web site hit counter Lighting Their Fires: Raising Extraordinary Children in a Mixed-up, Muddled-up, Shook-up World - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Lighting Their Fires: Raising Extraordinary Children in a Mixed-up, Muddled-up, Shook-up World

Availability: Ready to download

One of America's most celebrated educators teaches parents how to create extraordinary children-in the classroom and beyond In his bestselling book, Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire, readers were introduced to Rafe Esquith and his extraordinary students in Hobart Elementary School's Room 56. Using his amazing and inspiring classroom techniques, Esquith has helped thousands of One of America's most celebrated educators teaches parents how to create extraordinary children-in the classroom and beyond In his bestselling book, Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire, readers were introduced to Rafe Esquith and his extraordinary students in Hobart Elementary School's Room 56. Using his amazing and inspiring classroom techniques, Esquith has helped thousands of children learn to maximize their potential. In Lighting Their Fires, Esquith shows that children aren't born extraordinary; they become that way as a result of parents and teachers who instill values that serve them not just in school, but for the rest of their lives. Framed by a class trip to a major league baseball game, Lighting Their Fires moves inning by inning through concepts that help children build character and develop enriching lives. Whether he is highlighting the importance of time management or offering a step-by-step discussion of how children can become good decision makers, Esquith shows how parents can equip their kids with all the tools they need to find success and have fun in the process. Using examples from classic films and great books, he stresses the value of sacrifice, the importance of staying true to oneself, and the danger that television can pose to growing young minds. Lighting Their Fires is that rarest of education books: one that explains not just how to make our children great students, but how to make them thoughtful and honorable people.


Compare

One of America's most celebrated educators teaches parents how to create extraordinary children-in the classroom and beyond In his bestselling book, Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire, readers were introduced to Rafe Esquith and his extraordinary students in Hobart Elementary School's Room 56. Using his amazing and inspiring classroom techniques, Esquith has helped thousands of One of America's most celebrated educators teaches parents how to create extraordinary children-in the classroom and beyond In his bestselling book, Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire, readers were introduced to Rafe Esquith and his extraordinary students in Hobart Elementary School's Room 56. Using his amazing and inspiring classroom techniques, Esquith has helped thousands of children learn to maximize their potential. In Lighting Their Fires, Esquith shows that children aren't born extraordinary; they become that way as a result of parents and teachers who instill values that serve them not just in school, but for the rest of their lives. Framed by a class trip to a major league baseball game, Lighting Their Fires moves inning by inning through concepts that help children build character and develop enriching lives. Whether he is highlighting the importance of time management or offering a step-by-step discussion of how children can become good decision makers, Esquith shows how parents can equip their kids with all the tools they need to find success and have fun in the process. Using examples from classic films and great books, he stresses the value of sacrifice, the importance of staying true to oneself, and the danger that television can pose to growing young minds. Lighting Their Fires is that rarest of education books: one that explains not just how to make our children great students, but how to make them thoughtful and honorable people.

30 review for Lighting Their Fires: Raising Extraordinary Children in a Mixed-up, Muddled-up, Shook-up World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    All Esquith's books are basically the same, because he's describing the same things in different ways. But the thing he's describing is so good, it's worth hearing again and again: he teaches kids the value of persistence, diligence, integrity, self-control, and the arts. He tells story about his kids and how capable, mature, and successful they are as a result of these lessons. The lessons for parents and kids: * punctuality, * use time valuably, * care about and learn from the past, * repeat an All Esquith's books are basically the same, because he's describing the same things in different ways. But the thing he's describing is so good, it's worth hearing again and again: he teaches kids the value of persistence, diligence, integrity, self-control, and the arts. He tells story about his kids and how capable, mature, and successful they are as a result of these lessons. The lessons for parents and kids: * punctuality, * use time valuably, * care about and learn from the past, * repeat and repeat the values, * embrace an art and learn time management, focus, etc. * put away distractions, * develop a personal code of behaviour (he uses Kohlberg's six levels of motivation) * radio, models, board games, getting good at music and other arts, reading all build focus. TV and games do not. * the importance of decisions and that they be good ones, * to recognise that they are making decisions every day, * spotting and discussing decisions in novels, plays, and movies, * if something's worth doing, it's worth doing well, * actions have consequences, there are good outcomes and bad, strive for excellence, lose the sense of entitlement, * consider your alternatives, * in the arts, try for excellence not adequacy, * allowances not tied to chores—chores are responsibility, and the reward is the job well done, * identify substandard work and require it to be done to standard, otherwise there are no standards, * be self-less, * work with groups not individuals, so all can recognise and appreciate and celebrate the hard work of others, * do the right thing for the right reasons, * be able to do the right thing without acknowledgement or praise (humility), * to be able to delay gratification. Along the way, lots of great quotes. Over the library of Thebes: "Medicine for the Soul". Mark Twain's alleged line, "The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who can't read them." Martin Luther King, Jr: "If it falls to your lot to sweep the streets, Sweep them like Michelangelo painted pictures, Like Shakespeare wrote poetry, Like Beethoven composed music."

  2. 5 out of 5

    April

    Lighting Their Fires: Raising Children in a Mixed-Up, Muddled Up, Shook Up World by Rafe Esquith is basically as the title promises a guide to upbringing children to be all they can be. I don't have children, but I interact with children on a daily basis, as a student teacher. (I haven't dropped out of the program yet, thank goodness!) Rafe uses baseball to structure his book instead of chapters, there are innings. Anecdotes are used to further illustrate his point. Also each chapter includes a Lighting Their Fires: Raising Children in a Mixed-Up, Muddled Up, Shook Up World by Rafe Esquith is basically as the title promises a guide to upbringing children to be all they can be. I don't have children, but I interact with children on a daily basis, as a student teacher. (I haven't dropped out of the program yet, thank goodness!) Rafe uses baseball to structure his book instead of chapters, there are innings. Anecdotes are used to further illustrate his point. Also each chapter includes a section about what to put in a child's backpack. The backpack thing is a metaphor, i.e. place a sense of time in your child's backpack. Read the rest of my review here

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sadie

    There are some dedicated, inspiring teachers out there. The kind that could have a movie made about their life. Rafe Esquith, a 5th grade elementary teacher in Los Angeles, is one of those teachers. He uses the story of taking his students to a Dodger game to illustrate important lessons kids need to learn to help them succeed in life-not just on end of the year tests. All and all an inspiring read. He expounds on the quote "Sweep like Shakepeare writes poetry, Sweep like Michaelangelo paints an There are some dedicated, inspiring teachers out there. The kind that could have a movie made about their life. Rafe Esquith, a 5th grade elementary teacher in Los Angeles, is one of those teachers. He uses the story of taking his students to a Dodger game to illustrate important lessons kids need to learn to help them succeed in life-not just on end of the year tests. All and all an inspiring read. He expounds on the quote "Sweep like Shakepeare writes poetry, Sweep like Michaelangelo paints and like Beethoven composes music." He gives suggestions for books and movies to read, watch, and discuss with kids to drive home each life lesson. Although I'll pass on many of his suggestions, I had scenes from other movies and books pop in my head that illustrates the same point. And now on to the library website to place a hold for his other book "Teach Like Your Hair's on Fire."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    The central theme of the book is that students aren't born extraordinary - they become that way. It takes more than natural smarts and skills to be successful - it takes work on the parts of parents and teachers to ignite in children the drive and determination needed to become more than mediocre. I liked how the anecdotes, advice and examples were woven around the story of a night at a ballgame with a small group of students. The students learned so many things during their experience and the au The central theme of the book is that students aren't born extraordinary - they become that way. It takes more than natural smarts and skills to be successful - it takes work on the parts of parents and teachers to ignite in children the drive and determination needed to become more than mediocre. I liked how the anecdotes, advice and examples were woven around the story of a night at a ballgame with a small group of students. The students learned so many things during their experience and the author uses it to teach us as well. I was sold by the First Inning since it was focused on the value of time. Esquith had taught his students the importance of being on time especially in that it reflects an appreciation of others. I can remember as early as high school having a great respect for being on time. I felt (and still feel) that those that are chronically late don't care about those they are meeting or don't care about the event they are attending. It's especially sad to see families continually late for school or Mass - what are we teaching our children when we don't value education and worshiping God? I plan to go back through the book to write down book and movie suggestions for teaching life lessons. Whether a new or seasoned parent or teacher, this book can provide all with ideas for instilling greatness in the next generation.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kimberlee

    This inspirational book balances stories with theory and ties it all together during a baseball game. The book grabs the reader from page one, and deposits the reader in a better place at the last words. I have been reading parenting books recently, and they unfortunately give me pause to ponder the places that I have fallen short. (My husband has actually suggested that I stop reading parenting books as I end up feeling guilty and ruminating about it.) This book will be among a very few books t This inspirational book balances stories with theory and ties it all together during a baseball game. The book grabs the reader from page one, and deposits the reader in a better place at the last words. I have been reading parenting books recently, and they unfortunately give me pause to ponder the places that I have fallen short. (My husband has actually suggested that I stop reading parenting books as I end up feeling guilty and ruminating about it.) This book will be among a very few books that I will push upon my adult children when they become parents. Within the first chapters, I reached out to my brother, who is a teacher and a huge baseball fan, to read it, and he has since ordered it. I wish I had made a list of all the movies and books that Esquith highlights. I appreciated the fine line he walked between teaching life lessons to his students and judging others. I loved the idea of sweeping the floor like Shakespeare from this Martin Luther King quote that Esquith refers to a few times: "If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as a Michaelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music, or Shakespeare wrote poetry. He should sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will pause to say, 'Here lived a great street sweeper who did his job well."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caedi

    I forgot how much I enjoy books for educators.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Rafe Esquith sets out to prove to us that he is the best teacher ever, and this book is basically about all the wonderful things he does for students over and above a regular school day in the classroom. Maybe he'd needs to re-read his sections on humility. Basically his advice boils down to teaching children how to behave, turning off the television, and making sure they have music lessons. He uses the innings of a baseball game--that, of course, he took students to on his own time--as the frame Rafe Esquith sets out to prove to us that he is the best teacher ever, and this book is basically about all the wonderful things he does for students over and above a regular school day in the classroom. Maybe he'd needs to re-read his sections on humility. Basically his advice boils down to teaching children how to behave, turning off the television, and making sure they have music lessons. He uses the innings of a baseball game--that, of course, he took students to on his own time--as the framework for this book, but a baseball game cannot pull together all of the disconnected pieces. He seems to be aware of this problem, and in the acknowledgements he says, "I am privileged to write books because my extraordinary publisher... recognizes substance over style." But it's still a book, we're still readers, and style matters. A book that repeatedly leaps from one paragraph or short section to the next unrelated paragraph or short section is not a good book, regardless of the quality of the substance!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Debby

    The reviews I read before starting this book tended to note how judgmental the author seems to be, but if that's so, well, then so am I. Perhaps I simply share his values. I, too, bemoan the lack of courtesy, difficulty in delaying gratification, and non-stop attachment to screens (whether it be TV, video games, or whatever) that I see in today's youth and, unfortunately these days, more widely in society. The cautionary tales he told did not surprise me in the least. I've read his other books ab The reviews I read before starting this book tended to note how judgmental the author seems to be, but if that's so, well, then so am I. Perhaps I simply share his values. I, too, bemoan the lack of courtesy, difficulty in delaying gratification, and non-stop attachment to screens (whether it be TV, video games, or whatever) that I see in today's youth and, unfortunately these days, more widely in society. The cautionary tales he told did not surprise me in the least. I've read his other books about teaching, and while this one is purportedly for parents, there's much that can be put to use in the classroom as well (even though he really covers no new ground from his previous works). I'd have liked some ideas about what to do with/for older "kids"--I'm teaching high school now--who haven't been exposed to the enriched, character-based, challenging, involved family/educational environment that he poses as ideal. Other than that, though, it was a quick, satisfying read that confirmed a lot of what I already believe.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Ugh. This book didn't do it for me. There were two things I liked about it: Firstly, he described a hierarchy of what motivates people to do things and I liked his part about how we want to get our kids to do things for intrinsic reasons and not just to avoid punishment or for a reward. And the second thing I (kind of) liked was that he gave a few specific book, movie, game recommendations on how to use those to teach life lessons to your kids. But his voice and tone did not work for me - he's a Ugh. This book didn't do it for me. There were two things I liked about it: Firstly, he described a hierarchy of what motivates people to do things and I liked his part about how we want to get our kids to do things for intrinsic reasons and not just to avoid punishment or for a reward. And the second thing I (kind of) liked was that he gave a few specific book, movie, game recommendations on how to use those to teach life lessons to your kids. But his voice and tone did not work for me - he's an elementary teacher and I felt like he was writing for a 5th grader. Maybe it would be an okay book for someone with little to no exposure to how to teach life lessons to kids but I think my friends can safely skip this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    di

    Esquith's final book, written more as advice for parents than his former memoirs. I found this book to be quite repetitive of the others...no real new ideas, just another spin on the others. I did get a sense of superiority from Esquith in this book that I forgave him for in the other books--at times he portrays as the world going to pot around him. As if the only person in society left with any decency is him (& his students, because of him.) Oddly enough, he includes quite a long section of de Esquith's final book, written more as advice for parents than his former memoirs. I found this book to be quite repetitive of the others...no real new ideas, just another spin on the others. I did get a sense of superiority from Esquith in this book that I forgave him for in the other books--at times he portrays as the world going to pot around him. As if the only person in society left with any decency is him (& his students, because of him.) Oddly enough, he includes quite a long section of developing modesty in this book...so it's a little ironic. It's okay though. I hugely admire Esquith, & he has influenced me a lot. I imagine it would be very difficult to be modest in his situation.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Felt compelled to read this as an educator and I haven't read his earlier work. Although I'm impressed by what he has accomplished and how far his students have come, it saddens me that we need a book like this to teach us how to parent our children, how to encourage our youth and how to "light their fires." His tips and advice are not rocket science - it's mostly common sense values. What does it say about our society that we need to have a how-to book that talks about the importance of teachin Felt compelled to read this as an educator and I haven't read his earlier work. Although I'm impressed by what he has accomplished and how far his students have come, it saddens me that we need a book like this to teach us how to parent our children, how to encourage our youth and how to "light their fires." His tips and advice are not rocket science - it's mostly common sense values. What does it say about our society that we need to have a how-to book that talks about the importance of teaching our children to be on time?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amber R Brown

    I picked up this book looking for some help making my own kids extraordinary. I am not a teacher. I am in healthcare and I have wanted to be a doctor since I was in 8th grade!! After a particularly hard week of parenting and working, I came to the realization that my oldest child (10 y/o boy) is very intelligent, athletic, and funny but he has no real passion about anything. I set about finding a book to help me “light his fire”. I started with a book with those words in the title!! We are slowl I picked up this book looking for some help making my own kids extraordinary. I am not a teacher. I am in healthcare and I have wanted to be a doctor since I was in 8th grade!! After a particularly hard week of parenting and working, I came to the realization that my oldest child (10 y/o boy) is very intelligent, athletic, and funny but he has no real passion about anything. I set about finding a book to help me “light his fire”. I started with a book with those words in the title!! We are slowly but surely employing some of these strategies and we are seeing some positive changes!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    This was a easy book in which Mr Esquith shares some positive ideas for bringing out the best in kids. Really, the lessons to apply to everyone. Things like being on time, reading, respecting others, being present in whatever you are currently doing, limiting screen time, arts and music. I don't think there were any great ah-ha moments, but since reading, the chess board has been out on our table. His book reminds me of a quote, "In family relationships love is really spelled t-i-m-e, time.” —Diet This was a easy book in which Mr Esquith shares some positive ideas for bringing out the best in kids. Really, the lessons to apply to everyone. Things like being on time, reading, respecting others, being present in whatever you are currently doing, limiting screen time, arts and music. I don't think there were any great ah-ha moments, but since reading, the chess board has been out on our table. His book reminds me of a quote, "In family relationships love is really spelled t-i-m-e, time.” —Dieter F. Uchtdorf

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I love how the book is organized and the example shared. I would love to be a teacher like this man! Some really great principles are taught that apply to parenting as well as teaching. I imagine he could teach an excellent course on this book!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Epp

    I loved certain quotes from this book and made a little TBR out of books mentioned throughout but felt it was mostly common sense. Yes we know kids should slow down and pay attention, etc.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Having read all of his books, I felt that this one was a little preachy at times, but still great! I recommend reading his other books too!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Sessions

    Race does it again. His stuff is inspiring as always.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Funk

    Interesting and inspiring read. I liked how the entire framework of the book was set in the various of one baseball game. However, the advice to parents seemed simplistic and unrealistic.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    Meh.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adriane Devries

    Tragedy is not merely a sad ending; it is a sad ending that should have been wonderful. So says Rafe Esquith of all students who are not given access to a true education, and he’s not talking merely math and grammar. In his little experimental classroom in an urban school in California, he has been shaping the lives of young people for decades. The world has stood up to notice. How, with the usual limited resources of an impoverished district, is he able to take ordinary, underperforming students Tragedy is not merely a sad ending; it is a sad ending that should have been wonderful. So says Rafe Esquith of all students who are not given access to a true education, and he’s not talking merely math and grammar. In his little experimental classroom in an urban school in California, he has been shaping the lives of young people for decades. The world has stood up to notice. How, with the usual limited resources of an impoverished district, is he able to take ordinary, underperforming students and transform them not only into scholars, but into exemplary human beings in only one year? In Lighting Their Fires, he reveals how to encourage kids to use their time wisely (who wouldn’t want to get the most possible fun out of a precious weekend?); turn off their TVs; write their own personal code of conduct that sets them apart from the crowd (and how to manage that curious lonely feeling that often results); treat consequences as rare learning opportunities; learn and read for pleasure, not to merely “rent knowledge” for a test; and take pride in everything they do as servants to the greater good of humanity. Like other leaders in the teaching field, he challenges the No Child Left Behind standards and grading practices, citing the lack of consequences for poor performance or disrespectful behavior as the unintended creator of an entitlement mentality that will ultimately fail students in all they endeavor in life, from relationships to career. He insists we are not doing kids a favor, for their self-esteem or otherwise, by passing them when they are only getting 10 percent correct on tests. He also confronts schools’ contracts with publishers who censor out rival companies’ books from the classrooms, putting teachers in the difficult position of secretly reading great world literature to their students like smugglers. If the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over expecting different results, then we need to make a major change in how we do this school thing. Districts, students, parents, and teachers must face who truly benefits from our current system and be willing to unplug the flow of money for the sake of our kids’ futures. This process will require energy, courage, and a willingness to be unpopular. He urges us to raise children, and I dare say, ourselves, to be fine people in order to change the world. As an anonymous philosopher once said, “If you chase two rabbits, both will escape.”

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Lighting Their Fires is, as Esquith says in his acknowledgments, about substance over style. I have little doubt that Rafe Esquith is a fantastic teacher. Reading this book gave me great ideas for some things to tackle with my fifth grader next year (specifically, some Shakespeare) and affirmed many of my parenting tenets. The reason it earns only three stars is that I didn't feel like I really learned as much from this book as I would have liked. I think that is true, in large part, because this Lighting Their Fires is, as Esquith says in his acknowledgments, about substance over style. I have little doubt that Rafe Esquith is a fantastic teacher. Reading this book gave me great ideas for some things to tackle with my fifth grader next year (specifically, some Shakespeare) and affirmed many of my parenting tenets. The reason it earns only three stars is that I didn't feel like I really learned as much from this book as I would have liked. I think that is true, in large part, because this book is not targeted to me. I wanted this book to help me light my child's spark for a love of learning. And while there are things in this book that I will use with my children (especially Kohlberg's six levels of moral development), I wanted a bit more. Who should read this book? Two categories leap to mind: classroom teachers, especially those in disadvantaged schools and those who work with non-profits who serve youth. As I read it, I thought of a friend who runs a ballet ministry for at-risk kids. There are many ideas in here that will reinforce what she's already doing and that might be useful for her dance teachers as they deal with students and parents who approach life in a different way. So if you're looking for a book that will energize your approach to your after school program or your work with sixth graders, give this book a try.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Saxon

    I've heard Rafe Esquith speak and he's definitely an inspirational speaker. His book is pretty well written with relatively engaging stories carefully structured around a baseball game. Overall I think he makes some useful points that are great to remember when parenting, even if I think there's too much harping on about the dangers of TV while holding up "classic" Hollywood cinema as a good teaching tool. Here's some of the main points I found useful to remember: - give your kids a backpack filled I've heard Rafe Esquith speak and he's definitely an inspirational speaker. His book is pretty well written with relatively engaging stories carefully structured around a baseball game. Overall I think he makes some useful points that are great to remember when parenting, even if I think there's too much harping on about the dangers of TV while holding up "classic" Hollywood cinema as a good teaching tool. Here's some of the main points I found useful to remember: - give your kids a backpack filled with tools and skills - the importance of teaching kids about time, timeliness, and time management - to help with focus, engage kids with Lawrence Kohlberg's 6 levels of moral development which are level 1 - I do not want to get in trouble, level 2 - I want a reward, level 3 - I want to please someone, level 4 - I always follow the rules, level 5 - I am considerate of other people, level 6 - I have a personal code of behavior. - help kids understand decisions and how they are made - work hard at every project and task - have philanthropy integrated into the family life - the importance of humility, focusing on the project, not attention - picking schools that don't just focus on tests. - it's the process not the end result. Helpful to have kids engaged in longterm projects, such as gardening.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anita

    Christmas day was a good day to finish this consistently clear and useful book. Rafe Esquith is obviously writing from his own personal beliefs (level 6) and couldn't have helped us see his mission already in progress any better. Though, better still, he invited us to do the same. There were times when I was reading though these easily digested pieces of advice that I thought, "Wow. Maybe he's just Type A and likes kids who are Type A." That could be the case now and then, but since his heart is Christmas day was a good day to finish this consistently clear and useful book. Rafe Esquith is obviously writing from his own personal beliefs (level 6) and couldn't have helped us see his mission already in progress any better. Though, better still, he invited us to do the same. There were times when I was reading though these easily digested pieces of advice that I thought, "Wow. Maybe he's just Type A and likes kids who are Type A." That could be the case now and then, but since his heart is in the right place, that's okay. The only thing about those Type A-ers that could possibly decrease world happiness is by losing sight of the important things in life; that Rafe does not do. There are some bits that have the familiar unpleasant taste of rehashed sermons from a preacher. He even uses the classic Starfish sketch. But, unlike the salty preachers who tell us it happened to his nephew, Rafe tells it like a little (short!) example of what he truly thinks. Not bad :) Main lessons: 1) good people learn to turn off their own tvs 2) good people do whatever they do to the level that Shakespeare wrote 3) good people make good decisions based on personal codes of belief, not motivated by rewards etc.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    I'm a softie when it comes to inspirational stories for teachers as I am studying to be one. I was given this book by a random stranger on a plane, so how could I give it any less than five stars!? That aside, it is a wonderful book, full of ideas that are easily within the reach of the average person. This is not a go out and buy this product that will make it all better kind of solution, but rather a philosophy of education that makes sense. The arts are usually one of the first programs to go I'm a softie when it comes to inspirational stories for teachers as I am studying to be one. I was given this book by a random stranger on a plane, so how could I give it any less than five stars!? That aside, it is a wonderful book, full of ideas that are easily within the reach of the average person. This is not a go out and buy this product that will make it all better kind of solution, but rather a philosophy of education that makes sense. The arts are usually one of the first programs to go in these days of tight budgets and hard decisions, but Rafe and other research is showing that adding the arts back into the curriculum is one of the best and least cost-effective ways to boost those test scores that we have become increasingly fixated on. Plus, its fun to have more creative lessons, for the teachers AND the students. Rafe's style is easy and witty and full of real examples from his students and everyone would be a little better off if they picked this up and read through it at least once. =)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

    My mom gave me this book after she received a copy from her principal. She thought it might be interesting for a teacher....who is also a parent! The book was divided up into different "innings" which I thought was clever and then he interwove examples with his students attending a Dodgers game. Overall, I thought the chapters were really well-done. It didn't take me long to begin with my own children to see if they are living out the different skills that are discussed in each chapter. For exam My mom gave me this book after she received a copy from her principal. She thought it might be interesting for a teacher....who is also a parent! The book was divided up into different "innings" which I thought was clever and then he interwove examples with his students attending a Dodgers game. Overall, I thought the chapters were really well-done. It didn't take me long to begin with my own children to see if they are living out the different skills that are discussed in each chapter. For example, I especially liked how he stressed focus & concentration and he gave practical ideas for all grade levels that teachers & parents can incorporate. The only issue I had were when he described his own career. I appreciate all his time & dedication to his students but he mentioned how he takes them to all of these different games and stays after school, rehearses...you name it he was doing it. I just felt like it was unrealistic. Solid, quick read and I appreciated his writing style and pragmatic tone.!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    Written by an award winning teacher. The book is written for parents. He talked about such things as teaching kids: time management, following through with things, importance of learning a musical instrument, the evils of watching too much tv, not being selfish, being humble etc. Many good things to think about. But with all of his "ideas" for parents I did often wonder if he has children of his own not just his students. That's all I'll say about that. Lol. He gave many ideas of movies and book Written by an award winning teacher. The book is written for parents. He talked about such things as teaching kids: time management, following through with things, importance of learning a musical instrument, the evils of watching too much tv, not being selfish, being humble etc. Many good things to think about. But with all of his "ideas" for parents I did often wonder if he has children of his own not just his students. That's all I'll say about that. Lol. He gave many ideas of movies and books that can be used as teaching tools for kids. Although I didn't agree with the age appropriateness of some of them (Example: Saving Private Ryan for 5th graders), there are many that I will watch with my kids. There aren't any new concepts in this book, but sometimes it is nice to have reminders of all the things we need to be doing and teaching our kids. Even if it is overwhelming. Wish there was more techniques and a wee bit less bragging on students.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Wendi Lau

    Good, applicable tips for helping your child become all that s/he can be. One good tip Rafe includes is to teach child a musical instrument and also to learn yourself. Learning to play an instrument teaches self-discipline, listening (to yourself play as well as the other musicians around you), time management, and a few other things. The listening part really perked me up because I suck at that and so does my big kid, and surprise, we don't play musical instruments. But we can listen the heck o Good, applicable tips for helping your child become all that s/he can be. One good tip Rafe includes is to teach child a musical instrument and also to learn yourself. Learning to play an instrument teaches self-discipline, listening (to yourself play as well as the other musicians around you), time management, and a few other things. The listening part really perked me up because I suck at that and so does my big kid, and surprise, we don't play musical instruments. But we can listen the heck out of an audio book. Not the same thing. Most tips are applicable no matter your income and focus on things people do not think of when giving their kids things. If your child does not have these things he talks about, no matter how many toys and clothes, etc, your child has, s/he is "deprived" and not equipped to compete on the global playing field.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chris Aylott

    Superteacher Rafe Esquith uses a baseball game as the framework for a meditation on ways to inspire and teach kids. I like his methods and subscribe to his metaphorical newsletter -- he preaches a potent combination of enthusiasm and high expectations for both scholarship and behavior. I'm not so nuts about his dismissal of television and video games as worthwhile entertainment. I'd be the first to agree that Americans could benefit from less television and better video games... but I also see th Superteacher Rafe Esquith uses a baseball game as the framework for a meditation on ways to inspire and teach kids. I like his methods and subscribe to his metaphorical newsletter -- he preaches a potent combination of enthusiasm and high expectations for both scholarship and behavior. I'm not so nuts about his dismissal of television and video games as worthwhile entertainment. I'd be the first to agree that Americans could benefit from less television and better video games... but I also see these media as emerging art forms that can be every bit as engaging and challenging as the movies and Shakespeare that he loves. There's a little bit of a generation gap there, but even great teachers are allowed to have blind spots.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Those familiar with Rafe Esquith will recognize much of the content in this book. But his advice is so valuable it certainly does not hurt to be repeatedly. The clever thing about this book is the layout. Esquith, a devoted baseball fan, tells the story of bringing five of his students to a Dodgers game. Each chapter revolves around one of the nine innings and highlights relates lessons associated with each stage of the game. His primary focus is teaching children to be of strong moral character Those familiar with Rafe Esquith will recognize much of the content in this book. But his advice is so valuable it certainly does not hurt to be repeatedly. The clever thing about this book is the layout. Esquith, a devoted baseball fan, tells the story of bringing five of his students to a Dodgers game. Each chapter revolves around one of the nine innings and highlights relates lessons associated with each stage of the game. His primary focus is teaching children to be of strong moral character, something desperately needed in today's world. He cites many literary and cinematic books to be used in conjunction with such lessons. What could possibly be wrong with a man who looks up to one Atticus Finch?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stanley Wang

    Esquith's advice to parents (and teachers) is practical, sound, and things I agree with 100%, and his examples taken from the baseball game he takes his "young scholars" is nicely illustrative, as is his interwoven stories of his students throughout his teaching history. The only real negative for me was that it was a little TOO obvious, and maybe lacking some insight that would be expected from his decades of teaching excellence. Of course, this might just be because I come from a teaching back Esquith's advice to parents (and teachers) is practical, sound, and things I agree with 100%, and his examples taken from the baseball game he takes his "young scholars" is nicely illustrative, as is his interwoven stories of his students throughout his teaching history. The only real negative for me was that it was a little TOO obvious, and maybe lacking some insight that would be expected from his decades of teaching excellence. Of course, this might just be because I come from a teaching background myself, and came back to America from living in Japan for close to a decade, which allows me to examine the "boorishness" of some Americans from outside the fishbowl. Overall though, a very good affirmation of the values needed to instill young people with today.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.