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Paul, Apostle of God's Glory in Christ: A Pauline Theology

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While thoroughly informed by the issues of contemporary Pauline studies, he offers an account of Paul's theology that is relatively unburdened by scholarly trappings but deals directly with the matter. "The goal of writing a Pauline theology," he writes, "is to unearth Paul's worldview and to present it to contemporaries. Our task is not merely to reproduce Paul's thinking While thoroughly informed by the issues of contemporary Pauline studies, he offers an account of Paul's theology that is relatively unburdened by scholarly trappings but deals directly with the matter. "The goal of writing a Pauline theology," he writes, "is to unearth Paul's worldview and to present it to contemporaries. Our task is not merely to reproduce Paul's thinking on various topics but to rightly estimate what is most important in his thinking and to set forth the inner connections between the various themes." Like most writers of a Pauline theology, Schreiner discerns something at the heart and soul of Paul's theology. As Schreiner puts it, "The passion of Paul's life, the center and foundation and capstone of his vision, and the animating motive of his mission was the supremacy of God in and through the Lord Jesus Christ." Schreiner has stitched this theme into the fabric of his book, and the result is a Pauline theology that is not only informative, but spiritually uplifting, as well. Here is a Pauline theology eminently suited to the needs of theological students and preachers.


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While thoroughly informed by the issues of contemporary Pauline studies, he offers an account of Paul's theology that is relatively unburdened by scholarly trappings but deals directly with the matter. "The goal of writing a Pauline theology," he writes, "is to unearth Paul's worldview and to present it to contemporaries. Our task is not merely to reproduce Paul's thinking While thoroughly informed by the issues of contemporary Pauline studies, he offers an account of Paul's theology that is relatively unburdened by scholarly trappings but deals directly with the matter. "The goal of writing a Pauline theology," he writes, "is to unearth Paul's worldview and to present it to contemporaries. Our task is not merely to reproduce Paul's thinking on various topics but to rightly estimate what is most important in his thinking and to set forth the inner connections between the various themes." Like most writers of a Pauline theology, Schreiner discerns something at the heart and soul of Paul's theology. As Schreiner puts it, "The passion of Paul's life, the center and foundation and capstone of his vision, and the animating motive of his mission was the supremacy of God in and through the Lord Jesus Christ." Schreiner has stitched this theme into the fabric of his book, and the result is a Pauline theology that is not only informative, but spiritually uplifting, as well. Here is a Pauline theology eminently suited to the needs of theological students and preachers.

30 review for Paul, Apostle of God's Glory in Christ: A Pauline Theology

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Fritz

    I really enjoyed this book, gives a pretty in depth overview of Paul’s theology and how it focuses on God’s glory revealed in Christ. It was quite accessible and clear. The only thing I didn’t love was there were a few times where Schreiner gets into more technical arguments on different meanings of passages, I felt that they were distracting and if one was to want to get into that they should go to a commentary.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matt Pitts

    Dr. Schreiner is a level-headed, clear, and faithful scholar. He believes that all 13 of Paul's letters were actually written by Paul and that Paul's theology is coherent and consistent. Despite the length of the book, Schreiner is amazingly adept at covering a wide breadth of information in a short amount of space. An excellent example is his discussion of tongues. He covers whether all believers should speak in tongues, tongues as a sign of judgment on unbelievers, baptism in the Spirit, tongu Dr. Schreiner is a level-headed, clear, and faithful scholar. He believes that all 13 of Paul's letters were actually written by Paul and that Paul's theology is coherent and consistent. Despite the length of the book, Schreiner is amazingly adept at covering a wide breadth of information in a short amount of space. An excellent example is his discussion of tongues. He covers whether all believers should speak in tongues, tongues as a sign of judgment on unbelievers, baptism in the Spirit, tongues as an earthly or heavenly language, and the practice of tongues speaking today all in under 5 pages! The wonder of this book is not that it is almost 500 pages long, but that with all it covers it is not 900 pages long! He doesn't shrink back from 'hot button' issues like women in ministry, spiritual gifts, roles in marriage, and slavery in Paul's writings. In fact I wish I had read his thorough and level headed treatment of spiritual gifts about 10 or 12 years ago when they were a significant point of controversy. But these are not the main issues Schreiner addresses. Much more of his attention is focuses on God, Christ, sin, salvation, Paul's mission and suffering, justification, sanctification, the church, and the fulfillment of God's promises. If you want a comprehensive understanding of Paul's letters, Schreiner is an excellent teacher and guide.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Classic Schreiner: clear, cogent, and incredibly helpful. Looking forward to his whole Bible biblical theology coming out this year!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joel Wentz

    I am submitting this review with a bit of fear and trembling - Schreiner is clearly a brilliant Pauline scholar, and even manages to make academic ideas on Paul's theology accessible in his writing. That said, I found this to be a very narrow perspective, frustratingly-dismissive in key areas of theological dispute, and way, way, way too long and repetitive. First, the good, and there is indeed good to be had here! Schreiner works hard to center "God's glory" as the heartbeat of Pauline though, a I am submitting this review with a bit of fear and trembling - Schreiner is clearly a brilliant Pauline scholar, and even manages to make academic ideas on Paul's theology accessible in his writing. That said, I found this to be a very narrow perspective, frustratingly-dismissive in key areas of theological dispute, and way, way, way too long and repetitive. First, the good, and there is indeed good to be had here! Schreiner works hard to center "God's glory" as the heartbeat of Pauline though, and I appreciated the attempt to "de-center" other Reformed talking points (justification, predestination, ordo salutis, etc.). The first few chapters are also great reading; I especially loved the chapter on Paul's suffering, and how this is integral to any attempt to systematize his thought. Schreiner also foregrounds Paul's idea of "mission," something else that is frequently overlooked in academic works like this. Overall, the book gets off to a great and exciting start. Eventually, though, it grinds down under Schreiner's theological presuppositions regarding God's foreknowledge, individualized soteriological readings of letters like Romans and Galatians, and a very hard rebuff of anything that smacks of the so-called "New Perspective." As he builds a more cumulative reading of Paul's letters on top of these unexamined preconceptions, these themes continue to layer (and repeat) on top of each other in such a way that gave me a crystal-clear view of the Neo-Reformed, hard-Calvinist take on Paul, but also left a pit in my stomach. For example, discussions of 'grace' and the work of the Spirit in animating faith lapse into the very-tired "we all deserve damnation, so the fact that ANY of us get saved should inspire gratitude and worship" view. The words "supralapsarian" and "infralapsarian" are never explicitly used, but Schreiner seems to come from the "supra" viewpoint, which is perhaps why I experienced so much tension in this reading. It's fine to clamp down on one's understanding of these matters, and to vocalize them clearly, but there is no meaningful discussion of the various views of God's "plan before the foundations of the world" (Ephesians!) that complicate this perspective. The book reads as if it's so simple after all, and when disagreements are noted, they are casually dismissed, which leads to my other major complaint. Judging from the footnotes and citations, Schreiner is operating from a very narrow theological stream. This is not a problem in itself (we all have no choice but to operate out of our culture/viewpoint) but the problem is in his dismissiveness of those outside the "stream". For example, there's an extremely frustrating excursus on the idea of "universalism" that gets barely three pages in a 500-page tome. Whatever one's views on universal salvation, there are many texts from Paul that absolutely can be read in a universalist direction, and in a book that purports to consider all the vectors of Paul's writing and thinking, that topic deserves much more balanced and serious consideration than it gets here. Instead, Schreiner simplistically argues that "Paul wouldn't have labored so hard in the mission if he believed in universal salvation," which is a baffling argument to anyone who is actually conversant in the philosophical-theological ideas at play here. Similarly, the complicated discussion around women's roles in ministry leadership gets short shrift, but for some reason, his idiosyncratic interpretation of 1 Timothy 2 (that childbearing is women's "role" and so women should always seek to embody their "role") gets repeated in multiple chapters. It's very frustrating. Overall, this book is very much a systematized presentation of the Neo-Reformed, Calvinistic, Double-Predestinitarian take on the writings of the great apostle of Christianity. In one sense, it's valuable as a one-stop presentation of that perspective, and if the reader resonates deeply with it, then you know which theological tradition you are at home in. For this reader, it left me looking for a more expansive, balanced interpretation. For someone looking for a presentation of the "old perspective" that Schreiner is a stalwart defender of, I recommend Stephen Westerholm instead. He is much more conversant in other streams of interpretation. For someone who is already a convinced, TULIP-Calvinist, looking for an informed and clear articulation of Paul's thought with that interpretive lens, Schreiner might be your guy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    Having read a few books on Paul, and his theology, I was pleasantly surprised that Schreiner really expanded the conversation beyond the usual topic of choice: Justification. Schreiner presents a Pauline theology whose center is Jesus Christ himself. He has a very interesting chapter on suffering and how central it was to Paul's thinking. He does interact with other Pauline scholars, and their conclusions, though usually not to any great depth unlike Westerholm and his book on the New Perspective Having read a few books on Paul, and his theology, I was pleasantly surprised that Schreiner really expanded the conversation beyond the usual topic of choice: Justification. Schreiner presents a Pauline theology whose center is Jesus Christ himself. He has a very interesting chapter on suffering and how central it was to Paul's thinking. He does interact with other Pauline scholars, and their conclusions, though usually not to any great depth unlike Westerholm and his book on the New Perspectives on Paul. I really enjoyed how it utilizes the Greek language, I learned some Greek! and takes conservative outcomes on Paul's usage in his other writings (And also non-biblical writings). I thought the book could've been shorter. For example, there are two chapters that, I thought, should've been conflated: The Violation of God's Law and the Power of sin. Don't they go hand in hand? Also, in the Chapter on "Living as Christians in the Culture", he addresses Paul's views on Marriage, amongst other topics. He references 1 Corinthians 7:8-9 and as far as Paul's writings are concerned, Paul never marries. But it would've been interesting if he used the reference of St. Ignatius of Antioch letter to Philadelphians (chapter 4) which states that Paul was married. Overall, it's a good resource in the Pauline scholarship field. It's an easier read then most theological books. It's just refreshing to read scholarship work that credits all 13 epistles to Paul instead of the usual liberal answer of just six or seven.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    No scholar has impacted me and shaped my reading of the Bible as much as Tom Schreiner. This second edition did not disappoint. We need more clear writing like this—writing that presents and values different views while also humbly and respectfully offering one's views. This book is not merely an academic book that navigates all the contours of Pauline theology for the sake of knowledge; no, Schreiner shows that, for Paul, "New life in Christ embraces and touches every dimension of the life of b No scholar has impacted me and shaped my reading of the Bible as much as Tom Schreiner. This second edition did not disappoint. We need more clear writing like this—writing that presents and values different views while also humbly and respectfully offering one's views. This book is not merely an academic book that navigates all the contours of Pauline theology for the sake of knowledge; no, Schreiner shows that, for Paul, "New life in Christ embraces and touches every dimension of the life of believers" (502). Interview related to Pauline Theology: https://wyattgraham.com/episode-20-th...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Lee

    What did Paul really believe about God and the Gospel? Was there a central message behind all of his letters? In the second edition of Thomas R. Schreiner’s Paul, Apostle of God’s Glory in Christ, we look at the scope of Paul’s worldview and writings to see the powerful themes of his theology. About the Author Schreiner is uniquely qualified to write this book. He is associate dean and James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. H What did Paul really believe about God and the Gospel? Was there a central message behind all of his letters? In the second edition of Thomas R. Schreiner’s Paul, Apostle of God’s Glory in Christ, we look at the scope of Paul’s worldview and writings to see the powerful themes of his theology. About the Author Schreiner is uniquely qualified to write this book. He is associate dean and James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He has written commentaries on Romans and Galatians, as well as the books New Testament Theology: Magnifying God in Christ, and The King in His Beauty: A Biblical Theology of the Old and New Testaments. The first edition was published back in 2001. Since then, more recent works have engaged with Paul, and Schreiner uses this second edition with nearly 600 pages in a beautiful hardback book to interact with them. From the first chapter, Schreiner states that the passion of Paul’s life, the foundation and capstone of his vision, and the animating motive of his mission is the supremacy of God in and through the Lord Jesus Christ. Missions and Suffering If Schreiner’s assessment of Paul’s main thrust in his writing sounds familiar, it may be because John Piper has crafted a similar mission statement for his ministry. Schreiner notes that he is indebted to Piper, as he was his pastor for eleven years and helped him understand Paul and biblical theology. Actually, those familiar with Piper’s work will find Schreiner concisely package Paul’s themes in similar categories. The basis of mission is highlighted in Chapter 3, and the ultimate goal of Paul’s mission was not Jew and Gentile reconciliation or to see God’s saving promises for Jews and Gentiles come to fruition. Rather, Paul’s mission was to see God glorified, and one outpouring of this was in Jew and Gentile worship. Chapter 4 is all about suffering as a means to proclaim the Gospel. In imprisonment and affliction, the weakness of the messenger showcases the power and strength of God. Universalism and Spiritual Gifts I was intrigued by an excursion at the end of Chapter 7 on Universalism and the inclusion of the Gentiles. Schreiner makes it a point to say that repentance and faith are necessary for salvation. Spiritual gifts are the topic of Chapter 13. He addresses Wayne Grudem’s interpretation on the gift of prophecy, concluding that there is no evidence that the New Testament prophets spoke both truth and error. Like the Old Testament prophets, they spoke the truth accurately. In regards to tongues, they are a language with a discernible code and can be interpreted. For the Glory of God This book is scholarly yet nontechnical. It is proofed with Scripture and the Hebrew/Greek languages yet approachable. It will cause you to better understand Paul and Scripture. But more importantly, it will cause you to better understand the God whom Paul and Scripture speak of – and it will lead you to worship. I was provided a free copy of Paul, Apostle of God’s Glory in Christ but was not required to write a positive review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Hines

    While I had to read this for a seminary class, I did not feel it to be an obligation. This work had a markedness of academia yet was still very accessible to anyone who would be interested in learning about Paul's theology as revealed in the Pauline letters. While I do not hold to all of the convictions of Dr. Thomas Schreiner, he explains and elucidates his position well and I felt an integrity in his writings. What I mean by this is he explains why he believes what he believes, commenting on t While I had to read this for a seminary class, I did not feel it to be an obligation. This work had a markedness of academia yet was still very accessible to anyone who would be interested in learning about Paul's theology as revealed in the Pauline letters. While I do not hold to all of the convictions of Dr. Thomas Schreiner, he explains and elucidates his position well and I felt an integrity in his writings. What I mean by this is he explains why he believes what he believes, commenting on the strengths and weaknesses to various positions. I have felt fortunate to have read this work!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brad Hough

    Really appreciated Schreiner’s thorough catalogue of Paul’s theology. His thesis is that Paul’s central theme is the mission of God, as accomplished by Christ’s work, and he does an impressive job of making his argument while crafting a deeply encouraging and enlightening book. Planning on keeping this one for my shelf as a reference.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ben Potloff

    This was a very good book that I read for a seminary class with online lectures from Schreiner. It was an in depth yet accessible overview of Paul's theology in all of his Epistles. I think I will refer to it often when preparing sermons from the Pauline Epistles. This was a very good book that I read for a seminary class with online lectures from Schreiner. It was an in depth yet accessible overview of Paul's theology in all of his Epistles. I think I will refer to it often when preparing sermons from the Pauline Epistles.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    An excellent treatise on Pauline theology. Schreiner explores many of the apostle's subjects and distills various opinions into what he deems as the most exegetically faithful interpretations. An excellent study with no fluff. An excellent treatise on Pauline theology. Schreiner explores many of the apostle's subjects and distills various opinions into what he deems as the most exegetically faithful interpretations. An excellent study with no fluff.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Deep read. Not sure that Paul's theology was explained or is even explainable. But still very insightful. Recommend reading, especially if you really want to dig down into Paul's Epistles. Deep read. Not sure that Paul's theology was explained or is even explainable. But still very insightful. Recommend reading, especially if you really want to dig down into Paul's Epistles.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    A well organised, dense, scripturally saturated, 500 page study of the theology of Paul in his 13 epistles. Organised by topic, not by letter. He attempts to make 'magnifying God's glory in Christ' a unifying theme to hold the book together, but its not really a book to read cover to cover (unless like me its your textbook and you do foolish things like read all your textbooks cover to cover). A reliable reference for a conservative reformed perspective on Pauline theology. Focusing purely on Pa A well organised, dense, scripturally saturated, 500 page study of the theology of Paul in his 13 epistles. Organised by topic, not by letter. He attempts to make 'magnifying God's glory in Christ' a unifying theme to hold the book together, but its not really a book to read cover to cover (unless like me its your textbook and you do foolish things like read all your textbooks cover to cover). A reliable reference for a conservative reformed perspective on Pauline theology. Focusing purely on Paul's teaching on any given topic is helpful in bringing clarity and keeping context on view, especially on some of the controversial topics.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Douglas

    I will not rate this work. Agonizingly painful to read with an incessant repeating of one thought stated differently with each sentence. Schreiner never expounds on any thought and has no original thought at that. He is blinded by his own importance as if his lack of thought was the gospel itself. I honestly felt I was in the mind of a narcissistic windbag or an Alzheimer's victim. I would not recommend this book. I will not rate this work. Agonizingly painful to read with an incessant repeating of one thought stated differently with each sentence. Schreiner never expounds on any thought and has no original thought at that. He is blinded by his own importance as if his lack of thought was the gospel itself. I honestly felt I was in the mind of a narcissistic windbag or an Alzheimer's victim. I would not recommend this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Barry

    Without getting into the nitty gritty of perspectives on Paul, Mr. Schreiner does his best to analyze Paul's writings and construct a viable systematic theology of Paul. Of this he does a good job. Reading partly as a theology book and partly as a commentary, the writing is clear and moves quickly. While not a marvelous book for its insights, it is a solid book with well-presented ideas and a fair construction of Pauline theology. Without getting into the nitty gritty of perspectives on Paul, Mr. Schreiner does his best to analyze Paul's writings and construct a viable systematic theology of Paul. Of this he does a good job. Reading partly as a theology book and partly as a commentary, the writing is clear and moves quickly. While not a marvelous book for its insights, it is a solid book with well-presented ideas and a fair construction of Pauline theology.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    Good presentation of Paul´s theology taken from the epistles and Acts. I liked his analysis of the different epistles in presenting Paul´s theology. Even though he is not dispensational, he believes in the salvation of the nation Israel in the future, though the church has presently taken its place. I didn´t care for his interpretation regarding the role of women. It was a good read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Atkinson

    I thought this book was good content-wise, with some excellent exegesis of Scripture and defense of traditional doctrines. However, there are some inconsistencies and some rather questionable arguments in regards to the defense of anti-paedobaptism and for the abrogation of the Sabbath. For this and the occasional repetitiveness and lack of flow in his writing style, I give the book 4/5 stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Preston

    I read this book for my "Life and Teachings of Paul" class at Belhaven College. Many parts I just couldn't put down. This a great book for people who want to learn deep thoughts behind Paul's teachings. I read this book for my "Life and Teachings of Paul" class at Belhaven College. Many parts I just couldn't put down. This a great book for people who want to learn deep thoughts behind Paul's teachings.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Annie Rose

    While I don't agree with every aspect of Schreiner's interpretation of Paul (particularly on his view of women, as my friends might suspect!), I found this book to be both intellectually stimulating as well as spiritually nourishing. Don't be fooled by the length; it's actually very readable! While I don't agree with every aspect of Schreiner's interpretation of Paul (particularly on his view of women, as my friends might suspect!), I found this book to be both intellectually stimulating as well as spiritually nourishing. Don't be fooled by the length; it's actually very readable!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Cox

    Great Pauline Theology! His thesis is that the foundation of Paul's theology is the supremacy of God in Christ. Great Pauline Theology! His thesis is that the foundation of Paul's theology is the supremacy of God in Christ.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ben K

    An excellent overview of Pauline theology. Clear, engaging, and well-organized. I especially liked the chapter on suffering, an oft-neglected aspect of Paul's theology. An excellent overview of Pauline theology. Clear, engaging, and well-organized. I especially liked the chapter on suffering, an oft-neglected aspect of Paul's theology.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    I didn't really finish this book. Very unimpressive, given the many other contributions to Pauline studies of late. I didn't really finish this book. Very unimpressive, given the many other contributions to Pauline studies of late.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hank Pharis

    I've read half a dozen books on Paul's life and letters in recent months in preparation for a class and this is by far the best of the bunch. I've read half a dozen books on Paul's life and letters in recent months in preparation for a class and this is by far the best of the bunch.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jay Risner

    really great

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jon Hawkins

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jcp

  27. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  28. 5 out of 5

    Neil Andrews

  29. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Binkley

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andre

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