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The Marauders are slaughtering Morlocks in the sewers of New York in this epic adventure, and the high-flying X-man called Angel loses his wings. This story features the first appearance of Mr Sinister.


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The Marauders are slaughtering Morlocks in the sewers of New York in this epic adventure, and the high-flying X-man called Angel loses his wings. This story features the first appearance of Mr Sinister.

30 review for X-Men: Mutant Massacre

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    This volume collects the most well executed Marvel comics event/crossover I have read. It may even be better than most of the even/crossover comics I have read from any publisher. In this book, we have Uncanny X-Men #210-214, X-Factor #9-11, New Mutants #46, Daredevil #238, Power Pack #27, and Thor #373-374. There was no need for a "Mutant Massacre" series of comics to tie things together. A reader of X-Factor was not obliged to read all the others to know what was going on. However, when read all This volume collects the most well executed Marvel comics event/crossover I have read. It may even be better than most of the even/crossover comics I have read from any publisher. In this book, we have Uncanny X-Men #210-214, X-Factor #9-11, New Mutants #46, Daredevil #238, Power Pack #27, and Thor #373-374. There was no need for a "Mutant Massacre" series of comics to tie things together. A reader of X-Factor was not obliged to read all the others to know what was going on. However, when read all together, the whole thing was powerful, exciting, tragic, and worth every minute of reading. This story has long-term impact on all the characters involved. It definitely changed the X-Men and X-Factor completely! This collection takes several major characters out of action, maybe forever. It also provides the addition of Psylocke and Dazzler to the X-Men. Another highlight comes from the many appearances of Sabretooth throughout this collection! For fans of the mutant comics from Marvel, this is essential, highly recommended!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Introduction: After I heard so many good reviews on this comic, I just had to read this and oh boy, I just have so much to say about this particular comic book! I know that so many events had happened before “X-Men: Mutant Massacre” happened (as was stated by the characters in this comic), but I wanted to read this so badly that I was willing to skip the last few issues of “X-Men” just to get to this comic! “X-Men: Mutant Massacre” was a first for me in many different ways: it was the first Introduction: After I heard so many good reviews on this comic, I just had to read this and oh boy, I just have so much to say about this particular comic book! I know that so many events had happened before “X-Men: Mutant Massacre” happened (as was stated by the characters in this comic), but I wanted to read this so badly that I was willing to skip the last few issues of “X-Men” just to get to this comic! “X-Men: Mutant Massacre” was a first for me in many different ways: it was the first “X-Men” comic book that I read that featured Elizabeth “Betsy” Braddock, also known as Psylocke, the first time I had read about the original “X-Factor,” the first time I had read about “The New Mutants,” the first time I had read “Daredevil” and the first time I had read about the “Power Pack.” With the combined writing of Chris Claremont, Louise Simonson, Walter Simonson, and Ann Nocenti and the combined artwork of John Romita Jr., Terry Shoemaker, Bret Blevins, Walter Simonson, Jackson Guice, Sal Buscema, Jon Bogdanove, Rick Leonardi, Alan Davis, and Barry Windor-Smith, “X-Men: Mutant Massacre” is definitely a story that “X-Men” fans have to check! What is this story about? When the Marauders, a group of mutant assassins, started killing most of the Morlock community, the X-Men, now lead by a Mohawk wearing Storm, step in to help out the Morlocks. Meanwhile, X-Factor, a group of mutant hunters who are actually the original five X-Men (Cyclops, Jean Grey, Iceman, Beast and Angel) in disguise, try to defeat the Marauders while Angel goes through an emotional trip that would change him forever. Also, this comic features guest appearances from Thor, Daredevil, the New Mutants and the Power Pack who also try to help out the X-Men in defending the Morlock community! This graphic novel contains stories from: Uncanny X-Men (issues #210 – 214) X-Factor (issues #9 – 11) New Mutants (issue #46) Thor (issues #373-374) Powr Pack (issue #27) Daredevil (issue #238) What I loved about this story: The story: Usually, I do have problems with reading crossovers in comics because the stories almost never match up as long as you have different writers writing each story, but for a crossover, I found this story pretty impressive! I liked the fact that all of the stories mentioned in this graphic novel actually flowed well together and it felt like we were getting one cohesive storyline instead of having several different things happening all at once and it made me really enjoy the storyline! I really enjoyed the way that each different writer had a different take on the Marauders attacking the Morlocks as we see the attacks on the Morlocks from the X-Men, Thor, the Power Pack and Daredevil’s viewpoint. The stories that I really enjoyed in this graphic novel were the stories written by Chris Claremont as he wrote the stories for “Uncanny X-Men” and “New Mutants.” I loved the way that Chris Claremont made the story extremely dramatic and intense as we witness many Morlocks being killed in brutal ways and the X-Men characters dealing with the tragedy emotionally. I really enjoyed how Chris Claremont handled Storm’s character as we see her being emotionally affected by the situation and how it affected her position as the leader of the X-Men and it was truly moving seeing Storm struggle with being the leader of the X-Men. I also enjoyed seeing Storm as the leader of the X-Men since it was rare of me to see her in such a position. I really enjoyed Chris Claremont’s writing in “New Mutants” as the characters were really interesting, especially Illyana Rasputin (Magik), Warlock, Danielle Moonstar (Valkyrie) and Samuel Guthrie (Cannonball) and it was great seeing a younger generation of X-Men step up the plate in this tragedy. Louise Simonson’s writing for “X-Factor” was fantastic as it was interesting seeing the original five X-Men work together again and I enjoyed seeing how the murdering of the Morlocks affected them and how the mutant community looks at them as they were disguised as the mutant hunting team “X-Factor” even though they were trying to help the mutants. I also enjoyed Louise Simonson’s writing in “Power Pack” as it was hilarious and intense at the same time as I really enjoyed seeing the adventures of Franklin Richards and the Power Pack as it is rare that I see a comic book with small children being superheroes, which I thought was really cute! I really like Ann Nocenti’s writing in “Daredevil” as the fight between Daredevil and Saber tooth was really intense and I enjoyed the inner monologues of Daredevil as it really defined his position in being a superhero. The artwork: Out of all the graphic novels I had read, “X-Men: Mutant Massacre” probably had the most artists I had ever seen out of any graphic novel! Each artist had contributed greatly to this storyline and I had enjoyed each one! My favorite artwork in this book came from Jackson Guice’s artwork in “New Mutants,” Rick Leonardi’s artwork in “Uncanny X-Men,” John Romita Jr’s artwork in “Uncanny X-Men,” and Sal Buscema’s artwork in “Daredevil.” (I know that there is some hate on John Romita Jr.’s artwork in current comics, but I enjoyed the scratchy artwork he created for this storyline). What made me feel uncomfortable about this story: The reason why I gave this book a four star rating was because I felt that Thor’s side of the story was a bit of a distraction for me as it focused too heavily on Thor and I am not used to the “Shakespearean” dialogue that Thor usually talks in. Also, you can tell that so much has happened before this storyline, so anyone (like myself) who just jumped in to read an X-Men comic might be wondering about how half of the events that happened to the characters happened in the first place. This was back in the days when continuity was important in comics. This comic also deals with the theme of death and sorrow as many characters are killed in this graphic novel and that might upset sensitive readers. Final Thoughts: Overall, despite the four star rating (the “X-Men” storylines alone are five stars in my book), “X-Men: Mutant Massacre” is definitely one of the darkest yet most invigorating series I had ever read and anyone who is a huge fan of the X-Men will definitely enjoy this book! (view spoiler)[At the end of this book, I've wondered whatever happened to Kitty Pryde, Nightcrawler and Colossus? They were injured in battle, but they never really told us if they ever got better or not. That was apart of the story I would have like to see resolved. Also, here are some of my favorite moments from this comic: (hide spoiler)] Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erich

    Ceilings consistently collapse to separate implacable enemies who had planned to fight to the death.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Asciigod

    This gets a "Low" 3/5 rating from me due to the wildly inconsistent quality of the titles involved in this crossover. It's actually somewhat comical to have such disparate titles juxtaposed in a graphic novel collection. Makes it completely clear just how new and unpolished this whole "giant crossover" gimmick was at the time. Why is Thor involved in this? Daredevil? His appearance at least makes sense... I guess. Power Pack? Are mutants immune to abortions? Honestly, I love the X-tinctio... er.. This gets a "Low" 3/5 rating from me due to the wildly inconsistent quality of the titles involved in this crossover. It's actually somewhat comical to have such disparate titles juxtaposed in a graphic novel collection. Makes it completely clear just how new and unpolished this whole "giant crossover" gimmick was at the time. Why is Thor involved in this? Daredevil? His appearance at least makes sense... I guess. Power Pack? Are mutants immune to abortions? Honestly, I love the X-tinctio... er... Massacre concept. Love it almost every time it's utilized in a series (which is, thankfully, quite often!) But here, there are just too many terrible turds clogging up the Morlocks' tunnels. I don't blame this on what would appear to be the obvious culprits: Daredevil, Thor, Power Pack (!?); the real catastrophe is X-Factor, which is awe inspiring in it's incompetency. It's shocking that X-Factor survived it's infancy as a title if this is representative of its quality at the time. The plot, if existent, is nonsensical. The combat pacing and layout is confusing, chaotic and unfolds like children playing superhero on the playground: "Nice try Cyclops, but you can't block my ninja star storms!", "Ha! Villionious, I created a optic shield to counter your ninja star storm!", etc. Just bad, bad stuff. Claremont, of course, shines. Schadenfreude is defined by Webster's as "watching Chris Claremont struggling to keep his own books' narratives afloat when forced to interact with several tangentially related titles by inferior writers. See: Mutant Massacre." Im my view, a pretty highly overrated experience. Unfortunately. :(

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    The Mutant Massacre (XM#210-213, XF #9-11, NM #46 +++). The Mutant Massacre was the first major crossover for the X-Men, threading between X-Men and X-Factor, with briefer stops in several other comics (New Mutants, Thor, Power Pack, Daredevil). Even today it remains quite notable for a number of reasons. First, the continuity between the 11 major comics is superb. The authors clearly carefully collaborated to make sure that they knew where everyone was at every point, and when all the major plo The Mutant Massacre (XM#210-213, XF #9-11, NM #46 +++). The Mutant Massacre was the first major crossover for the X-Men, threading between X-Men and X-Factor, with briefer stops in several other comics (New Mutants, Thor, Power Pack, Daredevil). Even today it remains quite notable for a number of reasons. First, the continuity between the 11 major comics is superb. The authors clearly carefully collaborated to make sure that they knew where everyone was at every point, and when all the major plot points occurred. This also allowed them to ensure that many of the various comics had major repercussions (in fact, a couple of the most important plot elements occur in Thor, admittedly by Walt Simonson who helped to kick off X-Factor). Second, it actually has major repercussions. The Morlocks, the X-Men, and X-Factor are all changed forever, each in their own way. Even today, I think the changes to the X-Men are the most stunning. The team that entered the Mutant Massacre was largely the same as the team 70 or so issues earlier, when Kitty Pryde joined the team. There'd always been the occasional addition or subtraction from the team, but nothing large-scale. Over the course of the Mutant Massacre, three different team members are critically wounded, removing them from action, and over the next several issues, four more would join them, fully replacing half the team. This would create the foundation for the more dynamic X-teams of recent years. Beyond that, this is a great (brutal) crossover that's constantly surprising. It introduces the Marauders and namedrops Mr. Sinister for the first time (though he wouldn't appear until #221). The X-Men issues are the best, then the X-Factor. It's harder to measure the rest, because they're all so caught up in their own storylines (a real change from how crossovers are managed now). Overall, a monumental, foundational, and groundbreaking crossover [5/5].

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kyne Anderson

    Mutants Massacre collects numerous stories from the Xmen story arc. However some stories are stronger than others. The book as a whole suffers from a lack of focus and lack of a real conclusion. It’s best read by someone who wants to read all Xmen story arcs or someone who already has a strong knowledge of comic events. As a pure standalone, it is not recommended due to varying quality of comics and the wide range of titles included.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cameron H

    “Gentlemen! Gentlemen! Don’t you dare fight in here — This is Bloomingdale’s!!!” Perhaps the best line ever.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    Welcome to the X-Men of the 1980s. Lots of talky-talk, lots of True Romance, a so-very-80s look. Cutting edge for its time, but we've come so far since then. Important for the fact it's the first X-Men crossover, and for the changes to the team's line-up, but a bit difficult to get through, especially if you're used to how comics look today. Welcome to the X-Men of the 1980s. Lots of talky-talk, lots of True Romance, a so-very-80s look. Cutting edge for its time, but we've come so far since then. Important for the fact it's the first X-Men crossover, and for the changes to the team's line-up, but a bit difficult to get through, especially if you're used to how comics look today.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marco Nerlini

    2.5/5 stars

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

    Can't believe I'm honestly enjoying 80's X-men. It's a pretty solid little event with some really horrifying consequences for the teams involved. Bit of a shame there's not a companion book with more of the story collected. Read this along side the first volume of Essential X-Factor which I fell head over heals in love with. Walt Simonson, duh. Why is it that this material has not reprinted in color anywhere? Roy Thomas labels the current age of comic books as the Age of Reprints. He makes a goo Can't believe I'm honestly enjoying 80's X-men. It's a pretty solid little event with some really horrifying consequences for the teams involved. Bit of a shame there's not a companion book with more of the story collected. Read this along side the first volume of Essential X-Factor which I fell head over heals in love with. Walt Simonson, duh. Why is it that this material has not reprinted in color anywhere? Roy Thomas labels the current age of comic books as the Age of Reprints. He makes a good argument. It's a shame this overlooked little gem of a series has not been given the color treatment. Though, I must admit I do enjoy being forced to read black and white versions. You do see the art completely differently. Line take over. And line can be astounding. I do have one gripe with the whole Morlocks business. One that's held-over since I was a teen. The Morlocks are Mutants that cannot pass as human. Basically, they're just too ugly. So they hide in the tunnels under Manhattan Island. Among their number is a mutant named Masque whose power is basically plastic surgery by touch. He can give you a new face. Any face. Or reform your body. Reshape you however he wish - beautiful or ugly. So... if that's the case - why doesn't Masque make all the Morlocks beautiful so they don't have to hide in the tunnels? Such a big plot hole and one never addressed.

  11. 5 out of 5

    C

    (Sort of an addendum to the great x-read – just earlier in continuity than all of the post-90s stuff I read at that time…) First of all, I am giving this book 3 stars which is a little lower than I expected. If you want the too long, didn’t read version of this review, it is this: The Claremont X-men issues are fantastic. The rest is a bit of a meandering mess that mars the whole a bit. Now on to the longer version… When I was reading the x-books as a youngster, I came in a bit after the mutant ma (Sort of an addendum to the great x-read – just earlier in continuity than all of the post-90s stuff I read at that time…) First of all, I am giving this book 3 stars which is a little lower than I expected. If you want the too long, didn’t read version of this review, it is this: The Claremont X-men issues are fantastic. The rest is a bit of a meandering mess that mars the whole a bit. Now on to the longer version… When I was reading the x-books as a youngster, I came in a bit after the mutant massacre. It was mentioned constantly – particularly in X-factor whenever Archangel made an appearance – so I had a pretty good idea of what had happened but when I saw this thick volume at the library I knew I had to borrow it. (Plus any chance I get to read earlyish Claremont x-men books I take it…) And.. Well, it is a mixed bag. I don’t think Marvel really had a handle yet on how to do a big bombastic crossover and it shows. Claremont’s book is the through-line and it carries everything else. The emotional core is there and it does most of the heavy lifting of the plot as well. Most everything else is pretty tangential (sometimes in strange ways. Did we really need Power Pack of all heroes running around the Morlock sewer tunnels during a massacre that is supposed to be absolutely shocking in its sudden and brutal violence?) and not particularly necessary for the story. X-factor, I suppose, does a decent job of also moving the plot forward but it really feels like they had no idea what story they wanted to tell in X-factor at this time (It’s a far cry from what the book would eventually become at this point) and it is really scattered – both in terms of plot and characterization. The writing in the X-factor issues is *really* over the top comics speak – lots of villainous monologues and talking us through the fight going on. And then you have Thor and Daredevil. You know, the Daredevil appearance at least makes a bit of sense due to the location and it isn’t a bad story. Just more of a “Why is Daredevil carrying an x-crossover?” sort of weirdness. Thor, though, seems like an inclusion out of left field and in my opinion, it just doesn’t work. He is even given some pretty important moments to carry (finding the crucified Angel, etcetera) but the whole time it feels like he just does not even vaguely fit in this story. Keep in mind that this is coming from someone who is never a huge fan of the rest of the marvel universe crossing over into the x-books (and vice versa) but this one feels particularly egregious and out of place. Oh, and the less said about Power Pack the better. I know they had their fans, but every Power Pack issue I have ever read has had me praying for it to end. So in the end it is a story that is very much better than the sum of its parts, mostly thanks to the hard work of Claremont to keep the whole story moving and emotional. I want to give it a higher review for the lasting impact that it had on all of the x-titles as it really is a seminal moment in the history of these comics (and I’ve got to say – I really miss the Marauders as villains. The x-books have had so many good villain teams – Marauders, Reavers, Freedom Force, Mutant Liberation Front, the Acolytes… and it seems odd that the modern books haven’t seemed very interested in developing good villain teams. They just want to continually reuse the big big baddies but I digress…). Is it worth a read? Abso-freaking-lutely. Just understand going in that you are probably going to find yourself skimming through some of these secondary titles that are forced into the storyline.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    The Marauders attack the Morlocks in a gritty story that would have some lasting and grave consequences for the X-Men. Even some characters not yet introduced at printing would be affected by the events that play out here. This really is a darker X-Men tale, as a band of mercenaries is assembled with the goal of killing as many Morlocks as they can. The body count quickly rises, and our heroes even find themselves taking lives as events unfold. Fierce battles with meaningful consequence give this The Marauders attack the Morlocks in a gritty story that would have some lasting and grave consequences for the X-Men. Even some characters not yet introduced at printing would be affected by the events that play out here. This really is a darker X-Men tale, as a band of mercenaries is assembled with the goal of killing as many Morlocks as they can. The body count quickly rises, and our heroes even find themselves taking lives as events unfold. Fierce battles with meaningful consequence give this book its weight. Mutant Massacre is also a great introductory vehicle for Sabretooth, who by the end of the volume has made a major impact. His ferocious fight with Wolverine is a touchstone in combative X-Men lore. My only issue with this volume is the inconsistent quality between the different included titles. Power Pack appears and just doesn't fit in with the story's tone. Daredevil shows up while being written by Ann Nocenti, and the best that I can say about her prose is that it's easily forgotten. The strongest issues are, unsurprisingly, from Chris Claremont's X-Men. Walter Simonson's Thor also makes an appearance and is strong, though I say that as a general fan of Simonson's run on Thor.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Iantony

    This crossovers of 80's X-men is pretty dark for its time. I also want to note that this is the first major X-men crossovers involving . For a big crossover, the continuity between all the single issues involved crossovers is pretty neat, you may not see too many of Thor, Daredevil, X-men, X-Factors, and Power Pack members mingling with each other but you could know exactly where every characters are situated at in the crossover. But the qualities of various titles involved weren't consistent at This crossovers of 80's X-men is pretty dark for its time. I also want to note that this is the first major X-men crossovers involving . For a big crossover, the continuity between all the single issues involved crossovers is pretty neat, you may not see too many of Thor, Daredevil, X-men, X-Factors, and Power Pack members mingling with each other but you could know exactly where every characters are situated at in the crossover. But the qualities of various titles involved weren't consistent at some point. The story is quite good and a bit too dark for that time. If you were into X-men, it's important to follow the story as the consequences of this crossover is pretty much a game-changer for X-menverse. I don't want to say a lot about the art, let's not compare artwork from 80's comic book with the recent ones. 3.5/5 stars for me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David

    5.0 It is so fun reading a collection that was so important in my youth. It was interesting revisiting old characters, locations and storylines that clearly had a big impact on my development as a young adult. Seeing the themes found in many of these stories today as an adult make their relevance to my life then, and their connection to deeper societal issues, even more apparent and appreciated. I cherish the lessons in embracing diversity, teamwork, redemption, love, purpose, leadership, moralit 5.0 It is so fun reading a collection that was so important in my youth. It was interesting revisiting old characters, locations and storylines that clearly had a big impact on my development as a young adult. Seeing the themes found in many of these stories today as an adult make their relevance to my life then, and their connection to deeper societal issues, even more apparent and appreciated. I cherish the lessons in embracing diversity, teamwork, redemption, love, purpose, leadership, morality, self belief, overcoming adversity and so many more that so skillfully fill these pages.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    The Marauders are massacring the morlock mutants in the tunnels. The X-men, X-Factor, New Mutants, Thor and Power Pack go to help. The storyline works really well, and it doesn't pull any punches with the horror of the situation. The way the characters react is really well written, all want to protect the mutants, though a lot are not successful. This was a game changer, it showed prejudice for what it is, and brought a sense of reality to the world of the mutants. I particularly liked Thor tryi The Marauders are massacring the morlock mutants in the tunnels. The X-men, X-Factor, New Mutants, Thor and Power Pack go to help. The storyline works really well, and it doesn't pull any punches with the horror of the situation. The way the characters react is really well written, all want to protect the mutants, though a lot are not successful. This was a game changer, it showed prejudice for what it is, and brought a sense of reality to the world of the mutants. I particularly liked Thor trying to help, and not caring what those he helped looked like. A very good read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tom Malinowski

    Way way back in the days of yore...the first mutant crossover....what a doozy the Mutant Massacare turned out to be as there are lots of deaths. The Mauraders are killing the Morlocks, shunned mutants who have found peace living in the sewers underground New York. The X-Men and X-Factor along with Power Pack, Thor, and the New Mutants, even Daredevil are featured here. Some milestones are Peter, Kitty, and Kurt getting hurt...which will eventually lead to two of them forming Excalibur. And Dazzl Way way back in the days of yore...the first mutant crossover....what a doozy the Mutant Massacare turned out to be as there are lots of deaths. The Mauraders are killing the Morlocks, shunned mutants who have found peace living in the sewers underground New York. The X-Men and X-Factor along with Power Pack, Thor, and the New Mutants, even Daredevil are featured here. Some milestones are Peter, Kitty, and Kurt getting hurt...which will eventually lead to two of them forming Excalibur. And Dazzler finally joins the team as well as Psylocke.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lance Grabmiller

    Collects Uncanny X-Men #210-214 (October 1986 - February 1987), X-Factor #9-11 (October - December 1986), New Mutants #46 (December 1986), Thor #373-374 (November - December 1986), Power Pack #27 (December 1986) and Daredevil #238 (January 1987). This was the first crossover of what would become a yearly phenomenon for the X-Men comics. At least, for this first one, it was all intentional on Chris Claremont's part, but later these would spiral into editorial dictates from on high to increase com Collects Uncanny X-Men #210-214 (October 1986 - February 1987), X-Factor #9-11 (October - December 1986), New Mutants #46 (December 1986), Thor #373-374 (November - December 1986), Power Pack #27 (December 1986) and Daredevil #238 (January 1987). This was the first crossover of what would become a yearly phenomenon for the X-Men comics. At least, for this first one, it was all intentional on Chris Claremont's part, but later these would spiral into editorial dictates from on high to increase comic sales and would lose their coherence and organic nature. This also, sort of, marks the beginning of the end of my comic collection from childhood. Will tackle the crossover as a whole first. When I was young, I believe I only had the X-men and New Mutants parts of this storyline and it was (and is) a powerful story. Unfortunately, seeing the complete story here, it suffers from some pretty massive weaknesses. The X-men stuff is top notch, but the other material less so. The X-factor is mediocre (more on that later) but at least adds to the story and the Thor stuff seems like too much but at least answers a few questions I didn't have answers for. The Power Pack and Daredevil stuff is pretty pointless. The artwork on the Marauders in both is atrocious and Sabretooth's characterization in the Daredevil comics just feels plain wrong. At least, at this point, this crossover, though sloppy, was still under Chris Claremont's wheelhouse, though the vast array of writers and artists involved here makes it a bit of a mixed blessing. That said, reading it now, I am struck by how MEDIOCRE the Marauders were. I just don't understand how a little more than half a dozen rather average mutant villains slaughtered hundreds of Morlocks, severely injured 3 X-Men (Kitty Pryde, Nightcrawler and Colossus) and one of the X-Factor (Angel) and even broke Thor's arm. Though three of the Marauders do actually die in this event, still makes little sense how half a dozen could battle the X-Men, X-Factor, Power Pack, Thor and Daredevil and come away with so few casualties. Now, on the "beginning of the end." In 1986, Marvel retconned Jean Grey's death in order to create X-Factor. Felt like a huge betrayal at the time (and I was glad to learn later that Chris Claremont also hated the idea). Salt was poured into the wound by what the X-Factor actually was. This was the first X-Comic not under Chris Claremont's control and it shows. If they were going to retcon Jean Grey's death and bring back the original X-Men for a GREAT comic, I might forgive them, but X-Factor was bad from issue one. The writing and artwork were average (at best) and the entire premise was just awful (posing as mutant hunters with overblown advertising that actual stokes MORE mutant hatred). And don't even get me started on Cyclops leaving his wife and newborn baby and just generally being a dick. Most of that shows up here in these X-Factor issues. That was strike one. Strike two was these crossovers. By 1986, there were now 3 X-men comics (Uncanny X-Men, New Mutants and X-Factor) as well as yearly limited series (which began with the four issue Wolverine series in 1982). In 1988, Excalibur and a permanent solo Wolverine series were added to the line-up and in 1991, a second X-Men title (also in 1991 the New Mutants changed to X-Force). With these crossovers taking up more and more time, one would have to collect six or more titles a month for about half the year to keep up with the complete storyline. My youthful budget and resources (no regular access to an actual comic shop) couldn't keep up. Third and final straw played into the second. Comics had doubled in price since I began collecting. They were 60 cents a piece when I began and $1.25 when I stopped. Again, my youthful budget just couldn't keep up and I quit collecting in 1988. So, we're moving into bittersweet territory in the X-men universe for me. Claremont's work was strong as ever and I was still loving the main title, but the X-Men universe was beginning to slip from his control and become one big mess of a juggernaut with no real direction but "how can we sell more."

  18. 4 out of 5

    David Edmonds

    Having read these issues for the first time when they were released by in the mid 80s, I can safely say that after 20 years, X-Men: Mutant Massacre can still stand on its own as a decent story. Of course, it's severely dated in some circumstances, but if you can read it in the context for when it was written, where characters needed to be called by name in every issue to make sure the readers knew who they were, and the fashions that the characters were drawn in are so the 80s, if you can get pa Having read these issues for the first time when they were released by in the mid 80s, I can safely say that after 20 years, X-Men: Mutant Massacre can still stand on its own as a decent story. Of course, it's severely dated in some circumstances, but if you can read it in the context for when it was written, where characters needed to be called by name in every issue to make sure the readers knew who they were, and the fashions that the characters were drawn in are so the 80s, if you can get passed all that to the actual story, it really isn't all that bad. The Marauders, a mysterious group of mutant bounty hunters, have been hired to find the Morlocks, a group of mutants who have decided to remove themselves from society altogether and live in tunnels under NYC, and exterminate them, entirely. Why the Marauders were hired for this purpose is never entirely made clear and who hired them remains a mystery, mentioned only once by the name of Mr. Sinister (all this is explained many, many years later and even I don't know the entire reasoning behind it), but in the course of this massacre, the X-Men are contacted to help the Morlocks, and a war breaks out between the Marauders and the X-Men, with several other super groups being brought into the mix. There are casualties on both sides, some with ramifications that had to be dealt with for years for the characters. The art is amazing in this volume, also giving me my first experience with some of the artists that would become some of my favorites over the years, such as John Romita Jr and Alan Davis. There was a good portion of my childhood that was taken up with ideas of being a comic book artist because of these guys. Alas, that never happened, but I can still appreciate their art on these issues all these years later. This newly released hardcover edition is presented quite nicely, with all of the relevant issues presented in chronological, reading order. X-Men: Mutant Massacre certainly won't be for everybody, but I think if you are a current fan of the X-Men titles and you've not read back this far in the X-Men canon, I think it would be a good idea to see some of the defining moments for these characters, as quite a bit of the characters that we see today came from the events of this one storyline. Of course, that could just be me, since I've already confessed to being a little biased toward this story. But I'll still stick by it no matter what.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alazzar

    (Note: Semi-spoilers ahead. You've been warned.) This was a damn fine read, and could have earned a 5-star rating if there had been a more satisfying ending. Or, really, any ending at all. Throughout the book, I loved what I was reading. (With the exception of the Power Pack issue, because no one wants to read about eight-year-olds saving the world. This is a fact.) The Marauders jumped into the Morlock tunnels and started slaughtering everything in sight, and I couldn't wait to find out what thei (Note: Semi-spoilers ahead. You've been warned.) This was a damn fine read, and could have earned a 5-star rating if there had been a more satisfying ending. Or, really, any ending at all. Throughout the book, I loved what I was reading. (With the exception of the Power Pack issue, because no one wants to read about eight-year-olds saving the world. This is a fact.) The Marauders jumped into the Morlock tunnels and started slaughtering everything in sight, and I couldn't wait to find out what their motivation was--I had to know what devious master plot demanded such carnage. It's a shame the book decided never to tell me. Although the action was great and had me on the edge of my seat, I was very much let down by the fact that we never learned why the action was there in the first place. That question had kept me going for so long, and then it was never answered. Ugh. On the plus side, though, it was fun to see all these characters I remembered from the Morlock episodes of the '90s X-men animated series. And there's a well-known moment from X-history that gets its start in this arc(view spoiler)[ (Angel's wings get damaged beyond repair, setting him up to become the metal-winged Archangel) (hide spoiler)] , but unfortunately we're cut just short of seeing that happen as well. There are two random issues of Thor and Daredevil in this collection, which some people might find odd. I, however, like Thor and love Daredevil, so I was okay with these cameos. In fact, I particularly liked how the Daredevil issue gave some explanation for Sabretooth's murderous behavior. (Spoiler: Sabretooth.) All in all, it was a very enjoyable read. I just wish it woulda gone on for another few issues of X-Factor (and maybe Uncanny X-men, as well).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    This is pretty dark. Soo... bunch of psycho mutants go into the sewers and callously slaughter the Morlocks with impunity. X-Factor, the X-Men, the New Mutants, Power Pack, Thor and Daredevil all head down to save the day. ...but like... they do it at completely different times and don’t really encounter each other at all. The exception is Thor, who saves Angel’s life in a pretty awesome way. This is really good, dark at times, fun at times, and all around insane. Do I wish teams and heroes interact This is pretty dark. Soo... bunch of psycho mutants go into the sewers and callously slaughter the Morlocks with impunity. X-Factor, the X-Men, the New Mutants, Power Pack, Thor and Daredevil all head down to save the day. ...but like... they do it at completely different times and don’t really encounter each other at all. The exception is Thor, who saves Angel’s life in a pretty awesome way. This is really good, dark at times, fun at times, and all around insane. Do I wish teams and heroes interacted more? Yeah... but even taking that into account, this is pretty rad. The art varies from issue to issue but generally speaking, it’s pretty good. The best parts of this are the parts written by Chris Claremont and drawn by Alan Davis. It was really pleasurable to see a Dazzler driven story towards the end. I love her. I may be her biggest fan, to be honest. Such a unique character. I love the fact that her story is a rock’n’roll story. This is an important part of X lore with some game changing consequences. I give it a full throated “recommend.”

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jason Mock

    The comics collected here are indicative of the 80's scene: writers Claremont and Simonson, artists Davis and Romita, Jr, concepts and ideas laying plot groundwork for decades to come, line-wide crossover formats still used every few months to this day, exposition-heavy dialogue. It's a classic, but hard to get through at times for modern comics reader. The comics collected here are indicative of the 80's scene: writers Claremont and Simonson, artists Davis and Romita, Jr, concepts and ideas laying plot groundwork for decades to come, line-wide crossover formats still used every few months to this day, exposition-heavy dialogue. It's a classic, but hard to get through at times for modern comics reader.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kurt Rocourt

    It's not a home run but it's a classic X-Men story. The fights are tough and brutal. The number of dead and injured is very high in the story. It seems weird going from X-Men to Thor to Power Pack but that's all part of the story. It doesn't feel like it ends when the book ends. The story seems like it needs a part two to wrap it all up. Still it's a classic story to read. It's not a home run but it's a classic X-Men story. The fights are tough and brutal. The number of dead and injured is very high in the story. It seems weird going from X-Men to Thor to Power Pack but that's all part of the story. It doesn't feel like it ends when the book ends. The story seems like it needs a part two to wrap it all up. Still it's a classic story to read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    These comics came out before I started reading comics. But only a few months before. When I got hooked on X-Men, I found all of these in the back issues bin. God I am tired of Cris Claremont's writing style. He should have devised the plots and let someone else do the dialogue. Anyway, it's still a fun read for me. But I know that my enjoyment is slightly fueled by nostalgia. These comics came out before I started reading comics. But only a few months before. When I got hooked on X-Men, I found all of these in the back issues bin. God I am tired of Cris Claremont's writing style. He should have devised the plots and let someone else do the dialogue. Anyway, it's still a fun read for me. But I know that my enjoyment is slightly fueled by nostalgia.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    Storm with her mohawk? Power Pack? Thor? The New Mutants? Old-school Psylocke? Check!! What more could one ask for? In all seriousness, this is just a fun read that exemplifies the X-Men that I fell in love with as a kid. As a bonus, the HC is well made. Read it!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    Leído y poseído en la edición mexicana de Editorial Vid en dos tomos. Creo que me lo compré en alguna convención de oferta hace cosa de diez años, y que me gustó, aunque no sé muy bien por qué. Cuando lo relea, blablablablablablá...

  26. 5 out of 5

    John

    It's not a very fulfilling story. Surprisingly dark, though. It's not a very fulfilling story. Surprisingly dark, though.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Trey

    Oh, how I want to give this 4 stars. But it's just too uneven. Some fantastic art by John Romita, Jr., Walt Simonson, Barry Windsor Smith, and Alan Davis. Man! Alan Davis is pretty great. Oh, how I want to give this 4 stars. But it's just too uneven. Some fantastic art by John Romita, Jr., Walt Simonson, Barry Windsor Smith, and Alan Davis. Man! Alan Davis is pretty great.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    via NYPL - some good action and character moments, but long and overly repetitive.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

    Daredevil #238 3 stars. Storyline 4 stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike Dorfman

    Lots of crossover. Power Pack is kind of ridiculous. Thor was cool. Daredevil seemed a bit forced. Interesting focus on Sabretooth. Definitely a cornerstone plot in the overall X-Men arc.

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