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Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons

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With more than one million copies sold, Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is a remarkable step-by-step program that teaches your child to read in just 20 minutes a day—with love, care, and joy only a parent and child can share. Is your child halfway through first grade and still unable to read? Is your preschooler bored with coloring and ready for reading? Do you With more than one million copies sold, Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is a remarkable step-by-step program that teaches your child to read in just 20 minutes a day—with love, care, and joy only a parent and child can share. Is your child halfway through first grade and still unable to read? Is your preschooler bored with coloring and ready for reading? Do you want to help your child read, but are afraid you’ll do something wrong? Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is a complete, step-by-step guide that shows parents simply and clearly how to teach their children to read. Twenty minutes a day is all you need, and within 100 teaching days your child will be reading on a solid second-grade reading level. It’s a sensible, easy-to-follow, and enjoyable way to help your child gain the essential skills of reading. Everything you need is here—no paste, no scissors, no flash cards, no complicated directions—just you and your child learning together. One hundred lessons, fully illustrated and color-coded for clarity, give your child the basic and more advanced skills needed to become a good reader.


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With more than one million copies sold, Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is a remarkable step-by-step program that teaches your child to read in just 20 minutes a day—with love, care, and joy only a parent and child can share. Is your child halfway through first grade and still unable to read? Is your preschooler bored with coloring and ready for reading? Do you With more than one million copies sold, Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is a remarkable step-by-step program that teaches your child to read in just 20 minutes a day—with love, care, and joy only a parent and child can share. Is your child halfway through first grade and still unable to read? Is your preschooler bored with coloring and ready for reading? Do you want to help your child read, but are afraid you’ll do something wrong? Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is a complete, step-by-step guide that shows parents simply and clearly how to teach their children to read. Twenty minutes a day is all you need, and within 100 teaching days your child will be reading on a solid second-grade reading level. It’s a sensible, easy-to-follow, and enjoyable way to help your child gain the essential skills of reading. Everything you need is here—no paste, no scissors, no flash cards, no complicated directions—just you and your child learning together. One hundred lessons, fully illustrated and color-coded for clarity, give your child the basic and more advanced skills needed to become a good reader.

30 review for Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons

  1. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    I have been using this book with my 5 year old twin girls, and have such mixed feelings about it. We are half way through. Some things I love are the structure, it is scripted and somewhat rigid. That means less work for me in terms of figuring out what to cover. I love how it teaches phonics, which is incredibly lacking in the school system near us. I also like the whole brain approach the book takes. As a neuropsychologist, it's nice to see the integration of writing, sounding out, comprehensi I have been using this book with my 5 year old twin girls, and have such mixed feelings about it. We are half way through. Some things I love are the structure, it is scripted and somewhat rigid. That means less work for me in terms of figuring out what to cover. I love how it teaches phonics, which is incredibly lacking in the school system near us. I also like the whole brain approach the book takes. As a neuropsychologist, it's nice to see the integration of writing, sounding out, comprehension and memorization, especially since reading is such a whole brain activity. Making the associations between writing (a parietal lobe function), saying the sounds (temporal lobe function), comprehension (frontal lobe/whole brain) is what good, forgetting resistant memory is all about. I like how the book also takes you through question asking about the picture at the end of the story, focusing the kids on what they might see based on what they read, and then getting them to think about what the characters in the picture might be thinking about (theory of mind, good for autism). Some things I don't like: the structure. Honestly, sometimes the script is agonizingly boring, and I can't stand that you go through some of the words/stories once, and then have to go back through them again a second time. Plus, my girls are freaking out by that time! Although going back through the story a second time and asking questions is excellent for comprehension. The biggest thing for me is just managing my own expectations, recognizing when my girls (who are partially deaf anyway) have reached their fatigue point, and letting it go to another day (which is SO hard for me, I want to get things done!). I've also started switching it up with reading repetitive early readers, like "Dick and Jane" books, and the leveled readers from their kindergarten class. This helps with the boredom/frustration and is good for getting sight words into their long-term memory without doing flashcards. I definitely see progress in my twins. I am hopeful they will be reading independently on some level, any level would satisfy me, by the end of kindergarten. I wish I had known about it when my son was this age, he struggled to read with the method taught at our neighborhood school - which was, "look at the picture and try to figure out what the word is", totally crazy - and he still struggles, though he has made great progress. Overall, I think this is one good tool in helping your children really learn to read and sound out unfamiliar words

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alisha

    This book has been a journey for me. I began with a squirmy 4 year old and finished with a squirmy, but able to focus 5 year old. I observed how my daughter learned and how I communicate under difficult circumstances. Not only am I glad I taught her to read myself, I'm glad I spent this last year and a half studying her learning habits and becoming a better teacher. Easy lessons by nature do not mean that focusing is easy for a child. I had to be creative and consistent. I implemented many ideas This book has been a journey for me. I began with a squirmy 4 year old and finished with a squirmy, but able to focus 5 year old. I observed how my daughter learned and how I communicate under difficult circumstances. Not only am I glad I taught her to read myself, I'm glad I spent this last year and a half studying her learning habits and becoming a better teacher. Easy lessons by nature do not mean that focusing is easy for a child. I had to be creative and consistent. I implemented many ideas that helped me: 1) Using a puppet to teach the lessons (she still likes the puppet even when the lessons get difficult) 2) I used a reward chart specifically for completing a lesson 3) After observing how difficult focusing even for 10-20 minutes was, I started giving focusing prizes for focused lesson time (sitting still, not talking about off-subject ideas, or being silly) 4) Learning that after 20 minutes focusing became especially difficult, so to complete the lesson another day. 5) Some lessons are easy for my daughter to complete because they are review lessons and some which introduce new sounds are more difficult, so I could not expect them all to be the same amount of time. Based on educational research, the Distar reading method streamlines the learning to read process. It has been proven more effective than the traditional teaching methods (sight reading, which her kindergarten class uses). Designed for 3 1/2 to 4 year olds, this book's lessons worked well for us, with plenty of consistency and endurance. It taught me and my daughter speech and phonetics and she is way ahead in her kindergarten class now. It was a good study in focusing for a 4 and 5 year old.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shiloah

    I’ve read this through about a hundred times over the course of my life. My mom used it to teach my siblings to read. I taught about half of my children to read with it as well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    I'm about halfway finished with this book. My son, who is 5, getting ready to start Kindergarten in the Fall has been the source of experimentation with this book. Okay, so he pretty much hates it.... But, it's working. This book really shows children how to sound out each letter to form words. I'm really pleased with it. As a parent who was a bit clueless on how to teach my child to read, this has been a huge help. Like I said, we are halfway through and he is already reading paragraph (stories) So I'm about halfway finished with this book. My son, who is 5, getting ready to start Kindergarten in the Fall has been the source of experimentation with this book. Okay, so he pretty much hates it.... But, it's working. This book really shows children how to sound out each letter to form words. I'm really pleased with it. As a parent who was a bit clueless on how to teach my child to read, this has been a huge help. Like I said, we are halfway through and he is already reading paragraph (stories) So, I wholeheartedly suggest if you need to teach a child to read that you pick this one up! The lessons are about 10 minutes each day, you really can't beat that!!!! 5 stars!!!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Megan B

    Finally finally finally finished! ROCK ON!!!! LOOOOOOOVE THIS BOOK!!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alice-Anne

    My almost 5 year old really wanted to learn to read so we recently started this program. It took me a while to get started doing it b/c 1) I was waiting for her to be little more ready, 2) As the parent, you do have to read through the instructions and do a little preparation in terms of practicing sounds (to make sure you teach them right) beforehand and I kept putting that off. But we did start and it wasn't a smooth ride for the first two weeks. It was easy for ME because they give you a scri My almost 5 year old really wanted to learn to read so we recently started this program. It took me a while to get started doing it b/c 1) I was waiting for her to be little more ready, 2) As the parent, you do have to read through the instructions and do a little preparation in terms of practicing sounds (to make sure you teach them right) beforehand and I kept putting that off. But we did start and it wasn't a smooth ride for the first two weeks. It was easy for ME because they give you a script and you just follow the script. She, however, lost interest real fast. But we've stuck with it (thanks to some bribery :) and I'm glad. She use to only have the attention span for half a lesson...now she's getting really quick at it that we can do a whole lesson in one sitting (20 minutes) and we are now at lesson 15. This book was highly recommended by my sister-in-law, Tiffany, who has used it with her kids and she told me that when they get to lesson 100 they are at a 2nd grade reading level and so she suggested I just work to lesson 30-40, which brought me tons of relief. :) Thanks, Tiffany. Sorry for all the details but thought others might want to know. It's a good resource for kids who want to start reading before school or could use some help learning to read after they have started school. I think the program seems great. If ANYTHING, my daughter is learning to sit still for 20 minutes every day to do something academic (which she needed to practice for kindergarten).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    I found this to be an easy and engaging way to teach my 5/6 year old how to read. Just sat down and went through the lessons step by step. I didn't make him repeat stuff as much as the book said, unless he was having trouble with a particular word. I let him set the learning pace so that he didn't get bored or overly frustrated. Only made it to lesson 70-something where the lessons start to repeat but without the special writing to help you pronounce the words. But he is reading books himself no I found this to be an easy and engaging way to teach my 5/6 year old how to read. Just sat down and went through the lessons step by step. I didn't make him repeat stuff as much as the book said, unless he was having trouble with a particular word. I let him set the learning pace so that he didn't get bored or overly frustrated. Only made it to lesson 70-something where the lessons start to repeat but without the special writing to help you pronounce the words. But he is reading books himself now so there doesn't seem to be much point in going on. Would definitely recommend this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Schrepfer

    It seems gimmicky, but I highly recommend this book! I have two very good readers after having worked through this book. This was recommended to me by several homeschooling moms that I know, all of which have good readers. It must be understood, though, that this is not a grammar book. This is simply teaching a child to read the words in front of him. It uses mainly phonics, but also incorporates memorization of “funny words”. After I consulted with my sister, Rachel Deese, who is a wonderful ed It seems gimmicky, but I highly recommend this book! I have two very good readers after having worked through this book. This was recommended to me by several homeschooling moms that I know, all of which have good readers. It must be understood, though, that this is not a grammar book. This is simply teaching a child to read the words in front of him. It uses mainly phonics, but also incorporates memorization of “funny words”. After I consulted with my sister, Rachel Deese, who is a wonderful educator and has a masters in Reading, we used this book in conjunction with A.C.E.‘s Word Building lessons (our main curriculum) and did fine. She was glad that phonics was the overall principle used, and that it also recognized that not all English words will hold to strict phonetic pronunciations. Her only recommendation was to be sure to keep terminology consistent between this book and our regular curriculum so as not to confuse the kids. I must say as well that it wasn’t always easy. The lessons could get tedious and frustrating, because it’s a whole new way of thinking for a Kindergartner. But I would say, stick with it! After all, who says every lesson of every day of school has to be Sesame Street!? As I read the reviews on Amazon, there were some who hated the book because of this, and I suppose it is fair to say that at certain points it was difficult. Some days we just had to skip the lesson. But I’m so happy with the results. It was definitely worth it to read the introductory material so I knew what my part was. Each lesson begins with introducing a new sound. Then there is a section of drilling, and finally the child gets to read a story. I read all the words in red, and the child follows my instruction. The book says that the lesson should only take 20 minutes, but for us it was twice as long. I suppose it was 20 minutes on a really good day when my kids were really into it and breezing through it, but this was not typical. I’ll post this video below to show how my kids read. In the video Matthew is in 1st grade and reading his A.C.E. PACEs easily. He went through the book last year. Katie was in Kindergarten. I’d say my kids are very normal. They don’t have any developmental issues, so those factors may influence your decision to use it. You’ll notice that they are sounding out a lot of words, and that’s good! My challenge now is to get them to read outside of class time. Katie seems to be enjoying reading the most, but Matthew is proud of himself for his reading skill even though he’d rather be playing Lego’s. This book was reviewed at MostlySensible.com...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shauna

    I have had some requests for more information about how I teach my children to read. I use this book, and I read aloud ALOT. We start off each lesson with a picture book (child's choice) then a chapter from a chapter book (my choice). Then we read the lesson. Sometimes we stop in the middle of the lesson (depending on attention span and how well the lesson is going, etc.) We always peek ahead to see if there is a "new sound" coming up. (A very exciting development, if you can imagine.) After the I have had some requests for more information about how I teach my children to read. I use this book, and I read aloud ALOT. We start off each lesson with a picture book (child's choice) then a chapter from a chapter book (my choice). Then we read the lesson. Sometimes we stop in the middle of the lesson (depending on attention span and how well the lesson is going, etc.) We always peek ahead to see if there is a "new sound" coming up. (A very exciting development, if you can imagine.) After the lesson we read from a phonics reader. For small breaks during the lesson we often read nursery rhyme and poetry books. At the end of the lesson we read another picture book--my choice. It often has something to reinforce the lesson. Sallie gets a treat every tenth lesson. Funny how the ante rises with each child. Aerie got a book every 10th lesson, Coco got something from the dollar store. Sallie gets Polly Pockets. We pick the next prize the day the first prize is finished. Sallie usually does two lessons on the days she is close to earning a prize. I never push, and if she is reluctant, we stop the lesson read aloud and call it good. I do not use the writing portion of the book. We keep writing completely separate. (I like Handwriting Without Tears and Draw Write Now, but I use them only loosely, mostly I just let them draw and write on their own. Sallie and I have started to incorporate some writing time into her reading lesson. She dictates a story to me, I write it, fold it, staple it and she illustrates it. We've done that a couple of times now and it has been great fun. She usually uses a couple of the words for her lesson, so I am careful to point those out. She loves to read her book to me when she is finished. So there you have it! Luckily, my children haven't had any reading troubles (eye problems, dyslexia, ADD, etc.) So learning to read has been fairly easy and painless as well as fun for all of us! Note: Sallie is on lesson 57. This is a great "teach your child" to read book. But, I think it only works after hundreds of hours of reading aloud. If I was starting from scratch with a new reader, I would still recommend hundreds of hours of read aloud, but I would also look into Jessie Wise's "The Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading." I haven't used it, but it looks fantastic, and I have really loved her other "homeschool" aids. Just a thought. N0te: I have used this book to teach Aerie and Coco to read. I cheated a little and customized it (turned it into games) for Coco, but by the end of the book (along with lots of read aloud at home) the child is considered on a second grade reading level. I'm starting to use the same "games" with Sallie, like "say it fast" and "say it slow", but we won't start on the real lessons until she is 4 or so.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This is an absolutely wonderful book! We are a homeschool family. My wife handles most of the lessons, but I teach each child to read when they show interest around 4 or 5 years old. My oldest daughter is 18. She is an avid reader. I started her off on this book when she was five years old. So far I have taught six of my children how to read using this book. I'm about to start on number seven. My youngest son is four years old and has started to show interest. (In case you are wondering, there a This is an absolutely wonderful book! We are a homeschool family. My wife handles most of the lessons, but I teach each child to read when they show interest around 4 or 5 years old. My oldest daughter is 18. She is an avid reader. I started her off on this book when she was five years old. So far I have taught six of my children how to read using this book. I'm about to start on number seven. My youngest son is four years old and has started to show interest. (In case you are wondering, there are eight children all together. My baby girl is almost three months old.) The only problem I have ever had with this book is one unfortunate incident with my oldest daughter. For some unknown reason there is a lesson that has the words "fun" and "luck" right close together. Well, my innocent daughter confused those words and uttered something I never hope to hear out of her lips. I simply corrected her and said, "no, the word is 'luck.'" She's the only one of six so far that's done that. The only other logistical thing I wish they would change is that there are cartoon pictures that you show the child only after reading the story. You are supposed to cover these with a piece of paper or something and only show the child after they read the story. Often times, it is difficult to keep the picture covered. I think for this next child I'm going to go through and tape pieces of paper over the pictures when I can lift if up like a flap. That should make it easier to use. If the publisher would just make a point to put the picture on the next page after the story that would be a better solution.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I've just started this book again with my twins who are almost 4. They are very excited and moving through the lessons very quickly. (By the way, for those with twins, I've found INDIVIDUAL lessons work best) I've used this with my three older kids with varied results. My oldest daughter soaked it up like a sponge, started kindergarten reading picture books well and ending the year reading chapter books. My second child (a son) took longer to get through the lessons, but also read well at the sta I've just started this book again with my twins who are almost 4. They are very excited and moving through the lessons very quickly. (By the way, for those with twins, I've found INDIVIDUAL lessons work best) I've used this with my three older kids with varied results. My oldest daughter soaked it up like a sponge, started kindergarten reading picture books well and ending the year reading chapter books. My second child (a son) took longer to get through the lessons, but also read well at the start of kindergarten. My third child (a son) proved to me that one-size-fits-all is NOT what this book is about. Despite lots of efforts and his willingness to play along, he didn't learn much at all from this book at age 4.5 and 5. However, a year later, and with first grade coming up, he is now excited to start the book again and we're working on it. This time, he's doing well. So my recommendation? Try the book for the first 10 or 20 lessons on your 4 or 5 year old. If they are interested and learning, keep it up. Otherwise, set it aside until they are older and focus on learning letters and numbers instead.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    On the recommendation of a friend, I began using this book with Nathan. I love the method used and that it takes no daily preparation on my part. So far we are on lesson 12 and Nate is doing extremely well. I am very pleased with the results and only expect good things from here.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    Just completed this book with Stevie Jr. It worked great!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alisha G

    This book comes highly recommended, and I have no doubt a lot of people have had success with it. But I hated it. On the plus side, my son did learn to read, it is comprehensive and very easy to use. On the other... First, as to the methodology: It teaches a special orthography to introduce different phonetics. I didn't have a problem with this, but I think it was frustrating for my son. It isn't until lesson 73 that the standardized alphabet is introduced--which means that for literally months, This book comes highly recommended, and I have no doubt a lot of people have had success with it. But I hated it. On the plus side, my son did learn to read, it is comprehensive and very easy to use. On the other... First, as to the methodology: It teaches a special orthography to introduce different phonetics. I didn't have a problem with this, but I think it was frustrating for my son. It isn't until lesson 73 that the standardized alphabet is introduced--which means that for literally months, he thought he couldn't read because he couldn't pick up a normal book and read it. It also meant he couldn't practice during the day with normal books. We started doing two lessons a day just to get through it quicker so he could see that he had learned something. I also question the wisdom of not introducing certain phonetic rules, like the long vowel if an 'e' is at the end of the word, earlier. The child is expected to read such words in standard type several lessons before the rule is formally introduced. And so, not having learned the rule, when my son got to the standardized type, he had no idea how to figure those words out. I went off script and introduced the rule myself. I don't know how he ever would've figured it out--was he supposed to infer the rule on his own? It was terribly frustrating that he was expected to read words without knowing how to sound them out. I am also confused as to why the book didn't introduce some letter combinations at all--like 'oa' or 'ci' and 'ce'. I had to tack on a lesson at the end to introduce those. Second, the manual itself: The editing in this book has to be the absolute worst I've ever seen. In one lesson, I found FOUR different typos (the script would refer to circled letters and none would be circled, for example). If you're going to teach a child a specialized orthography--if you're going to teach him that 's' and 'h' make a different sound when they're connected than when they're just right next to each other--well, at the very least you ought to make quite sure you are consistent. The book was rife with such mistakes--even my son pointed a couple out. I finally took to using a black pen to fix the text as we went along. There is no excuse for such sloppy editing in a reading manual of all things! And I haven't even mentioned my minor complaints--the illustrations are poorly drawn, a few of the stories involve a hunter with a gun (thanks including unnecessary violence, book!), too many of the reading comprehension questions are yes/no questions, etc. I will definitely not use this book with my other children.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    This book does a phenomenal job of teaching kids to read !! After having tried other reading methods (hooked on phonics, etc) that did not work with my oldest child, a friend recommended this to me and I couldn't be happier. By the end of the book, she was reading like a pro (she was 4.5 years). Now at the end of 1st grade (7 years) she reads at a 5th grade level. I used it on my second child (she was 4) and she will go to kindergarten in a few months but already reads at a second grade level. B This book does a phenomenal job of teaching kids to read !! After having tried other reading methods (hooked on phonics, etc) that did not work with my oldest child, a friend recommended this to me and I couldn't be happier. By the end of the book, she was reading like a pro (she was 4.5 years). Now at the end of 1st grade (7 years) she reads at a 5th grade level. I used it on my second child (she was 4) and she will go to kindergarten in a few months but already reads at a second grade level. Both love to read, but I know that may not be the case for everyone's children. I feel this book was a great start to teaching my children to read. After some difficulties with the power struggle with the first child, I adjusted and changed some things with the second child. Made a big difference. The key to winning the power struggle with your child is to take it easy and be flexible. If your child doesn't like the writing lessons at the end, don't do them (we hardly did any, because neither of my kids liked them). They get plenty of writing practice in preschool and kindergarten anyway. I have friends who say this was their child's favorite part, so they did extra time writing. When it comes to the second story reading, we would only do it once and save the second reading for the next day. Then the next day, we started with reading the previous days story (the second read) and then moved onto the new lesson and did the same thing at the end: read the story only once and save the second read for the next day. Keeps the kids more interested that way. Also, you don't have to follow the script Word for Word, adjust it to your everyday vocabulary and keep it fun. If you make it seem like a chore, they react accordingly.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jane G Meyer

    I taught my daughter, Madeleine, how to read by using this system. She wanted badly to read like her big brother. She flew through the lessons, doing two in one day and progressed quickly. She's good at deciphering symbols and recognizing rules, so it worked well for her. I'm now teaching my son to read this way (we started when he was four, and he's now five. It has taken us about five months to make it through the text--with a few breaks when he was getting too antsy and negative), and though t I taught my daughter, Madeleine, how to read by using this system. She wanted badly to read like her big brother. She flew through the lessons, doing two in one day and progressed quickly. She's good at deciphering symbols and recognizing rules, so it worked well for her. I'm now teaching my son to read this way (we started when he was four, and he's now five. It has taken us about five months to make it through the text--with a few breaks when he was getting too antsy and negative), and though the progress is slower, he's still grabbing all the concepts and despite his bouncy-ness is reading nicely. We're on lesson 88! If you're interested in doing this, you have to completely buy in to their system. I don't think going half way would be helpful for a child--just confusing. I don't really like the physical feel of the book. It's big, and might be more helpful if the spine could fully open. And the illustrations, though humorous, lack a certain whimsy and taste. my two cents :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    Wow! I've tried lots of things (6 or 7) to teach my kids to read and this is the only no-fail system. Yes, my kids hate this book after a month or so of it, but it doesn't make them hate reading. This is the only book they are successful at. Whenever I have them try to read the school reading assignments or Bob books or I see sam books, or reader rabbit, or starfall, they instantly stop progressing. Most of these other methods either introduce new information too quickly or discourage sounding o Wow! I've tried lots of things (6 or 7) to teach my kids to read and this is the only no-fail system. Yes, my kids hate this book after a month or so of it, but it doesn't make them hate reading. This is the only book they are successful at. Whenever I have them try to read the school reading assignments or Bob books or I see sam books, or reader rabbit, or starfall, they instantly stop progressing. Most of these other methods either introduce new information too quickly or discourage sounding out words. I tell my kids that although they hate this book, we read it anyway and I remind them of the fun things they'll soon be able to read. UPDATE: I still like this book, but the authors have made a computer version that is so much better and even easier to teach and learn. It is called Funnix. It is very inexpensive and about once a year at the holidays is offered for free download.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    My son is not ready to begin reading lessons yet. At the time of this "review" he is 3 years and 3 months old. I can see him being ready to begin in 3 to 6 months, though. I only wanted to check out this book to read the introduction and instructions. Everything looks good and I think we will probably use this to begin reading instruction if we're ready to start that before we start K. The only issue or confusion I had is that this book claims to be appropriate for children as young as three and My son is not ready to begin reading lessons yet. At the time of this "review" he is 3 years and 3 months old. I can see him being ready to begin in 3 to 6 months, though. I only wanted to check out this book to read the introduction and instructions. Everything looks good and I think we will probably use this to begin reading instruction if we're ready to start that before we start K. The only issue or confusion I had is that this book claims to be appropriate for children as young as three and a half but there are writing portions in every lesson, from what I could tell. I think most probably any 3 year old that is ready to begin reading still lacks the necessary motor skills to begin writing. I have read that this is especially common in boys, even when they are not early readers. We can reevaluate when we get there, but I imagine I will have to alter the writing tasks to allow for tracing or finger painting or simply skip them altogether.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I wanted to love this book, but it was just taking way too much time, and my daughter was getting frustrated. We're going to try "Explode the Code" instead, but maybe we'll come back to this one. I really, really like their method: - repetition of all the lessons woven together (spiral) - handwriting in every lesson - lessons appear short - method of teaching pre-reading and reading skills is brilliant - I liked how they made little changes to the letters to make it easier for the child to differ I wanted to love this book, but it was just taking way too much time, and my daughter was getting frustrated. We're going to try "Explode the Code" instead, but maybe we'll come back to this one. I really, really like their method: - repetition of all the lessons woven together (spiral) - handwriting in every lesson - lessons appear short - method of teaching pre-reading and reading skills is brilliant - I liked how they made little changes to the letters to make it easier for the child to differentiate "ta hha" as "Th" - I liked the black-and-white pages and occasional pictures. I felt that it helped us focus on the words instead of pictures. But that was something that my daughter didn't like about it. Great methodology, just didn't work for us this time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amber Allen

    My son was having problems learning to read at school. The way that they were teaching just wasn't helping him at all! They finally told me that they wanted to place him in special ed as he wasn't learning with his other classmates. I knew he was smart and didn't belong in special ed so I purchased this book. In two weeks he was reading at grade level and by the end of the book he was reading at a 3rd grade level well above his peers. Any time a friend comes to me and either wants to start teachi My son was having problems learning to read at school. The way that they were teaching just wasn't helping him at all! They finally told me that they wanted to place him in special ed as he wasn't learning with his other classmates. I knew he was smart and didn't belong in special ed so I purchased this book. In two weeks he was reading at grade level and by the end of the book he was reading at a 3rd grade level well above his peers. Any time a friend comes to me and either wants to start teaching their child to read or their child has a problem keeping up with reading at school I recommend this book. I always get rave reviews from them by the end of the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    My mom wrapped this up as a birthday present for my third birthday as she had for my two older siblings, and later did for my two younger siblings. I learned to read with this book and was definitely ahead of the other kids in my kindergarten class by the time I started school. My mom gave it to her friends and they taught their children to read with it as well. It's a great program that makes reading simple for any child, and will teach children to become avid readers. Also, I probably wouldn't My mom wrapped this up as a birthday present for my third birthday as she had for my two older siblings, and later did for my two younger siblings. I learned to read with this book and was definitely ahead of the other kids in my kindergarten class by the time I started school. My mom gave it to her friends and they taught their children to read with it as well. It's a great program that makes reading simple for any child, and will teach children to become avid readers. Also, I probably wouldn't have a goodreads account without it. ;]

  22. 5 out of 5

    Claire Kenny

    This book is amazing! I highly recommend this book to any parent wanting to teach their child to read. It is a phonics based approach that is simply brilliant. I finished all 100 lessons with my four year old about a month ago and it is amazing to sit and listen to him read--he WANTS to read. I love it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    WE DID IT! I'm not going to lie, sometimes it was a slog to get through, but we managed, and my kid has a solid understanding of phonics. When I took him to his kindergarten testing his teacher said that this is the book she used to teach all four of her children. She also has used it to supplement her teaching in various classrooms. WE DID IT! I'm not going to lie, sometimes it was a slog to get through, but we managed, and my kid has a solid understanding of phonics. When I took him to his kindergarten testing his teacher said that this is the book she used to teach all four of her children. She also has used it to supplement her teaching in various classrooms.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    A simple guide to teaching the basics of reading. We have paused now at lesson 80, and my son can make it through Frog and Toad stories with only a little help. This book has silly stories and illustrations but I felt could never show a child the joy of reading unless there are a lot of great read alouds happening at the same time.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Janei

    I've successfully taught my oldest daughter how to read with this book. She could read fluently before kindergarten. I'm currently teaching my second daughter and she is doing just as well as her older sister. I will teach all my children to read with this book, the results are worth the effort. I've successfully taught my oldest daughter how to read with this book. She could read fluently before kindergarten. I'm currently teaching my second daughter and she is doing just as well as her older sister. I will teach all my children to read with this book, the results are worth the effort.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    BEST book for teaching your kiddos how to read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    booklady

    Extremely helpful method for teaching some children to read. It worked for mine anyway. Well I used it with my oldest and my younger daughter eavesdropped on the lessons and taught herself.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    used this with my first two...I love it

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kris Muir

    Reading is not only a critical skill for development, but in many ways it is a superpower to other skills. If you're looking for a structured way to teach your child to read, I HIGHLY recommend this book by Siegfried "Zig" Engelmann, a former professor at the University of Oregon. Zig is best known as the creator of the concept of direct instruction in education. But he and few collaborators created an evidence-based reading approach that builds skills and confidence through a progression that a Reading is not only a critical skill for development, but in many ways it is a superpower to other skills. If you're looking for a structured way to teach your child to read, I HIGHLY recommend this book by Siegfried "Zig" Engelmann, a former professor at the University of Oregon. Zig is best known as the creator of the concept of direct instruction in education. But he and few collaborators created an evidence-based reading approach that builds skills and confidence through a progression that any parent can follow. How early can you start? Zig recommends 4/5-years-old or a gifted 3.5-year-old. Our personal journey started around age 4 but endured beyond the prescriptive 100 days-in-a-row. It took 14 months in total due to life getting in the way, but we stayed committed to doing the lessons as instructed. And we feel as if we just climbed a metaphorical mountain. In our family we started this when our daughter was 4-years-old and 10 months (or so) but we discovered it was too early for her. We waited a few months and started again around 5-years-old during the spring before she started Kindergarten. We built up some momentum but lost that momentum over the summer. We picked it back up during the Fall while she was in Kindergarten but only completed it on the weekends because she was fatigued from school. Earlier this Spring we started doing the lessons consistently after school, and once going to school was canceled due to the pandemic we were able to do them every day. In hindsight, this was not an ideal strategy. It's best to do these every day because there is a progression to the lessons. But, when our daughter finished lesson #100 today we could see a glorious confidence beam from her eyes. Lessons learned: -Do the lessons once your child can recognize words and sounds on a page -Build a time and place to do the lessons every day for 15 minutes (e.g. 6pm in the dining room) -As a parent/teacher, read the instructions ahead of time and glance at the pronunciation guide liberally (the book uses phonetic marks to direct you and your child how to pronounce the letters) -use a reward system but don't over-do it with prizes (we used stickers and the daily reward was that she could have screen time if she completed the lesson, and we created two big surprises at lessons #50 and #100) -at times our daughter refused, disengaged, pretended to be too tired, and pushed back; but we remained focused -we worried that our daughter would start to see reading as a chore and not want to read anymore, but as long as we read aloud to her at other times during the day (where she could relax and listen) she was able to enjoy reading and the confidence that came with being able to read sentences -use the local library extensively to keep reading fun and fresh for read aloud time (we take in multiple grocery bags when we go) Happy Reading!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    These lessons worked incredibly well. I started this with my daughter when she was five and a half, and I was happily surprised by how quickly she was picking up on things. She was reading small words and short sentences much sooner than I anticipated, and by the end, she had become a fantastic reader. She is now often reading things that she sees in real life (signs, words on TV, etc.). I'm really proud of my daughter, and I would name teaching her to read as one of my greatest accomplishments These lessons worked incredibly well. I started this with my daughter when she was five and a half, and I was happily surprised by how quickly she was picking up on things. She was reading small words and short sentences much sooner than I anticipated, and by the end, she had become a fantastic reader. She is now often reading things that she sees in real life (signs, words on TV, etc.). I'm really proud of my daughter, and I would name teaching her to read as one of my greatest accomplishments in life. It was easily the best things that I accomplished during the COVID-19 quarantine.

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