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Astonishing X-Men: Storm

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Storm is an orphaned street urchin, living by her wits on the unforgiving plains of Africa as she struggles to harness her developing mutant powers. Black Panther, the warrior prince, is embarking on his rite of passage as he ponders the responsibility of his future. But what sparks will occur when their paths cross?


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Storm is an orphaned street urchin, living by her wits on the unforgiving plains of Africa as she struggles to harness her developing mutant powers. Black Panther, the warrior prince, is embarking on his rite of passage as he ponders the responsibility of his future. But what sparks will occur when their paths cross?

30 review for Astonishing X-Men: Storm

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tiamatty

    Back in the early '80s, in an Marvel Team-Up, Chris Claremont wrote a story that showed how Storm and Black Panther first met. In that story, a young Ororo, just discovering her powers, rescued a young T'Challa. Eric Jerome Dickey seems to have decided that the idea of a girl rescuing a boy was just silly, so he did away with that, and had T'Challa rescue Ororo. Repeatedly. Storm was always depicted as a strong, independent woman who was capable of taking care of herself. Dickey turned her into Back in the early '80s, in an Marvel Team-Up, Chris Claremont wrote a story that showed how Storm and Black Panther first met. In that story, a young Ororo, just discovering her powers, rescued a young T'Challa. Eric Jerome Dickey seems to have decided that the idea of a girl rescuing a boy was just silly, so he did away with that, and had T'Challa rescue Ororo. Repeatedly. Storm was always depicted as a strong, independent woman who was capable of taking care of herself. Dickey turned her into a helpless little twit. She's reduced to being the love interest, and her entire character in the story revolves around T'Challa and her feelings for him. T'Challa gets to be a more complex character, with feelings and motivations beyond Ororo, but she doesn't get to be any more than a Damsel In Distress. It is, to be blunt, misogynistic bullshit. The art's nice, but Dickey's total character assassination on Storm is just so stupid and offensive that it makes this book infuriating.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brown Girl Reading

    This is my first real Marvel comic although I know and have heard a lot about the character for quite some time. Storm happens to be my favourite character. The story was written by Eric Jerome Dickey and I must admit that enticed me to get this one.The cover is striking and beautiful. I didn't know exactly the story of Storm and this comic let's us know a bit more about her past. I hoped to learn a bit more details about how she actually got her powers but that wasn't the focus of the story. Th This is my first real Marvel comic although I know and have heard a lot about the character for quite some time. Storm happens to be my favourite character. The story was written by Eric Jerome Dickey and I must admit that enticed me to get this one.The cover is striking and beautiful. I didn't know exactly the story of Storm and this comic let's us know a bit more about her past. I hoped to learn a bit more details about how she actually got her powers but that wasn't the focus of the story. The colours are beautiful, rich browns and gold and black. The only real gripe I had with the artwork was the way Storm was drawn. I understood her to be about 12 or 13 years old but she's drawn as if she's much older. That was just a little weird for me. Despite that the story is pretty good.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Winter Sophia Rose

    Intriguing, Deep & Amazing Illustrations!! An Excellent Read! I Loved It! Intriguing, Deep & Amazing Illustrations!! An Excellent Read! I Loved It!

  4. 5 out of 5

    HeavyReader

    Tony turned me on to this comic which tells the story of how Storm and the Black Panther meet and fall in love. The art is fantastic, really, really lovely, and the story is good too. I thought it was neat that Storm (the narrator) talks about getting her period as if it is totally normal (which it really is). I thought it was a bit creapy that Storm is supposed to be twelve but looks like an 18 year old woman (and a comic book fantasy 18 year old woman at that) and has sex with the Black Panther. Tony turned me on to this comic which tells the story of how Storm and the Black Panther meet and fall in love. The art is fantastic, really, really lovely, and the story is good too. I thought it was neat that Storm (the narrator) talks about getting her period as if it is totally normal (which it really is). I thought it was a bit creapy that Storm is supposed to be twelve but looks like an 18 year old woman (and a comic book fantasy 18 year old woman at that) and has sex with the Black Panther. Granted the sex was totally consensual and special, but maybe 12 year old girls (and the grown men who are probably the main audience for this book) don't need to think that having sex at such an early age is a good idea.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bailey

    The bravest of us own no powers. The bravest of us fight wars with the truth. -Storm This book was a beautiful story about the well known super hero, Storm. For six years of her life, all Storm knew was love. This changed with her parents' tragic death as a result of war. Resorting to a hard life on the streets, she became a thief. No longer could she look up to her parents for guidance. Now, she only had herself, Teacher, and fellow orphans. Currently, several years later she has met T'Challa, The bravest of us own no powers. The bravest of us fight wars with the truth. -Storm This book was a beautiful story about the well known super hero, Storm. For six years of her life, all Storm knew was love. This changed with her parents' tragic death as a result of war. Resorting to a hard life on the streets, she became a thief. No longer could she look up to her parents for guidance. Now, she only had herself, Teacher, and fellow orphans. Currently, several years later she has met T'Challa, the Black Panther. She discovers love and that she can overcome being a thief, creating a life that her parents would be proud of. This book had beautiful illustrations and told Storm's background with heart.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adriel

    When I found out after the fact that Storm and Black Panther had gotten married I was confused as to where it came from and after reading this I feel much the same. I am annoyed and frustrated that they felt they needed to put the two of them together and that they had to make up a non-existent back story to fix the oddness of it all. Dickey does a lovely job of showing African life in a touching and heart wrenching way. This story would be lovely if it wasn't for the existence of a love story b When I found out after the fact that Storm and Black Panther had gotten married I was confused as to where it came from and after reading this I feel much the same. I am annoyed and frustrated that they felt they needed to put the two of them together and that they had to make up a non-existent back story to fix the oddness of it all. Dickey does a lovely job of showing African life in a touching and heart wrenching way. This story would be lovely if it wasn't for the existence of a love story between two fantastic characters that just doesn't work. Storm's back story without the Black Panther would have been a lovely read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    M

    In order to justify the Black Panther/Storm marriage ceremony, Marvel tapped Eric Dickey to showcase a tale of their original meetings. Defying continuity and logic, we readers are left to suffer through this volume. Set in the days of both their youths, we have burgeoning thief Ororo being rescued by a questing T'Challa. As both kids are looking to pass into adulthood, they discover mutual attraction and common enemies. A truly scornful retcon of two powerful Marvel heroes used to explain a for In order to justify the Black Panther/Storm marriage ceremony, Marvel tapped Eric Dickey to showcase a tale of their original meetings. Defying continuity and logic, we readers are left to suffer through this volume. Set in the days of both their youths, we have burgeoning thief Ororo being rescued by a questing T'Challa. As both kids are looking to pass into adulthood, they discover mutual attraction and common enemies. A truly scornful retcon of two powerful Marvel heroes used to explain a forced matrimony; a true "perfect storm" of bad storytelling.

  8. 4 out of 5

    sixthreezy

    Way better than I had imagined it would be. Really cool origin story for Storm and Black Panther. Though it's almost kind of a romantic/love story, I really did enjoy it. It was a perfect kind of tie-in with these two characters, I could not have been any more surprised with my enjoyment.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Iona Sawyer

    Whether you are a comic book reader or not this is a must read for all. As they say a book tells a story so much more. Marvel comics couldn't have picked a better author to tell the story of the Storm from X-Men and The Panther.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nadia

    Well. This book retells a story about Storm and Black Panther from Marvel Team-Up 100.** In that story, 12 year old Storm saves a young Black Panther from a bunch of white South Africans, in this version it's the other way around (the short lived 2000s Black Panther cartoon has it this way too.) Storm is a damsel in distress multiple times in this book and Storm as a damsel in distress is a bad thing. T'Challa is more well rounded and his interests are varied, they have him hearing stories of refu Well. This book retells a story about Storm and Black Panther from Marvel Team-Up 100.** In that story, 12 year old Storm saves a young Black Panther from a bunch of white South Africans, in this version it's the other way around (the short lived 2000s Black Panther cartoon has it this way too.) Storm is a damsel in distress multiple times in this book and Storm as a damsel in distress is a bad thing. T'Challa is more well rounded and his interests are varied, they have him hearing stories of refugees from various parts of the continent to report back to his homeland. Storm is written as mainly concerned with crushing on T'Challa. Then there is a weird writing choice of starting her period causing her to realise she is a sexual being and thus deciding she needs to have sex as well. She loses her virginity and she's drawn naked (with strategic blocking), thankfully she's drawn to look a lot older than the 12 years old her character is actually supposed to be (she looks more like 17) but it's still uncomfortable. The villains are also really rapey which I could have done without I think their brutality was sufficiently shown in a lot of other ways. I really wanted to like this the first part was really promising and gave more depth to her family and the racism that was just touched upon previously* (why this book has more than 1 star.) I also like how it established how out of place Storm was wherever she went, but then when it got to part three, the bulk of which she spent unconscious, it had me feeling a very different way. **MTU 100 is collected in the X-Men: Worlds Apart book if you are curious. *And references to imperialism except for Egypt which is depicted as scary men in turbans which was a little disappointing.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kamilah

    So am I the only one who had a problem with 12 year old Ororo Munroe, aka Storm completely have sex for the first time in the way that she did? First of all, she's too young--however, she's drawn to look much older than she actually is. So much so that I thought there was a time-jump into the future that I overlooked. I think it's cool how the author normalized her having a period but I did not approve of her sexual behavior, it was advanced and inappropriate for the age that she is. (She claims So am I the only one who had a problem with 12 year old Ororo Munroe, aka Storm completely have sex for the first time in the way that she did? First of all, she's too young--however, she's drawn to look much older than she actually is. So much so that I thought there was a time-jump into the future that I overlooked. I think it's cool how the author normalized her having a period but I did not approve of her sexual behavior, it was advanced and inappropriate for the age that she is. (She claims the next morning that "her body is her temple" yet she gave it up to someone she just met on the ground...) I really did like the story to this book because it was written well and the artwork was spectacular. I think that T'Challa has more personality here than he does in any of the other Black Panther comics I've read (sorry Reginald Hudlin, your Black Panther series is great but T'Challa's personality is blah). I liked the back story of Ororo's parents but I wish that Eric Jerome Dickey would have explained her mother more...although I did catch his reference when the South African mentioned another wind-rider who escaped and she left Kenya for "her own reasons". I understood the reference. This is definitely entertaining, I just wish that Zanja didn't come off as such an antagonist because I understand exactly how she feels towards the end. She lost everyone around her because of Ororo. I didn't mention this before, but I like the romance between Ororo and T'Challa, but I thought the sex and all of that was over-the-top.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Collin

    I absolutely love Storm in the X-Men movies and I was really excited for this to be sort of a part of an origin story, but it was disappointing. Mostly due to confusion. She's twelve years old, right? But she looks like that? And she's sleeping with some prince who is who knows how old? It's possible that there were missing pages, so maybe I shouldn't be too harsh. But if it wasn't missing pages, then it sort of weirds my sensibilities to be sexualizing a twelve-year-old girl. I feel like I shou I absolutely love Storm in the X-Men movies and I was really excited for this to be sort of a part of an origin story, but it was disappointing. Mostly due to confusion. She's twelve years old, right? But she looks like that? And she's sleeping with some prince who is who knows how old? It's possible that there were missing pages, so maybe I shouldn't be too harsh. But if it wasn't missing pages, then it sort of weirds my sensibilities to be sexualizing a twelve-year-old girl. I feel like I should give this more stars because the art was pretty (Storm's perpetually angry eyebrows excepted) and the story was okay but once T'challa came into the picture, I just... lost interest. Storm using her powers was cool but it wasn't quite enough to beat the disappointment.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paula PJ

    I don't want to spoil too much, but Storm is a thief who worries about what her dead parents would think of her. She also wants to be a WOMAN and not a child and apparently that only happens when a guy sleeps with you. Tchalla does this, so congrats to her I guess. There's some sexist dialogue that I think is banter? In the second half she's almost ready to accept death because she'd be meeting her parents as a WOMAN and not a thief anymore. Oh, and there's a white dude after her who has a thing I don't want to spoil too much, but Storm is a thief who worries about what her dead parents would think of her. She also wants to be a WOMAN and not a child and apparently that only happens when a guy sleeps with you. Tchalla does this, so congrats to her I guess. There's some sexist dialogue that I think is banter? In the second half she's almost ready to accept death because she'd be meeting her parents as a WOMAN and not a thief anymore. Oh, and there's a white dude after her who has a thing for black girls and repeatedly threatens sexual assault. I really wonder if a single woman was consulted on this coming of age book for Storm.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

    I never knew this series existed. This is the first and only Dickey I've ever read and finally, we get a little more back story on Storm. Being exposed to the X-Men over the years, she was one of the characters I wanted to know more about. I didn't care much about Cyclops's past, I accepted Wolverine's past as one of those mysterious things that was supposed to remain mysterious (but then of course, they served that one up in full). Storm wasn't my favorite, but her story intrigued me more. I wo I never knew this series existed. This is the first and only Dickey I've ever read and finally, we get a little more back story on Storm. Being exposed to the X-Men over the years, she was one of the characters I wanted to know more about. I didn't care much about Cyclops's past, I accepted Wolverine's past as one of those mysterious things that was supposed to remain mysterious (but then of course, they served that one up in full). Storm wasn't my favorite, but her story intrigued me more. I won't call this a masterpiece, but it's definitely a solid read that satisfied.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    The readers of "Storm" will enjoy the well-written story by Eric Jerome Dickey that incorporated the beautiful illustrations by David Yardin and Lan Medina. "Storm" is about a young girl who lives on the street and starting to understand her mutant powers and after she has stolen a camera her roll coaster advantages started. I did enjoy reading "Storm" and looking at the beautiful illustrations. I recommend this book

  16. 4 out of 5

    Londa

    Loved this! Now I want to get the other graphic novels to follow Storm and Black Panther's story. Great job Eric Jerome Dickey!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steven Bell

    This was so close to being good. It’s not bad but it could’ve been better. My issues are the very jarring tone. It wants to be a cutesy YA romance (between Storm and T’Challa) while also exploring horrific racism and actual rape. The way the women in this comic are written is pretty terrible. Of course, there’s only two women and one of them hates Ororo and tries to kill her and is jealous of her relationship with T’Challa. The romance with T’Challa couldn’t be more cliche. They meet and instantly This was so close to being good. It’s not bad but it could’ve been better. My issues are the very jarring tone. It wants to be a cutesy YA romance (between Storm and T’Challa) while also exploring horrific racism and actual rape. The way the women in this comic are written is pretty terrible. Of course, there’s only two women and one of them hates Ororo and tries to kill her and is jealous of her relationship with T’Challa. The romance with T’Challa couldn’t be more cliche. They meet and instantly fall in love. There’s a bunch of crap about how she feels like a woman after they have sex. Instead of the story feeling like it’s about Storm coming of age and finding her place in the world on her own merits, it’s basically like... “welp, thank god I found a man, now I’m a woman, yay.” Which, again, is made frustrating given how HEAVY literally everything else in this is.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    This was great! My expectations were low because Eric Jerome Dickey isn’t really a comic book writer, so I was worried he’d have continuity issues... but the man did his homework! This fits perfectly well into X-Men canon, and adds some welcome layers to Ororo’s story! I loved the entire flow and structure of this tale. It was consistent and powerful. The badguys were super bad. The heroics were exciting. The art was also very beautiful. Here’s my one gripe; Most of the asskicking was done by T’chal This was great! My expectations were low because Eric Jerome Dickey isn’t really a comic book writer, so I was worried he’d have continuity issues... but the man did his homework! This fits perfectly well into X-Men canon, and adds some welcome layers to Ororo’s story! I loved the entire flow and structure of this tale. It was consistent and powerful. The badguys were super bad. The heroics were exciting. The art was also very beautiful. Here’s my one gripe; Most of the asskicking was done by T’challa. The name on the cover isn’t “Black Panther!” The name on the cover is “Storm.” I wanted to see more images of Storm beating some ass. I kept waiting for her to emerge from the sky, engulfed in lightning, raining down vengeance on the badguys. It never happens. Oh well. Still a really great story. I recommend it for anyone.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tally

    All I can say is that I need more?! Never read anything about Storm and this is definitely a nice start. Only thing I may dislike is how she thought she was a woman just because she had sex, yet I do understand that in African culture that very well may be the thing. I can't really judge a culture I don't know much about. This is a perfect opportunity to educate myself on the topic. I do love how well everything was written but I want so much more from the story. I may go on the look out for more All I can say is that I need more?! Never read anything about Storm and this is definitely a nice start. Only thing I may dislike is how she thought she was a woman just because she had sex, yet I do understand that in African culture that very well may be the thing. I can't really judge a culture I don't know much about. This is a perfect opportunity to educate myself on the topic. I do love how well everything was written but I want so much more from the story. I may go on the look out for more Storm stories but I did like how Eric Jerome Dickey wrote her. She was a very head strong woman and I love her and T'Challa together. Makes me wish Marvel put him with her like he originally suppose to be.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This is a good book, it brings the superhero Marvel elements together with some of the realities that African counties have to face (of course in a very simplified way due to the space constraints). It is an engrossing origin story grounded in the hints of Storm's early life which have been hinted at over the years. It is violent with a great deal of death and harsh scenes which reflects what happens to the most vulnerable in those types of situations. The artwork is clean and detailed and adds This is a good book, it brings the superhero Marvel elements together with some of the realities that African counties have to face (of course in a very simplified way due to the space constraints). It is an engrossing origin story grounded in the hints of Storm's early life which have been hinted at over the years. It is violent with a great deal of death and harsh scenes which reflects what happens to the most vulnerable in those types of situations. The artwork is clean and detailed and adds to the story line. It is a fantastic addition to the Storm, Black Panther pantheon and I recommend it for the Marvel fans.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Penny Wright

    I love the X-Men, and Storm (Ororo) has always been one of my favorite characters. She's such a complex, strong, and inspirational character with a lot of rich history. This collection, however, dismisses all of that history and turns Ororo into a hormonal teenager who loses her virginity to Black Panther (T'Challa) in order to feel like more of a woman. First, this isn't Storm's actual backstory. I'm not sure why Marvel decided to release this collection, but it's definitely not canon to Marvel I love the X-Men, and Storm (Ororo) has always been one of my favorite characters. She's such a complex, strong, and inspirational character with a lot of rich history. This collection, however, dismisses all of that history and turns Ororo into a hormonal teenager who loses her virginity to Black Panther (T'Challa) in order to feel like more of a woman. First, this isn't Storm's actual backstory. I'm not sure why Marvel decided to release this collection, but it's definitely not canon to Marvel's Earth-616 universe. It also isn't how Storm and Black Panther originally meet. Second, the writing of the story itself is really bad. As I mentioned before, Storm has always been a really strong character. However, Dickey's portrayal of her gets rid of that strength. So much of this story is Storm obsessing over "becoming a woman" through sleeping with a man. It's an offensive revision of her original backstory. While the art wasn't to my personal liking, it wasn't terrible, so I don't have much to say about that. If you want to learn about Storm, skip this and just read some classic X-Men. It's a much better portrayal.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Loved it. It had a ring of authenticity to it that a lot of comics don't seem to have. It addressed race issues as well as cultural differences and sexism, and I think the author strung it all together very well. This is a addition to Storm's story and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    Book Riot's Read Harder Challenge 2018 Task #8 A comic written or illustrated by a person of color

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Illustrations were beautiful, but the story was meh.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Martin Yankov

    This was... interesting. It's not about superheroes, but about two teenagers trying to survive in Africa. Also about the inner storm of first love. Great for Storm/Black Panther shippers as myself!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Novelist Dienne

    I love this coming of age story for my favorite character. I wish it was more centered around her though. This would have been great if it was a second volume where it showed them together.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Xaanua

    I love this saga since one of my favorite character of X-men is ororo. I love to know more about her

  28. 5 out of 5

    Xavier Guillaume

    I was on an X-Men from the library kick, so I decided to pick up this one. I've always been a huge fan of Storm, perhaps liking her even more than Cyclops. There was always something about Cyclops that I didn't like. Perhaps it was his cocky know-everything attitude about things. Storm always seemed to take a greater picture into perspective and not let personal emotions stand in her way as much. If you don't know Storm's story, it's an amazing one. It tells you everything from how she lost her p I was on an X-Men from the library kick, so I decided to pick up this one. I've always been a huge fan of Storm, perhaps liking her even more than Cyclops. There was always something about Cyclops that I didn't like. Perhaps it was his cocky know-everything attitude about things. Storm always seemed to take a greater picture into perspective and not let personal emotions stand in her way as much. If you don't know Storm's story, it's an amazing one. It tells you everything from how she lost her parents, to how she developed her claustrophobia, to how she grew up as an orphan in Africa. I loved it because I never really got to see that side before, but all of it is so important to understanding her persona. The book also features her first love relationship with the Black Panther way back when the two were very young. People hate to think of teenagers having sexual identities, but they do, and I like how Eric Jerome Dickey is unafraid to capture that. This book is very unafraid. It portrays racism, it talks about slavery, it addresses rape, it depicts the murder of women and children, it portrays Western Imperialism, and it shows the problems of poverty in Africa. Basically, it pretty much addresses the ugly side that our world has to offer, but it also addresses things like admiration, and hope, and love, and pride. Overall, the book is a mixed bag of emotions and themes, which made for a very interesting experience. So why the three stars? The book touched on all of these things, but parts of it were too in my face. I didn't greatly enjoy seeing all the violence and attempted rape in the book. I thought it was unnecessary and the book could have stuck to racism and poverty and it would have been fine. It seemed kind of strange that the villains of the book were pretty much one-dimensional evil white men who's only motivation was to make money and kill any black person that stood in their way. Their characters were utterly pathetic with zero redeeming qualities to them. Personally I prefer a book with sympathetic villains, or at least villains with more than one dimension to them. These goons were just cowardly evil murdering rapists. It was pretty awful. Other than that, I still recommend X-Men and Marvel fans to read this book. I mean, how could you not like the daughter of an African princess with white hair that could fly and shoot lighting out of her hands? That's like sooo awesome! I feel like Storm is often downplayed as a character, but she is so powerful and rocking, she definitely deserves her own series. All in all, good book. You get to see a side of Storm you don't typically see in the series alone. :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Trinika Abraham

    So we all know Storm, from the X-Men series; white haired, black woman who can control the weather. We are also aware of the new Marvel character coming out with his own movie (Black Panther). But did you know that these two characters fall in love? Neither did I!!! Okay to be honest, I sort of knew because my son is an avid comic book reader, and if you are too, then this is not news to you. However, everyone else can play catch up reading this amazing graphic novel. Storm by Eric Jerome Dickey (t So we all know Storm, from the X-Men series; white haired, black woman who can control the weather. We are also aware of the new Marvel character coming out with his own movie (Black Panther). But did you know that these two characters fall in love? Neither did I!!! Okay to be honest, I sort of knew because my son is an avid comic book reader, and if you are too, then this is not news to you. However, everyone else can play catch up reading this amazing graphic novel. Storm by Eric Jerome Dickey (that’s right, the African American fiction author) is a love story. Ororo and T’Chala come from very different backgrounds. Ororo (Storm) is an orphan turned “street urchin” who has been trained to steal from unsuspecting targets. T’chala (Black Panther) is the prince of Wakanda, an African country with a rich history and vast resources. The two cross paths as Storm is being hunted down by men she stole from. T’chala, on his walkabout to become a man intervenes, saving Ororo’s life. As their relationship develops, Ororo’s abilities begin to heighten. Because her powers are directly affected by her emotions, it is impossible for her to hide the way she feels about T’chala which leaves a trial for those hunting her to trace. I admit that I am not an avid graphic novel reader and I’m certain Dickey’s spin on the story of Storm and Black Panther ventures off from the original comics, but I truly enjoyed reading this book. Not only did Dickey recreate the story of two beloved fictional characters, but he did it without shying away from real social political issues of the region. I would recommend this book to those who appreciate a quality story line with powerful characters.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I'm still in shock about the idea of Eric Jerome Dickey doing not just an origin story but STORM'S origin story. Honestly I wasn't expecting to much but I was surprised at the overall book. EJD did good job marrying his storytelling with the X-Men universe. I am glad it wasn't one of those experiences where I was thinking the entire time "oh my god what is he doing". I would pick up another book by him... well more specifically another graphic novel. Side note, I'm not sure how much of the writi I'm still in shock about the idea of Eric Jerome Dickey doing not just an origin story but STORM'S origin story. Honestly I wasn't expecting to much but I was surprised at the overall book. EJD did good job marrying his storytelling with the X-Men universe. I am glad it wasn't one of those experiences where I was thinking the entire time "oh my god what is he doing". I would pick up another book by him... well more specifically another graphic novel. Side note, I'm not sure how much of the writing leans in illustration but there is one page in the book that honestly leaves me speechless. (view spoiler)[After they made love and they're lying there before the sunrise. Beautiful. Literally not a word of text but somehow all the emotions before that page and the waking conversations. Loved that moment. (hide spoiler)] I'm almost tempted to loan this one to my mother who is the true EJD fan, she reads his books like they are going out of style - talks about them quite a bit too - I'm trying hard to not pick up Gideon but she's wearing on me ;-) But until he writes another graphic novel this will have to do. I'd definitely recommend it to X-Men and Storm fans - of which I clearly am both.

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