web site hit counter Why Our Health Matters: A Vision of Medicine That Can Transform Our Future - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Why Our Health Matters: A Vision of Medicine That Can Transform Our Future

Availability: Ready to download

A landmark book that shows us exactly how we have let health and medicine become a crisis in our society and what we can all do to resolve it. Healthcare is no longer just a public issue; for millions of Americans it is now a crisis on their own doorstep. Cost of medical care today are a leading cause of personal bankruptcy. Although policy makers have weighed in on all si A landmark book that shows us exactly how we have let health and medicine become a crisis in our society and what we can all do to resolve it. Healthcare is no longer just a public issue; for millions of Americans it is now a crisis on their own doorstep. Cost of medical care today are a leading cause of personal bankruptcy. Although policy makers have weighed in on all sides, in this book, bestselling author Andrew Weil, M.D., identifies the root of the problem. He shows us exactly how we have become embroiled in the present situation and provides a solution that will not only make healthcare affordable, but will also put each one of us on the road to optimum health. Dr. Weil states that we have a right to good healthcare that is effective, accessible, and affordable. Many Americans would be surprised to know that our national health is far from the best in the world, even though we spend more money on it than any other country. The World Health Organization recently rated America thirty-seventh in health outcomes, on par with Serbia. Tackling head-on the Three Major Myths of American Medicine, Dr. Weil shows how medical schools fail to give future doctors the education they need to care for patients, how insurance companies have destroyed our opportunity to get excellent care, and how pharmaceutical companies have come to rule our lives. The solution involves nothing less than the creation of a completely new culture of health and medicine in this country, one that we can each start building today.


Compare

A landmark book that shows us exactly how we have let health and medicine become a crisis in our society and what we can all do to resolve it. Healthcare is no longer just a public issue; for millions of Americans it is now a crisis on their own doorstep. Cost of medical care today are a leading cause of personal bankruptcy. Although policy makers have weighed in on all si A landmark book that shows us exactly how we have let health and medicine become a crisis in our society and what we can all do to resolve it. Healthcare is no longer just a public issue; for millions of Americans it is now a crisis on their own doorstep. Cost of medical care today are a leading cause of personal bankruptcy. Although policy makers have weighed in on all sides, in this book, bestselling author Andrew Weil, M.D., identifies the root of the problem. He shows us exactly how we have become embroiled in the present situation and provides a solution that will not only make healthcare affordable, but will also put each one of us on the road to optimum health. Dr. Weil states that we have a right to good healthcare that is effective, accessible, and affordable. Many Americans would be surprised to know that our national health is far from the best in the world, even though we spend more money on it than any other country. The World Health Organization recently rated America thirty-seventh in health outcomes, on par with Serbia. Tackling head-on the Three Major Myths of American Medicine, Dr. Weil shows how medical schools fail to give future doctors the education they need to care for patients, how insurance companies have destroyed our opportunity to get excellent care, and how pharmaceutical companies have come to rule our lives. The solution involves nothing less than the creation of a completely new culture of health and medicine in this country, one that we can each start building today.

30 review for Why Our Health Matters: A Vision of Medicine That Can Transform Our Future

  1. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    Mostly an explanation about why our healthcare is so expensive. Basically boils down to a system that is completely broken: - American system is "disease management", not health care - insurance companies set reimbursement policies. Have a bias towards fancy high-tech procedures (regardless of how effective they are), and drugs - doctors attempt to order as many procedures as possible, to basically get whatever they can from the insurance company - focus on high-tech procedures creates large compens Mostly an explanation about why our healthcare is so expensive. Basically boils down to a system that is completely broken: - American system is "disease management", not health care - insurance companies set reimbursement policies. Have a bias towards fancy high-tech procedures (regardless of how effective they are), and drugs - doctors attempt to order as many procedures as possible, to basically get whatever they can from the insurance company - focus on high-tech procedures creates large compensation gap between specialists and general practitioners. In some cases this is a 10x difference ($1.3M for radiologists and anesthesiologists vs $130K for GP). This creates a large glut of specialists, and a dearth of general practitioners - focus on profits has driven doctors towards minimal patient times. Makes it impossible to understand each patient as an individual, and what underlying causes of health problems might be - most doctors dissatisfied with profession, and if given the choice would not have become doctors. Overloaded with administrative work (dealing with insurance companies) - industry is biased towards cure-all drugs and procedures. Specialists are just that; hammer effect (every problem looks like a nail). Often the prescribed procedures lack a general understanding of the root causes, and just treat the symptoms, since specialists are not broad-knowledged enough to grok greater picture. - Drug trials are aimed at single set of circumstances, with a yes/no effect, rather than considering the effect in a broader situation. Doctors hence do not understand how to integrate drugs into a larger plan of attack, and no one is studying this either. Drug companies do the vast majority of studies on effects, and it's not in their interest to do comparative studies. FDA/CDC should do comparative studies, but are often stymied by lobbyists. - pharma companies strategy is to market the hell out of drugs to get people to believe they need them. Argument that advertising is needed to make up for research costs is total bullshit; marketing expenses are often 2-5x what research costs were - way to reduce costs is to focus on preventative medicine. Need more GPs, and doctors must get to know their patients. Need integrated approach of lifestyle change, with drugs and operations used in emergency situations and as a backup. Most health problems are quite simple to solve, but Americans have become lazy and often just want a simple fix.

  2. 5 out of 5

    L

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. (4 1/2) I was half-expecting a new age, feel-good apologist manifesto for Obamacare, but that is not at all what this is. Dr. Weil does a decent and logical job explaining what he finds to be the problems with our healthcare system today and doesn't bastardize us as a country, comparing us to the "superior" healthcare systems of other countries. However, neither does he repeatedly toot our own horns about our technological advances in medicine. He explains how other countries' systems will collap (4 1/2) I was half-expecting a new age, feel-good apologist manifesto for Obamacare, but that is not at all what this is. Dr. Weil does a decent and logical job explaining what he finds to be the problems with our healthcare system today and doesn't bastardize us as a country, comparing us to the "superior" healthcare systems of other countries. However, neither does he repeatedly toot our own horns about our technological advances in medicine. He explains how other countries' systems will collapse, too, and for the same reasons. He's realistic; he's practical; he cares; he makes sense. He says exactly what I've thought the problem was but adds another factor (and rightly so!) to the equation. Insurance companies are killing us with their profit-driven structures. Prices were never so high before insurance came along. (BTW, this is the Libertarian Party's platform, too). Dr. Weil then heavily and mercilessly criticizes Big Pharma and reveals some of the most startling statistics I've read about where they spend their money. Hint: It's not R&D. I'll admit that reading about the cold and inhumane way they operate, without regard to human life, made me tear up. Insurance companies (Aetna, I hate you) + Big Pharma = people who struggle their entire lives to keep up with unnecessary medical bills. This is just senseless. He calls for practical solutions to healthcare, all involving some form of "Integrated Medicine." I love this. It appeals to the individual in me, forcing people to take some sort of responsibility for their own health. It appeals to the collective in me, knowing that no one will have to take control of one's health alone; one receives guidance, help, and support. I like the idea of Integrated Medicine a lot - stress management, healthy eating, and physical activity should always, always, always be a part of health. We should never rely on a pill to swallow and be done with it. His ideas would save our citizens money and most importantly shift the focus from "Disease Management" (and let's face it, that's what healthcare is right now) to "Disease Prevention and Health Promotion." This book will leave you optimistic about taking care of yourself and with a bigger picture of how healthcare should ideally work. Four and a half stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    Just started this one. It's PTTC (preaching to the choir). Of course our medical system needs changing, but where does that come from? More legislation? I can't see that happening in a good way. I hope that our medical system changes one informed patient/client at a time. *I* take the responsibility to become and remain informed about my health and various choices quite seriously. I partner with my family doctor, when I do go see him. I try to practice preventative "medicine" at home through lif Just started this one. It's PTTC (preaching to the choir). Of course our medical system needs changing, but where does that come from? More legislation? I can't see that happening in a good way. I hope that our medical system changes one informed patient/client at a time. *I* take the responsibility to become and remain informed about my health and various choices quite seriously. I partner with my family doctor, when I do go see him. I try to practice preventative "medicine" at home through lifestyle. I use herbs. And I will fight whoever I have to in order to keep that option wide open to me. My big beef these days is with the FDA. It should not be a policing agency, but they are increasingly "busting" small farmers and small supplement companies, putting them out of business one by one by bankrupting families. Wrong, I tell you. I figure the FDA should be policing Big Pharma, rather than kowtowing to them, and *informing* the public, rather than policing them. We'll see if I can read much more of this without my blood boiling. :) Cheers!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robin Tobin (On the back porch reading)

    An excellent look at the healthcare industry and ways that could bring about happier, healthy societies... I listened to the audio copy of this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mike Lyons

    The state of American health care is poor. We focus too much on treatment of diseases and too little on prevention and the enhancement of wellness. Thanks to Dr. Weil for reminding me of this. Dr. Weil goes off the rails a little bit with some of his zealous recommendations for fixing the problems, but most are valid. We need to look at our food subsidies, we need to re-prioritize how we approach healthcare in how we train and compensate doctors. It's hard to legislate answers, and Dr. Weil seems The state of American health care is poor. We focus too much on treatment of diseases and too little on prevention and the enhancement of wellness. Thanks to Dr. Weil for reminding me of this. Dr. Weil goes off the rails a little bit with some of his zealous recommendations for fixing the problems, but most are valid. We need to look at our food subsidies, we need to re-prioritize how we approach healthcare in how we train and compensate doctors. It's hard to legislate answers, and Dr. Weil seems fond of that as a solution. It would be preferable if people could decide on our own that our health is worth fighting for.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    This is the real deal about how to place the brakes on runaway health insurance spending. Would love to see this as required reading for every primary care doctor in the U.S. Weil makes the case that health care should be tailored to the individual and that blockbuster drugs for invented diseases do more harm than good by blocking the body's natural ability to heal on its own. Fascinating. His skepticism is necessary and all too rare in the exam rooms of doctors who use pharmaceutical sales reps t This is the real deal about how to place the brakes on runaway health insurance spending. Would love to see this as required reading for every primary care doctor in the U.S. Weil makes the case that health care should be tailored to the individual and that blockbuster drugs for invented diseases do more harm than good by blocking the body's natural ability to heal on its own. Fascinating. His skepticism is necessary and all too rare in the exam rooms of doctors who use pharmaceutical sales reps to provide drug education. I will not look at this industry the same. I dare you to read this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    It was a good book. He makes some very good points about preventive medicine. If insurance paid for preventive measure then more people would use those measures and fewer of them would end up needing to be treated for things that are actually preventable. He also makes the point that if costs of health care keeps going up we will not be able to afford it at all eventually. He wants to change the way health care works in the United States so it is affordable for all and keeps people healthy in the It was a good book. He makes some very good points about preventive medicine. If insurance paid for preventive measure then more people would use those measures and fewer of them would end up needing to be treated for things that are actually preventable. He also makes the point that if costs of health care keeps going up we will not be able to afford it at all eventually. He wants to change the way health care works in the United States so it is affordable for all and keeps people healthy in the first place instead of only trying to cure then after they get sick. He has some good ideas on how to do that as well. Anyone interested in health care should read this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    I saw this guy on Larry King one night and he had some interesting things to say. Unfortunately he argues with few facts, uses circumstantial antecdotes, and constantly pleads that he's 'no policy expert' when trying to argue for a better health care system. I wished he actually had well-argued, well-reasoned points. Unfortunately this book is little more than a soapbox. I saw this guy on Larry King one night and he had some interesting things to say. Unfortunately he argues with few facts, uses circumstantial antecdotes, and constantly pleads that he's 'no policy expert' when trying to argue for a better health care system. I wished he actually had well-argued, well-reasoned points. Unfortunately this book is little more than a soapbox.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Telaina

    Really great information about integrative medicine and a blueprint for changing the dysfunctional pharmaceutical-insurance-medical clusterf*ck. He repeats himself a lot and it is a very sturdy (not artistic prose) but an important voice about what is REALLY wrong with American's health. Really great information about integrative medicine and a blueprint for changing the dysfunctional pharmaceutical-insurance-medical clusterf*ck. He repeats himself a lot and it is a very sturdy (not artistic prose) but an important voice about what is REALLY wrong with American's health.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Great book! I read a copy from my local library, but plan to acquire it and reread it, and pass it along to family/friends to read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This was a great book about weil's ideas on a better health care system. Lots of well thought out things we can do to make America a healthier place. The man is a genius. It's a little repetitive and a lot of the information I already knew but still a great read though. All Americans should read this and demand more from our insurances. This was a great book about weil's ideas on a better health care system. Lots of well thought out things we can do to make America a healthier place. The man is a genius. It's a little repetitive and a lot of the information I already knew but still a great read though. All Americans should read this and demand more from our insurances.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This book gives a clear picture of what is wrong with our healthcare system. I do not think all the suggestions would work but the main problem I have with this book is that he is not very clear on how we should deal with people with chronic diseases. Prevention is always great but some things just can't be prevented and are expensive to deal with. This book gives a clear picture of what is wrong with our healthcare system. I do not think all the suggestions would work but the main problem I have with this book is that he is not very clear on how we should deal with people with chronic diseases. Prevention is always great but some things just can't be prevented and are expensive to deal with.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joe Archer

    Read as a part of my Integrative Medicine elective rotation for Medical School. I agree with almost everything said here, but this is just a very watered down version of the online integrative health course that I was also assigned. The movie “Escape Fire” is a better short overview for anyone interested in an introduction to topics of integrative medicine and healthcare reform.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Foster

    I have enjoyed Dr. Weil for decades. While this book is a couple of years old, I found his ideas insightful and thought provoking. I think all of our politicians and business leaders should be required to read this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra H

    I enjoyed this book. I love the idea of Integrated Medicine as the future of "regular" medicine and health care. This should be required reading for all medical students or anyone in the health care profession. I enjoyed this book. I love the idea of Integrated Medicine as the future of "regular" medicine and health care. This should be required reading for all medical students or anyone in the health care profession.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christine Snitkin

    Logically written, well read. Good info.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary Anne

    Belated review. But I found this to be extremely useful to listen to. Weil practices and promotes integrative medicine. He emphasizes three major points (under the heading that our healthcare system needs a serious revamping): 1.) too many specialists and not enough general practitioners, 2.) not enough focus on preventative healthcare, and 3.) too much focus on pills and not enough focus on other methods of medication, for various reasons. These three areas are completely interconnected. My argu Belated review. But I found this to be extremely useful to listen to. Weil practices and promotes integrative medicine. He emphasizes three major points (under the heading that our healthcare system needs a serious revamping): 1.) too many specialists and not enough general practitioners, 2.) not enough focus on preventative healthcare, and 3.) too much focus on pills and not enough focus on other methods of medication, for various reasons. These three areas are completely interconnected. My argument against Dr. Weil would be that we need specialists, but I acknowledge that he's not saying we need to get rid of specialized medication. Indeed, the human body is so complex that it's probably more than one person can handle. Rather, I think he makes a good argument for general practitioners: doctors who are so specialized don't know common (or somewhat uncommon) symptoms, and people get passed around until they can find the right doctor. There are problems with diagnoses and other areas. Some doctors don't even know how to help their patients lead healthy lives, have healthy diets, and get a reasonable amount of exercise. He also emphasizes a great deal of our problem has to do with the importance we place on insurance, insurance companies, and on medication in the form of prescribed pills. Here is one way where integrative medicine comes in: using thing other than pills that are more natural, less harmful, and actually solve problems. He's not completely taking pills out of the equation, but he heavily emphasizes that 1.) the medical community is so well-enveloped by insurance and pharmaceutics companies that they'll prescribe medication without going through all the motions to rule other things out (or worse, the doctors who did the research and test on the pills will lie about their results and effectiveness of drugs) because they don't know what else to do, or 2.) it's now ingrained in us that we need pills for after stuff happens, and drugs are the answer. Last, but certainly not least, is the emphasis Weil places on preventative medication. He often mentioned the idea that we don't care about getting sick because then we'll have drugs and pills to make us feel better. While I don't think we mindfully go about our days saying we'll wait until it's broken before we try to fix it, the idea is quite alarming. Perhaps people really do go about that way without actually thinking about it. But the idea is the same and has been mentioned many times before: healthy eating and regular exercise, as well as stress management and other crucial topics, are often unrecognized as having anything to do with healthy living. I'll admit that some of Dr. Weil's suggestions are way out there for my tastes (fining people for not getting to a healthy weight within a certain period of time, a system similar to Japan). Overall, an excellent read, and I especially enjoyed listening to the audio format of this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I have the same opinions as Andrew Weil, because the health care system in America is not as decent as the health care systems in other countries. America’s health care system provides health care to those who pay for it but not to those who does not have money and could not afford it. I can see why Andrew Weil came up with his conclusion of trying to change the health care system and the medical system, including their medical education, in America. Andrew Weil’s philosophy on the medical syste I have the same opinions as Andrew Weil, because the health care system in America is not as decent as the health care systems in other countries. America’s health care system provides health care to those who pay for it but not to those who does not have money and could not afford it. I can see why Andrew Weil came up with his conclusion of trying to change the health care system and the medical system, including their medical education, in America. Andrew Weil’s philosophy on the medical system and the unreasonable health care system in America gives valid points to why America should change it and not keep it as it is today. I have taken a liking to this book, because the author’s point of view on the health care and medical system in America was very clear and he repeatedly states his facts and opinions. His clear statements, facts, and citations made the book and the author reliable and authentic. I noticed that his targeted audience was people from ages sixteen and up, in other words, people who understands their surroundings and aspects of others. Andrew Weil opened up my eyes and made me realize what a professional thought about this situation, and it was clear to me that since he had much more experience than I do, he was more thorough and detailed on his aspects. I really liked this book, because it was easy to read. In all honesty, I do not have anything to dislike about this book. I would recommend this book to those who care about economics and those who care about the medical and health care systems such as doctors, nurses, and health care workers and interviewers.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ice

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Healthcare is no longer just a public issue; for millions of Americans it is now a crisis on their own doorstep. Cost of medical care today are a leading cause of personal bankruptcy. Although policy makers have weighed in on all sides, in this book, bestselling author Andrew Weil, M.D., identifies the root of the problem. He shows us exactly how we have become embroiled in the present situation and provides a solution that will not only make healthcare affordable, but will also put each one of Healthcare is no longer just a public issue; for millions of Americans it is now a crisis on their own doorstep. Cost of medical care today are a leading cause of personal bankruptcy. Although policy makers have weighed in on all sides, in this book, bestselling author Andrew Weil, M.D., identifies the root of the problem. He shows us exactly how we have become embroiled in the present situation and provides a solution that will not only make healthcare affordable, but will also put each one of us on the road to optimum health. Dr. Weil states that we have a right to good healthcare that is effective, accessible, and affordable. Many Americans would be surprised to know that our national health is far from the best in the world, even though we spend more money on it than any other country. The World Health Organization recently rated America thirty-seventh in health outcomes, on par with Serbia. Tackling head-on the Three Major Myths of American Medicine, Dr. Weil shows how medical schools fail to give future doctors the education they need to care for patients, how insurance companies have destroyed our opportunity to get excellent care, and how pharmaceutical companies have come to rule our lives. The solution involves nothing less than the creation of a completely new culture of health and medicine in this country, one that we can each start building today.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mark Slee

    A breath of fresh air, and timely. Weil primarily discusses the fact that our current health care system is, in fact, not a *health* care system at all. We disproportionately devote resources towards incredibly costly late-stage interventions in chronic disease. Essentially, we practice disease management rather than health promotion. Weil argues for integrative medicine, with greater focus on overall well-being and the promotion of health through preventive practice. My one knock is that Weil is A breath of fresh air, and timely. Weil primarily discusses the fact that our current health care system is, in fact, not a *health* care system at all. We disproportionately devote resources towards incredibly costly late-stage interventions in chronic disease. Essentially, we practice disease management rather than health promotion. Weil argues for integrative medicine, with greater focus on overall well-being and the promotion of health through preventive practice. My one knock is that Weil is dismissive of evidence based medicine without offering detailed support for his position, other than that he distrusts some RCTs (randomized controlled trials). While I certainly agree with his conclusion that most pharmaceuticals are of dubious effectiveness (or, even if effective, have questionable risk-reward profiles when side effects are considered), I would have liked for him to further development his argument against the evidence-based approach. Overall, a good read, and I do genuinely hope the future of health care looks like the vision Weil describes.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    I really like Andrew Weil's philosophy about integrative health and wellness, and I've read (and taken to heart) pretty much every book he's written. So, this book was definitely preaching to the choir. He makes excellent, valid points not only for health care reform, health literacy, education of our doctors, and integrative measures, but also for the urgent need for us to take responsibility for our own individual health and wellness, starting immediately. That said, my main concern about this I really like Andrew Weil's philosophy about integrative health and wellness, and I've read (and taken to heart) pretty much every book he's written. So, this book was definitely preaching to the choir. He makes excellent, valid points not only for health care reform, health literacy, education of our doctors, and integrative measures, but also for the urgent need for us to take responsibility for our own individual health and wellness, starting immediately. That said, my main concern about this book is that the people who need to read it and understand its contents most, won't. It's the same way I feel about Michael Pollan. Yes, he says great stuff - but the people who are reading it and agreeing with the valid points are the people who already *understand and practice* said points. Maybe my view is limited or too subjective, but until the statistic numbers start changing for real, I'm afraid books like this may be lost on the masses.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Asiri

    Actually, this book is not exactly what I was looking for. I do not mean that my health is not important for me but because this book does not discuss anything about our bodies directly. However, it is a fabulous book for all household people who consider about healthcare or health management. For example, doctors, patients, health education, medicines and medical insurance offices. The writer gives interesting suggestion and solution for all health aspects after he addresses the major problem Actually, this book is not exactly what I was looking for. I do not mean that my health is not important for me but because this book does not discuss anything about our bodies directly. However, it is a fabulous book for all household people who consider about healthcare or health management. For example, doctors, patients, health education, medicines and medical insurance offices. The writer gives interesting suggestion and solution for all health aspects after he addresses the major problems about the US health. For me as a non American citizen, I assume that the US has a incredible medical health, but this book extracts and analyzes some bad habits that americans do for their health. Likewise, he presents the most remarkable evil points about health education, hospitals and medicines. Briefly, i recommend that this book is useful for people who considers about the US healthcare or who wants to be a doctor or medical manager.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Breanne

    I didn't agree with everything presented in this book, but it did raise some excellent point that all Americans need to understand about our health care system and how it's not nearly as good as so many people seem to think it is. We spend so so so much more money and don't have any better health outcomes than in other countries. I also liked the parts that showed how pharmaceuticals and insurance companies are just skyrocketing prices - this needs to be common knowledge and something needs to b I didn't agree with everything presented in this book, but it did raise some excellent point that all Americans need to understand about our health care system and how it's not nearly as good as so many people seem to think it is. We spend so so so much more money and don't have any better health outcomes than in other countries. I also liked the parts that showed how pharmaceuticals and insurance companies are just skyrocketing prices - this needs to be common knowledge and something needs to be done about it! Also has great points about why private sector only insurance just won't work in our favor at all! I thought his view of current medical profession schooling was a little off - my nursing school experience and experiences as a patient had/have tons of focus on prevention and non-drug treatments. In looking at insurance, it seems that insurance is really what is so far behind in my mind.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    A smart look at what's wrong with our health care system and what natural improvements could be made. A little history of insurance companies (like the government only started to require health insurance in the 1960s, before then health care costs were reasonable enough that people paid for everything out of pocket), the dangers of the current equipment/tests/medications used today (all of the scans/grams/etc.), and why the country is getting sicker by the day are discussed. There are ways peopl A smart look at what's wrong with our health care system and what natural improvements could be made. A little history of insurance companies (like the government only started to require health insurance in the 1960s, before then health care costs were reasonable enough that people paid for everything out of pocket), the dangers of the current equipment/tests/medications used today (all of the scans/grams/etc.), and why the country is getting sicker by the day are discussed. There are ways people can get healthier. By promoting good choices instead of bad, it will crowd out the processed food obsessed and sedentary lifestyles we Americans currently lead. Weil also gives the warning that things will only get worse with the generation of baby boomers nearing old age when their health begins to deteriorate. Bottom line: put down the junk food, start eating clean, and move your body.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Dr. Weil spells clearly spells out what's wrong with the American healthcare system from top to bottom. I liked his holistic approach that included the complexity of the problems with our medical training programs, federal regulatory agencies, pharmaceutical companies, and on and on. I appreciate that he doesn't just list the problems, but identifies potential solutions. He's 100% right that the American public can't rely on its representatives in government to do the right thing for its constit Dr. Weil spells clearly spells out what's wrong with the American healthcare system from top to bottom. I liked his holistic approach that included the complexity of the problems with our medical training programs, federal regulatory agencies, pharmaceutical companies, and on and on. I appreciate that he doesn't just list the problems, but identifies potential solutions. He's 100% right that the American public can't rely on its representatives in government to do the right thing for its constituents when they have conflicts of interest. For those confused by the healthcare debate, Dr. Weil lays out the issues and how to address them, one by one.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I'm sure Dr. W will seem a little off-the-deep-end to a lot of conventional medicine folks, but he makes some excellent points, both about our health care system and our overall failings as a population at maintaining our own good health. I was glad to see that many of his points about the "system" are not simply abut how we are going to pay for healthcare, but about the screwed up way that high-intervention, pharmaceutical-heavy, disease-management-based medicine is practiced today. I certainly I'm sure Dr. W will seem a little off-the-deep-end to a lot of conventional medicine folks, but he makes some excellent points, both about our health care system and our overall failings as a population at maintaining our own good health. I was glad to see that many of his points about the "system" are not simply abut how we are going to pay for healthcare, but about the screwed up way that high-intervention, pharmaceutical-heavy, disease-management-based medicine is practiced today. I certainly saw these same issues come up again and again when I was working with doctors and patients in a hospital setting.

  27. 5 out of 5

    110

    In this book Dr. Weil talks about "Health Matters". He talks about how the big corporations are making money by making people sick, overweight and preventing them from learning very simple principles on how to be healthy in the modern world. He recommends that everyone should learn basic things about health in order to take preventive actions before it is too late. Basically, he recommends coming back to the natural principles and getting (re-)connected to oneself. Highly recommended together wi In this book Dr. Weil talks about "Health Matters". He talks about how the big corporations are making money by making people sick, overweight and preventing them from learning very simple principles on how to be healthy in the modern world. He recommends that everyone should learn basic things about health in order to take preventive actions before it is too late. Basically, he recommends coming back to the natural principles and getting (re-)connected to oneself. Highly recommended together with his websites and other books.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    Dr. Weil writes about opportunities missed to improve our health care system and how much we could do if we incorporate an integrated approach to the care of our health. The status quo of treating every ailment or condition with drugs and high tech machines is costing us monetarily and in long-term physical after effects. His prescription to fix what is ailing our health care system is simple and starts with promotion of prevention and changing how we view reimbursements for the family doctory v Dr. Weil writes about opportunities missed to improve our health care system and how much we could do if we incorporate an integrated approach to the care of our health. The status quo of treating every ailment or condition with drugs and high tech machines is costing us monetarily and in long-term physical after effects. His prescription to fix what is ailing our health care system is simple and starts with promotion of prevention and changing how we view reimbursements for the family doctory vs. complex high tech interventions for every ailment.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Dr. Weil talks about the harsh realities of health care where executives of insurance companies are making millions while many are going without care. Alternative care such as acupuncture, energy work and carnio-sacral therapy are very effective but not coeverd by insurance. They are only available to those who can afford them. Well worth reading. Makes me want to get involved and do something to change the system. I am one of those lucky few who can afford alternative care and it has tranformed Dr. Weil talks about the harsh realities of health care where executives of insurance companies are making millions while many are going without care. Alternative care such as acupuncture, energy work and carnio-sacral therapy are very effective but not coeverd by insurance. They are only available to those who can afford them. Well worth reading. Makes me want to get involved and do something to change the system. I am one of those lucky few who can afford alternative care and it has tranformed my life.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    A quick read that, as many here have said, was preaching to the choir. However, I learned a few new things. For one, I was delighted to learn that there are some medical professionals out there who establish a balance between hippie homeopathic methods and traditional medical practices, which is how I've always approached my own health. I also believe the book makes a solid argument for his case and might be something those of us in the know can recommend for our less enlightened friends who a A quick read that, as many here have said, was preaching to the choir. However, I learned a few new things. For one, I was delighted to learn that there are some medical professionals out there who establish a balance between hippie homeopathic methods and traditional medical practices, which is how I've always approached my own health. I also believe the book makes a solid argument for his case and might be something those of us in the know can recommend for our less enlightened friends who are otherwise reasonable.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.