know. In any case, he lived an adventurous and problematic life (he was married four times, had any number of affairs, and committed suicide at age 61 due to serious illness). Hemingway had a somewhat unique and testosterone-soaked code of honor in which dignity and courage were the paramount virtues, and that comes through pretty clearly in most of these stories. They're chock-full of violence and brutality and various types of unpleasantness: * detailed, brutal scenes of hunting on an African safari in "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" * a man dying of an infected leg in "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" * a fixed (or is it?) boxing match in "Fifty Grand" * hit men on the prowl in "The Killers" * men suffering both physical and mental war wounds in ... several stories. The women characters in these stories are of the ball-and-chain variety and/or actively predatory and cruel; the first and last stories in particular have some really nasty relationship issues. Some of the stories are so slice-of-life that I'm not sure what their point was. It would be very easy, especially in our day and age, to be dismissive of his stories. I can't say that the values espoused in them really speak to me in any profound or moving way. And yet there's something in these stories, often below the surface of his simply-told tales, that has worked its way into my head and pokes at me and my comfortable life. "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" is, at least in part, a cautionary story about using your talents and not letting life pass you by because it's easier to say "I'll do that sometime later." These stories have made me think a little harder about being, and doing, what is important to me, even if they're not the same things that Hemingway thought were important.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    A short story about regret from a dying man set in Africa.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Clumsy Storyteller

    'Why, I loved you. That's not fair. I love you now. I'll always love you Don't you love me?" "No," said the man. "I don't think so. I never have." "Harry, what are you saying? You're out of your head." "No. I haven't any head to go out of." "Don't drink that," she said. "Darling, please don't drink that. We have to do everything we can." "You do it," he said. "I'm tired." WHAT A FUCKING ASSHOLE! This is one of those *i'm dying so i can be an ass, and people would just let me be, So i'm gonna shit on e 'Why, I loved you. That's not fair. I love you now. I'll always love you Don't you love me?" "No," said the man. "I don't think so. I never have." "Harry, what are you saying? You're out of your head." "No. I haven't any head to go out of." "Don't drink that," she said. "Darling, please don't drink that. We have to do everything we can." "You do it," he said. "I'm tired." WHAT A FUCKING ASSHOLE! This is one of those *i'm dying so i can be an ass, and people would just let me be, So i'm gonna shit on everything and everyone* kind of books. the writing was fine (to me at least) smooth really. But Goddamn. Harry's personality made me want to reach out, and strangle him to death. He was an arrogant, rude, obnoxious, prick. he did shut his wife down, When all she ever wanted to do is to help him and fix him. i hate when women gets mistreated, but she still is nice and warm and loving toward the person whom she should hate. *SIGH* a sentence summary of this book: how an asshole behaves in the face of death.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Published in the same year as Hemingway’s death, this collection of ten previously released short stories comprises some of his very best short work. "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" first published in 1936 is a strange and thoughtful account at the end of a life with many regrets. "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" first published in 1933, this is one of my favorite of his short stories. Describing a time and place and mood of introspection, isolation and solitude. "A Day's Wait" first published in 1933, thi Published in the same year as Hemingway’s death, this collection of ten previously released short stories comprises some of his very best short work. "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" first published in 1936 is a strange and thoughtful account at the end of a life with many regrets. "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place" first published in 1933, this is one of my favorite of his short stories. Describing a time and place and mood of introspection, isolation and solitude. "A Day's Wait" first published in 1933, this is a touching scene of interactions between a father and son, revealing a very human side to Hemingway’s writing. "The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio" earlier published in 1933, this is a tragi-comic story reminiscent in the setting and style to something John Steinbeck may have written. "Fathers and Sons" was first published in 1933 and features Hemingway’s recurring protagonist Nick Adams. Telling of three generations of men, this explores themes of relationships, race and sex, leadership and influence. Like many of Hemingway’s most illuminating work, this centers around outdoor activities like hunting and fishing. "In Another Country" first published in 1927 and the unnamed protagonist is likely Nick Adams, who is an injured American officer serving with the Italians during WWI. This is an exploration of courage, fear and loss. "The Killers" first published in 1927, this is another Nick Adams story but one set in Illinois and describes a tense scene where two assassins seek to kill a local prize fighter and Adams’ talk with the target, Ole Anderson. This scene, where Adams seeks to warn Anderson of the plot against him, is one of existential ennui and hopelessness. "A Way You'll Never Be" was earlier published in 1933 and describes Nick Adams recovering from a head wound in Italy during the first world war. Interestingly, this describes an illuminating scene of post-traumatic stress disorder decades before that condition was explained in medical science. "Fifty Grand" first published in 1927 and centers around an aging boxer training for his final fight. Like hunting and fishing, boxing was a theme for which Hemingway revealed not just an affinity but also a sophisticated depth of understanding. A good sports story, this also expounds and illustrates Hemingway’s moral code. "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" was first published in 1936 and is perhaps my favorite Hemingway story. In his economical style, Hemingway packs a novel amount of content into a short story length. The reader is guided through explorations of wealth, value, relationships, fear, courage, betrayal and redemption. Margot, like Lady Britt from The Sun Also Rises, is one of Hemingway’s most villainous women. The hunter Robert Wilson, in his narrative asides, reveals Hemingway’s moral code and an eagerness to live a principled, heroic life. This would be an excellent introduction to Hemingway’s great work for a new reader.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Sumi

    I’d forgotten what a good short story writer Ernest Hemingway could be. This collection came out in 1961, the same year as the author’s death. But most of the stories were published in magazines in the 1920s and 30s, when he was at the height of his powers, and all were available in earlier volumes. There’s an impressive range of work here, from the ambitious title story about a man dying of gangrene while on safari and slipping into and out of consciousness, remembering scenes from his (wasted) I’d forgotten what a good short story writer Ernest Hemingway could be. This collection came out in 1961, the same year as the author’s death. But most of the stories were published in magazines in the 1920s and 30s, when he was at the height of his powers, and all were available in earlier volumes. There’s an impressive range of work here, from the ambitious title story about a man dying of gangrene while on safari and slipping into and out of consciousness, remembering scenes from his (wasted) life – the story has the depth and richness of a novel – to the noir classic “The Killers,” which inspired the famous film and contains some very amusing gangster dialogue. “Fifty Grand” takes you into the world of boxing (there’s also a boxer in “The Killers”), and has a narrative left hook you might not see coming (I didn’t), while “The Gambler, The Nun, And The Radio” – about a man who’s been shot and his colourful hospital visitors – shows you just how funny Hemingway could be. Also included is a classic story that I’ve read several times but still seems mysterious to me: “A Clean Well-Lighted Place,” about two waiters discussing the final patron in their bar before it closes for the night. The old, deaf man tried to kill himself the week before, and the contrasting reactions of the waiters is very telling. Some stories in the book didn’t resonate with me, particularly the Nick Adams war tales. (I recall the Adams stories from In Our Time working much better.) But their themes – grace under pressure, war and death, initiations of various sorts – are in keeping with the rest of the volume. I think my favourite story is the final one, “The Short And Happy Life Of Francis Macomber,” which feels connected to the opening tale because it’s also set on safari and includes a man, woman, death and the concepts of courage and dignity. I love the way it’s constructed and how the characters’ actions in a moment of pressure tell you things that will affect their entire lives. Also, it and “Fifty Grand,” the story that precedes it, are simply exciting on a narrative level. I don’t know why I’ve been on a Hemingway kick recently – three of his books in less than a month – but I’m glad I picked this up. These days, the author’s legend seems to overshadow his work; it’s encouraging to know the writing, at least in the author’s prime, was solid.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Connie G

    This collection of ten stories by Ernest Hemingway is dripping with testosterone. The stories involve hunting, the horrors of war, the wounded, boxing, and fathers. The majority of the stories were quite good, but I'll only write about my two favorites. The title story is about a man laying in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro with a terrible infection in his leg. The vultures are flying, the hyena is crying, and the gangrene has an awful odor. The man is thinking back on his life, knowing that he This collection of ten stories by Ernest Hemingway is dripping with testosterone. The stories involve hunting, the horrors of war, the wounded, boxing, and fathers. The majority of the stories were quite good, but I'll only write about my two favorites. The title story is about a man laying in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro with a terrible infection in his leg. The vultures are flying, the hyena is crying, and the gangrene has an awful odor. The man is thinking back on his life, knowing that he has wasted time and talent. He will probably never have the opportunity to write all the stories that are in his head. He's made a habit of using rich women to fund his lifestyle, including the wife at his side now. He enters a dream state flying to the brilliant white snow on Kilimanjaro. Many of the regrets in the story are similar to events in Hemingway's own life so the tale is very poignant. The last story, "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" is about courage and masculinity during a safari in Africa. The story is full of danger and ends with a twist. It reflects Hemingway's passion for hunting and other macho pursuits. Today many of us have negative attitudes toward trophy hunting of wild animals. But most of the stories were written in the 1920s and 1930s so need to be read in that context.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    When I read Hemingway I try to focus on the writing and the story and forget that he was an a**. But that fact seeps into his writing, into his characters. His characters, at least for me, are not very likeable, and that's the case in this short story. Harry, in the wilds of Africa, is dying of gangrene from a leg injury, and he and his wife are waiting for a plane to arrive and get him to medical help. While he is laying, waiting, he muses about his life, mostly about his life's failings. It's When I read Hemingway I try to focus on the writing and the story and forget that he was an a**. But that fact seeps into his writing, into his characters. His characters, at least for me, are not very likeable, and that's the case in this short story. Harry, in the wilds of Africa, is dying of gangrene from a leg injury, and he and his wife are waiting for a plane to arrive and get him to medical help. While he is laying, waiting, he muses about his life, mostly about his life's failings. It's easy to project Hemingway himself into his character Harry. I think that was his intention. It's hard to know what frame of mind he was in when he wrote this, but it's obvious his mortality was foremost in his mind.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    The title story, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, is one of Hemingway’s most famous and no doubt garners such appeal because it deals with the essence of every man’s life...what he has accomplished before he dies. Some see it as a treatise on procrastination, but I do not. I believe it is every man’s lot to die with things undone, hopes unrealized, opportunities missed, and I think Hemingway is making that point as well. We are busy living our lives and these things slip by us, sometimes without a thou The title story, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, is one of Hemingway’s most famous and no doubt garners such appeal because it deals with the essence of every man’s life...what he has accomplished before he dies. Some see it as a treatise on procrastination, but I do not. I believe it is every man’s lot to die with things undone, hopes unrealized, opportunities missed, and I think Hemingway is making that point as well. We are busy living our lives and these things slip by us, sometimes without a thought, but often with the idea that we will come back to them, do them later, and then life runs out, as life always does. We all die in the midst of living. A secondary, but important theme, would seem to me to be that of isolation. No matter who is there holding our hands, soothing our brows, we die alone. No one can take that journey with us, and those who will continue to live after we are gone do not truly understand our going as we understand it, as an end of second chances, a startling realization that whatever we might have done is lost to us now, forever. A Day’s Wait is an amazing bit of literature, packed into three scant pages. It is about waiting for death, and the wonder of being spared. I found it very striking and all the more so because of the childish perspective from which it is told. Fathers and Sons A Way You’ll Never Be and The Killers are Nick Adams stories. Nick is a recurring character for Hemingway, and every time I encounter him in Hemingway’s writing, I feel I have added a piece to a puzzle that I have been working on for decades. Someday I would like to read all the Nick Adams stories together and see if the entire puzzle comes into focus. In the Fall the war was always there, but we did not go to it any more. Thus begins In Another Country, which is about the unexpected nature of death and the elusiveness of bravery, and this line seemed to set up the story so perfectly for me. Another line I loved, The three with the metals were like hunting-hawks; and I was not a hawk, although I might have seemed a hawk to those who had never hunted; they, the three, knew better, and so we drifted apart. Fifty Grand registered nothing with me. I do not like prize fighting and I was surprised to find my mind wandering even in the midst of the story. Finally, The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber is an astounding story about cowardice, sex and marriage, set against the backdrop of a safari. The descriptions of the hunting were difficult to read, they were so stark and from my view senseless, but they served to draw pictures of Macomber, his wife and the Great White Hunter, Wilson. The end was a shocker for me, and I loved the uncertainty surrounding what had happened. Hemingway is a deceptive storyteller. His stories seem so straightforward and simple, but they are extremely complex and he mines the depths of a man’s soul and often makes you grimace at what you find there. He sometimes seems to be saying that we are all the same...just carrion headed for death...but there in the details you find the devil, we are all exceedingly individual and unique and alone in the journey from cradle to grave.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lorna

    The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories was a collection of ten short stories by Ernest Hemingway, many of them written in the 1920's and 1930's for Esquire Magazine, but published as an anthology shortly before his death in 1961. The Snows of Kilimanjaro has been purported by many to be one of Hemingway's greatest works. It was a powerful piece of fiction taking place at the foot of Mount Kilimanjaro where Harry is on a safari in Africa. Dying from a gangrenous infection, he and his companio The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories was a collection of ten short stories by Ernest Hemingway, many of them written in the 1920's and 1930's for Esquire Magazine, but published as an anthology shortly before his death in 1961. The Snows of Kilimanjaro has been purported by many to be one of Hemingway's greatest works. It was a powerful piece of fiction taking place at the foot of Mount Kilimanjaro where Harry is on a safari in Africa. Dying from a gangrenous infection, he and his companion Helen are waiting to hear the plane that will be coming to rescue him as he lapses in and out of consciousness reliving his life and his dreams. I also loved The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber. another powerful story that takes place on a safari in Africa as well. I became interested in reading many of these short stories as many were discussed extensively in a biography that I read recently as to providing some insight into the life of Ernest Hemingway.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Perhaps this is heresy but... I just don't find Hemingway's work to be all that interesting. It just seems like macho tough guy bullshit and maybe-just-maybe there is something humanized and vulnerable deep down in there but I'm not so sure. Were we talking about mortality? ------ Alternatively: (source) ------ UPDATE (like… 9 years later): Then I actually read Old Man and the Sea , which was pretty good and has some great stuff in it. Anyway there's that. Perhaps this is heresy but... I just don't find Hemingway's work to be all that interesting. It just seems like macho tough guy bullshit and maybe-just-maybe there is something humanized and vulnerable deep down in there but I'm not so sure. Were we talking about mortality? ------ Alternatively: (source) ------ UPDATE (like… 9 years later): Then I actually read Old Man and the Sea , which was pretty good and has some great stuff in it. Anyway there's that.

  15. 5 out of 5

    CarolynMarieReads

    I really enjoyed the title story TSOK, but some other I didn't love as much! Hemingway if definitely hit or miss, usually a hit with me. This one if in between a hit and a miss! 4th book of the Rory Gilmore Readathon!!!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steven Godin

    This short story may seem like one of man versus nature, and it is, but it also turns into a story of man versus himself, a theme Hemingway repeatedly analyzed and returned to throughout his career. Harry, a writer, and his wife, Helen, are stranded while on safari in Africa. Harry, lies on his cot, and in a series of flashbacks recalls the mountains of Bulgaria and Constantinople, as well as the suddenly hollow, sick feeling of being alone in Paris among other things. He is fully aware vultures This short story may seem like one of man versus nature, and it is, but it also turns into a story of man versus himself, a theme Hemingway repeatedly analyzed and returned to throughout his career. Harry, a writer, and his wife, Helen, are stranded while on safari in Africa. Harry, lies on his cot, and in a series of flashbacks recalls the mountains of Bulgaria and Constantinople, as well as the suddenly hollow, sick feeling of being alone in Paris among other things. He is fully aware vultures are stalking around around his small camp, whilst a hyena lurks in the shadows. Knowing that he will most likely die before he wakes, Harry goes to sleep and dreams that the rescue plane is taking him to a snow covered summit of Kilimanjaro and the hope of seeing the legendary leopard there. Concerning the structure of the story, Hemingway uses six sections, each of these sections inserts a flashback that appears in italic, continually juxtaposing the hopeless, harrowing present with the past, which often seemed full of promise. The flashbacks themselves center around concerns about the erosion of values: lost love, loose sex, drinking, revenge, and war. Both Harry and Hemingway were of a Lost Generation during World War I and had to rebuild their lives after being wounded in combat and seeing the horrors of war. This particular work, some have asserted, seems to reflect Hemingway's concerns about leaving unfinished business behind as a writer and the proper lifestyle for a writer that is conducive to writing on a daily basis, so even though it's fiction, Hemingway definitely uses his life as mold for the story. He was quoted as saying once that "politics, women, drink, money, and ambition" ruin writers. A decent read, that turned out better than I thought, and in a short space of time only it was easy to see why Hemingway was regarded as one of the 20th century's most important writers.

  17. 4 out of 5

    John

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have not read much Hemingway. I am also not a fan of short stories but after reading these short stories may have to change that viewpoint. The stories follow themes of regret, solitude, hatred of women, stupidity and a love of the outdoors. Hemingway writes crisply and oddly none of his characters are very likeable and mostly without depth or rather shallow. My favourite was the first one about a man dying in the African bush after he was scratched by a thorn, reflecting on his life and all t I have not read much Hemingway. I am also not a fan of short stories but after reading these short stories may have to change that viewpoint. The stories follow themes of regret, solitude, hatred of women, stupidity and a love of the outdoors. Hemingway writes crisply and oddly none of his characters are very likeable and mostly without depth or rather shallow. My favourite was the first one about a man dying in the African bush after he was scratched by a thorn, reflecting on his life and all the regrets. Some of the stories are linked with one character such as Nick who seems to be forever at a crossroads and obsessed with trout fishing. The small bits at the start of the stories about either bullfighting or war are thought provoking. An enjoyable read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lyn (Readinghearts)

    OK, It is official. Ernest Hemingway is just not for me. I read this book because I am doing a three month "Give an author a second chance" challenge, and I couldn't think of anyone who I needed to give a second chance more than Hemingway. I have only read two books by Hemingway in my whole life, The Old Man and the Sea and The Sun Also Rises. Both of those were a long time ago. So I thought, how perfect for the challenge. At first, as I started the book, I was beginning to think that maybe he w OK, It is official. Ernest Hemingway is just not for me. I read this book because I am doing a three month "Give an author a second chance" challenge, and I couldn't think of anyone who I needed to give a second chance more than Hemingway. I have only read two books by Hemingway in my whole life, The Old Man and the Sea and The Sun Also Rises. Both of those were a long time ago. So I thought, how perfect for the challenge. At first, as I started the book, I was beginning to think that maybe he wasn't as bad as I remembered, but every time I would really start to get into a story.....BAM, he would slap me upside the head with one of the traits of his writing that drive me crazy, thus reminding me why I don't read Hemingway. For example, in one story he spends a whole page having the two characters say "Watch the game with me." "No, I'm going to pray." "Watch the game with me." "No, I'm going to pray." "Watch the game with me." "No, I'm going to pray." "Watch the game with me." "No, I'm going to pray." Literally, a whole page. Or he describes something in the most undescriptive way possible. Or he doesn't describe it at all. In my opinion the man has no imagination at all. The only things that he writes about are old men who are womanizers, like to either hunt or fish, and want to commit suicide. In other words, himself. I will not be running out to get any more Hemingway anytime soon.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Khashayar Mohammadi

    I have never enjoyed Hemingway's writing; BUT this collection of his short stories finally convinced me that he was once an innovative writer who pioneered American Short Fiction. Hemingway's influence can be seen across the decades, from the beatnix all the way to Mccarthy and David Foster Wallace. My problem with Hemingway is that I truly believe he is no longer relevant in the world of fiction. He was an important stepping stone in American literature, with certain flaws that were mended as de I have never enjoyed Hemingway's writing; BUT this collection of his short stories finally convinced me that he was once an innovative writer who pioneered American Short Fiction. Hemingway's influence can be seen across the decades, from the beatnix all the way to Mccarthy and David Foster Wallace. My problem with Hemingway is that I truly believe he is no longer relevant in the world of fiction. He was an important stepping stone in American literature, with certain flaws that were mended as decades passed and American writing matured. He was a pioneer, and as a pioneer he experimented with style and form which was't always smooth and coherent. I for one loathe the juxtaposition of his laconic, haiku-esque prose with the needlessly niche and quirky dialogue that firmly negates the feel of the action lines. However, this collection was the first time I truly respected him as a writer. I understood what it means to write a Hemingway short story, what it means to throw someone in the middle of an action and provide absurd information in short lines while hiding so much crucial information from the reader. And to top it off, comes his utter fascination with death; a character that appears in all of his stories in one shape or another. Having been born in a time of War, having encountered death face to face countless times; his courtship with death was apparent in each and every page of his work. I stay by my word and say Hemingway no longer matters in the world of Literature. His prose is snappy but boring, and his once-innovative style has been perfected over the years. I understand if readers of older generations still read him; but I can't see the point of handing this book to teenagers and expecting them to take much away from it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Piyangie

    The Snows of Kilimanjaro is my first short story read of Hemingway. The story is about a writer who revisits his past on the verge of death. He dwells on the lost opportunities and failed relationships and vents out his frustration on his present wife/girlfriend. The story perhaps has a personal touch of the author's life. The story, however is a little depressing; and my emotions kept on rolling between anger and pity to the main character, Harry - the writer. All in all he was not a likable ch The Snows of Kilimanjaro is my first short story read of Hemingway. The story is about a writer who revisits his past on the verge of death. He dwells on the lost opportunities and failed relationships and vents out his frustration on his present wife/girlfriend. The story perhaps has a personal touch of the author's life. The story, however is a little depressing; and my emotions kept on rolling between anger and pity to the main character, Harry - the writer. All in all he was not a likable character. However, one cannot resist Hemingway's beautiful and intense writing even if you do not like the story. The beauty, intensity and simplicity of expression and deliverance, I believe, is the secret of his success as a writer.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Quo

    Judging a composite work, a short fiction anthology as an example, is a bit like isolating individual letters in an alphabet soup, a thankless task. I would assign Hemingway's The Snows of Kilimanjaro & Other Stories a score of 3.5 if it were possible but 2 (perhaps 3) of the stories are excellent, worthy of a 4+ rating! The collection covers a long period of time & some of the tales seem experimental, unfinished, considerably less than robust. It has been said that with Hemingway, one often get Judging a composite work, a short fiction anthology as an example, is a bit like isolating individual letters in an alphabet soup, a thankless task. I would assign Hemingway's The Snows of Kilimanjaro & Other Stories a score of 3.5 if it were possible but 2 (perhaps 3) of the stories are excellent, worthy of a 4+ rating! The collection covers a long period of time & some of the tales seem experimental, unfinished, considerably less than robust. It has been said that with Hemingway, one often gets more than is apparent at first glance, in part because his prose seems so simple, even formulaic at times & thus often parodied but upon rereading the short story or novel, it appears much-enhanced. Hemingway has a way of conveying inner fears & contrasting emotions within the human condition that can on some occasions seem almost banal but at other times seem quite riveting. Beyond that, these stories--at least in my Hudson River Edition for Scribners--portray a period when frequent use of the N-word for black people & a pejorative epithet for Jews was probably commonplace but which now seem quite out-of-place & even distinctly offensive. One story also describes a bloody, gruesome slaughter of African animals, much at odds with the views of many preservation-minded readers today. The title story, "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" represents the tale of a dying man named Harry, suffering from gangrene while in the midst of a big game hunt in East Africa, haunted by the sight of vultures as well as the sounds of hyenas & malignant odors that accentuate the feeling of decay. But beyond that, it is the lament of a man who senses not just time dwindling away but time wasted, a 2nd form of decay because..."now he'd never write the things he'd saved to write until he knew enough to write them well." Yes, a rather common theme for E.H., particularly in a book like A Moveable Feast, a book not just about times past but time lost. The story set near Kilimanjaro details memories of Paris, Switzerland & Turkey, a wife who Harry apparently married for her money & who seems to love the man but who is accused of having destroyed his talent. Often Hemingway preferred both the money that came from his first wife Hadley's trust fund thus magnifying his lifestyle, while also desiring to maintain the image of a starving artist. He admired money but not so much those who had it. In this story the main character has flashbacks while being stalked by death, even as his wife attempts to console & encourage him. Harry intones..."so this was how you died, with whispers that you do not quite hear." The story is quite poignant, detailing the manner in which an artist's talent can atrophy due to booze, lack of dedication & various distractions while using a man perishing of gangrene in sight of the snow-covered peak of Africa's largest mountain as a metaphor. "The Short Happy Life of Francis McComber" is a 2nd excellent story within the collection. It again takes place on safari in Africa & portrays a very wealthy man who in this case married a beautiful woman, Margot, a "trophy wife". At the point of the tale, McComber is in search of big game, or trophies of a different sort. Francis experiences fright not once but twice, as many might in sight of an aggressive lion or a wounded cape buffalo, with the prey being stalked now very much on the attack. McComber's wife finds her husband's lack of courage while on the hunt for big game trophies a defining moment in their marriage, taunts him & even shares intimacy late at night with the "white hunter" they have enlisted, Robert Wilson, who had to bail out Francis on 2 occasions. After the 1st unsuccessful bout, failing to stand fast in the face of danger, McComber reflects:I'd like to clear away that lion business. It's not very pleasant to have your wife see you do something like that. That night, after a dinner and a whisky & soda by the fire, Francis McComber lay on his cot with the mosquito net over him & listened to the night noises. He felt that it was neither all over nor was it beginning. It was exactly as it happened with some parts of it indelibly emphasized and he was miserably ashamed. But more than shame, he felt cold, hollow fear in him. The fear was still there like a cold, slimy emptiness where once his confidence had been & it made him feel sick.And yet, partly in search of a way to redeem himself & his marriage, McComber endeavors to try again on the next day's hunt. It was said by some that their marriage, when viewed at a distance was "comparatively happy" but in reality was one "where divorce is often rumored but never occurs". The ending of the story of Francis McComber's African safari is quite ambiguous & the lack of clarity about his demise adds to the appeal of this particular tale, with his wife as a potential culprit. Or was she merely intending to come to McComber's rescue? Or, perhaps did she see herself in competition with her husband in quest of her own misguided trophy? Come what may, this is one of Ernest Hemingway's profiles of "grace under pressure", or in this case, its absence. "The Killers", written in 1927, portrays 2 would-be assassins of a man called Ole Andreson, hired guns named Max & Al, with Nick Adams as the overseer of the narrative that ultimately seems more of an outline than a meaningful story. In 1946, the story was greatly expanded to fill in gaps about why the killers had taken aim at Andreson. "It's a hell of a thing; it's an awful thing" says Nick Adams commenting at the diner where the assassins briefly converge. "Well, you'd better not think about it", says George, as he wipes down a counter at the diner after Max & Al have moved on when Ole Andreson fails to appear at his usual time. Perhaps, the lack of resolution adds something to the story but I found it lackluster. Likewise, "Fifty Grand" the story of a prizefighter who is literally at the end of his ropes, an Irishman named Jack Brennan who has bet on his opponent, a well-regarded opponent named Walcott, in a boxing match while attempting to make a good show of the contest, seemed lacking in dramatic edge & not very compelling. "A Clean Well-Lighted Place" presents the image of a lonely, old man who comes nightly to a cafe, drinking to the point of insobriety, observed by 2 waiters who are forced to keep the cafe open until the man finally departs, while sharing in his ennui. "Fathers & Sons" seems a story of alienation between a boy & his father, also involving the boy's sexual encounter with his Native-American friend's sister. "The Gamble, the Nun & the Radio" is a longer tableau with some interesting details but still seems incomplete. And, "A Way You'll Never Be" builds an image in the aftermath of WWI, with two soldiers reunited by chance and a considerable uncertainty about the background of one of them. What the reader finds with many of the short tales in The Snows of Kilimanjaro & Other Stories is a young Hemingway exploring the framework for just how to structure a short work of fiction & eventually a novel, often building the skeletal background or literary scaffolding without always making the story concrete. Still, it was not unpleasant to reread some of the more familiar stories, most of which are also within the author's more comprehensive short story anthology, The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway. *My version of the anthology including "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" did not seem to be listed at Goodreads but is the Hudson River hardcover edition, published by Charles Scribners & Sons.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Olivier Delaye

    A great collection of perfect little tales by the master of sparse writing. Especially liked A Very Short Story (lover's expectations VS harsh reality), Cross-Country Snow (a slice of life between two friends), My Old Man (self-explanatory), and Big Two-Hearted River (the masterpiece of the bunch, IMHO). Gotta move on to some of his longer books someday. Like A Farewell To Arms and For Whom The Bell Tolls. Someday.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Hatley

    This is a spectacular collection of short stories by a brilliant author. Hemingway demonstrates here his versatility both in the content of these ten stories and in his use of the English language. He was a genius!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter Meredith

    I don't like to continually bash famous authors. I worry that it might make me look as though I'm just jealous, when really I am. That being said, there isn't much to The Snows of Kilimanjaro to make it worthy of a recommendation. These stories by Hemmingway feel as though each had been pulled at random from a longer story--as if there was something I had missed earlier and, in eight out of ten of the stories, as if there was definitely something I was going to miss later, by which I mean to say I don't like to continually bash famous authors. I worry that it might make me look as though I'm just jealous, when really I am. That being said, there isn't much to The Snows of Kilimanjaro to make it worthy of a recommendation. These stories by Hemmingway feel as though each had been pulled at random from a longer story--as if there was something I had missed earlier and, in eight out of ten of the stories, as if there was definitely something I was going to miss later, by which I mean to say that I felt left up in the air. At the conclusion of each I kept asking myself, "Is that it?" Perhaps what was worse was how he wrote conversations. They were annoyingly repetitive with characters saying the same line over and over again in rather short conversations. Here is an example: When offered alcohol the 'thin one' says--"Thanks no. It mounts to my head."--half a page later when there's a second round--"Not me. It mounts to my head." On the next page he adds, just in case you missed it the first two times, "It is alcohol that mounts to my head." and on the next page, after a number of lines that are so meaningless as to be absolutely chalk full of hidden meaning that only literature professors could interpret, he reminds us, "I can't take it. It goes right to my head." I get the feeling he's not into alcohol. It's subtle, but it's there. Here's a line that is so repetitive all by itself that nothing can save it: "No. No. No. No. No. No. No. I'm going right down to the church to pray." That was seven Nos! All in response to an invitation to listen to a football game on the radio. I would have to work very, very, very, very, very, very, very hard to write so badlier as this. (You see? It's not easy.) Now for the only thing I actually liked about the book. The smell. The copy I read was over fifty years old and the musty aroma brought back memories of shabby little book shops I used to frequent as a teen in New York City. You'd see a sign that only read "Books" and through the door with its little bell above, there would be stacks as high as the ceiling and shelves where the word unkempt wouldn't do to describe. I always went with Unruly, as if the thousands of stories fought to be seen and read. In these shops, it seemed alphabetizing was seen as a sign of weakness and the only order came from the endless war between truth and make believe. For me, always make believe won out, and how could it not? Where can truth ever compete with imagination? It can't...except for maybe when it comes to the sense of smell. The smell of that book, that was truth, it's one redeeming truth.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bryce Wilson

    Anyone looking for a good entry way into Hemingway need look no farther. This basically acts as an unofficial greatest hits. Not only do you get the wonderful and surprisingly vunerable (tho kinda misogynistic) title story, a quiet meditation on death and wasted potential. But you also get A Clean Well Lighted Place considered the greatest short story ever written by none other then James friggin Joyce, and most of the best Nick Adam's stories as well, including The Killers, Fathers and Sons, an Anyone looking for a good entry way into Hemingway need look no farther. This basically acts as an unofficial greatest hits. Not only do you get the wonderful and surprisingly vunerable (tho kinda misogynistic) title story, a quiet meditation on death and wasted potential. But you also get A Clean Well Lighted Place considered the greatest short story ever written by none other then James friggin Joyce, and most of the best Nick Adam's stories as well, including The Killers, Fathers and Sons, and A Way You'll never be. A great collection.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bogdan

    My first encounter with this great writer. I like the majority of the stories here. The first one the most, that gave the name of the volume, a well made drama, also the last one, The Short And Happy Life Of Francis Macomber, a funny tale, in wich I was curios how will it end it, and I`m glad that I wasn`t dissapointed by the very good and unexpected choice, indeed. Solid stuff! My first encounter with this great writer. I like the majority of the stories here. The first one the most, that gave the name of the volume, a well made drama, also the last one, The Short And Happy Life Of Francis Macomber, a funny tale, in wich I was curios how will it end it, and I`m glad that I wasn`t dissapointed by the very good and unexpected choice, indeed. Solid stuff!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I read these short stories because I'm never going to finish For Whom the Bell Tolls and because, since climbing Kili, everyone asks whether I've read them. From the scope of half a century, the stories function more as a lens into the world of Hemingway and men like him and who, at the end of their lives, saw that world slipping away. But reading about these men, who were so determined to be men (and they had a particular and exacting definition of what that meant), its easy to see why their wa I read these short stories because I'm never going to finish For Whom the Bell Tolls and because, since climbing Kili, everyone asks whether I've read them. From the scope of half a century, the stories function more as a lens into the world of Hemingway and men like him and who, at the end of their lives, saw that world slipping away. But reading about these men, who were so determined to be men (and they had a particular and exacting definition of what that meant), its easy to see why their way of life no longer exists (or as been exiled to the fringes). Namely, they would destroy themselves and everyone around them to maintain the ideal. I suppose there is a tragic aspect of it all - men, trying to cling to their code and their as the world changes around them, refusing themselves to change, rending themselves irrelevant. Some stores were better than others. The first and last, in particular, were highlights. Both are about the end of a man's life, one man's life ended just as he recognized what it was to be a man (which, of course, led to his death) and the other about a man who, at the end of a long life lived exactly how he wanted, takes stock of who he became as a result of his choices.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ziba

    Hemingway at the height of his personal low.

  29. 5 out of 5

    From

    -gangrene -rape -dead babies -suicide -break-ups -drunkards -crazy old men -gonorrhea -closeted lesbian married to a drunk poet... these are some of my favorite things :( No I kid, these are some of the delightful stories in this bad boy. I picked it up thinking it would be fun. First time only made it to 37. Walked away for 3 months but my "no book left behind' policy kept nagging me finally attempt Two. Read it in two days and honestly don't care for it at all. PS. Santiago I know your out there in th -gangrene -rape -dead babies -suicide -break-ups -drunkards -crazy old men -gonorrhea -closeted lesbian married to a drunk poet... these are some of my favorite things :( No I kid, these are some of the delightful stories in this bad boy. I picked it up thinking it would be fun. First time only made it to 37. Walked away for 3 months but my "no book left behind' policy kept nagging me finally attempt Two. Read it in two days and honestly don't care for it at all. PS. Santiago I know your out there in the sea and all but... miss you... call me...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cherie

    What a great story! I loved the way the man's thoughts wandered as he lay on his camp cot waiting to face death and thinking about the stories he was never going to write, but writing them in his head. Even the story about his end felt so real. I listened to it three times over. It got better and better each time! Charlton Heston's voice added so much life to the man's arguements with wife and his feelings about what was happening to him.

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