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Bow-Wow Bugs a Bug

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Bow-Wow may look like your average terrier. The streets he walks may seem familiar. But just around the corner, things get a little unusual.      With nary a word, Mark Newgarden and Megan Montague Cash have created a story about a bold new doggy who goes where no doggy has gone before. With a spring in his step and his tail only occasionally between his legs, Bow-Wow face Bow-Wow may look like your average terrier. The streets he walks may seem familiar. But just around the corner, things get a little unusual.      With nary a word, Mark Newgarden and Megan Montague Cash have created a story about a bold new doggy who goes where no doggy has gone before. With a spring in his step and his tail only occasionally between his legs, Bow-Wow faces down every foe--well, almost every foe--in his path. Step aside, mutts. There's a new dog in town.


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Bow-Wow may look like your average terrier. The streets he walks may seem familiar. But just around the corner, things get a little unusual.      With nary a word, Mark Newgarden and Megan Montague Cash have created a story about a bold new doggy who goes where no doggy has gone before. With a spring in his step and his tail only occasionally between his legs, Bow-Wow face Bow-Wow may look like your average terrier. The streets he walks may seem familiar. But just around the corner, things get a little unusual.      With nary a word, Mark Newgarden and Megan Montague Cash have created a story about a bold new doggy who goes where no doggy has gone before. With a spring in his step and his tail only occasionally between his legs, Bow-Wow faces down every foe--well, almost every foe--in his path. Step aside, mutts. There's a new dog in town.

30 review for Bow-Wow Bugs a Bug

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    A Bug Bugs Bow-Wow might be a more appropriate title, as this intrepid pooch harries a hapless insect. If only Bow-Wow had opposable thumbs and this: A Bug Bugs Bow-Wow might be a more appropriate title, as this intrepid pooch harries a hapless insect. If only Bow-Wow had opposable thumbs and this:

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lstirl

    An unexpected treasure found in a wordless picture book. Ages 3-8 I found this book delightful in its simplicity. The bum-sniffing, bug obsessed Bow-Wow leads readers on an adventure through the neighborhood where he encounters all sorts of zany characters. A young child would delight in watching this bug versus dog story unfold. The comic strip style illustrations are simple, colorful and fun, yet are filled with details to discover that make the story new each time through. The off the wall story An unexpected treasure found in a wordless picture book. Ages 3-8 I found this book delightful in its simplicity. The bum-sniffing, bug obsessed Bow-Wow leads readers on an adventure through the neighborhood where he encounters all sorts of zany characters. A young child would delight in watching this bug versus dog story unfold. The comic strip style illustrations are simple, colorful and fun, yet are filled with details to discover that make the story new each time through. The off the wall story is both intriguing and silly. Clever and original, this story is sure to be a hit for all. Non readers will enjoy creating their own words to this delightful tale. Publishers Weekly This wordless sequence of comic panels, the first in a planned Bow-Wow Books series, is an eminently charming and surreal twist on what might otherwise be just another of the dog days of summer. Garbage Pail Kids creator Newgarden and Cash (What Makes the Seasons?) create a kind of silent feature, composing each orderly panel with a beefy black line and saturated digital colors. Bow-Wow himself, a golden-yellow terrier, has oval-dot eyes and an expressive brow that convey a broad range of emotions as he goes about his day. The action centers on his pursuit of a pesky black bug, which hops to the edge of his dog dish in the morning. With his nose to the ground and brow furrowed in concentration, Bow-Wow tracks the bug down the sidewalk where, in swift succession, gags pile up and absurdities bloom. Bow-Wow encounters a Doppelganger and the duo (as well as their respective insects) engages in an increasingly zany series of mirrored movements. Bow-Wow then meets an enormous lookalike who has been pursuing an equally oversize insect; when Bow-Wow flees this pair of behemoths, he rounds a corner to find a wild convoy of dogs sniffing after bugs. (Turning yet another corner, he is stunned to discover an array of giant insects chasing after minuscule dogs.) Newgarden and Cash use a varied layout of panels to great effect (three spreads are dedicated to close-ups of Bow-Wow's blinking disbelief as the enormous creepy-crawlies charge toward him), making this outing, which in less skilled hands might have read like a Sunday comic strip, feel enormously fresh and modern. Ages 3-7. (June) Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information A good description and this does feel fresh and modern. An excellent review. Kirkus Reviews A little black speck of a bug leads a feisty yellow terrier on an increasingly surreal trip around his neighborhood in a brilliantly whimsical wordless romp. When the bug descends on Bow-Wow's dog dish, a scowl descends on his features and off he sets to teach it a lesson. Comic-strip panels advance the action with perfect pacing, the Photoshopped sameness of Bow-Wow's suburban neighborhood providing a bland, impossibly regular background to ever more zany situations, which include meeting mirror images of himself and the bug, encountering giant-sized versions of both himself and the bug and armies of bug-pursuing dogs and dog-pursuing bugs. Long shots and close-ups hilariously assist in the progress of the narrative, cinematic convention adapting perfectly to the medium. The aforementioned blandly regular background combines with bold, clean lines and a sunnily uncomplicated palette to keep what might in other hands be a rather terrifying journey into 1950s horror/sci fi from overwhelming young readers. Call it a kinder, gentler Twilight Zone in which the doughty protagonist is allowed to return home to bowl and bed at the end of the day. Thoroughly inspired. (Picture book. 4-10) A nice description of the illustrations, but I would have liked a bit more about the plot, however, they are right on with thoroughly inspired.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rfrancik

    This picture only book is fun and recommended for anyone K-5 who likes a good story or dogs. The frames start off easily enough as a dog wakes up and discovers a flea on his food bowl. Things progress quickly towards a more complicated series of events that will give the story tellers among you plenty of opportunity to embelish their re-telling. I was particularly taken with the number of expressions given the protagonist and his antics when he encounters another dog just like himself. I use this This picture only book is fun and recommended for anyone K-5 who likes a good story or dogs. The frames start off easily enough as a dog wakes up and discovers a flea on his food bowl. Things progress quickly towards a more complicated series of events that will give the story tellers among you plenty of opportunity to embelish their re-telling. I was particularly taken with the number of expressions given the protagonist and his antics when he encounters another dog just like himself. I use this book to talk to my K-5 classes about context clues. How does this dog feel? How do we know? Reviews: 1)Horn Book (July/August, 2007) 2)School Library Journal (July 1, 2007) Both reviews are favorable calling the book "humorous" or "funny, quirky, and even suspenseful" While complimentary neither review states this is a must have in your library. School Library Journal points out it does teach children to read in sequence left to right and "will be most appreciated by youngsters who have the patience and interest to examine and decode the pictures" On the basis of these recommendations I would be inclined to purchase it if I were looking to increase my non-text picture book collection.

  4. 4 out of 5

    The Library Lady

    Now, if THIS got the Caldecott instead of the usual hipster crap I would love it. Which is why I'm breaking my habit of not giving 5 stars to titles and handing it to this book. What a book. I liked it from the start and by the time I got to the page with the Dalmation I just gave up and loved it. I am normally NOT a fan of wordless picture books but this one needs no words. Funny, creative with a Warner Brothers sort of sensibility, hand this to your older preschooler, your kindergartener or you Now, if THIS got the Caldecott instead of the usual hipster crap I would love it. Which is why I'm breaking my habit of not giving 5 stars to titles and handing it to this book. What a book. I liked it from the start and by the time I got to the page with the Dalmation I just gave up and loved it. I am normally NOT a fan of wordless picture books but this one needs no words. Funny, creative with a Warner Brothers sort of sensibility, hand this to your older preschooler, your kindergartener or your first grader. And then hand it to their elementary or teenaged sibling. Love it, love it, love it!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    (SPL catalog) A wordless picture book about a persistent terrier who spends a day following a bug through his neighborhood. (Claudia) Bow-Wow, drawn in simple but expressive cartoon-style, varies humorously realistic doggy behavior with delightful fantasy episodes and laugh-out-loud unexpected encounters. Mid-sized. Suitable for pre-K to early elementary children. (SLJ) Clever plot is funny, quirky, even suspenseful ... best appreciated by youngsters with patience to examine and decode the picture (SPL catalog) A wordless picture book about a persistent terrier who spends a day following a bug through his neighborhood. (Claudia) Bow-Wow, drawn in simple but expressive cartoon-style, varies humorously realistic doggy behavior with delightful fantasy episodes and laugh-out-loud unexpected encounters. Mid-sized. Suitable for pre-K to early elementary children. (SLJ) Clever plot is funny, quirky, even suspenseful ... best appreciated by youngsters with patience to examine and decode the pictures. (Hornbook) Appealing pop-art style cartoons ... simple black lines and dots do the speaking ... [in] a series of comic encounters.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I do love wordless books, and goshdarn if this isn't an excellent one. Bow-Wow, a yellow dog, follows a little black bug around town, and gets into several surreal situations (including, but not limited to, meeting a GIANT version of himself, and [my daughter's favorite part] running into a pack of GIANT BUGS all chasing tiny dogs!) along the way. There's plenty of meaning and various levels of humor in these bright, bold illustrations -- kids and adults will find plenty to laugh and wonder at. I do love wordless books, and goshdarn if this isn't an excellent one. Bow-Wow, a yellow dog, follows a little black bug around town, and gets into several surreal situations (including, but not limited to, meeting a GIANT version of himself, and [my daughter's favorite part] running into a pack of GIANT BUGS all chasing tiny dogs!) along the way. There's plenty of meaning and various levels of humor in these bright, bold illustrations -- kids and adults will find plenty to laugh and wonder at.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Russell

    A marvelous, transcendent tale. Unpredictable, yet not a hot mess as it defies your attempts to make assumptions about where the narrative is going. So what if bugs don't sniff other bugs' rear ends? This wordless book is an instant classic. I haven't been this moved by a work of fiction since I watched Adaptation. in a friend's basement after an all night bender in Atlantic City. The first thing I had to do after finishing it was immediately read it again. A marvelous, transcendent tale. Unpredictable, yet not a hot mess as it defies your attempts to make assumptions about where the narrative is going. So what if bugs don't sniff other bugs' rear ends? This wordless book is an instant classic. I haven't been this moved by a work of fiction since I watched Adaptation. in a friend's basement after an all night bender in Atlantic City. The first thing I had to do after finishing it was immediately read it again.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Adorable, brilliantly creative wordless story of a dog and a bug--and another dog and another bug, and much more. Offers tons of scope for imagination (to quote Anne Shirley/L.M. Montgomery), with enough fascinating bits to view and talk about over and over again for both lapsitters and parents/adults.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristie

    Make up your own story with this wordless graphic-novel-style book for the youngest readers!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Destinee Sutton

    Wordless, like a comic book. Funny. I loved it!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Sebly

    * mind opening * stretching * alternate realities

  12. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Picture books without words are usually a lot of fun; this one was no exception. In strip after strip Bow-Wow follows an annoying bug all around town. Very entertaining pictures.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Awesome graphic illustrations. No word just picture panels about a dog following his bug around and all the other dogs in the neighborhood doing the same. Super cute and funny.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Blaine Gerdes

    I thought this book had great illustrations, the big bugs toward the end of the book were great! The book contained no words, which I didn't realize until I opened it up to read. I thought it was really cool getting to watch the dog follow the bug and then the bug follow the dog and them go back and forth on it. I liked being able to see the dogs compete with emotions and then the bugs copied and did the same. I think this book is good for young children because they can comprehend the illustrat I thought this book had great illustrations, the big bugs toward the end of the book were great! The book contained no words, which I didn't realize until I opened it up to read. I thought it was really cool getting to watch the dog follow the bug and then the bug follow the dog and them go back and forth on it. I liked being able to see the dogs compete with emotions and then the bugs copied and did the same. I think this book is good for young children because they can comprehend the illustrations and guess what they show and predict what will happen next.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Beagley

    An existential masterpiece, exploring all of reality and our perceptions of it. What does it mean to be? What is the value in the efforts we extend each day? Are other people real, or do we know them only as projections of ourselves? Is the other real? This book explores all of these questions. For 2-4 year olds.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mayra Rosales

    It stretches students’ imaginations and encourages them to be creative! They have to create their own story to the pictures, but the pictures are not too broad that it is overwhelming for students. It can be a great book to use for a writing activity - having students write the story that goes along with their book!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Wordless picture book The dog discovers a bug (flea?) and follows it around town. Along the way, he encounters other dogs and giant bugs. The story felt disjointed though the illustrations were terrific.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    Totally NOT a fan of wordless books, but this one is a gem! What a marvelous imagination tale! No, it doesn't make logical sense, but that's the point! It starts out normal, but keeps getting stranger and stranger and stranger as the imagination takes over. Great one to explore with a child. Totally NOT a fan of wordless books, but this one is a gem! What a marvelous imagination tale! No, it doesn't make logical sense, but that's the point! It starts out normal, but keeps getting stranger and stranger and stranger as the imagination takes over. Great one to explore with a child.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    In this wordless book, the little terrier still has lots to say. It is a great story to get children to use their imagination on what is happening. Bow Wow has a bug that takes him on quite an adventure for a day. The illustrations are simple but very expressive.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I'm not really a fan of wordless picture books. This might make a good lap read for a preK to 3rd grader who loves dogs or bugs. It has a bit of humor to it, but it's definitely not appropriate for story time. I'm not really a fan of wordless picture books. This might make a good lap read for a preK to 3rd grader who loves dogs or bugs. It has a bit of humor to it, but it's definitely not appropriate for story time.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Vanasco

    Throughout this book the dogs follow bugs and runs into many things that scare him. In the end he runs into many insects chasing dogs and then runs home. I think children would like this book and find the ending very ironic and funny.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Diana Tran

    I love how wordless books are like comic strips. It is unto just flip through the pages and watch the story unfold. This is great children's book about a dog and a small bug. I recommend it for any grade level, and for kids who are still learning to read and just like looking at the pictures. I love how wordless books are like comic strips. It is unto just flip through the pages and watch the story unfold. This is great children's book about a dog and a small bug. I recommend it for any grade level, and for kids who are still learning to read and just like looking at the pictures.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Super cute book! This is a wordless picture that tells the story of a dog chasing down a bug! You see all the critters he meets and all the goofy stuff he gets into.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    A great wordless book - my preschoolers had a lot of fun making up the story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    A dog sees a bug. He follows the bug, along with other dogs following too. In the end the bug follows the dog home to where he sleeps.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ginny

    wordless picture book

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christina Getrost

    Hilarious and adorable! Winner of 2008 Buckeye Children's and Teen Book Award, grades K-2 Hilarious and adorable! Winner of 2008 Buckeye Children's and Teen Book Award, grades K-2

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Loved it. It's a wordless book that tells a great tale through very simple illustrations. Loved it. It's a wordless book that tells a great tale through very simple illustrations.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Evans

    For: dog fans; readers looking for a wordless book. Possible red flags: gigantic bugs and dogs.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    CIP: "A wordless picture book about a persistent terrier who spends a day following a bug through his neighborhood." Maggie: Cute story about a little dog who cannot seem to rid himself of the bug who has been bothering him. Wonderfully illustrated and laid out in the style of a graphic novel, this book will delight readers aged 5 to 8. PW: "This wordless sequence of comic panels, the first in a planned Bow-Wow Books series, is an eminently charming and surreal twist on what might otherwise be ju CIP: "A wordless picture book about a persistent terrier who spends a day following a bug through his neighborhood." Maggie: Cute story about a little dog who cannot seem to rid himself of the bug who has been bothering him. Wonderfully illustrated and laid out in the style of a graphic novel, this book will delight readers aged 5 to 8. PW: "This wordless sequence of comic panels, the first in a planned Bow-Wow Books series, is an eminently charming and surreal twist on what might otherwise be just another of the dog days of summer. Garbage Pail Kids creator Newgarden and Cash (What Makes the Seasons?) create a kind of silent feature, composing each orderly panel with a beefy black line and saturated digital colors. Bow-Wow himself, a golden-yellow terrier, has oval-dot eyes and an expressive brow that convey a broad range of emotions as he goes about his day. The action centers on his pursuit of a pesky black bug, which hops to the edge of his dog dish in the morning. With his nose to the ground and brow furrowed in concentration, Bow-Wow tracks the bug down the sidewalk where, in swift succession, gags pile up and absurdities bloom. Bow-Wow encounters a Doppelganger and the duo (as well as their respective insects) engages in an increasingly zany series of mirrored movements. Bow-Wow then meets an enormous lookalike who has been pursuing an equally oversize insect; when Bow-Wow flees this pair of behemoths, he rounds a corner to find a wild convoy of dogs sniffing after bugs. (Turning yet another corner, he is stunned to discover an array of giant insects chasing after minuscule dogs.) Newgarden and Cash use a varied layout of panels to great effect (three spreads are dedicated to close-ups of Bow-Wow's blinking disbelief as the enormous creepy-crawlies charge toward him), making this outing, which in less skilled hands might have read like a Sunday comic strip, feel enormously fresh and modern. Ages 3-7." Horn Book: "Wordless pop art–style cartoons chronicle the day-long obsession of a terrier with a flea problem. The dog's on a mission to follow the flea; his journey is a series of comical encounters. Without text, simple black lines and dots do the speaking. In the final scene, man's best friend is curled up asleep alongside dog's best friend--his bug."

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