web site hit counter Heart of a Patriot: How I Found the Courage to Survive Vietnam, Walter Reed and Karl Rove - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Heart of a Patriot: How I Found the Courage to Survive Vietnam, Walter Reed and Karl Rove

Availability: Ready to download

Book Description Publication Date: October 6, 2009 By the time he had reached middle age, Max Cleland thought he had nothing to live for. A grenade explosion in Vietnam had left him a triple amputee. He had lost his seat in the U.S. Senate, and in the grip of depression he had lost his fiancée, too. But instead of giving up, Cleland reaches deep into his soul and discovers Book Description Publication Date: October 6, 2009 By the time he had reached middle age, Max Cleland thought he had nothing to live for. A grenade explosion in Vietnam had left him a triple amputee. He had lost his seat in the U.S. Senate, and in the grip of depression he had lost his fiancée, too. But instead of giving up, Cleland reaches deep into his soul and discovers that he has what it takes to survive: the heart of a patriot. Born and raised in Georgia, Max comes back from Vietnam missing three limbs and is confined for months at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Doctors don't give him much hope of living an active life, but through the bonds he forms with other wounded soldiers, and through his own Southern grit, he learns how to be mobile and overcome his despair. He returns home, where he pursues his passion for public service by becoming the first Vietnam veteran to serve in the Georgia state senate. Jimmy Carter then appoints him head of the Veterans Administration. From there he becomes Georgia's youngest secretary of state and ultimately realizes his dream of becoming a U.S. Senator.


Compare

Book Description Publication Date: October 6, 2009 By the time he had reached middle age, Max Cleland thought he had nothing to live for. A grenade explosion in Vietnam had left him a triple amputee. He had lost his seat in the U.S. Senate, and in the grip of depression he had lost his fiancée, too. But instead of giving up, Cleland reaches deep into his soul and discovers Book Description Publication Date: October 6, 2009 By the time he had reached middle age, Max Cleland thought he had nothing to live for. A grenade explosion in Vietnam had left him a triple amputee. He had lost his seat in the U.S. Senate, and in the grip of depression he had lost his fiancée, too. But instead of giving up, Cleland reaches deep into his soul and discovers that he has what it takes to survive: the heart of a patriot. Born and raised in Georgia, Max comes back from Vietnam missing three limbs and is confined for months at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Doctors don't give him much hope of living an active life, but through the bonds he forms with other wounded soldiers, and through his own Southern grit, he learns how to be mobile and overcome his despair. He returns home, where he pursues his passion for public service by becoming the first Vietnam veteran to serve in the Georgia state senate. Jimmy Carter then appoints him head of the Veterans Administration. From there he becomes Georgia's youngest secretary of state and ultimately realizes his dream of becoming a U.S. Senator.

30 review for Heart of a Patriot: How I Found the Courage to Survive Vietnam, Walter Reed and Karl Rove

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stan Lanier

    I live in Georgia and saw first hand the shameful behavior of Saxby Chambliss, a dishonorable Senator if there ever was one, as he lied and savaged this man who left three limbs in Viet Nam. It was the worst savaging of a patriot I have ever seen. Mr. Cleland has a chance to give his side of that experience. Republicans in Georgia, also, disparaged Mr. Cleland by saying it was his own ineptitude that caused the grenade that took his limbs to explode. Now, Mr. Cleland has set the record straight.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Toby Decker

    If you are sickened by the chicanery of Vietnam draft dodgers currently or formerly slithering through the halls of Congress, (e.g. Dick Cheney) or Washington (W Bush, Rush Limbaugh, Bill O'Reilly, etc, this book will break your heart. A triple amputee from a horrible Vietnam event, the Republicans smeared a man who didn't dodge military service, to oust him from the Senate. If you are sickened by the chicanery of Vietnam draft dodgers currently or formerly slithering through the halls of Congress, (e.g. Dick Cheney) or Washington (W Bush, Rush Limbaugh, Bill O'Reilly, etc, this book will break your heart. A triple amputee from a horrible Vietnam event, the Republicans smeared a man who didn't dodge military service, to oust him from the Senate.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marfita

    As Tom Wolfe did in The Right Stuff, Cleland leads off with the gory bits. He describes his near fatal encounter with a grenade after having survived Khe Sanh. He didn't need to go to Khe Sanh, his tour nearly being over, but he had to prove something to himself in real combat, I suppose. It was on a more routine delivery mission that he was wounded by what he assumed was his own grenade having fallen off his belt. Then Cleland starts over with his birth and upbringing and his nascent interest i As Tom Wolfe did in The Right Stuff, Cleland leads off with the gory bits. He describes his near fatal encounter with a grenade after having survived Khe Sanh. He didn't need to go to Khe Sanh, his tour nearly being over, but he had to prove something to himself in real combat, I suppose. It was on a more routine delivery mission that he was wounded by what he assumed was his own grenade having fallen off his belt. Then Cleland starts over with his birth and upbringing and his nascent interest in politics. Then he relates his experience in field hospitals, Walter Reed, and the VA. I really, really hope things have improved at the VA. Apparently it was more important to keep under budget than to address the needs of the veterans. Despite numerous smackdowns by life, Cleland has persevered - starting on a state level and working his way to the US Senate. He was on the spot at many turning points in history: the Kennedy assassination, the Clinton impeachment, 9/11, the Iraq war, and the Swiftboating of John Kerry. The political machine (AKA Republicans) even tried dirty tricks on him that apparently backfired. Instead of showing him to be immoral, the recordings of phone sex with an old girlfriend made him look like more of a red-blooded American male. Throughout his career he has been an advocate for veterans and the disabled, but 40 years later he was still subject to PTSD, something he thought he'd side-stepped. Although his own story is on balance positive, it's difficult to read about recent history knowing what's coming. It certainly doesn't make the Republican party (separate from Republicans, might I add) look very good. But you can guess that just from the subtitle. I'd hate to imagine what Cleland is thinking now.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Great book by an amazing man. He lost his right arm and both legs in Vietnam and after much struggle became a Georgia congressman, US senator from Georgia and the Administrator of the Veterans Administration. In inspiring story about never quitting and fighting for what you believe in.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leeanna

    Heart of a Patriot, by Max Cleland While reading "Heart of A Patriot," I kept turning to discuss certain points with my father, as I was continually inspired and amazed by Max Cleland. In this book he briefly describes his childhood and coming of age during the Kennedy era, which inspired him to get into politics. He then delves into his time in Vietnam and the subsequent grenade explosion that took his legs and arm. He spares nothing in recounting his recovery, both physical and mental, and his Heart of a Patriot, by Max Cleland While reading "Heart of A Patriot," I kept turning to discuss certain points with my father, as I was continually inspired and amazed by Max Cleland. In this book he briefly describes his childhood and coming of age during the Kennedy era, which inspired him to get into politics. He then delves into his time in Vietnam and the subsequent grenade explosion that took his legs and arm. He spares nothing in recounting his recovery, both physical and mental, and his sheer determination to walk again despite overwhelming odds was incredibly inspiring. Cleland used politics as a way to find purpose in his life - he wanted to *do* something. And he definitely did something - Georgia state senator, Veterans Affairs Administrator, Secretary of the State of Georgia, U.S. Senator, 9/11 Commission, and Secretary of the American Battle Monuments Commission. During the 2002 Senate race, Cleland lost his seat to a Republican, likely due in large part to a smear campaign that he felt "took away his service." His vote for the Iraq War authorization also caused him grief and doubt, and he discusses the thought process behind voting for the resolution in the book. I enjoyed some of the lighter information as well, such as the historical desks in the Senate offices. Cleland is very clearly a Democrat, and his book tells it how *he* sees it - and I find nothing wrong with that. Even so, if you may have political views on the other side of the spectrum, don't let that stop you from reading this book. While much of it is political, much is also not, particularly Cleland's battle with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after the disastrous 2002 Senate race. Some people have said that he sounds like a crybaby, but nothing could be further from the truth; he suffered from extreme depression and anxiety, and fought like a man to overcome PSTD and live a normal life. Cleland's struggle is inspiring, and I think it's pretty cool that a normal guy was willing to talk about his struggles so openly, in the hopes that it would help someone else. 4/5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

    I loved this book. Billy picked it up because my cousin used to work for Max in Georgia. Max is an inspiration and quite a character! When I emailed my cousin about the book, this what she had to say: "Yes, Max was amazing, and that was a big attraction for me. Being a DC brat, I guess it was just in my genes to go for a political job when the time arrived in my life. I never knew until after I got the job as chief of staff with Max that there were over 100 applicants ahead of me. I felt very hono I loved this book. Billy picked it up because my cousin used to work for Max in Georgia. Max is an inspiration and quite a character! When I emailed my cousin about the book, this what she had to say: "Yes, Max was amazing, and that was a big attraction for me. Being a DC brat, I guess it was just in my genes to go for a political job when the time arrived in my life. I never knew until after I got the job as chief of staff with Max that there were over 100 applicants ahead of me. I felt very honored to work with him in his initial campaign, and eventual run off for Secretary of State of GA. Campaigning and then eventually working in the State Capitol across from the Governor's office was a big thrill. While I had a political job to perform, I was also expected to do a lot in his personal life, as well. I worked with a designer to modify his capitol office and apartment to make them handicap accessible, although Max hated that term. All in all, I guess we were together six years. He was an only child, and his mother and father treated me like another sibling. His mother would often bake brownies for my girls, and his father would offer to work on my car! I remember a time when we had a big snow storm in GA (by that I mean 6 inches!). Max wouldn't hear of my driving myself all the way down to the state capitol, so this man with horrific dismemberments to his body, came by my house in his modified car to pick me up! That's the kind of guy he was."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kell Morrow

    With this book, we get to know an American hero on many levels. Max writes about his life and takes us into his motivations--the desire that has kept him going--the desire to serve. I think that for Max, this book is a form of therapy as he honestly discusses the US strategy in Vietnam, the decision to allow George W Bush to preemptively invade Iraq, his being drawn into different levels of public service by the vigor of President Kennedy......He also, though, goes into the long undiagnosed PTSD With this book, we get to know an American hero on many levels. Max writes about his life and takes us into his motivations--the desire that has kept him going--the desire to serve. I think that for Max, this book is a form of therapy as he honestly discusses the US strategy in Vietnam, the decision to allow George W Bush to preemptively invade Iraq, his being drawn into different levels of public service by the vigor of President Kennedy......He also, though, goes into the long undiagnosed PTSD that he suffered, the nastiness that now envelopes American politics and the reliance that he has with family and friends. There are many wonderful accomplishments by this great man, who could have just shut down after that April day in 1968--but, he didn't. He went on to serve in the Georgia state senate, as the Director of the Veterans Administration, as Georgia's Secretary of State, as a United States senator from Georgia--always putting his constituency first. It is a disgusting shame that we have allowed him and so many like him to be replaced by greed.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shelley

    This book is an autobiography about a man who served in Vietnam and became a triple-amputee, Purple Heart recipient from a grenade explosion. He accounts his process of recovery, both physically and psychologically, initially at Walter Reed hospital, describing his strong desire to walk with prosthetic legs and to live independently. After discharge, he sought continued care at the VA of the 1970s, and accounts the horrors of care he received there. I have heard of these horrors from my patients This book is an autobiography about a man who served in Vietnam and became a triple-amputee, Purple Heart recipient from a grenade explosion. He accounts his process of recovery, both physically and psychologically, initially at Walter Reed hospital, describing his strong desire to walk with prosthetic legs and to live independently. After discharge, he sought continued care at the VA of the 1970s, and accounts the horrors of care he received there. I have heard of these horrors from my patients at the VA, and this confirmed everything they said. Fed up with this care, and a need for a career, Cleland pursued the career in politics as a Democrat he had dreamed of before his service in Vietnam. I appreciated most his honesty about his experiences in politics -- regarding his work with the VA system, the Bush administration's lies and cover-up regarding the 9/11 attacks, the slander of John Kerry during his run for president, etc.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I was interested to read this author because its author, Max Cleland, is an alum of my undergraduate institution. Mr. Cleland is frequently cited among the school's most important alumni, but I knew very little about him. (However, the subtitle of the book mentions beating Karl Rove, which would have been enough enticement for me to read, had I not known of the author!) The story of Max Cleland's unique and inspirational life was interesting, but marred by the quality of the narrative. (I blame t I was interested to read this author because its author, Max Cleland, is an alum of my undergraduate institution. Mr. Cleland is frequently cited among the school's most important alumni, but I knew very little about him. (However, the subtitle of the book mentions beating Karl Rove, which would have been enough enticement for me to read, had I not known of the author!) The story of Max Cleland's unique and inspirational life was interesting, but marred by the quality of the narrative. (I blame this on the editor in the case of memoirs, which are frequently written by non-professional writers.) Several times, Mr. Cleland repeats himself, and lack of chronological order is distracting in its inconsistency. It's a shame. Overall, a 2.5 to 3 star book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    You can't help but love Max Cleland, a triple amputee who lost his limbs in Vietnam and became a rabid anti-war US Senator. He always seemed to be one of those few politicians with common sense and a great desire to tell the truth. I watched the dirty political tricks played on him as Republicans eager to gain the seat challenged his patriotism and military service. This book is as honest as they come. He talks freely about his deep depression and undiagnosed PTSD. He is open about his fears and You can't help but love Max Cleland, a triple amputee who lost his limbs in Vietnam and became a rabid anti-war US Senator. He always seemed to be one of those few politicians with common sense and a great desire to tell the truth. I watched the dirty political tricks played on him as Republicans eager to gain the seat challenged his patriotism and military service. This book is as honest as they come. He talks freely about his deep depression and undiagnosed PTSD. He is open about his fears and challenges. I've always seen him as someone with great courage and cannot imagine the courage one has to have to write something as personal as this.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bronwyn Parhad

    I just finished this book and found it immense interesting and poignant. The author, a triple-amputee from an accident during his tour of duty during the Vietnam War, talks about his life after being traumatically injured. He faces months of treatment at Walter Reed Hospital, months of trying to "walk" again, and has vivid memories of being in VA hospitals. He goes on to become the Head of the Department of Veterans Affairs, and later on become the Senator from Georgia. I chose to read this book I just finished this book and found it immense interesting and poignant. The author, a triple-amputee from an accident during his tour of duty during the Vietnam War, talks about his life after being traumatically injured. He faces months of treatment at Walter Reed Hospital, months of trying to "walk" again, and has vivid memories of being in VA hospitals. He goes on to become the Head of the Department of Veterans Affairs, and later on become the Senator from Georgia. I chose to read this book because my generation went to Vietnam, and my younger brother served in Vietnam as well.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    This book is inspiring. Max's story is one everyone should know. As a veteran and a Democrat, it was great to hear about how he combined the two in his life. There are often times when people say you are Un-Patriotic if you are a Democrat. Max outlines how that is so far from the truth (neocon scare tactics?). This book is inspiring. Max's story is one everyone should know. As a veteran and a Democrat, it was great to hear about how he combined the two in his life. There are often times when people say you are Un-Patriotic if you are a Democrat. Max outlines how that is so far from the truth (neocon scare tactics?).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    The most interesting thing about this book is that he lays it all out there. He doesn't shy away from potentially embarrassing or not favorable stories about himself. He definitely isn't planning on another high profile gig where they would use this book against him. The most interesting thing about this book is that he lays it all out there. He doesn't shy away from potentially embarrassing or not favorable stories about himself. He definitely isn't planning on another high profile gig where they would use this book against him.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Dolven

    An inspiring story - Max Cleland has overcome more than most of us would ever dread to fear in our lives. An illustration that sadly, politics isn't always about the truth. An inspiring story - Max Cleland has overcome more than most of us would ever dread to fear in our lives. An illustration that sadly, politics isn't always about the truth.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amber Beckstead

    This was a great motivational book about a vetran learning to heal. I learned a little more than I wanted to about the politics behind war but it was very motivational.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Greg Hoyle

    excellent story. Max Cleland is a hero indeed. What an incredible journey he has undertaken.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I enjoyed this book, especially the second half. I was very familiar with the first part as it seemed to be similar to Strong in the Broken Places.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leota

    Heart of a Patriot is a MUST read. Cleland had a front row seat to more than I thought. Great book

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    If this doesn't reinforce why I'm a Democrat, nothing would. If this doesn't reinforce why I'm a Democrat, nothing would.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Helene

    I wasn't expecting to like this book as much as I did. Max is quite an inspiration and his story is worth reading. I wasn't expecting to like this book as much as I did. Max is quite an inspiration and his story is worth reading.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John

    An honest read from a guy who has been through hell and back. You wish every autobiography was both this honest and open.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paula Matuskey

    Autobiography of Vietnam war hero.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tom Olmsted

    Max Cleland opens his soul to us. We feel his pain as he goes through rehab and get a glimpse into the inner workings of dirty politics. A very good read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ronnie Edwon

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dixie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tom Heuerman

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christine

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.