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Ultimate X-Men Collection, Book 1

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Collecting the groundbreaking first year of the Ultimate X-Men in one colossal trade paperback! The world stands on the brink of genetic war, Mankind has made the first move, launching an army of giant, cybernetic executioners called Sentinels--programmed to target and eliminate the mutant DNA strand. Now, Magneto and his mutant terrorist cell are preparing to follow throu Collecting the groundbreaking first year of the Ultimate X-Men in one colossal trade paperback! The world stands on the brink of genetic war, Mankind has made the first move, launching an army of giant, cybernetic executioners called Sentinels--programmed to target and eliminate the mutant DNA strand. Now, Magneto and his mutant terrorist cell are preparing to follow through on their threats of Homo sapiens genocide. The only force that can prevent total annihilation: five awkward teenagers and their crippled mentor! Collecting Ultimate X-Men #1-12.


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Collecting the groundbreaking first year of the Ultimate X-Men in one colossal trade paperback! The world stands on the brink of genetic war, Mankind has made the first move, launching an army of giant, cybernetic executioners called Sentinels--programmed to target and eliminate the mutant DNA strand. Now, Magneto and his mutant terrorist cell are preparing to follow throu Collecting the groundbreaking first year of the Ultimate X-Men in one colossal trade paperback! The world stands on the brink of genetic war, Mankind has made the first move, launching an army of giant, cybernetic executioners called Sentinels--programmed to target and eliminate the mutant DNA strand. Now, Magneto and his mutant terrorist cell are preparing to follow through on their threats of Homo sapiens genocide. The only force that can prevent total annihilation: five awkward teenagers and their crippled mentor! Collecting Ultimate X-Men #1-12.

30 review for Ultimate X-Men Collection, Book 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Donovan

    Mark Millar is awesome. I've only read a few Claremont and Whedon X-Men books, but this is the best X-Men I've read so far. And I'll explain why, in detail. The thing is, there's no set version of the X-Men as characters. That's the beauty of various writers and different stories, it's a varying spectrum of characterization. I would argue there are specific, recognizable qualities inherent to each character, and it behooves the writer to stay close to those qualities so the reader can better enj Mark Millar is awesome. I've only read a few Claremont and Whedon X-Men books, but this is the best X-Men I've read so far. And I'll explain why, in detail. The thing is, there's no set version of the X-Men as characters. That's the beauty of various writers and different stories, it's a varying spectrum of characterization. I would argue there are specific, recognizable qualities inherent to each character, and it behooves the writer to stay close to those qualities so the reader can better enjoy the story, instead of be distracted by how deeply "miswritten" or "misinterpreted" those characters are. And I think Millar has done just that. The X-Men are neurotic, that's a fact. They're goofy, melodramatic, indecisive, and morally whimsical. They are also, like in many books, teenagers. While Millar's romantic dialog feels forced, I also recognize how terribly awkward and abnormal teenage romance can be. And in the context of the outright "soap-operatic" X-Men, I think the dialog and characterization are just fine, if not great sometimes. For cartoon mutants, sure, they're totally well written. Turns out I was reading Book 1, not Volume 1, hence 336 pages. I mention this because some criticism of Volume 1 is, I think, nullified by the end of the story arc in Volume 3. One such criticism was Wolverine's seemingly short lived double agentry for Magneto and the Brotherhood of Mutants. Well it turns out there's total legitimacy to that. And we find out exactly why. (view spoiler)[He's been playing both teams, ever the rogue, the entire time. Because the Brotherhood tracks him to Weapon X, unlock all the mutants' cells, and destroy Weapon X. (hide spoiler)] If you ask me, I think his double agentry makes perfect sense within the larger narrative. So while it seems like a misstep in Volume 1, by Volume 3 Millar fully redeems this as a great plot twist. Andy and Adam Kubert's illustrations are phenomenal, especially for 15 years old. Seriously. This is probably the best X-Men art I've seen so far, (with the exception of Stuart Immonen in Bendis' All New X-Men), and the best I've seen from the Kuberts in a Marvel comic. I have little criticism other than the product placement and the kidnapping of the President's daughter. For real, there's more product placement here than televised professional football. Coke. Weber. McDonald's. Fubu. Just bizarre. But coming off the 90s I totally get it, it was a generation of corporate love. And Marvel probably got bonus points for all the advertising. Then the latter was just a trope written out of convenience, probably. Oh no! The President's daughter! Whatever shall we do! Overall, this kicked ass. It was a tight, fun, sometimes Millar-intense comic. There was great allegory for humanism and moral dilemma. Solid dialog. And excellent artwork. I think the Ultimate Universe may be where "it" is at.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Wow, I'm so disappointed with this. I've been an X-men fan since I was a kid and I've been trying to slowly read through most of the modern X-men stuff that I missed once I stopped reading comics in the late 90's. I thought I'd try out the Ultimate universe X-men as well. And while I always appreciate a good modern updating, this was not what I was hoping for. I don't mind changes being made to the characters and storylines, I just want them to actually be good and also still have some of the es Wow, I'm so disappointed with this. I've been an X-men fan since I was a kid and I've been trying to slowly read through most of the modern X-men stuff that I missed once I stopped reading comics in the late 90's. I thought I'd try out the Ultimate universe X-men as well. And while I always appreciate a good modern updating, this was not what I was hoping for. I don't mind changes being made to the characters and storylines, I just want them to actually be good and also still have some of the essence of what made that character special and sets them apart. Aside from the many inconsistencies and motivational flip-flopping, the writing here simply just isn't good at all and the whole thing was a bit obnoxious and frankly, BORING.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    This is fine. I cant see the Ultimate universe X-men being all that different from the main universe X-men.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    Brief History: When I first heard about Marvel making a separate X-Men series entitled “Ultimate X-Men,” I was a little hesitate in reading it at first because it was going to be a totally different version of the classic X-Men series that I grew up with. But when I read this small collection of “Ultimate X-Men” stories written by Mark Millar along with artwork by Adam Kubert, I was actually blown away by how interesting and exciting this collection really is! What is the story? This coll Brief History: When I first heard about Marvel making a separate X-Men series entitled “Ultimate X-Men,” I was a little hesitate in reading it at first because it was going to be a totally different version of the classic X-Men series that I grew up with. But when I read this small collection of “Ultimate X-Men” stories written by Mark Millar along with artwork by Adam Kubert, I was actually blown away by how interesting and exciting this collection really is! What is the story? This collection of stories from Mark Millar’s run on “Ultimate X-Men,” which basically started the series, collects both volumes one and two from the “Ultimate X-Men” series which were called “The Tomorrow People” and “Return to Weapon X.” In “The Tomorrow People,” the X-Men are recruited by Professor Xavier and they try to fight against Magneto and his Brotherhood of mutants as they try to wipe out all the humans on the Earth. In the second story “Return to Weapon X,” Wolverine’s old adversary Colonel Wraith comes and kidnaps the X-Men and forces them to work for him. Can the X-Men escape this vicious villain? What I loved about this comic: Mark Millar’s writing: I will admit that when I heard about the new “Ultimate X-Men” series, I thought that these new revisions of the classic X-Men characters that I grew up with would turn out to be terrible. But I was totally surprised by how this collection turned out to be! Mark Millar has done an excellent job at rewriting the classic X-Men characters by transforming the teenage X-Men that started out during the 1960s to teenage X-Men that grew up during the 2000s era. Mark Millar made the characters come much more alive by giving them mannerisms of teenagers during the 2000s, while giving each character a certain depth to their personalities. I also loved the changes that Mark Millar incorporated into these characters such as making Colossus be apart of the Russian Mafia instead of being the simple and humble farmer boy that he was portrayed in the mainstream universe, or making Storm into a more hip teenager as opposed to the regal beauty she is portrayed in the mainstream universe. These changes really made me relate to the characters even more and it is definitely easier for the current audience to relate to these characters also. Adam Kubert’s artwork: I really enjoyed Adam Kubert’s artwork in this collection as it does have that scratchy look and sometimes, the characters’ heads are a little lop sided, but they are detailed in expressing the characters’ reactions to the series and it gives this collection a sort of gritty feel to the stories. I also loved the way that Adam Kubert illustrated some of the action scenes in this collection as they are detailed and exciting to look at. My favorite image in this collection was during the “Return to Weapon X” storyline where Colossus stops a whole train with his bare hands. This scene was brilliantly executed and I just cannot stop looking at this brilliant scene of Colossus stopping the train with his bare hands. [image error] The characters: I just loved how the characters were portrayed in this collection from “Ultimate X-Men!” They are hip but they have a lot of depth to their character. I really enjoyed Colossus’ slightly different interpretation of his attitude from the mainstream universe as he is portrayed as being outspoken and tough. However, Colossus still maintains that friendly nature that he is famous for in the mainstream universe. I also loved what they did with Storm as she has a more bubbly personality in this universe and yet is willing to fight anyone who harms her friends. I also loved the fact that Jean Grey is portrayed as being a confident and caring person in this universe as it really made me really love her character. Final Thoughts: Overall, “Ultimate X-Men: Ultimate Collection Book One” is a brilliant collection of stories from the first run of “Ultimate X-Men” and any fan of the “Ultimate X-Men” franchise will definitely enjoy this small collection!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    Ultimate X-Men #1-12 and #1/2. Mark Millar's Ultimate X-men book tied to the grittier and more realism based Ultimates franchise. Same ol' story but with Colossus, Logan and Storm in the original team with Scott, Jean, Hank and Bobby. There's are great renditions of Magneto, Weapon X and the Brotherhood.. not so much with the Hellfire Club or the Phoenix Force. A top drawer open salvo by Millar and co. 8/12 Ultimate X-Men #1-12 and #1/2. Mark Millar's Ultimate X-men book tied to the grittier and more realism based Ultimates franchise. Same ol' story but with Colossus, Logan and Storm in the original team with Scott, Jean, Hank and Bobby. There's are great renditions of Magneto, Weapon X and the Brotherhood.. not so much with the Hellfire Club or the Phoenix Force. A top drawer open salvo by Millar and co. 8/12

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vince

    Millar has a knack for creating rich characters and engaging dialog, with just enough humor to keep it fun. After meeting Mark at Wizard World Chicago 2007, I can say that his writing is most definitely a mirror of his personality. If you've ever wondered where to start with X-Men, but were concerned you'd encounter flat, stereotypical hero archetypes, this is the book for you. Millar will suprise you. And the art is simply amazing, to boot. Millar has a knack for creating rich characters and engaging dialog, with just enough humor to keep it fun. After meeting Mark at Wizard World Chicago 2007, I can say that his writing is most definitely a mirror of his personality. If you've ever wondered where to start with X-Men, but were concerned you'd encounter flat, stereotypical hero archetypes, this is the book for you. Millar will suprise you. And the art is simply amazing, to boot.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brandt

    When I posted my review for Ultimate Spider-Man: Ultimate Collection vol. 1 on Facebook, my friend Andy (who is much more well read in comics than I am) used it as a platform to launch into a diatribe on his dislike for Mark Millar's Ultimate X-Men. I had made mention in my Ultimate Spider-Man review that there was good Bendis and bad Bendis, and while taking a shot at Millar, Andy lauded the good Bendis: "This was Bendis I liked. Taking his time in setting up a new universe where superheroe When I posted my review for Ultimate Spider-Man: Ultimate Collection vol. 1 on Facebook, my friend Andy (who is much more well read in comics than I am) used it as a platform to launch into a diatribe on his dislike for Mark Millar's Ultimate X-Men. I had made mention in my Ultimate Spider-Man review that there was good Bendis and bad Bendis, and while taking a shot at Millar, Andy lauded the good Bendis: "This was Bendis I liked. Taking his time in setting up a new universe where superheroes are not a thing yet. Only to have the auspicious start torpedoed by the time Ultimate X-Men debuted because Millar is the opposite of subtle and he introduced mutants by having them already fighting giant purple death robots on page 1." This got me thinking as I began reading Ultimate X-Men: Ultimate Collection, Book 1 whether Bendis and Millar's approaches to both books were mutually exclusive. As I began reading this collection, there were other things that bothered me more than Andy's complaint about Millar's "unsubtle" approach. What Andy says is valid, I guess, but the impact is lessened if one decides they really don't care about continuity. I tend to view continuity as an impediment to good story telling, so even though I valued Andy's opinion going into Ultimate X-Men, I wasn't going to let it be the only thing to inform my opinion about this book. I had been familiar with Millar's work from previous reads of books like JLA and The Flash but every time, he was always collaborating with more established writers like fellow Scotsman Grant Morrison (who is one of my favorites) and Mark Waid. Ultimate X-Men is one of my first forays into a series where Millar's work stands front and center. Could Millar and Bendis have collaborated in a way that both Spider-Man and X-Men could exist in a universe where Sentinels run around trying to kill mutants? Probably. But the fact of the matter is that things like racism and things like the Holocaust and the Rwandan genocide are not subtle, so we should not expect the Sentinels or the ideology that created them to be either. Sure, their existence could inform Bendis' take on Spider-Man, but teenagers like Peter Parker tend to be more concerned with their little ponds than the oceans, something that seems obvious in Ultimate Spider-Man. I'm willing to give both Bendis and Millar a pass here--they both appear to have been hired to work on the "Ultimate" universe because they were both up and coming writers at the time and the "Ultimate" line was essentially an experiment from Marvel editorial at the time--would books for established heroes sell if their continuity were restarted? The answer ended up being "yes" but at the time no one could have known that. Actually my problem with this book have to do with some major plot holes that Millar seems stymied by, especially with Wolverine, who plays a major role in both of the arcs presented in this collection. In the first arc, Wolverine has the ability to do something that he had never previously been to do. It isn't explained apart from having something to do with the Weapon X program, and it just seems like a convenient thing to avoid the obvious flaw in a particular plan executed by Magneto, who is allied with Wolverine at the beginning of the book. Unfortunately, it's glaring and kind of comes off as lazy story-telling. In the second arc, after dealing with the denouement of the previous arc, Wolverine immediately sets off to engage the Weapon X program and it's leader, Wraith. These characters had shown up in the first arc where they attempt to ambush Wolverine at an airport, but the fact that Millar made the narrative decision to address some of Wolverine's origins immediately after the set up arc for the series seems poor and rushed. I think it would have made more sense to establish Wolverine with the X-Men a little more before immediately going into the Weapon X stuff. It isn't that I hated Ultimate X-Men--but like with Spider-Man, you take a chance when trying to recast a series that produced such brilliant story arcs as "Dark Phoenix". There are some things to love here--the Wolverine/Jean Grey/Cyclops love triangle is more interesting here than when Claremont and Byrne hinted at it during their Uncanny X-Men run, but by that same token Jean is a much more interesting character here--I think when Lee conceived of her she was just there to be an object of Cyclops affection and it was only later, when Claremont and Byrne made her almost god-like that she stopped being a cookie cutter character, but even in the "established" Marvel universe, Jean's existence in the X-Men was to drive the actions of male characters. While Cyclops does fulfill the "leader" role in Ultimate X-Men, it often feels like he is only in charge in the field and that Jean is actually the true leader of the team. On that account, I'm really interested to see where Millar is headed with this. I guess it is easier to read these books in hindsight, after we have seen how they have influenced countless movies and effectively the first step in creating something like the MCU. Andy told me that these books seem to make these heroes "movie-ready" and I find that hard to disagree with.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Josephine (biblioseph)

    So, wow. Really cool. I didn't read all the extra stuff at the back, I was too itchy to get onto the second collection... Alright, part one is Tomorrow People, which is such a great story because I love Magneto against Professor X. (I saw First Class prior to reading this, so I was primed for good chemistry, and even though they only meet face to face for a short time, you know these guys have history. It's different than the movies, but they're killer, for sure.) Next part is Return to Weapon X, So, wow. Really cool. I didn't read all the extra stuff at the back, I was too itchy to get onto the second collection... Alright, part one is Tomorrow People, which is such a great story because I love Magneto against Professor X. (I saw First Class prior to reading this, so I was primed for good chemistry, and even though they only meet face to face for a short time, you know these guys have history. It's different than the movies, but they're killer, for sure.) Next part is Return to Weapon X, which was a source of conflict for me, sympathy-wise! I'm an Iron Man fan, and having SHIELD, apparently, anti-mutants was tearing me apart. But ah, Colonel Fury came through for me in the end. Good story, not as strong as Tomorrow People. The ending, I knew it was coming because by accident spoiled some stuff when I skimmed through Vol 2 of the Ultimates, but yanno. Still. I think Jean Grey is my favorite character. A note to fans of the trilogy and somewhat reboot of a prequel, (I mean, either that or we can pretty, pretty please take Wolverine: Origins out of the canon) Rogue is, I mean, what? What is her story? I really would like to find out what she thinks she is doing. Mostly because you really connect with her in the first movie. Also, I'm a mystique fan from the movies, she needs a cameo soon. Wolverine fans will most likely be delighted with the harder-to-sympathize-with assassin who's background is much more complex in these comics, yay! All in all, you've just got to accept they're basically the same people, just different events have defined them because it's the Alternate Universe. Groovy?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I really enjoyed this take on the beginning of the X-men and the story of Weapon X. I admit that I haven't read many graphic novels or comic books on either topic, but from what I have learned from the tv series and the movies, this was darker and grittier. I only wish that marvel had the rights to the X-men as there were many hints to other franchises in this (S.H.I.E.L.D. , Captain America, Spider Man and probably more). Reading this has definitely awakened a thirst in me to read more. I really enjoyed this take on the beginning of the X-men and the story of Weapon X. I admit that I haven't read many graphic novels or comic books on either topic, but from what I have learned from the tv series and the movies, this was darker and grittier. I only wish that marvel had the rights to the X-men as there were many hints to other franchises in this (S.H.I.E.L.D. , Captain America, Spider Man and probably more). Reading this has definitely awakened a thirst in me to read more.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kati

    Beautiful artwork and great story. This was my first X-Men comic book - though I'm a big fan of the movies - but I hadn't even finished it yet and I was already ordering Book 2, so that's telling. Like always, I was mostly interested in Charles and Erik's story. Which was quite interesting in this volume. I'm curious what happened to Magneto and if Professor X knows... Beautiful artwork and great story. This was my first X-Men comic book - though I'm a big fan of the movies - but I hadn't even finished it yet and I was already ordering Book 2, so that's telling. Like always, I was mostly interested in Charles and Erik's story. Which was quite interesting in this volume. I'm curious what happened to Magneto and if Professor X knows...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Evan Dossey

    Eh. I'll let this review be a stand-in for all of Mark Millar's run on the "ultimate x-men" title, which he launched as the sister title to Bendis' (far superior) "Ultimate Spider-Man" title. Millar is known for his bombastic, offensive, and utterly moronic attempt to tell 'mature' (i.e. sex (PG13) and violence (Pg13)) superhero stories to appeal to teenage audiences. His ouvre is defined by this kind of shit. I sound negative, and for the most part I do dislike his work, but some of it I love. L Eh. I'll let this review be a stand-in for all of Mark Millar's run on the "ultimate x-men" title, which he launched as the sister title to Bendis' (far superior) "Ultimate Spider-Man" title. Millar is known for his bombastic, offensive, and utterly moronic attempt to tell 'mature' (i.e. sex (PG13) and violence (Pg13)) superhero stories to appeal to teenage audiences. His ouvre is defined by this kind of shit. I sound negative, and for the most part I do dislike his work, but some of it I love. Like this. There was a period of time where he truly defined the Marvel Universe, and it lasted from about 2002 to 2006 (UXM #1, Ultimates, and Civil War). This was after he had jumped onto The Authority at Wildstorm, a superhero book that first took the 'government sanctioned real-world peacekeepers' angle that was definitive in the early-to-mid 2000's. He wrote some other shit here and there - a Spidey run, a Wolverine run, Ultimate FF -as well as his indie work, but really those three titles helped showcase the adaptability of many Marvel properties into filmic language and influenced the initial direction of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. For better or worse, his storytelling instincts are forever imprinted on DNA of a decade of superhero storytelling. "Ultimate X-Men" came about as a way of simplifying the X-Men saga after a decade of increasing convolution during the 1990's. Really, 1990's X-Men is maybe that series' apex in more ways than one. It features some of the most famous stories and the broadest cast of characters, as well as some of its most recognizable visual motifs. It's also essentially unreadable. Look, I know the series was better during the 70's and 80's, but the 90's is what the modern comics are always chasing nowadays. So UXM starts with Millar distilling the team back to some of the core characters, mostly those seen in Singer's 2000 blockbuster + Beast, Iceman, and Colossus. Millar's version of Xavier is so much more two-faced and abominable, and his Magneto is an outright cult leader. I can go without his Xavier, but I adore his take on Magneto. Magneto is a villain who was turned antihero, like, 40 years ago at this point. Even his greatest act of villainy (at the end of Morrison's New X-men) has since been retconned to maintain the utility of ole' Mags in other X-Men stories, and he's now one of the stars of the mainline franchise. Millar has 6 major stories. The first two are the best (one of which plays with the Weapon X stuff for Wolverine, as all X-Men stories must constantly do I guess). The 3rd is good, but features weird art shifts between Kubert & Bachalo - whom I love individually, but sort of don't think work well trading off. The 4th is shitty bullshit that doesn't go anywhere and engaged with the Phoenix stuff that no UXM writers are ever able to really figure out for the remaining 2/3rds of the series. The 5th is a crossover with The Ultimates that doesn't really go anywhere. The 6th is a "return of Magneto" story that just...sucks. Anticlimax after anticlimax. So I love the first two arcs and will always revisit them fondly, even though Millar's primary mode is "write everyone like a asshole." The rest, eh.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jason Tanner

    The Marvel Ultimate Universe was a big deal when it first came about in the year 2000, with fresh imaginings of Marvel's core properties by dynamic new creators without the yoke of decades of intricate continuity. It was a chance to explore the core of the characters and rebuild them from the ground up. (And to, you know, pitch movie studios looking for comic book stories.) Really though, twenty years on, Ultimate X-Men just isn't all that good. It's not all that groundbreaking, it changes very l The Marvel Ultimate Universe was a big deal when it first came about in the year 2000, with fresh imaginings of Marvel's core properties by dynamic new creators without the yoke of decades of intricate continuity. It was a chance to explore the core of the characters and rebuild them from the ground up. (And to, you know, pitch movie studios looking for comic book stories.) Really though, twenty years on, Ultimate X-Men just isn't all that good. It's not all that groundbreaking, it changes very little about the status quo (aside from the totally edgy decision to let Wolverine bang Jean Grey right off the bat), and it consistently goes for cheap shock and gratuity over a real attempt at mature storytelling. Mark Millar is writing, as usual, a movie treatment dressed as a comic book, and the Kuberts' art is good but not great. There are some good ideas, but they are unfortunately overshadowed by Millar's affection for his own cleverness. In all, it's a decent, quick read, but Ultimate X-Men hardly lives up to what the line claimed to be. It lacks both the pathos of Ultimate Spider-Man and the sheer cynical joy at breaking things of The Ultimates. It's considerably better than Ultimate Fantastic Four, but that just makes it a pretty average X-book. Weight of expectations against reality forces me to drop this from 3 stars to 2.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Just like volume 2, I really enjoyed this newer take on the X-men. I liked the way the team came together, the way they characterized the various characters, and the fairly epic plotline. The artwork as a whole was really good too, with some great multipage spreads. Occasionally the facial expressions were a bit funny, but I think that as the only thing lacking in the artwork. Looking forward to reading more in this series!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brian James

    In late 2018 I came back to Marvel comics in a BIG way (after 35 years away). It's still a daunting task going through the many trades I've bought but i took a quick look at some of the first I bought (the three U X-men volumes). I can't STAND the cheesy almost Manga-esque artwork and the dialogue isn't killing me either. This isn't a Marvel era that will grab me, clearly.. They go on ebay today. In late 2018 I came back to Marvel comics in a BIG way (after 35 years away). It's still a daunting task going through the many trades I've bought but i took a quick look at some of the first I bought (the three U X-men volumes). I can't STAND the cheesy almost Manga-esque artwork and the dialogue isn't killing me either. This isn't a Marvel era that will grab me, clearly.. They go on ebay today.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jonas Mccaffery

    I remember liking this series when it came out 17 years ago, but rereading it now (*sigh*) This revamp of the X-Men is like their uniforms: sleek, modern, and unimaginative. If you can redesign these characters, why do they look and act so similar to the older versions.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I'm going through the Marvel 'Ultimate' titles and this one wasn't too bad. Some of the others are cringe-worthy - little plots and really unlikeable characters. I'm going through the Marvel 'Ultimate' titles and this one wasn't too bad. Some of the others are cringe-worthy - little plots and really unlikeable characters.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paxton Holley

    Collecting the first 12 issues of Ultimate X-Men from 2001. This is awesome. I really, really liked this run. I am actively looking for Volume 2 now.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Review here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com... Review here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com...

  19. 4 out of 5

    David Muñoz

    Series is pretty good. I do think sometimes it’s a bit extreme, but all around a decent twist on the X-men. Adams artwork I’m a big fan of. Although I do prefer his work in Ultimate Fantastic Four. I feel like he gets a bit lazy with some of his panels. Mark Millar is the main writer and like I mentioned he does a pretty good job of switching it up with the X-men but I just didn’t think it was as big as the other Ultimate titles. So far at least. Pretty good start just didn’t wow me as much as t Series is pretty good. I do think sometimes it’s a bit extreme, but all around a decent twist on the X-men. Adams artwork I’m a big fan of. Although I do prefer his work in Ultimate Fantastic Four. I feel like he gets a bit lazy with some of his panels. Mark Millar is the main writer and like I mentioned he does a pretty good job of switching it up with the X-men but I just didn’t think it was as big as the other Ultimate titles. So far at least. Pretty good start just didn’t wow me as much as the other ultimate titles I’ve been reading.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I remember when this first came out, the first big reboot that I can recall of the X-Men series. The whole idea was to create a new continuity that new fans, introduced to the characters from the movies, could experience a more modern vision of the X-men without being weighed down by decades of continuity. This volume contains 2 graphic novels. The first, the Tomorrow People, brings the band together. Beast, Storm, Iceman and Colossus join Prof. X, Jean Grey and Cyclops in their struggle against I remember when this first came out, the first big reboot that I can recall of the X-Men series. The whole idea was to create a new continuity that new fans, introduced to the characters from the movies, could experience a more modern vision of the X-men without being weighed down by decades of continuity. This volume contains 2 graphic novels. The first, the Tomorrow People, brings the band together. Beast, Storm, Iceman and Colossus join Prof. X, Jean Grey and Cyclops in their struggle against mutant terrorist Magneto and his Brotherhood of Mutants (who ever sees themselves as evil, anyway?) Along the way, they pick up Wolverine (who else?) , an assassin sent by Magneto to kill the professor, but instead finds a mentor in his target. The second book, Return to Weapon X, find the X-men pitted against Wolverine's old masters. Along the way, they find new allies in Nightcrawler and Rogue (and to a lesser extent, Nick Fury in his new role as leader of S.H.I.E.L.D.). Wolverine gains more of the group's trust as well as settling business with Sabretooth. The series is cool and a lot of fun. Much more modern and hip than the original comics and with a more cinematic quality, it takes time to develop the characters. Far from being carbon copies of the original X-men, the story takes time to develop the characters. Beast actually gets center stage for a while. Cyclops has a bit of a crisis of faith rather than be the stalwart Boy Scout. Like the other Ultimate titles, the art has a scratchy quality that just works. It's addictive and leaves you itching for the next volume. Recommnded for new fans as well as old looking for a new take on old favorites.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jabberjawocky

    Rather spectacular re-imagining of the X-Men and goes to show the highest aspirations of the Ultimates titles. "The Tomorrow People" brings fans right into the heart of the action, as the newly founded X-Men team is facing down government-sanctioned violence in the form of the Sentinel program. The usage here is at least moderately incredible and it was great to see the Sentinels shine as an antagonist, even if they were more of a supporting villain in some senses (with the real villain being pu Rather spectacular re-imagining of the X-Men and goes to show the highest aspirations of the Ultimates titles. "The Tomorrow People" brings fans right into the heart of the action, as the newly founded X-Men team is facing down government-sanctioned violence in the form of the Sentinel program. The usage here is at least moderately incredible and it was great to see the Sentinels shine as an antagonist, even if they were more of a supporting villain in some senses (with the real villain being public perception in the wake of terrorism). The second story arc is less impressive and concerns a somewhat disgraced Weapon X (facing defunding in the light of recent policy changes) coming after the team. Wraith is really played up as being a bad guy rather than giving his character any real complexity and Sabretooth's compliance in the program seems odd (especially after hearing his silly reasoning). Jean Grey has a feisty, fiercely intelligent personality and Storm's nature also receives something of a change. However, Wolverine feels at least partly true to the normal universe, as does Bobby Drake/Iceman, Professor X, and Colossus. Unsurprisingly, Cyclops is given relatively little personality. Still, the team really helps to make the comic.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This is a weird one. Ultimate Spider-Man was an initiative to take the beloved character, stick him back in high school and remove the weight of canon, all for the purpose of engaging a new generation of fans who would be more familiar with him through the Raimi film. Ultimate X-Men sort of has this same purpose - more important considering how complicated the X-Men canon had become around this time - but doesn't have a hook to it, other than "Hey, the Claremont lineup sure was great huh?" But i This is a weird one. Ultimate Spider-Man was an initiative to take the beloved character, stick him back in high school and remove the weight of canon, all for the purpose of engaging a new generation of fans who would be more familiar with him through the Raimi film. Ultimate X-Men sort of has this same purpose - more important considering how complicated the X-Men canon had become around this time - but doesn't have a hook to it, other than "Hey, the Claremont lineup sure was great huh?" But it's still trying to go for that younger filmgoing generation, so what we get is not exactly a fresh take - instead it's the same basic thing, but ruder. The violence is cruel, everyone swears, and Wolverine and Jean Grey fuck within the first 3 issues. And everyone - including, inexplicably, Professor X - is in black leather. In short, like all Millar, it's sophomoric - he wants his X-Men to be more "adult" because there's blood and self-aware snark and the costumes have a pseudo real-world "logic" behind them. But in doing so, he only shows that he's not mature enough to just wallow in the superhero chaos that he's honestly pretty good at.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mike Cruden

    This trade paperback (I read the paperback version, not the hardback) collects the first twelve issues of the Ultimate X-Men comic series. If you've not read any then prepare to be amazed, astounded, surprised etc. What author Mark Millar has done is to turn your favourite X characters through 180 degrees so for some of them the only aspect they have in common with their normal Marvel Universe versions is their powers. Both the story arcs are engaging and entertaining and are more sophisticated This trade paperback (I read the paperback version, not the hardback) collects the first twelve issues of the Ultimate X-Men comic series. If you've not read any then prepare to be amazed, astounded, surprised etc. What author Mark Millar has done is to turn your favourite X characters through 180 degrees so for some of them the only aspect they have in common with their normal Marvel Universe versions is their powers. Both the story arcs are engaging and entertaining and are more sophisticated than the ordinary comics, as befits their superior printing and paper stock. The art by Adam Kubert is thoroughly professional and competent, very pleasing to the eye without being so flashy that it distracts from the story. Worthy of particular mention are the covers reproduced from the individual comics, each of which is like a mini-poster rather than the usual representational scene from the story. All-in-all, a great graphic novel for your collection. This trade paperback and individual X-Men issues are available from http://internet-comics.ebid.net/

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emily G

    This book is a retelling of the X-Men story and I enjoyed it. Although I can't say that I ever quite got used to the new character designs, and whoever thought that 'Marvel Girl' was a good codename for Jean Grey, needs to think again! The three stories included are: The Tomorrow People, which sees Professor Xavier bringing together the X-Men to fight Magneto. Magneto sends Wolverine to kill the Prof but things do not go according to Magneto's plan! Burial Service is a short story, which tells us m This book is a retelling of the X-Men story and I enjoyed it. Although I can't say that I ever quite got used to the new character designs, and whoever thought that 'Marvel Girl' was a good codename for Jean Grey, needs to think again! The three stories included are: The Tomorrow People, which sees Professor Xavier bringing together the X-Men to fight Magneto. Magneto sends Wolverine to kill the Prof but things do not go according to Magneto's plan! Burial Service is a short story, which tells us more about Magneto's 'death'. Return to Weapon X, introduces us to S.H.I.E.L.D. and their part in the Weapon X programme, with all hell breaking loose when they try to add the X-Men to the programme. At the end is a pitch that another writer made for this book, which is very different from the one that was published. I personally would have liked to see it from a selfish perspective because it would have featured my favourite X-Man, Gambit :-)!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Corinne Zilnicki

    The first 12 issues of Ultimate X-Men combined in one book? Pretty awesome! Here we see the familiar mash-up of compassionate and scholarly Charles Xavier VS. war-hungry Magneto. We also discover how the X-Men came to be, and how Wolverine became entangled with the group. The second half of the book focuses on the mysterious Weapon X program, the shadow-ops program responsible for Wolverine's transformation into a killing machine. I liked this, but I didn't love it. At least, not as much as I lov The first 12 issues of Ultimate X-Men combined in one book? Pretty awesome! Here we see the familiar mash-up of compassionate and scholarly Charles Xavier VS. war-hungry Magneto. We also discover how the X-Men came to be, and how Wolverine became entangled with the group. The second half of the book focuses on the mysterious Weapon X program, the shadow-ops program responsible for Wolverine's transformation into a killing machine. I liked this, but I didn't love it. At least, not as much as I loved Ultimate Spiderman. I think I'm just much more of a Spiderman fan at heart; X-Men is a little intense for me. The only specific thing I can pinpoint as something that bothered me, though, is the way Jean and Wolverine's "romance" (if you can even call it that) is handled here. The abruptness put a bad taste in my mouth. Overall, though, this is an exciting, dark, and interesting comic.

  26. 5 out of 5

    William Clemens

    I like this version of the X-Men, younger, a bit darker, and very action packed, but I don't love it. I felt a bit like they were spending a lot of currency to make this series cool and edgy, and while it's nice that they weren't pulling punches it felt like they could have taken a lot more time with many of the things that happened here. I've heard that Millar can be dark and violent and not care as much about characters, and I definitely see it here. Having just felt the need to educate myself a I like this version of the X-Men, younger, a bit darker, and very action packed, but I don't love it. I felt a bit like they were spending a lot of currency to make this series cool and edgy, and while it's nice that they weren't pulling punches it felt like they could have taken a lot more time with many of the things that happened here. I've heard that Millar can be dark and violent and not care as much about characters, and I definitely see it here. Having just felt the need to educate myself a bit more I checked the Wikipedia article and found out that yes, these things I am saying are true. I want to read the next volume, not written by Millar, and see how this version develops, though I doubt I will even enjoy it as much as I am enjoying the 90's version that is streaming on Netflix. Go check that out!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Christman

    I generally like Mark Millar's stuff and this is no exception. Action always comes fast and furious when he's at the helm and we see more in the first 6.5 X-Men comics than the first two Ultimate Spider-man arcs, combined. And that's great, except that the X-Men cast is so much more vast than Spidey. By the end of "The Tomorrow People" there's already a dozen important characters introduced. Millar has chosen to gloss over their back story in favor of action, filling in the blanks along the way w I generally like Mark Millar's stuff and this is no exception. Action always comes fast and furious when he's at the helm and we see more in the first 6.5 X-Men comics than the first two Ultimate Spider-man arcs, combined. And that's great, except that the X-Men cast is so much more vast than Spidey. By the end of "The Tomorrow People" there's already a dozen important characters introduced. Millar has chosen to gloss over their back story in favor of action, filling in the blanks along the way with some clunky exposition during fight scenes and characterization via action (IE Wolverine and Cyclops.) The latter works. I'm hoping that the rest of the series settles down a bit and focuses on the characters, but overall it's a very solid and fun start to the Ultimate X-Men universe.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex Jones

    This was really enjoyable and easy to get into from someone who's only real X-Men knowledge is from the films. It contains two six-arc storylines and a small aside linking the two. The first, The Tomorrow People, sets up the X-Men and Magento's Brotherhood and is similar to the first X-Men film's storyline with the addition of sentinels from Days of Future Past. The second, Return to Weapon X, is similar to to the second X-Men film's storyline, but with the addition of Nick Fury. This made the p This was really enjoyable and easy to get into from someone who's only real X-Men knowledge is from the films. It contains two six-arc storylines and a small aside linking the two. The first, The Tomorrow People, sets up the X-Men and Magento's Brotherhood and is similar to the first X-Men film's storyline with the addition of sentinels from Days of Future Past. The second, Return to Weapon X, is similar to to the second X-Men film's storyline, but with the addition of Nick Fury. This made the plots really easy to jump into, but also different enough for them to be an enjoyable and refreshing take. The writing is handled well, with plenty of humour, but also some darker moments. The art is all nicely done and is bright and colourful. It was easy to get through and really enjoyable!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Colby twitchell

    This is the first Graphic Novel I have read and to be honest it was very gripping...The depictions of actions through words and the pictures is very clear and deep. The pictures have hidden things throughout the novel that is fun to decipher. Mark Miller did a fantastic job on pulling this together. I would recommend this book to those who are in for a new adventure or something different. Would highly recommend that those in the late teens or adulthood to read this novel. Spoiler: To be warned so This is the first Graphic Novel I have read and to be honest it was very gripping...The depictions of actions through words and the pictures is very clear and deep. The pictures have hidden things throughout the novel that is fun to decipher. Mark Miller did a fantastic job on pulling this together. I would recommend this book to those who are in for a new adventure or something different. Would highly recommend that those in the late teens or adulthood to read this novel. Spoiler: To be warned some pictures depict images that are not pleasant to the eye/mind...and some of the manner speaking thereof is graphic action (blood...etc) and immodesty.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lucas

    Decent I guess. Unlike some of the other graphic novels I've been reading the X-men are a lot more familiar because of the movies. It would be more interesting if the story were self-contained rather than just a reboot- it's hard to generate excitement when it's a given no major characters will be killed because they need to be around for years to come. I wish the artists would stay consistent over an entire six issue storyline. Decent I guess. Unlike some of the other graphic novels I've been reading the X-men are a lot more familiar because of the movies. It would be more interesting if the story were self-contained rather than just a reboot- it's hard to generate excitement when it's a given no major characters will be killed because they need to be around for years to come. I wish the artists would stay consistent over an entire six issue storyline.

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