web site hit counter Walking to Gatlinburg - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Walking to Gatlinburg

Availability: Ready to download

A stunning and lyrical Civil War thriller, Walking to Gatlinburg is a spellbinding story of survival, wilderness adventure, mystery, and love in the time of war. Morgan Kinneson is both hunter and hunted.  The sharp-shooting 17-year-old from Kingdom County, Vermont, is determined to track down his brother Pilgrim, a doctor who has gone missing from the Union Army.  But firs A stunning and lyrical Civil War thriller, Walking to Gatlinburg is a spellbinding story of survival, wilderness adventure, mystery, and love in the time of war. Morgan Kinneson is both hunter and hunted.  The sharp-shooting 17-year-old from Kingdom County, Vermont, is determined to track down his brother Pilgrim, a doctor who has gone missing from the Union Army.  But first Morgan must elude a group of murderous escaped convicts in pursuit of a mysterious stone that has fallen into his possession. It’s 1864, and the country is in the grip of the bloodiest war in American history.  Meanwhile, the Kinneson family has been quietly conducting passengers on the Underground Railroad from Vermont to the Canadian border.  One snowy afternoon Morgan leaves an elderly fugitive named Jesse Moses in a mountainside cabin for a few hours so that he can track a moose to feed his family.  In his absence, Jesse is murdered, and thus begins Morgan’s unforgettable trek south through an apocalyptic landscape of war and mayhem. Along the way, Morgan encounters a fantastical array of characters, including a weeping elephant, a pacifist gunsmith, a woman who lives in a tree, a blind cobbler, and a beautiful and intriguing slave girl named Slidell who is the key to unlocking the mystery of the secret stone.  At the same time, he wrestles with the choices that will ultimately define him – how to reconcile the laws of nature with religious faith, how to temper justice with mercy.  Magical and wonderfully strange, Walking to Gatlinburg is both a thriller of the highest order and a heartbreaking odyssey into the heart of American darkness.


Compare

A stunning and lyrical Civil War thriller, Walking to Gatlinburg is a spellbinding story of survival, wilderness adventure, mystery, and love in the time of war. Morgan Kinneson is both hunter and hunted.  The sharp-shooting 17-year-old from Kingdom County, Vermont, is determined to track down his brother Pilgrim, a doctor who has gone missing from the Union Army.  But firs A stunning and lyrical Civil War thriller, Walking to Gatlinburg is a spellbinding story of survival, wilderness adventure, mystery, and love in the time of war. Morgan Kinneson is both hunter and hunted.  The sharp-shooting 17-year-old from Kingdom County, Vermont, is determined to track down his brother Pilgrim, a doctor who has gone missing from the Union Army.  But first Morgan must elude a group of murderous escaped convicts in pursuit of a mysterious stone that has fallen into his possession. It’s 1864, and the country is in the grip of the bloodiest war in American history.  Meanwhile, the Kinneson family has been quietly conducting passengers on the Underground Railroad from Vermont to the Canadian border.  One snowy afternoon Morgan leaves an elderly fugitive named Jesse Moses in a mountainside cabin for a few hours so that he can track a moose to feed his family.  In his absence, Jesse is murdered, and thus begins Morgan’s unforgettable trek south through an apocalyptic landscape of war and mayhem. Along the way, Morgan encounters a fantastical array of characters, including a weeping elephant, a pacifist gunsmith, a woman who lives in a tree, a blind cobbler, and a beautiful and intriguing slave girl named Slidell who is the key to unlocking the mystery of the secret stone.  At the same time, he wrestles with the choices that will ultimately define him – how to reconcile the laws of nature with religious faith, how to temper justice with mercy.  Magical and wonderfully strange, Walking to Gatlinburg is both a thriller of the highest order and a heartbreaking odyssey into the heart of American darkness.

30 review for Walking to Gatlinburg

  1. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Sloan

    Walking to Gatlinburg: A Novel It is not often that a writer can successfully integrate the concept of language into writing a book. Howard Frank Mosher in Walking to Gatlinberg has not just one dialect (common English) in but 3 or more language dialects including that of the 1860 slaves and hidden from society hillbilly that people rarely are exposed to. I truly would give this book 4 1/2 stars just for the dialects alone. I loved it. Seventeen year old Morgan Kinneson starts his journey from the Walking to Gatlinburg: A Novel It is not often that a writer can successfully integrate the concept of language into writing a book. Howard Frank Mosher in Walking to Gatlinberg has not just one dialect (common English) in but 3 or more language dialects including that of the 1860 slaves and hidden from society hillbilly that people rarely are exposed to. I truly would give this book 4 1/2 stars just for the dialects alone. I loved it. Seventeen year old Morgan Kinneson starts his journey from the small family farm in Vermont to search for his brother Pilgrim Kinneson after first losing his charge of a slave he was delivering to freedom to killers sent to find the slave and a slave girl and boy. With clues from a stone the slave left to him Morgan sets out to find the missing slave girl who travels with a young boy in hopes that it will lead him to his brother Pilgrim who by last reports was a field doctor at Gettysberg. Morgan's travels along the Underground Railway takes all sorts of interesting turns with the people he meets and in the process seventeen year old Morgan becomes a man just as one would expect of anyone who lived during such a violent time as the civil war period we witness in Walking to Gatlinberg. Some of these people were downright crazy but we aren't sure if that is just the way these people always are or if it's the war that caused them to be this way. In any case; Walking to Gatlinberg is a marvelous read that I loved giving us just a glimpse into the lives of the people who lived through the Civil War era and I know you will love it too! Be sure to pick up a copy if you love any part of history! First chapter available online # Hardcover: 352 pages # Publisher: Shaye Areheart Books (March 2, 2010) # ISBN-10: 0307450678 # ISBN-13: 978-0307450678

  2. 5 out of 5

    Todd Stockslager

    Morgan Kinneson, from Kingdom County, Vermont, does indeed walk to Gatlinburg and even deeper into the heart of the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee (but not to the North Carolina side--the water tastes bad there, a mountaineer tells him) during the last year of the Civil War. But this is neither a standard road story nor a Civil War story. It is more fable than historical fiction. It is odd, disconcerting, and elegiac--the closest comparison I can think of in terms of its journey, scope, and Morgan Kinneson, from Kingdom County, Vermont, does indeed walk to Gatlinburg and even deeper into the heart of the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee (but not to the North Carolina side--the water tastes bad there, a mountaineer tells him) during the last year of the Civil War. But this is neither a standard road story nor a Civil War story. It is more fable than historical fiction. It is odd, disconcerting, and elegiac--the closest comparison I can think of in terms of its journey, scope, and reach for the fantastic is Thomas Pynchon's Mason & Dixon: A Novel. Morgan starts his quest in search of his brother after he has made a grave mistake in judgment that cost a man who had been entrusted to his care his life. His brother is likewise considered dead, most likely killed in the great conflagration at Gettysburg in 1863. But nine months later, Morgan will attempt to atone for his sin and confirm his faith that his brother is alive. I use these spiritual terms advisedly, because there is much that is spiritual in Morgan's journey. He sees things, even the gray things of life, through the flinty eyes of a native Vermonter in shades of only black and white. But this is no spiritualized mythology. This is a real journey through a fantastic time and place. At times author Mosher walks the line of fact and fable so finely that you have to re-read to be sure he's meant what he said. Did Morgan really meet a mad old general firing anything he can cram into the barrel of a cannon at the birds surrounding a deserted fort? Did he really inherit an elephant from a dying circus Gypsy, and then use the elephant to tow a canal boat on the Erie Canal and clear a log jam on a river? The answer is yes, and the wonder is amazing. We see a landscape, a nation, and a people,, even far north of Gettysburg, scarred and changed by war, willing and even forced to see and believe the unfathomable. Morgan see's and processes as well. And he survives, always taking the direct approach to his adventures and trials, yet coming away changed, as the journey south toward his brother and his destination teach him new ways to think and believe, without changing who he is. But don't let me scare you away thinking this is a deep mystical book that walks with its head in the clouds. It is firmly planted in joy, pain, and the dirt of real life. Indeed, one may say Morgan is the most optimistic person in the world he inhabits in spite of or perhaps because of his journey. Oh, and I haven't told you one thing you need to know about Morgan that makes his character the more true yet the more fabulously heroic--he is 17 years old when he starts on his journey, and only 18 when it ends, with a lifetime of wisdom you will only glimpse on the very last page, which you will read to the end. Best book I've read in a long time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kiersten

    There are scores of books that I read and promptly forget about. Some, if I see the cover or read the title, I can remember a bit about. Others escape me completely: I can read a full description of the book and still not remember anything else about it. Howard Frank Mosher's books do not fall into the category of forgettable books. They are so beautifully strange and interesting. He's also a wonderful, lyrical writer. Walking to Gatlinburg is set during the Civil War, although, with the excepti There are scores of books that I read and promptly forget about. Some, if I see the cover or read the title, I can remember a bit about. Others escape me completely: I can read a full description of the book and still not remember anything else about it. Howard Frank Mosher's books do not fall into the category of forgettable books. They are so beautifully strange and interesting. He's also a wonderful, lyrical writer. Walking to Gatlinburg is set during the Civil War, although, with the exception of one flashback scene, none of the action takes place on the battlefield. It's written in a magical realism style. Think of Cold Mountain meets One Hundred Years of Solitude. Or maybe Big Fish would be more accurate. It brings up interesting questions about war, death, good and evil, and the nature of man. However, although it has the feel of a fable or allegory at times, it doesn't come with an easy moral at the end. This book was very violent and quite graphic (both in terms of gore and sexuality) in places, so keep that in mind before you pick it up.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    This book was touted as "magical and wonderfully strange," but I'm afraid I only found it strange. I wanted so much to like it -- a thriller set in the Civil War with elements of the fantastic sounded right up my alley. After all, I loved The Terror, Dan Simmons' mixture of the fantastic and the historical. But the story in Walking to Gatlinburg simply could not engage my committed interest. Instead, I found the mixture of the realistic and the fantastic annoying and sometimes silly (really, an This book was touted as "magical and wonderfully strange," but I'm afraid I only found it strange. I wanted so much to like it -- a thriller set in the Civil War with elements of the fantastic sounded right up my alley. After all, I loved The Terror, Dan Simmons' mixture of the fantastic and the historical. But the story in Walking to Gatlinburg simply could not engage my committed interest. Instead, I found the mixture of the realistic and the fantastic annoying and sometimes silly (really, an Amish woman who lives in a tree?) and the constant movement back and forth interrupted the rhythm of what could otherwise have been a strong historical thriller. All in all, just not my cup of tea.

  5. 5 out of 5

    sal

    Because I am interested in Civil War historical fiction, I checked out the GRs reviews and downloaded it on my Kindle. (After reading Wild, I thought another walking adventure novel would be novel...) At first, I was delighted with the author's use of 19th cy Yankee vernacular, story line and his beautiful descriptions of Northeast Kingdom Vermont, and the Quaker Underground RR. But, as 30% neared, the plot and sub plots became so confounded that I was eager to put it down, rather than finish it Because I am interested in Civil War historical fiction, I checked out the GRs reviews and downloaded it on my Kindle. (After reading Wild, I thought another walking adventure novel would be novel...) At first, I was delighted with the author's use of 19th cy Yankee vernacular, story line and his beautiful descriptions of Northeast Kingdom Vermont, and the Quaker Underground RR. But, as 30% neared, the plot and sub plots became so confounded that I was eager to put it down, rather than finish it! Morgan, the central character's journey becomes horrific with twists and unimaginable turns that one wonders what hallucinogens the author was taking! Definitely a disappointment.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cissy

    Though beautifully, creatively written, and though I couldn't put it down, this novel irritated me. It was labeled Civil War-era historical fiction, so I was eager to try it; but it was really more like a dark, almost mystical thriller. During the Civil War. The entire story meandered through such sordid, seedy settings and characters as to leave me feeling like the whole world is purely evil. And though I certainly liked the main character, his journey was so horrific and tragic that it almost Though beautifully, creatively written, and though I couldn't put it down, this novel irritated me. It was labeled Civil War-era historical fiction, so I was eager to try it; but it was really more like a dark, almost mystical thriller. During the Civil War. The entire story meandered through such sordid, seedy settings and characters as to leave me feeling like the whole world is purely evil. And though I certainly liked the main character, his journey was so horrific and tragic that it almost became ridiculous. Ugh. Maybe I disliked the novel because it betrayed my expectations.

  7. 4 out of 5

    tomlinton

    It's rare recently that I have a book in hand that I want to slow down and savor This a Civil War era thriller but it's not about the war per se When you read keep the unabridged dictionary handy It will increase your enjoyment Better yet read it on a Kindle The dictionary is built in It's rare recently that I have a book in hand that I want to slow down and savor This a Civil War era thriller but it's not about the war per se When you read keep the unabridged dictionary handy It will increase your enjoyment Better yet read it on a Kindle The dictionary is built in

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jo Ann

    Beacause we were headed to Gatlinburg for a family reunion a few weeks ago, I chose to read this book last month, before the reunion...the premise was interesting and fun, and I tend to love books about the Civil War. Morgan, a 17 year old Quaker, tracks his brother Pilgrim, through NY, PA, Gettysburg, MD, West VA, KY, TN, and has a plethora of adventures along the way...I enjoyed it, but not as much as I anticipated I would.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    A well-written novel of the hero-takes-a-journey theme. I appreciated the many references to Homer’s Odyssey. Would be a good book to share with a group, because there is much symbolism to consider——as well as actual symbols, the runes. There were dragons to be slain —-represented by the five evil-doers. Civil War mythology (States rights)was entertained and dispelled. Robert E Lee even made an appearance. The Underground Railroad was present throughout the book—-in a unique way, and was central t A well-written novel of the hero-takes-a-journey theme. I appreciated the many references to Homer’s Odyssey. Would be a good book to share with a group, because there is much symbolism to consider——as well as actual symbols, the runes. There were dragons to be slain —-represented by the five evil-doers. Civil War mythology (States rights)was entertained and dispelled. Robert E Lee even made an appearance. The Underground Railroad was present throughout the book—-in a unique way, and was central to the plot. This was truly a remarkable book, an American epic, with much to be found below the surface.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Hicks

    I really liked the premise of this book...Morgan Kinneson, a young conductor on the Underground Railroad goes off on a quest during the Civil War to find his missing brother. There were three things that Mosher excelled at in this work: 1. Building characters -- A lot of times, novelists can get caught up in the characterization of their own protagonist, foregoing a better understanding of the supporting roles. Mosher, however, built a great cast of secondary characters, all connected to each oth I really liked the premise of this book...Morgan Kinneson, a young conductor on the Underground Railroad goes off on a quest during the Civil War to find his missing brother. There were three things that Mosher excelled at in this work: 1. Building characters -- A lot of times, novelists can get caught up in the characterization of their own protagonist, foregoing a better understanding of the supporting roles. Mosher, however, built a great cast of secondary characters, all connected to each other in some way. From the opinionated, yet bewitchingly beautiful runaway slave Slidell, to the cavalcade of deviant killers on Morgan's trail, every character is great in its own manner. My personal favorite: Cobbler Tom. 2. Use of regional dialect -- Morgan interacts with the local townsfolk throughout his journey, from the Canadian border to the Cajun Bayou. Mosher masters all the little regionalisms of each dialect to perfection. 3. Creating settings -- Mosher has a way of chronicling the varying landscapes Morgan encounters during his adventure that many have already compared to Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain. That's a very fitting--and flattering--comparison, but one that is well-deserved. The main criticism I have of this book, however, is the way Mosher glossed over major action sequences. One minute, Morgan is trekking through dense woodlands, the next he's in an all-out fight for his life with a murderous maniac, and then he's back on his way in the blink of an eye. It felt like the final showdown barely lasted a full page. With all the richness of Mosher's characters, it would have been better to delve deeper into the skirmishes among them along the way. Overall, 3 1/2 to 4 stars is an appropriate rating for this story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Batson

    I was a little disappointed with the ending. I would have liked more closer on some of the characters.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    really wanted to like this as historical fiction is one of my favorite genres but just didn't. the dialogue was really tedious and difficult to follow really wanted to like this as historical fiction is one of my favorite genres but just didn't. the dialogue was really tedious and difficult to follow

  13. 4 out of 5

    John

    Why do Americans write so much about criss-crossing their country in search of something? The landscapes traversed here are dream-like, surreal and sometimes nightmarish.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amy Kenney

    Fantasy usually isn't my gig. Walking to Gatlinburg is not a fantasy book but it does offer scenes of the fanatical type which make this book engaging and endearing. A young teenage boy is on a walking journey to find his brother, who was believed to have died in Gettysburg. In his heart, the young man knows his brother lives. Following a path from Vermont to the Carolinas during the Civil War encourages wild characters and outlandish scenes. The trials of a boy to become a man are at almost eve Fantasy usually isn't my gig. Walking to Gatlinburg is not a fantasy book but it does offer scenes of the fanatical type which make this book engaging and endearing. A young teenage boy is on a walking journey to find his brother, who was believed to have died in Gettysburg. In his heart, the young man knows his brother lives. Following a path from Vermont to the Carolinas during the Civil War encourages wild characters and outlandish scenes. The trials of a boy to become a man are at almost every juncture and every chapter reveals more of what a young man's character is built upon and reinforced by the ready decisions that need to be made in order to proceed and survive. It is not all chaos though, along the way there are beautiful scenes of love and the willingness of (most) mankind to act through honor, sacrifice and goodwill. The ending of this book is formulated and the reader can feel the peace and then the crescendo without being able to guess exactly how or who will be involved in the culmination of the story. And please, do not read the last page first. It is the sweetest ending you could have imagined.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Perkowski

    This was one of the weirdest historical fiction Civil War novels I've ever read, yet I found it to be engaging and a wonderful adventure story. The strange and mythical adventure that Morgan undertakes trying to find his brother conjures up folkloreish characters and tales that remind you of the Odyssey or a long yarn by Mark Twain. Fast paced with chapters that revolve around unique characters, then wrap up and move on to the next character, the book keeps you hooked until the very end. If you This was one of the weirdest historical fiction Civil War novels I've ever read, yet I found it to be engaging and a wonderful adventure story. The strange and mythical adventure that Morgan undertakes trying to find his brother conjures up folkloreish characters and tales that remind you of the Odyssey or a long yarn by Mark Twain. Fast paced with chapters that revolve around unique characters, then wrap up and move on to the next character, the book keeps you hooked until the very end. If you like Civil War fiction, this is one to add to the list - it'll definitely be one of the most unique Civil War stories you'll read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Mulcahy

    What a fantastic odyssey of heroic and monstrous proportions as a seventeen-year-old abolitionist leaves his Northern Kingdom home in pursuit of murdering, marauding escaped convicts across the northern and southern mountains while searching for his missing brother, a Union doctor. Episodes of adventure, survival, friendship, hunting and being hunted surround this coming-of-age story during the Civil War. Excellent writing that keeps the story taut, visceral and exciting. Four Stars

  17. 4 out of 5

    Donald Crane

    This book was certainly not predictable, but also was a bit disjointed and two-dimensional. With the author now dead, there will never be a Mosher book that quite measures up to A Stranger in the Kingdom, which was about as good as a novel can be. And unfortunately, all but the first few chapters takes place outside the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont, which is where Mosher’s characters adeptly reflect the real characters that live here.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kyra

    An old-fashioned picaresque novel but grimmer than expected, centred as it is around the violent aftermath of the most violent war to rend this country. There were spots in this book where I was outright terrified. All in all, an unexpected firecracker of a read. See if you can spot the one editing blooper (hint: its in the caves).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elisa

    The author uses a lot of big words that felt like he was trying harder to impress than to tell a good story. The introduction of the elephant in Civil War America was when I decided to throw in the towel.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Phyllis

    Good, believable historical story. The people Morgan meets along the journey to find his brother are very interesting. As with Chris, the ending hits you in the face but is acceptable.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Milo Geyelin

    Disappointing after The River Flows North. Young adult fiction. Good as far as that goes but not for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I enjoyed this immensely. Great pacing, plotting, and use of language. Mosher's characters are richly created and absolutely come to life. It is a fantastic read. I enjoyed this immensely. Great pacing, plotting, and use of language. Mosher's characters are richly created and absolutely come to life. It is a fantastic read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    A strange construction of a book to me. Staccato action scenes that are as far fetched as one could imagine; sometimes just weird.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Grant Ashley

    Fanciful good read This is a well written interesting tale, evoking the big questions of why the Civil War. I’d call it a page turner.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deann Doolittle

    Little slow to begin with but eventually picked up pace. Good read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Have up This book Walking to Gatlinburg by Howard Frank Mosher made no sense to me at all so I have up trying to read it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Diana Poulin

    I was a bit disappointed with the story, I was expecting it to be more historical.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    This author is just a beautiful writer.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Don Kathke

    Suspense, adventure, travel This book has it all, suspense, travel, love, history, nature. A good family drama. The book got me through a few more days of COVID-19.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    This story was a little crazy, to the point where I almost checked off the "fantasy" bookshelf. But I finished it. It was enjoyable. This story was a little crazy, to the point where I almost checked off the "fantasy" bookshelf. But I finished it. It was enjoyable.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.