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The World Is Open: How Web Technology Is Revolutionizing Education

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Discover the dramatic changes that are affecting all learners Web-based technology has opened up education around the world to the point where anyone can learn anything from anyone else at any time. To help educators and others understand what's possible, Curt Bonk employs his groundbreaking "WE-ALL-LEARN" model to outline ten key technology and learning trends, demonstrat Discover the dramatic changes that are affecting all learners Web-based technology has opened up education around the world to the point where anyone can learn anything from anyone else at any time. To help educators and others understand what's possible, Curt Bonk employs his groundbreaking "WE-ALL-LEARN" model to outline ten key technology and learning trends, demonstrating how technology has transformed educational opportunities for learners of every age in every corner of the globe. The book is filled with inspiring stories of ordinary learners as well as interviews with technology and education leaders that reveal the power of this new way of learning. Captures the global nature of open education from those who are creating and using new learning technologies Includes a new Preface and Postscript with the latest updates A free companion web site provides additional stories and information Using the dynamic "WE-ALL-LEARN" model, learners, educators, executives, administrators, instructors, and parents can discover how to tap into the power of Web technology and unleash a world of information.


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Discover the dramatic changes that are affecting all learners Web-based technology has opened up education around the world to the point where anyone can learn anything from anyone else at any time. To help educators and others understand what's possible, Curt Bonk employs his groundbreaking "WE-ALL-LEARN" model to outline ten key technology and learning trends, demonstrat Discover the dramatic changes that are affecting all learners Web-based technology has opened up education around the world to the point where anyone can learn anything from anyone else at any time. To help educators and others understand what's possible, Curt Bonk employs his groundbreaking "WE-ALL-LEARN" model to outline ten key technology and learning trends, demonstrating how technology has transformed educational opportunities for learners of every age in every corner of the globe. The book is filled with inspiring stories of ordinary learners as well as interviews with technology and education leaders that reveal the power of this new way of learning. Captures the global nature of open education from those who are creating and using new learning technologies Includes a new Preface and Postscript with the latest updates A free companion web site provides additional stories and information Using the dynamic "WE-ALL-LEARN" model, learners, educators, executives, administrators, instructors, and parents can discover how to tap into the power of Web technology and unleash a world of information.

30 review for The World Is Open: How Web Technology Is Revolutionizing Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jill Sprott

    This was on my "required" summer reading list, but I likely would have read it regardless. Almost all of the reviews I have read for the book have been glowingly positive, and I agree with comments that laud the book for being a treasure-trove of links and ideas that illustrate the premise that "anyone can now learn anything from anyone at anytime" (7). However, while I certainly respect the ideas in the book and feel supercharged by the possibilities of implementing many of these ideas in my cl This was on my "required" summer reading list, but I likely would have read it regardless. Almost all of the reviews I have read for the book have been glowingly positive, and I agree with comments that laud the book for being a treasure-trove of links and ideas that illustrate the premise that "anyone can now learn anything from anyone at anytime" (7). However, while I certainly respect the ideas in the book and feel supercharged by the possibilities of implementing many of these ideas in my classroom and in my own life-long learning endeavors, I found the book to be unnecessarily lengthy. Points that might have been made in a few paragraphs or examples that might have illustrated the point in just a few sentences take pages to explain. I often found myself "tuning out" and having to reread. It could just be a style preference of mine, however; others may enjoy the detail. Not every aspect of the book is as detailed as the profiles and examples, however. While Bonk's attempt to stress the positives in order to keep moving forward is admirable, his treatment of counterarguments is shallow, and although he brings up questions and reservations that "naysayers" might have, he does not really explore these thoughtfully -- especially in regard to issues of credibility. At the end of the book, he addresses "The Deadly Dozen" in about nine pages, listing issues that "we will need to keep in mind as the world of learning opens up" (375). He refers to these issues as "deal breakers" (or, in one interview that I read, as "discussion stoppers"). I was relieved that he touched upon many of the issues that emerged for me as I read the book, but again, the coverage of these issues was at the surface level -- "The Quick and Deadly Dozen", if you will. It is clear that though Bonk recognizes these issues, he finds it imperative to focus on the positive: "Are the critics correct in suggesting that better quality controls are needed to filter and shake out the credible and accurate pieces of knowledge and information that have been shared? Sure! But the world of learning is now open -- for all of us. There is no doubt about that anymore. ...We must find new ways to celebrate this learning epoch, as well as use what has been created, instead of continuing to ignore or resist it. There is certainly a need to further improve the situation as well as debate best practices. However, we can no longer debate whether to dip our toes in or not. That decision has already been rendered moot by the hundreds of learning doors that have opened during the past decade" (373). It isn't that he outright dismisses criticism, but it seems that this book isn't the place to explore it. It's already 459 pages, after all. As hyped as I am about the power and possibilities made evident through its pages, I am still not at peace with the unanswered questions that the book prompted for me. Luckily, Bonk has a companion website at http://worldisopen.com/, where he follows up on many of the topics covered in the book. Rather than becoming a static, sure-to-be-dated-someday text, the book endures and evolves through the web site. With some reservations in mind, I still recommend this text for teachers. If you're looking for a helpful resource, a boost in the right direction, and a hopeful vision of education, then you will find it here.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matt Potthoff

    The World is Open: Internet Enabled Learning This book review of The World is Open: How Web Technology is Revolutionizing Education by Curtis J. Bonk (2009) offers a summary of the text including excerpts interspersed with personal insights, a critique of the themes discussed with the author’s intent, and a discussion of the author’s qualifications. Summary Bonk states that the entirety of his book can be summed up in a single declaration, “Anyone can now learn anything from anyone at anytime” (Bon The World is Open: Internet Enabled Learning This book review of The World is Open: How Web Technology is Revolutionizing Education by Curtis J. Bonk (2009) offers a summary of the text including excerpts interspersed with personal insights, a critique of the themes discussed with the author’s intent, and a discussion of the author’s qualifications. Summary Bonk states that the entirety of his book can be summed up in a single declaration, “Anyone can now learn anything from anyone at anytime” (Bonk, 2009, Kindle Location 300). This idea of a human ability to learn anything is not new. However, the two additions of “from anyone at anytime” are made possible through the increasing availability and utility of web technologies. Through this type of education, Bonk (2009) argues that the world is becoming more and more open. The book is essentially delineated by the acronym WE-ALL-LEARN standing for ten different ‘openers’ of the new world of learning: Web searching and e-books, E- and blended learning, Availability of open source and free software, Leveraged resources and open courseware, Learning object repositories, Learner participation in open information communities, Electronic collaboration and interaction, Alternative reality learning, Real-time mobility and portability, and Networks of personalized learning (Bonk, 2009, Kindle Location 1106). This framework is a sampling of technologies, tools, and methods that can enhance learning through the web. Bonk presents learning as an exciting adventure, no longer held within the bounds of a brick and mortar library or school, one that anyone can now take. No longer are schools limited to offering a finite number of courses with a predetermined list of resources. Students can pursue their passions. And they can do so with a like-minded community of practice” (Bonk, 2009, Kindle Location 1186). Bonk also acknowledged that his framework is nothing more than opportunity and that “technology by itself will not empower learners. Innovative pedagogy is required,” (Bonk, 2009, Kindle Location 765). Critique I agree with the author’s view that the world is changing due to the emergent technology of the web and that learning is also changing. When I assess how I use the web to learn it is very close to the descriptions that Bonk gives. I learn what I want. For instance, how to pick a lock. I learn when I want. For instance, when I’m sitting in my garage locked out of my house. I learn from whom I want. For instance, the two minute YouTube video of someone who is actually picking a lock. Bonk’s idea’s about autonomy in learning are in line with the intrinsic motivation needed for true learning as described by Pink (2009). While I enjoyed reading about the possibility of an idealistic and individualized education, reading through all the different examples seemed to be a bit outdated. While Bonk (2009) does recognize that not one technology will make the difference, it is difficult to read so much of what has now become the history of web-based learning. I also found it to be a bit of a stretch to compare the American Declaration of Independence to the Cape Town Open Education Declaration. Contrary to what Bonk (2009) claims about the importance of this document, of which I had never heard anything about after studying education for nearly twenty years, it is doubtful that this document will have as dramatic impact on education as the American Declaration of Independence had on our nation. My suggestion would be to read the introduction to this book and search through the e-book for any of the openers that you feel personally drawn to and become your own living example of the open world in which we now live. Qualifications Curtis Bonk’s strong background in business, educational psychology, and technology gives him a well-rounded view of the topic of learning in the digital age. Bonk earned his Master’s and Ph.D. degrees in educational psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (“Pages.iu.edu,” n.d.”). He has won multiple awards including the CyberStar Award from the Indiana Information Technology Association, the Most Outstanding Achievement Award from the U.S. Distance Learning Association, and the Most Innovative Teaching in a Distance Education Program Award from the State of Indiana ("Worldisopen.com," n.d.). His passion and expertise in the area of both online learning and emerging learning technologies makes him a qualified and valuable resource on the topic. References Bonk, Curtis J. (2009). The world is open: How web technology is revolutionizing education [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com Pages.iu.edu. (2015). Professor Curt Bonk’s e-learning world. Retrieved 24 June 2015, from http://pages.iu.edu/~cjbonk/ Pink, D. H. (2009). Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us [Kindle version]. Retrieved from Amazon.com. Worldisopen.com. (2015). The world is open: how web technology is revolutionizing education - Curtis J. Bonk. Retrieved 24 June 2015, from http://worldisopen.com/bonk.php

  3. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    Bonk describes how technology is influencing the world, particularly in the field of education. Although I think he is overly optimistic about technology, and how many people use it at the level he is talking about, he brings to the reader's attention possibilities for the use of technology in education. I would still prefer a class that is face-to-face, but he predicts that soon most learning will be online. I do see his point about how the world is becoming more open, just as I understand Frie Bonk describes how technology is influencing the world, particularly in the field of education. Although I think he is overly optimistic about technology, and how many people use it at the level he is talking about, he brings to the reader's attention possibilities for the use of technology in education. I would still prefer a class that is face-to-face, but he predicts that soon most learning will be online. I do see his point about how the world is becoming more open, just as I understand Friedman's point how the world is becoming more flat.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Susannah Skyer Gupta

    This is my professional inspiration right now as I try to figure out whether I will go back to college for a degree in instructional technology. Each chapter overflows with cool ways the Internet can help auto-didacts/classrooms learners/homeschoolers at all levels. Ironic that it's a printed book, but that works for me at my ripe old age. This is my professional inspiration right now as I try to figure out whether I will go back to college for a degree in instructional technology. Each chapter overflows with cool ways the Internet can help auto-didacts/classrooms learners/homeschoolers at all levels. Ironic that it's a printed book, but that works for me at my ripe old age.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lorrie

    Curtis J. Bonk wrote, The World is Open: How Web Technology is Revolutionizing Education. In 2009. Bonk’s passion for online education is evident. Much of his beliefs in online education comes from his own personal experiences. His background stories that he shares are interesting. His insights on where education was heading at that time, is remarkable. Bonk’s acronym, WE-ALL-LEARN, sums it all up (2009). 1. Web searching in the world of e-books 2. E-Learning and Blended Learning 3. Availability Curtis J. Bonk wrote, The World is Open: How Web Technology is Revolutionizing Education. In 2009. Bonk’s passion for online education is evident. Much of his beliefs in online education comes from his own personal experiences. His background stories that he shares are interesting. His insights on where education was heading at that time, is remarkable. Bonk’s acronym, WE-ALL-LEARN, sums it all up (2009). 1. Web searching in the world of e-books 2. E-Learning and Blended Learning 3. Availability of Open Source and Free Hardware 4. Leveraged Resources and Open Course Ware 5. Learning Object Repositories and Portals 6. Learner Participation in Open Information Communities 7. Electronic Collaboration 8. Alternative Reality Learning 9. Real-Time Mobility and Portability 10. Networks of Personalized Learning (Bonk, 2009) This new way of learning is a far cry from how our parents learned (Bonk, 2009). Before Covid-19, some people were still not aware of it, or they were in denial of it. This book although written in the year 2009, is talking about how people are learning today. I found it very interesting, being that for the most part, online learning is all we have right now.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jim Schools

    Overall I don't really care for this book. Not that I disagree with the basic premise of the book which is that the developing WWW is offering all sorts of new ways for learners all over the world to access learning of virtually any content, anywhere, any time. There is no doubt that this is true and I believe in and use many of the specific tools that are discussed. For me personally, I don't care much for the breathless story-telling model of discussing how new technologies are impacting us. T Overall I don't really care for this book. Not that I disagree with the basic premise of the book which is that the developing WWW is offering all sorts of new ways for learners all over the world to access learning of virtually any content, anywhere, any time. There is no doubt that this is true and I believe in and use many of the specific tools that are discussed. For me personally, I don't care much for the breathless story-telling model of discussing how new technologies are impacting us. The stories get old quickly, and there is not really any usable and structured information that can be leveraged to actually exploit all of this new technology in a meaningful way for my own pursuit of unifying and simplifying the learning process. The book also over-emphasizes the impact of having open information available on the internet. We have had open information for virtually anyone for years via books in the library. That doesn't mean that everyone can become an expert on every topic by reading the books in the library. The MIT project with all of the coursework available to anyone in the world who wants to look at it doesn't generate a world full of people with the knowledge of MIT graduates. Unfortunately, learning just doesn't work that way. If only it were so easy! What we really need to focus on is the development of the technology such that it can supplement or if possibly replace traditional methods of teaching and learning, which have been developed and improved for many many years. Everyone is excited about using technology in this way, but much of the technology that is discussed in this book has actually been available for a number of years now and the impact doesn't seem to be all that great. Once again we are confronted with the idea that incorporating technology/multimedia into learning may not directly cause an impact in the effectiveness of that learning, a concept that has been researched and published upon extensively.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bridget

    Have you noticed that the world is being taken over by technology? It seems like every month there is a new and amazing gadget that can do something that we would have said was impossible a few hundred years ago? Do you ever feel like you've been left behind and the rest of the world doesn't seem to have a problem keeping up with the latest and greatest electronics available? Everyone learns in differently. Some will catch on really quick while others are stuck and don't know where to turn. If yo Have you noticed that the world is being taken over by technology? It seems like every month there is a new and amazing gadget that can do something that we would have said was impossible a few hundred years ago? Do you ever feel like you've been left behind and the rest of the world doesn't seem to have a problem keeping up with the latest and greatest electronics available? Everyone learns in differently. Some will catch on really quick while others are stuck and don't know where to turn. If you feel this way or know someone who does, I think you should read this book. It is the perfect companion for learning about the things that may terrify you. I already know a few people who would love to get this for Christmas! Book Information: The World is Open by Curtis J. Bonk Wiley, John & Sons, Inc. July 2009 480 pages Giving away a copy http://bridget3420.blogspot.com/2009/...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Saima

    Premise: "anyone can now learn anything from anyone at anytime" WE-ALL-LEARN model: W - web searching in the world of e-books E - e-learning and blended learning A - availability of open source and free software L - leveraged resources and OpenCourseWare L - learner participation in Open Information Communities E - electronic collaboration A - alternate reality learning R - real-time mobility and portability N - networks of personalized learning Currently one 1 billion of the 6.7 billion people in the wor Premise: "anyone can now learn anything from anyone at anytime" WE-ALL-LEARN model: W - web searching in the world of e-books E - e-learning and blended learning A - availability of open source and free software L - leveraged resources and OpenCourseWare L - learner participation in Open Information Communities E - electronic collaboration A - alternate reality learning R - real-time mobility and portability N - networks of personalized learning Currently one 1 billion of the 6.7 billion people in the world have internet access - what does this mean in terms of access to education? Deadly Dozen: web access limitations, quality, cheating, copyright in a shared world, lazy learners (why learn if knowledge is available in 5 seconds or less online).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Enthusiastic and optimistic, this looked like an interesting read for a teacher, and it was recommended by one of my favourite bloggers, but after reading the first 100 pages there wasn't much that was new to me, and I felt Bonk was just a bit too onesidedly uncritical and wide-eyed. You do have to read these things when they are newly hatched, or they date quite quickly. This read was a bit of a boost to my ego, because it made me feel quite up to date with new Educational Technology - I'm not Enthusiastic and optimistic, this looked like an interesting read for a teacher, and it was recommended by one of my favourite bloggers, but after reading the first 100 pages there wasn't much that was new to me, and I felt Bonk was just a bit too onesidedly uncritical and wide-eyed. You do have to read these things when they are newly hatched, or they date quite quickly. This read was a bit of a boost to my ego, because it made me feel quite up to date with new Educational Technology - I'm not sure if this is a reflection on the poorness of the content that I was reading or a reality. I've never thought I was that up with things!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This book covers the 10 principles of the We All Learn module. It took me a really long time to read the book; it is very long and is very detailed. I really liked this book and found some great resources in it. I especially like that the author references Library Thing. I think this book is not meant to be read straight thru, but to keep it and refer back to it sections at a time. I am grateful that I won a copy of it and I plane to keep it in my permanent library.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I gave it a 100 pages. There's nothing new or revolutionary here. Relies too much on Friedman's flat world concept, which has been widely problematized/debunked. All of the technologies that are mentioned have been discussed before - sure, he's gathered them in once place, but I saw a lot of cheerleading and not a lot of critical commentary. I gave it a 100 pages. There's nothing new or revolutionary here. Relies too much on Friedman's flat world concept, which has been widely problematized/debunked. All of the technologies that are mentioned have been discussed before - sure, he's gathered them in once place, but I saw a lot of cheerleading and not a lot of critical commentary.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Roger McHaney

    Excellent book by a super academic. This book really provokes thought and provides a worldview that is becoming prevalent among tech-savvy students. Highly recommended as a must read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    I highly recommend to all educators at all levels.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Frank Christ

    An eye opener and mind bender when one realizes the potential for learning anywhere, any time, and by anyone with an Internet or WiFi connection and a desire to learn.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    everything is on the internet if you know how to find it

  16. 4 out of 5

    Allison Yager

    interesting

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    Just bought this on EBAY for $10.00 including shipping. 2/20/10

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Martin

    reading this for a class. NOT too impressed with it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kp

  20. 5 out of 5

    Scout

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maha

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mr Tom Krawczewicz

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bokeeffe

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joli Hamilton

  26. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  27. 5 out of 5

    Livesimpleread

  28. 4 out of 5

    Divine Marshall

  29. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kimberley

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