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Two men possess vital data on Russia’s Star Wars missile defense system. One of them is CARDINAL—America's highest agent in the Kremlin—and he's about to be terminated by the KGB. The other is the one American who can save CARDINAL and lead the world to the brink of peace…or war. Here is author Tom Clancy’s heart-stopping masterpiece. A riveting novel of the most important Two men possess vital data on Russia’s Star Wars missile defense system. One of them is CARDINAL—America's highest agent in the Kremlin—and he's about to be terminated by the KGB. The other is the one American who can save CARDINAL and lead the world to the brink of peace…or war. Here is author Tom Clancy’s heart-stopping masterpiece. A riveting novel of the most important issue of our time.


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Two men possess vital data on Russia’s Star Wars missile defense system. One of them is CARDINAL—America's highest agent in the Kremlin—and he's about to be terminated by the KGB. The other is the one American who can save CARDINAL and lead the world to the brink of peace…or war. Here is author Tom Clancy’s heart-stopping masterpiece. A riveting novel of the most important Two men possess vital data on Russia’s Star Wars missile defense system. One of them is CARDINAL—America's highest agent in the Kremlin—and he's about to be terminated by the KGB. The other is the one American who can save CARDINAL and lead the world to the brink of peace…or war. Here is author Tom Clancy’s heart-stopping masterpiece. A riveting novel of the most important issue of our time.

30 review for The Cardinal of the Kremlin

  1. 4 out of 5

    Igor Ljubuncic

    After writing my Clear and Present Danger review, I decided I ought to add a few more Clancy opinionaires. So let's continue with this one. A very solid, entertaining book. Le classique, as the French would say. It's got the right dose of technology, warfare, sci-fi hi-tech stuff, espionage, bad Russians, good Russians, noble Russians, Afghanistan, satellites, LASERS, friggin' lasers, narrate that Dr. Evil style, everything you can expect from an 80s cocktail of Texas Ranger meets MIT postgrad m After writing my Clear and Present Danger review, I decided I ought to add a few more Clancy opinionaires. So let's continue with this one. A very solid, entertaining book. Le classique, as the French would say. It's got the right dose of technology, warfare, sci-fi hi-tech stuff, espionage, bad Russians, good Russians, noble Russians, Afghanistan, satellites, LASERS, friggin' lasers, narrate that Dr. Evil style, everything you can expect from an 80s cocktail of Texas Ranger meets MIT postgrad meets someone who's read about Soviet interrogation methods and how women think on USENET. The book is quite good in that it lacks the later taint of too much White House politics that became Clancy's calling card, making him the favorite reading slash fapping material among politicians, ahead of Playboy and Good Housewives. You enjoy the Janes' Monthly expose plus John Wayne western-like attitude to problem solving plus lesbians. YES! Clancy had a dirty mind once. We do need a limerick, now: With cliche names as sharp as razor, Ryan wore a Navy blazer, Russian spies, Lesbians and lies, In the end, 'twas a friggin' laser. Have much funski, Igor

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 to 3.5 stars. This was the first Tom Clancy book that I ever read and it turned out to be my least favorite. On the good side, I loved the introduction of "Mr. Clark" who is my favorite character of the Clancy novels. However, the novel seemed to drag in places and I just found myself wanting the plot to move along. Overall, it was still a god read and by other author's standards would have been a 4 star effort at least. However, I hold Clancy to a higher standard based on his later efforts 3.0 to 3.5 stars. This was the first Tom Clancy book that I ever read and it turned out to be my least favorite. On the good side, I loved the introduction of "Mr. Clark" who is my favorite character of the Clancy novels. However, the novel seemed to drag in places and I just found myself wanting the plot to move along. Overall, it was still a god read and by other author's standards would have been a 4 star effort at least. However, I hold Clancy to a higher standard based on his later efforts so he has to live with 3 to 3.5 stars for this one.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lena

    Comrades, this was much better the second time around. I got choked up at the end, a tear nearly escaped. Complex, tense, and insightful, this story sees Ryan making bold moves. I did speed through the Afghan parts because it was bitter and depressing. That entire situation was, in hindsight, perhaps a facepalm in American foreign manipulation. You can almost hear the Russians laughing. How do like your Afghan comrades now? *Audible note: the narrator was irredeemably bad. I read the ebook inst Comrades, this was much better the second time around. I got choked up at the end, a tear nearly escaped. Complex, tense, and insightful, this story sees Ryan making bold moves. I did speed through the Afghan parts because it was bitter and depressing. That entire situation was, in hindsight, perhaps a facepalm in American foreign manipulation. You can almost hear the Russians laughing. How do like your Afghan comrades now? *Audible note: the narrator was irredeemably bad. I read the ebook instead.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    Following the disappointing Patriot Games, Clancy redeemed himself (in my eyes) with a spy thriller with classical ingredients, i.e. the extrication of a Soviet double agent by the Americans. It's been a long while since I've read any Clancy, so caveat lector is in place here. But I would say that should I re-read any of the books, it is this one (and The Sum of All Fears). Following the disappointing Patriot Games, Clancy redeemed himself (in my eyes) with a spy thriller with classical ingredients, i.e. the extrication of a Soviet double agent by the Americans. It's been a long while since I've read any Clancy, so caveat lector is in place here. But I would say that should I re-read any of the books, it is this one (and The Sum of All Fears).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Peter Meredith

    As an author, Clancy brings a workman like approach to The Cardinal of the Kremlin. There is little in the way of fanciful prose, or endearing characters and the story is choppy, however this is far from unusual for him. He relies a good deal on the technical aspects of cutting edge weaponry and good old fashioned spy vs spy action to keep readers turning the page. Yes, Jack Ryan is back, but even in his second book he is starting to wear thin and thankfully plays only a small, yet important role As an author, Clancy brings a workman like approach to The Cardinal of the Kremlin. There is little in the way of fanciful prose, or endearing characters and the story is choppy, however this is far from unusual for him. He relies a good deal on the technical aspects of cutting edge weaponry and good old fashioned spy vs spy action to keep readers turning the page. Yes, Jack Ryan is back, but even in his second book he is starting to wear thin and thankfully plays only a small, yet important role. But there is a new hero in town. We are introduced to one of my favorite characters ever(and far from endearing) it is the shadowy, "Mr Clark". As the ultimate anti-James Bond spy, he makes the book worth it all by himself. Obviously, I recommend this to all Clancy fans. If you haven't read him yet, start with The Hunt for Red October and then Red Storm Rising.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    The short-short version of what became my review: A gripping spy thriller that brings back all that Cold War Nostalgia; but Tom Clancy has obviously never met a lesbian before in his life. --- Perhaps it goes without saying, but Tom Clancy's work is not high literature. He will never rank up there with Ernest Hemingway [1] or David Foster Wallace or Angela Carter. He'll be published long after his death as an historical literary study, a snapshot of late-stage Cold War Paranoia--but those are elec The short-short version of what became my review: A gripping spy thriller that brings back all that Cold War Nostalgia; but Tom Clancy has obviously never met a lesbian before in his life. --- Perhaps it goes without saying, but Tom Clancy's work is not high literature. He will never rank up there with Ernest Hemingway [1] or David Foster Wallace or Angela Carter. He'll be published long after his death as an historical literary study, a snapshot of late-stage Cold War Paranoia--but those are elective seminars in the History annex, and not part of the upper-division English rubric. That is totally fine though; this is why we bother cracking the covers on a Tom Clancy novel--for the thrill ride that is his particular flavor of military/political techno-thriller. His schtick is to razzle-dazzle his readers [2] with the nitty-gritty details of this or that weapon (real or hypothetical) and to go on tangents that involve world history as told through the lens of the Military-Industrial complex and/or to speculate on (then) contemporary socio-political machinations as told through the lens of world history as told through the lens of the Military-Industrial complex. We're not in it for the metaphors, we're in it for the bombs. And the lasers. My first exposure to Clancy was in the late-80s or early-90s, starting with Red Storm Rising and working my way through his books. At some point between ages 10 and 14, I read The Cardinal of the Kremlin. [3] Having re-read RSR back in 2006, I thought it might be worth re-reading another Tom Clancy book. A re-read 20 years in the making, I thought to myself. I had only two memories of this book, one vague [4] and one specific [5], and thought that, if nothing else, at least it would be like reading a book for the first time. So I borrowed my Dad's paperback and queued it up for a January read. [6] My vague recollection (footnote #4, vide infra) turned out to be pretty close--so at least that much was memorable, but I'd forgotten some of the other depth. Though calling it "depth" is maybe too generous? What Clancy does with this book is go bonkers with the espionage and counterintelligence business. He goes out of his way to include every facet: the analysis and speculation, the field operations, agents, double-agents, counter agents, double counter agents, spy satellites, submarines, extractions, kidnapping, disguises, botched missions, and the kind of at-the-highest-levels manifestations of what can only be boiled down to extortion. It's all in there. And/but I had completely forgotten about the whole sub-plot with "the Archer" and all the Afghan mujahideen stuff. The spy junk that makes up 70-80% of the book is great--but it would have been a completely two-dimensional arc. It helps to be reminded that the conflicts between the super-powers did not take place in a vacuum, and what was it that Archimedes said about long-enough levers? But there was also a huge let-down here. The big Act Two climax that bridges us into those closing chapters had a bizarre and almost nonsensical setup. (view spoiler)[Clancy presents us with Bea Taussig who works in the administrative staff at the Tea Clipper project and is a lesbian who has fallen in love with Candace Long, one of the scientists on the project who happens to be engaged to the brilliant lead scientist on the project, Alan Gregory. On the surface, the whole "secret unrequited love" bit is not all together awful or implausible. What's awful about it is that it seemed hastily tacked on to give her a motivation for her treason--only it doesn't explain it all. There is a bunch of narration in there about how Bea dislikes Alan Gregory, and how her friend Candace can do better--but it's all framed pretty hetero-normatively: as though Bea were simply a prissy spoiled brat who looked down on "the geek", and that same narration is lacking any sort of outward disdain for men in a general sense. [7] But even if an outward disdain for men in a general sense were a good marker for us that Bea were a lesbian (and I'm saying that it's not) then we still have the problem of motivation--because why would she sell state military secrets to the Soviets? to a totalitarian regime--even one in the middle of liberalizing itself--that had a history and an active policy of sending queers to labor camps? Was it then just the money? If she were motivated simply by the money, I could get by on that--I could give Clancy a pass. Now: clearly Bea is not motivated by ideology (because there is no evidence in the text for that, and because we're assuming that she is motivated first by the money) and maybe-just-maybe she is motivated by the excitement that comes with the danger of spying (there's some evidence in the text for that, too), but we still have that long last-mile to bring us up to that final mark where she assists in Gregory's kidnapping. Suddenly we go from "spoiled materialistic chick with a mis-guided sense of adventure" to "lovesick-to-the-point-of-delusional lesbian accomplice kidnapper"; passing microfilm with state secrets in the dressing room is one thing, but assisting in a KGB-sponsored kidnapping is quite another. Especially since the follow-on was for her to start awkwardly groping Candace (with Federal agents right downstairs) not 24 hours after Gregory is reported missing. And even if you were still on board after that, you have to then accept that she would completely fold/break-down and spill everything to the Feds about her crimes. Right: the woman who was in it for the thrill, the woman who didn't bat an eyelash when the KGB proposed an on-American-soil kidnapping, was going to hastily and predatorily move in on her distraught friend, and then (and then!) just spill everything? (hide spoiler)] I'm sorry but I'm just having too tough a time making that leap with you there, Tom. The whole Bea-Candi-Gregory not-quite-love-triangle bit aside, the novel was a fun read and full of every kind of semi-kinda/sorta-mostly realistics it-could-happen spy business you could want. It certainly tickled my Cold War Nostalgia. --- [1] And I don't even particularly like Hemingway. [2] Largely males ages 18-65? Largely white? Largely dudes who self-report their favorite movies as "Top Gun" and/or "Rambo" and/or "Red Dawn"? [3] Yes, I was effectively a child. [4] I knew it was about spies, and SDI lasers. [5] I remembered the scene where Mary Pat Foley scribbled "Let's give these microphones a hard-on!!" [6] I had to get through Neanderthal and The Untouchable before that, first. [7] And/but/which would still not paint a picture of Bea as a lesbian, though that might have painted a picture of her as a lesbian as seen through the lens of the Conservative White Male. Maybe.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Barry Medlin

    Enjoyed this one! Hard to beat Clancy and Jack Ryan!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ken Hammond

    The Cardinal of the Kremlin by Tom Clancy. Colonel Mikhail Semyonovich “Misha” 3 time winner of the medal Hero of the Soviet Union during WW2. By the 60s he had become disillusioned with everything incompetent leaders and wasteful loss of lives. CIA Recruited Misha after the deaths of his wife and 2 sons becoming its most valuable asset in the upper echelons of Soviet power. After a bungled effort to get information regarding USSR Star Wars program the much vaunted anti nuclear balĺistic missile The Cardinal of the Kremlin by Tom Clancy. Colonel Mikhail Semyonovich “Misha” 3 time winner of the medal Hero of the Soviet Union during WW2. By the 60s he had become disillusioned with everything incompetent leaders and wasteful loss of lives. CIA Recruited Misha after the deaths of his wife and 2 sons becoming its most valuable asset in the upper echelons of Soviet power. After a bungled effort to get information regarding USSR Star Wars program the much vaunted anti nuclear balĺistic missile program to shoot down missiles with lasers. Misha captured tortured but unbroken but for how long. Realising this the CIA go with Jack Ryan’s rescue plan. What follows is intrigue and dastardly acts sneaking behind and full on frontal attacks. What I thought were side stories like the Archer cleverly Clancy has intricately interwoven and meshed together several side plots. Battle tactics and best laid plans laid to waste and even believable if or unbelievable technologies were created however some fantastic ideas and possibilities abounds. Anyway a long story but very worthwhile

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Executive Summary: I found this one a bit uneven. The start was pretty slow, but the pace picked up as it went on. Good, but not great. Audiobook: Michael Prichard did a decent job narrating. He spoke clearly with good inflection and volume, but didn't really add anything to the book. Audio a good option, but definitely not a must listen. Full Review I mostly read SFF, so it's always nice to take a break with another genre. I hadn't exactly planned to listen to this one, but I had put a hold in Executive Summary: I found this one a bit uneven. The start was pretty slow, but the pace picked up as it went on. Good, but not great. Audiobook: Michael Prichard did a decent job narrating. He spoke clearly with good inflection and volume, but didn't really add anything to the book. Audio a good option, but definitely not a must listen. Full Review I mostly read SFF, so it's always nice to take a break with another genre. I hadn't exactly planned to listen to this one, but I had put a hold in for this awhile back because the wait list was pretty long. The timing on my hold worked out pretty well to fit this into my schedule. When I was younger I probably read thrillers more than any other genre, but I never read and Tom Clancy apart from Net Force (and in writing this review I discovered he didn't even write that). I had watched all the Jack Ryan movies however. I'm still working my way slowly through the entire series in publication order, and this one was up next. It certainly doesn't have the name recognition of several of the other Jack Ryan books, but it was a fairly solid entry. I found it slow in the early going, and wasn't really getting into it. There were a few different subplots, including a random Afghani mujahideen whose name we never learn, and is simply referred to as the Archer. I had no idea how that was supposed to tie in with everything else going on. As someone who was born in the 80's, I didn't learn about our involvement with helping the mujahideen, until much later. I must admit it seemed a bit strange to me reading this after we've been fighting in Afghanistan ourselves for so many years. That aside, it took quite some time for the relevance of Archer's storyline to fit into the larger picture. Jack Ryan is once again at the center of the story, but one could argue not the most important character. That may be the titular character the Cardinal himself, or possibly one of the other players in Russia. That doesn't mean he isn't a key player, but there is a lot of time spent away from Jack and his actions in this one. This book certainly had a lot more espionage than the previous books. I liked how Mr. Clancy presented both the American and Soviet sides. At times I felt he was a bit too eager to paint the Americans as lagging behind the Soviets. This isn't from any sense of superiority as an American, but simply that it felt like he was doing it try to ratchet up the stakes a bit too much. In the end though, I thought it was a pretty well balanced, with people on both sides of the conflict who simply wished to avoid further escalation of conflict between the US and the Soviet Union. Both sides made mistakes, and both sides took advantage of their adversaries mistakes. There wasn't a whole lot of action in this one. Most of the tension comes from the various spy plots. Don't get me wrong, there are still a few gunfights, explosions and a car chase, but I felt like they aren't as prevalent as other Jack Ryan stories. I thought the end of the book really picked up the pacing, likely because the early part spent so much time moving the pieces into place and setting up the stakes of the book. I enjoyed the book, but I didn't love it. I'm glad my library seems to have the whole series in digital audio now, so I can simply borrow these books rather than buying any more of them. I suspect most of them will be in the fun, but not spectacular category that I'd place this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    One of the best stories by one of my favorite authors, which I first read in 1992. Whenever one of Tom Clancy's novels deals with any subject I know a little something about, it always strikes me as being well-written and true-to-life. This novel deals with spies and counter-intelligence, subjects about which I know very little; however, based upon what Clancy has written about on other topics, I am left with the strong impression that this story rings true to life, as well. It is based upon the One of the best stories by one of my favorite authors, which I first read in 1992. Whenever one of Tom Clancy's novels deals with any subject I know a little something about, it always strikes me as being well-written and true-to-life. This novel deals with spies and counter-intelligence, subjects about which I know very little; however, based upon what Clancy has written about on other topics, I am left with the strong impression that this story rings true to life, as well. It is based upon the premise that the American CIA has had a deep-cover agent operating in the Soviet Union's Ministry of Defense for thirty years. The spy, code named "Cardinal," has recently come under suspicion by the KGB, but his high position in the ministry, as well as his status as a war hero, makes him as near to "untouchable" as it is possible to be in the U.S.S.R. As the KGB agent works to develop his evidence into the airtight case that he needs in order to arrest and expose Cardinal, the CIA learns of the investigation, and it becomes a race against time as the Americans develop a plan to rescue Cardinal and get him out before the KGB can arrest him, and very likely execute him. This story is a sequel to "The Hunt for Red October" and features Jack Ryan, the CIA analyst who spearheaded the Red October mission. It is Clancy at his very best!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian Eshleman

    One would not think the author could build an exciting story around something as predictable and scripted as an international summit, but when Tom Clancy's hero Jack Ryan is the aide charged with helping to write the script of the summit, the excitement will follow him. Indeed, international political currents co-mingle with individual rooting interests as those in high positions of the US government must decide how much risk repaying one man's loyalty is worth. Clancy's storytelling continues to One would not think the author could build an exciting story around something as predictable and scripted as an international summit, but when Tom Clancy's hero Jack Ryan is the aide charged with helping to write the script of the summit, the excitement will follow him. Indeed, international political currents co-mingle with individual rooting interests as those in high positions of the US government must decide how much risk repaying one man's loyalty is worth. Clancy's storytelling continues to be engaging. This is true in part because he refuses to tip the scales in favor of the United States, portraying professionals on both sides of the Cold War making realistic decisions within the realm of the adjacent possible. Along the way, Clancy makes cogent observations about human character as played out in his cast and particularly engaging observations about American and Soviet character. Jack Ryan is clearly a man developing the set of experiences and the temperament for higher office, and getting to see that up close in fiction is enough to keep me reading at the times when Tom Clancy seems to get lost in his love for weapons and technology.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Classic Clancy. Perhaps his best work. Gripping, insightful, exciting. He was truly a master storyteller, the likes of which we probably won't see again in the political/military/espionage world. The first appearance by John Clark, the first appearance of Sergey Golovko, a few cameos from 'The Hunt for Red October' and a stunning ending. Classic Clancy. Perhaps his best work. Gripping, insightful, exciting. He was truly a master storyteller, the likes of which we probably won't see again in the political/military/espionage world. The first appearance by John Clark, the first appearance of Sergey Golovko, a few cameos from 'The Hunt for Red October' and a stunning ending.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Konaka

    The Cardinal of the Kremlin The Cardinal of the Kremlin by Tom Clancy recounts a fictional story of political intrigue and espionage between the United States of America and the United Soviet Socialist Republic (U.S.S.R.) during the Cold War era. The book is 547 pages long, and was published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons in 1988. The plot revolves around the two nation’s development of a program akin to the Strategic Defense Initiative originally proposed by Ronald Reagan, which was devoted to serve as The Cardinal of the Kremlin The Cardinal of the Kremlin by Tom Clancy recounts a fictional story of political intrigue and espionage between the United States of America and the United Soviet Socialist Republic (U.S.S.R.) during the Cold War era. The book is 547 pages long, and was published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons in 1988. The plot revolves around the two nation’s development of a program akin to the Strategic Defense Initiative originally proposed by Ronald Reagan, which was devoted to serve as an aegis to the country in the event of nuclear war. The main characters are Jack Ryan, a United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) counter-espionage data analyst, and Colonel Mikhail Semyonovich Filitov also known as the Cardinal, a highly placed spy in the Soviet Defense Ministry. The Cardinal of the Kremlin is predominantly in the point of view of Jack Ryan, however it does change to encompass Colonel Filitov, the Komitet Gosudarstvennoy Bezopasnasti (KGB) Chairman Gerasimov, and various lower stationed officials. Tom Clancy utilizes characterization, point of view, and setting to present the audience with the full story in a convoluted plot around the clandestine art known as espionage. Tom Clancy breaks through the traditional “secret agent” archetype in order to present the audience with memorable and relatable characters. The main character, Jack Ryan, is not a clandestine, silver-tongued agent, but rather a wealthy ex-marine who spends most of his time analyzing data at a desk at the CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. Likewise, Colonel “Misha” Filitov is not a dapper young American sympathizer, instead he is an aged Soviet war hero that fulfills a role akin to secretary to the defense minister. With the plethora of spy novels available, Clancy’s characterization of these key figures sets his novel apart. As with any spy novel, The Cardinal of the Kremlin is full of unforeseen plot twists, many of them uncontrollable, and many of them facilitated by these characters themselves. Clancy’s deep and personal characterization allows the reader to understand why characters made the choices that they did. The way of espionage is “to know” without allowing one’s enemies “to know”, therefore it would not be logical if one character with a single allegiance knows all of the facts. Tom Clancy expertly utilizes point of view to present readers with the full story in a realistic fashion. Usually, Jack Ryan or a lesser functionary is used to convey the United States’ plans and knowledge, while Misha Filitov or Chairman Gerasimov fulfills a similar role for the U.S.S.R. As is true in reality none of these characters, no matter rank, have the full picture. To remedy this, Clancy uses perspective changes to give the reader the entire story while still maintaining realism. Utilizing point of view in this fashion allows for dramatic irony, however given the context it is usually fairly somber. The Cardinal of the Kremlin is set predominantly in the Soviet Union during the Cold War. However, Clancy also utilizes various locations in the United States and the Afghan-Pakistani border. Due to the sparsely populated nature of the U.S.S.R., the upper echelons of military and civilian society inhabit Moscow, the capital. This means that most of the state decisions are made in Moscow, therefore the majority of politics and intrigue occur there. At this time the Soviet Union is fighting a war against the United States-backed Muhajideen in Afghanistan and Pakistan. By incorporating this location Clancy is able to add action to the novel, without which he would lose many of his reader’s attention. While much of the political machinations take place in Moscow, the United States, particularly Washington D.C. and New Mexico are also settings. These places are where the United States agents and functionaries meet and voice their thoughts and plans. Whereas doing so in Moscow would be committing the unthinkable. Throughout the novel, Clancy maintains a sense of realism which is continued in the setting as all of the locations were important during the Cold War. Tom Clancy masterfully manipulates characterization, point of view, and setting to present a realistic espionage novel that shatters typical archetypes. Rather than the common furtive, clandestine, spies who typically inhabit “spy” novels, Clancy’s characters are each unique and resemble an everyday person one may meet. Clancy also makes successful use of point of view in order to present the audience with the full story while still making the book believable. His choice of setting serves both to hold the reader’s attention while not detracting from the other facets of the story. The Cardinal of the Kremlin is an engaging espionage novel that breaks the usual boundaries while still maintaining the sense of realism that is eminent in all of his publications.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

    I had been meaning to read "Cardinal of the Kremlin" now for several years. Published in 1988, it is one of the older Jack Ryan technothrillers, one that I had bypassed when I started reading Clancy's works, first "Red Storm Rising" and then beginning the Jack Ryan saga with "Clear and Present Danger." I had - with the exception of "Without Remorse" and the newly published "Red Rabbit"- read all of the other subsequent books, and those books that I did not read I had seen the movie version (name I had been meaning to read "Cardinal of the Kremlin" now for several years. Published in 1988, it is one of the older Jack Ryan technothrillers, one that I had bypassed when I started reading Clancy's works, first "Red Storm Rising" and then beginning the Jack Ryan saga with "Clear and Present Danger." I had - with the exception of "Without Remorse" and the newly published "Red Rabbit"- read all of the other subsequent books, and those books that I did not read I had seen the movie version (namely "The Hunt For Red October" and "Patriot Games"). I had resisted reading this one, or perhaps I should say I hadn't placed a high priority on this one, as they never filmed it, and it was a book very much steeped in Cold War intrigue, much of the novel taking place in the Soviet Union and involving two staples of the last years of the Cold War; "Star Wars" or the Strategic Defense Initiative (or to be more precise, something equivalent to it in the novel, a high-tech antiballistic missile or ABM system) and the Soviet war in Afghanistan. I was worried it would be antiquated, or that it would depict a Soviet Union that didn't really exist, as the collapse of the USSR in the late 1980s/early 1990s showed that how little the West really understood what the reality of the Soviet Union actually was. I decided to read the book recently, partially to say I had read all of the Jack Ryan novels, partially because I wanted to know more of Ryan's history (events in this novel were referenced several times in Clancy's later works), and partially because I had decided to treat it as a period piece (and I have in the past enjoyed good tales of Cold War intrigue). I figured it would show an interesting, early Ryan, quite a bit different from the powerful and experienced one who eventually becomes President of the United States later on in the "Ryanverse" series. I must say I enjoyed it. It wasn't my favorite of the Ryan series but it certainly held my interest and I found it a fast read. It was actually a rather enlightened novel, as it showed the Russians as real people; some were good, some were bad. The Soviets depicted were for the most part fairly well rounded individuals, who just like Americans simply wanted more or less the same thing out of life; basically success and happiness. Some were not good people but even they weren't depicted as moustache-twirling, cackling Cold War villains, though to be sure there were bad guys in the piece. While it is not surprising that the title character of the book - the Cardinal, Colonel Mikhail Filitov, a highly placed spy in the Soviet military - is shown as a good person, it was somewhat surprising that many of those opposed to his actions were not shown as evil or vile but simply as often good people doing their job. In essence, Clancy showed that while the Soviet regime was bad, its people weren't necessarily so. His view of governments versus people - particularly with regards to the Russians - holds true in his later works as well, showing a good deal of consistency in his writing. Perhaps I didn't give Clancy enough credit in this regard, I don't know. In any event I found myself occasionally rooting for characters in the novel who were actually opposed to Filitov, Ryan, and the other protagonists. The novel itself was as some have said more of a straightforward spy novel than some of the other volumes in the Jack Ryan series, with many classic espionage scenes taking place in Moscow and involving the KGB. Five major plotlines are followed in the novel, with four of these plotlines tightly interwoven; the Soviet Union is pursuing a largely ground-based ABM system (Bright Star), the United States is also pursuing one named Tea Clipper (these plots also involved those in one program trying to spy on the other nation's efforts), Colonel Filitov is spying for the Americans (and related to that plotline, there are Russians trying to uncover him), and Jack Ryan and others in the American government are conducting arms reduction negotiations in Moscow (ultimately the latter storyline becomes subservient to the others) The fifth plotline revolves around an Afghan mudjaheddin named the "Archer" and his actions in Afghanistan against Soviet forces and doesn't tie in hardly at all at first though it does in the end (more or less I think). Action-wise the book was middle of the road (if anything fairly light) until the end when several plotlines end in some violence (particularly the Archer plot). The storyline with Filitov ended with some surprise for me, though it was an ending hinted at in the later Ryan books I had read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Man, one of the underrated casualties of the fall of the Soviet Union was Tom Clancy's career. The spy plot of this book is fun, if hokey, yoked as it is to the author's political agenda ("STAR WARS! It's how today's serious armchair generals stroke their chins and avow hatred for war.") and the demands of writing massive best sellers (CIA's eponymous, undetectable agent: a tough old Red Army superhero who blew up swathes of Nazis and loves his homeland, but who sees the evils of Communism when Man, one of the underrated casualties of the fall of the Soviet Union was Tom Clancy's career. The spy plot of this book is fun, if hokey, yoked as it is to the author's political agenda ("STAR WARS! It's how today's serious armchair generals stroke their chins and avow hatred for war.") and the demands of writing massive best sellers (CIA's eponymous, undetectable agent: a tough old Red Army superhero who blew up swathes of Nazis and loves his homeland, but who sees the evils of Communism when his family is killed by the needs of the many) . . . but what an agenda it is. CIA's not incompetent, they just want us to think so. President Whoever-it-is (nope, didn't call him Reagan, didn't say it) is a damned fine guy in person: sharp, humane, and behind his top men to the end. What gall! What fun! And then the 80s throwback humor: KGB agents, marveling at the nutritional wonder of the BK Whopper. Mujahideen as valiant freedom fighters (!!!). SEC insider trading investigations falling willy-nilly on even the immaculate Jack Ryan. KGB agents, again, thankful for sugary American breakfast foods to power them through their days of kidnapping American antiballistic missile experts (albeit unsuccessfully -- huh. maybe Clancy's crack about sugar was wilier than it looked). If only the USSR had lived to provide a stage of Communist oppression and Western techno-spying for another thirty years.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Koan

    Tom Clancy knows his stuff. The first book of his that I read, "The Hunt for Red October", was filled with jargon and information about the navy. This book however, was filled with information about the KGB, Russian intelligence, the CIA, and the Strategic Defense Initiative. I learned quite a lot about all of these things, and am yet still confused by them. The best part of Tom Clancy's writing is the political intrigue. More than any other writer, Tom Clancy gets the Cold War and Russian-Ameri Tom Clancy knows his stuff. The first book of his that I read, "The Hunt for Red October", was filled with jargon and information about the navy. This book however, was filled with information about the KGB, Russian intelligence, the CIA, and the Strategic Defense Initiative. I learned quite a lot about all of these things, and am yet still confused by them. The best part of Tom Clancy's writing is the political intrigue. More than any other writer, Tom Clancy gets the Cold War and Russian-American relations. I loved almost every page that Jack Ryan was on and when Filitov was on. I was also surprised when they revealed so early on who "Cardinal" was, and it put me on the edge of my seat whenever he was on the page. I also really liked seeing Ed and Mary Pat Foley, and I hope they are used more in future books. They were funny and intereresting. I could have had a whole book about them being spies in Russia(it's like the reverse of the t.v. show "The Americans"). Honestly, I understand why Clancy included the Afgans and "The Archer", but I felt that he could have cut out that entire subplot, and just changed the ending slightly, and the book would have been much better. It would have been more concise and more understandable. The biggest difference between this book and Hunt for Red October is concision, and unfortunately, I believe it only gets worse from here. I also wasn't a huge fan of the Major Gregory plotline, until the big thing happens with him later in the book. Another good thing about the book was it delved a little into the reasons behind the Cold War. Too often, hollywood focuses on the wrong things regarding the buildup of nuclear weapons(such as in the disappointing Wonder Woman 1984 movie) and Clancy understands all sides of the situations. He understands Reagan's point of view(although Reagan is not in the book at all), and he understands the Russians as well. There was a decent amount of language in the book, and it was grating at times, but it didn't seem quite as bad as Hunt for Red October thankfully. Overall, I did really enjoy the book, but I felt it was too long and too convoluted. I still didn't understand who many of the characters were. But, I enjoyed myself and look forward to the next one, so it did it's job. 7.1 out of 10. Good job Clancy.

  17. 5 out of 5

    E

    This is basically a spy thriller with a few Clancyesque action scenes thrown in. I liked it very much. The Iron Curtain may have fallen three decades ago, but these novels are still gripping. They are about humans, after all, far more than about political ideology or, even worse "impersonal forces." This is called the "sequel" to The Hunt for Red October, but don't read this looking for hundreds of pages of underwater maneuvering. Well, not literally anyway. There is still plenty of clandestine This is basically a spy thriller with a few Clancyesque action scenes thrown in. I liked it very much. The Iron Curtain may have fallen three decades ago, but these novels are still gripping. They are about humans, after all, far more than about political ideology or, even worse "impersonal forces." This is called the "sequel" to The Hunt for Red October, but don't read this looking for hundreds of pages of underwater maneuvering. Well, not literally anyway. There is still plenty of clandestine maneuvering, and it is just as thrilling.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hugo

    For this reading check, I read a book from Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan series, named, The Cardinal of the Kremlin. As it is a long novel, this is the only title I have read since the break, and while it took quite a bit more than 2 hours per week, I enjoyed it thoroughly. In The Cardinal of the Kremlin, I liked how Tom Clancy combined action scenes from the tribal groups of the Mujahedin fending off the 1980s invasion of the Soviets, with the technical details of the newly developed arms, to see whic For this reading check, I read a book from Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan series, named, The Cardinal of the Kremlin. As it is a long novel, this is the only title I have read since the break, and while it took quite a bit more than 2 hours per week, I enjoyed it thoroughly. In The Cardinal of the Kremlin, I liked how Tom Clancy combined action scenes from the tribal groups of the Mujahedin fending off the 1980s invasion of the Soviets, with the technical details of the newly developed arms, to see which of the 2 superpowers, the US and the USSR, could be the first to make and use a laser defense system against ballistic missiles. This is the setting for the characters who are very developed in this great novel. They range from a CIA analyst by the name of Jack Ryan, over a Russian advisor, to a tribesman in Afghanistan called Archer. Archer is fighting off the Soviets in Afghanistan for personal reasons. He is called the Archer, because he is a master at knocking Soviet aircrafts out of the sky, utilizing the new American Stinger missiles. I was convinced of his skillfulness after reading this passage from the book. The missile screamed its readiness at the Archer now, but he was patient. He put his mind into that of his target, and judged that the pilot would come closer still before his helicopter had the shot he wanted at the hated Afghans. And so he did. When the Hind was only thousand meters off, the Archer took a deep breath, super- elevated his sight, and whispered a brief prayer of vengeance. The trigger was pulled almost of its own accord… The missile ran directly into one of the helicopter’s engines and exploded. The helicopter was crippled instantly. The drive shaft for the tail rotor was cut, and the Hind began spinning violently to the left while the pilot tried to auto rotate the aircraft down, frantically looking for a flat place while his gunner radioed a shrill call for rescue. (Clancy 16-17) Misha Filitov is a former Red Army colonel who is Defence Minister Yazov’s personal aide and advisor. He has won the Hero of the Soviet Union award 3 times for his bravery in World War 2, defending the USSR from the fascist German menace. He had many friends who died in the war, like Corporal Romanov who he mentally talks to every night, and sometimes Misha gets drunk remembering him. His wife died a couple years ago and so have his 2 sons, in tanking accidents. This leads Misha to begin sending information to the West. For example, when Filitov leaves the sauna the morning after he gets drunk, he gives a film cannister with pictures of Soviet secrets from his diary to the the bath attendant. He leaks more information successfully because no one suspects an old war hero to be a spy. Another reason I love Tom Clancy’s books in general is because of his attention to detail and technical specifications, and his way of explaining the technology behind everything, from vehicles to satellites. This book, thankfully, is no different. His explanation of Tea Clipper and Bright Star, the US and Soviet ballistic defense programs, are very easy to read and really interesting, as shown in the following excerpt. If I had to guess, sir, I’d say that the system uses the free-electron laser-... “Can I ask why, Major?” the President asked. “Power efficiency, sir. The actual lasting occurs in a stream of free electrons- that means they’re not attached to atoms like they usually are, sir- in a vacuum. You use a linear accelerator to produce a stream of the electrons and shoot them into the cavity, which has a low energy laser shining along its axis. The idea is that you can use electromagnets to oscillate the electrons crosswise to their path”.(Clancy 153, 156) I would recommend this book to anyone who likes action thrillers, but apart from the genre’s usual intrigue and action, there is also a lot of detail and technical background combined with well developed characters. I only have one complaint, which is that sometimes the plot is slow moving, and because many perspectives of characters are written, you are let down occasionally when you don’t hear or see from them for a couple chapters. However, I thought that Tom Clancy was magnificent in putting in Archer, my favorite character, and ultimately tie him into the story. Therefore, I would give this story 4.5 out of 5 stars, because of the slow moving plot. Otherwise, Tom Clancy’s genius of writing, combining characters storyline, and using the interesting topic of the laser defence systems of the 80s helped me enjoy this book a lot.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Corey Woodcock

    Retrospective Review I’m giving this 4.5/5 despite a few flaws because this book was interesting and exciting throughout. Clancy’s books became very long, filled with White House politics and dense, long passages of military detail, but this one is pretty tight for a Clancy book. It was an extremely fun read, and like most of his books I’ve read, built up to a fantastically heart pounding ending. One thing I have to give Clancy is that his endings have always been excellent and extremely action-p Retrospective Review I’m giving this 4.5/5 despite a few flaws because this book was interesting and exciting throughout. Clancy’s books became very long, filled with White House politics and dense, long passages of military detail, but this one is pretty tight for a Clancy book. It was an extremely fun read, and like most of his books I’ve read, built up to a fantastically heart pounding ending. One thing I have to give Clancy is that his endings have always been excellent and extremely action-packed. This is his truest and purest espionage novel and it’s all done pretty well and is mostly believable except for one storyline involving a lesbian that really was pretty unrealistic. It was also both funny to see Tom write about this as well as silly, as it was a bit of a caricature. Besides that, the main storyline involving a Russian code named CARDINAL-a true Hero of the Soviet Union in WW2-feeding secrets to the US is captivating. Despite this being a Jack Ryan book, the CARDINAL stole the show here. He was a fully fleshed out and sympathetic character, and was far more likable than Ryan IMO. This was written in the 80s so of course it’s Cold War centric, but also features a storyline that eventually connects to the main story about an Afghani freedom fighter and his band being aided by the USA in their fight against the Russians. Given the turn of events in the years since this was written, it certainly gives a different perspective than we are used to in the US these days. This book also sees the introduction of the badass John Clark character, star of Without Remorse, which was great, and Rainbow Six, which I hated. Regardless, this is a great character. We also saw the return of my favorite Clancy character-Marko Ramius, the hero of The Hunt For Red October (easily my favorite Clancy book). His return is of course, awesome! Overall, if you’re interested in US-Soviet Cold War relations and espionage, this book won’t let you down. I would recommend reading these books in order. While you probably could read this without having read The Hunt for Red October, there’s just so much more to be had from it if you read the first book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tex

    “The Cardinal Of The Kremlin” (TCOTK) is the fourth book written by the late Tom Clancy and the third featuring John Ryan. Written in 1988 it’s set in the tail end of the Cold War and is primarily based in Washington DC, Moscow, and Afghanistan. A time when it was the Russians fighting the Afghans instead of the US today (oh how allegiances and enemies can change over time). Tom Clancy is an author I love and hate all rolled up into one. Many of his novels are classified as techno-thrillers...and “The Cardinal Of The Kremlin” (TCOTK) is the fourth book written by the late Tom Clancy and the third featuring John Ryan. Written in 1988 it’s set in the tail end of the Cold War and is primarily based in Washington DC, Moscow, and Afghanistan. A time when it was the Russians fighting the Afghans instead of the US today (oh how allegiances and enemies can change over time). Tom Clancy is an author I love and hate all rolled up into one. Many of his novels are classified as techno-thrillers...and that’s where my love hate relationship with his book lies. Clancy is a wonderful story teller building tension, speed, and urgency. Race against time, espionage, risk of capture or close escapes. However it is the “techno” component that leaves me cold. Clancy drops the pace to the many pages of technical specs of military systems- laser defence systems, submarine engine and propulsion systems, for example - that doesn’t add to the story but highlights in detail certain elements of where a story is based. This may be a plus for some readers but for me it slows the pace of the book and fills a huge number of pages with things I’m not particularly interested in. I know this adds a level of realism to the story but would only be of interest to a small portion of engineers who read the book. I, however, find myself skimming these pages to get back to the actual story. TCOTK is all about espionage, discovery of spies, political manoeuvring, rescues of assets. It is a page turner and very entertaining (apart from the detail about how laser systems work...snore). That said I’m still not 100% sure what the point of the story involving The Archer was all about...this could have cut waaaaay back. Overall an enjoyable spy novel. TCOTK gets 3.5 dead-drops out of five.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    The CIA’s most highly-placed agent, codenamed CARDINAL, is Colonel Mikhail Semyonovich Filitov a 3 time hero of the Soviet Union. He begins passing information to the US but is compromised so Ryan leads a CIA operation to extract him. The information includes anti-satellite lasers and other SDI-type weapons, and the Soviet war in Afghanistan. Ryan successfully flips Gerasimov the head of KGB, who has seen the writing on the wall, and fetches Filitov from his confinement using his power as the KG The CIA’s most highly-placed agent, codenamed CARDINAL, is Colonel Mikhail Semyonovich Filitov a 3 time hero of the Soviet Union. He begins passing information to the US but is compromised so Ryan leads a CIA operation to extract him. The information includes anti-satellite lasers and other SDI-type weapons, and the Soviet war in Afghanistan. Ryan successfully flips Gerasimov the head of KGB, who has seen the writing on the wall, and fetches Filitov from his confinement using his power as the KGB Chairman. They then stop at Sheremetyevo Airport, awaiting the departure of the American delegation. Unfortunately, two security officers are clued into the operation: Klementi Vladimirovich Vatutin, a Colonel of the KGB's Second Chief Directorate who had arrested and interrogated two cutouts in Filitov's courier chain. and Sergey Nikolayevch Golovko, an officer of the KGB’s First Chief Directorate (the “Foreign” Directorate). As the pair pursues Gerasimov and Filitov, Ryan falls from the aircraft to the tarmac, and is taken into custody by an enraged Golovko, who points an (unloaded) gun at Ryan's head. Ryan orders the plane to depart, banking on his diplomatic status to protect him from harm. This is the occasion on which Golovko gives Ryan the Russian-style patronymic Ivan Emmetovich (John, Son of Emmet), which is used in later novels.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Luke Hays

    So I just finished this novel this afternoon and oh man, great Clancy thriller! Tom Clancy does it again, he balances multiple storylines and brings them all together in the end. I like the historical backdrop, unlike Red Rabbit where we had a United States vs Soviet Union, this time we get a story set in Afghanistan dealing with the Russians vs the Middle East. Now, I did find it a bit hard to keep everything together as there where a lot of characters coming in and out. Many times I forgot who So I just finished this novel this afternoon and oh man, great Clancy thriller! Tom Clancy does it again, he balances multiple storylines and brings them all together in the end. I like the historical backdrop, unlike Red Rabbit where we had a United States vs Soviet Union, this time we get a story set in Afghanistan dealing with the Russians vs the Middle East. Now, I did find it a bit hard to keep everything together as there where a lot of characters coming in and out. Many times I forgot who some of these extra characters where, so that was a challenge. There are several moments where I laughed. Without spoiling Jack and Caroline Ryan go to a dinner and Jack gets really drunk. The way Clancy wrote the scene made me chuckle, and there are other moments throughout the book with the character of John Patrick Ryan that where humorous. I'm reading this series in the order of publication. I started out of sequence and decided to go chronologically and I'm loving journeying with the Ryan family as they age and mature with the novels. I didn't like it as much as Red Rabbit and The Hunt For Red October, but it is still a fun novel to read if you are planning a long winded stay with a story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Jack Ryan is doing his thing at the CIA. In a complicated plot, action takes place in Afghanistan where the United States is helping the Afghans resist the Russian invasion. United States is unofficially providing the Afghans with misseles to use to destroy Russian helicopters. Another aspect of the story has the United States and Russia competing to develop a Star Wars missile system that could be used to shoot down enemy satillites and control space. Ryan is involved with Russian spy Colonel Mik Jack Ryan is doing his thing at the CIA. In a complicated plot, action takes place in Afghanistan where the United States is helping the Afghans resist the Russian invasion. United States is unofficially providing the Afghans with misseles to use to destroy Russian helicopters. Another aspect of the story has the United States and Russia competing to develop a Star Wars missile system that could be used to shoot down enemy satillites and control space. Ryan is involved with Russian spy Colonel Mikhail Filitov "the Cardinal" who has been giving information to the United States for years but is close to being discovered and must leave Russia. Action abounds in this story, difficult to follow all of the aspects of the story and questions that did the current troubles in Afghanistan begin when we provided those missiles? Interesting to look back to one of Clancy's earlier books and see some of the characters who would have major parts of future Clancy novels.

  24. 4 out of 5

    L.M. Mountford

    Yet another interesting work of cold war propaganda from Mr Clancy. The story of this book had me scratching my head... what is this about? Firstly it starts off as Iraq freedom fighters, then disarmament talks, then an experimental anti-missile weaponry, then spies in Moscow, then KGB operatives kidnapping an American scientist... it just went on and on leaving me no team to understand the characters or their motivation. Four times it even had me drifting off to sleep. Again the characters are u Yet another interesting work of cold war propaganda from Mr Clancy. The story of this book had me scratching my head... what is this about? Firstly it starts off as Iraq freedom fighters, then disarmament talks, then an experimental anti-missile weaponry, then spies in Moscow, then KGB operatives kidnapping an American scientist... it just went on and on leaving me no team to understand the characters or their motivation. Four times it even had me drifting off to sleep. Again the characters are underdeveloped and very 2d, it doesn't even explain why a decorated war hero of the soviet union would turn spy (something i would have been interested to hear, even though the story does hint that it was because his family died... ok rather similar to Marko from HFRO but ok). On the plus side the story is interesting if viewed from the whole, though it was just too much and some parts seemed to have been put in just to give the soviets a good kicking. Might have even made a good movie.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Given the change in the world since this book was released the plot seems a little dated. Aside from that this book is also probably the most compelling that Clany has witten. It also relies to some extent on characters from past Clancy novels which may it a little confusing for first time readers. I didn't find the plot as entralling or suspensful as other Clancy works like the Hunt for Red October or Clear and Present Danger. I still however enjoy Clancy's writing style and plot development and Given the change in the world since this book was released the plot seems a little dated. Aside from that this book is also probably the most compelling that Clany has witten. It also relies to some extent on characters from past Clancy novels which may it a little confusing for first time readers. I didn't find the plot as entralling or suspensful as other Clancy works like the Hunt for Red October or Clear and Present Danger. I still however enjoy Clancy's writing style and plot development and his high level knowledge of the subject matter. Perhaps the world has moved on too much now for this style of novel to be truely engrossing. It is hard to imagine a world in which the major struggle was the Cold War, yet it once was. Unfortunately that is what happens when you write a book based on current events, when those events change your work dates very quickly.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave Jones

    If I had the option, I would give this book 3.5 stars. It was a good, entertaining read although perhaps not up to the level of other Clancy stories. However, I found the plot resolution mostly predictable. Still I was fascinated by the characters and various plot threads. It was interesting to pick up on characters from earlier novels – even all the way back to Red October. I actually did not intend to read this book at this time but two years ago, I moved from Bloomington to adjacent Normal. Th If I had the option, I would give this book 3.5 stars. It was a good, entertaining read although perhaps not up to the level of other Clancy stories. However, I found the plot resolution mostly predictable. Still I was fascinated by the characters and various plot threads. It was interesting to pick up on characters from earlier novels – even all the way back to Red October. I actually did not intend to read this book at this time but two years ago, I moved from Bloomington to adjacent Normal. This was the last chance to use the Bloomington library card before it expires next month. This is a pity as I really enjoyed Bloomington’s Kindle offerings.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Ahh…..here at last we see the character development of Tom Clancy as architect of the Jack Ryan reality and in the character Jack Ryan himself who has in The Cardinal of the Kremlin lost the obnoxious edge to his arrogance, icing it down with a more calculated daring. Edging toward a five star rating here, Clancy leaves behind some of the more irritating components of his first novels (namely Jack’s wife and personal life) to focus more fully upon the fascinating world of international espionage Ahh…..here at last we see the character development of Tom Clancy as architect of the Jack Ryan reality and in the character Jack Ryan himself who has in The Cardinal of the Kremlin lost the obnoxious edge to his arrogance, icing it down with a more calculated daring. Edging toward a five star rating here, Clancy leaves behind some of the more irritating components of his first novels (namely Jack’s wife and personal life) to focus more fully upon the fascinating world of international espionage and intrigue. Those whom the gods would destroy, they first make proud,” the DDO said. Tom Clancy, The Cardinal of the Kremlin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    I have already read this book, years ago, however, a friend just gave me the book tape, and as I can not remember how it ended, and I have tons of ironing to do, this book on tape will be welcome. Story, takes place in Russia and Washington, the Americans are spying on the Russians, the Russians are spying on the Americans, the war goes on in Afghanistan and everyone who is spying believes they are doing it for a just cause! In comes Ryan, who tries to sort it all out, for the best of both countr I have already read this book, years ago, however, a friend just gave me the book tape, and as I can not remember how it ended, and I have tons of ironing to do, this book on tape will be welcome. Story, takes place in Russia and Washington, the Americans are spying on the Russians, the Russians are spying on the Americans, the war goes on in Afghanistan and everyone who is spying believes they are doing it for a just cause! In comes Ryan, who tries to sort it all out, for the best of both countries.

  29. 5 out of 5

    dead letter office

    have you seen tom clancy posing on the flaps of his more recent books, with his aviator sunglasses and his macho swagger? that is the picture of a guy who bought too much of his own shit. here is another picture of a guy who bought too much of his own shit. these people love flightsuits. have you seen tom clancy posing on the flaps of his more recent books, with his aviator sunglasses and his macho swagger? that is the picture of a guy who bought too much of his own shit. here is another picture of a guy who bought too much of his own shit. these people love flightsuits.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    Another terrific Jack Ryan adventure. I'm pretty sure I never read this one before now, but it is definitely one of my favorites. The action never stops, and of course, the good guys win in the end. ____________ *******____________ *******____________ *******____________ _________________ _________________ _________________ Another terrific Jack Ryan adventure. I'm pretty sure I never read this one before now, but it is definitely one of my favorites. The action never stops, and of course, the good guys win in the end. ____________ *******____________ *******____________ *******____________ _________________ _________________ _________________

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