web site hit counter Orbus - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Orbus

Availability: Ready to download

In charge of an old cargo spaceship, the Old Captain Orbus flees a violent and sadistic past, but he doesn't know that the lethal war drone, Sniper, is a stowaway, and that the past is rapidly catching up with him. In charge of an old cargo spaceship, the Old Captain Orbus flees a violent and sadistic past, but he doesn't know that the lethal war drone, Sniper, is a stowaway, and that the past is rapidly catching up with him.


Compare

In charge of an old cargo spaceship, the Old Captain Orbus flees a violent and sadistic past, but he doesn't know that the lethal war drone, Sniper, is a stowaway, and that the past is rapidly catching up with him. In charge of an old cargo spaceship, the Old Captain Orbus flees a violent and sadistic past, but he doesn't know that the lethal war drone, Sniper, is a stowaway, and that the past is rapidly catching up with him.

30 review for Orbus

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    As always, I'm surprised at how much I am eventually able to get into the psychology and biology and all the weirdness of the Prador aliens. I vacillate between annoyance and fascination. Fortunately, I got into this by the end. Spatterjay's humble beginnings become very clear and the whole ultimate always-alive always-eating neverending replenishing food supply of everything on the planet, alive even as they're digested... or we are all digested, transforming, never dying... becomes clear at las As always, I'm surprised at how much I am eventually able to get into the psychology and biology and all the weirdness of the Prador aliens. I vacillate between annoyance and fascination. Fortunately, I got into this by the end. Spatterjay's humble beginnings become very clear and the whole ultimate always-alive always-eating neverending replenishing food supply of everything on the planet, alive even as they're digested... or we are all digested, transforming, never dying... becomes clear at last. No spoilers, but we've met the big bad before. :) What we have here is a huge throwdown between different Prador factions including a handful of Polity peeps and the absolutely fantastic Sniper, the AI war drone. The interactions going on here made this novel a good deal better than average. :) BUT, I will say that aside from the great end, the rest of the novel had quite a few dull parts. On the whole, I enjoyed it and the cool end made up for a ton of evils. Solid novel wrapping up Spatterjay. Better than the last, I think, but not quite as good as the first in the trilogy. I'm happy enough. :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    I have to say that I am done with Spatterjay. This one tipped the balance where I no longer care about what happens in this story. It was all a bit too much. I feel like I read a story about one continuous long battle with high tech weaponry. It just didn't take a break and try to develop a story. It felt like it was a battle wrapped around some characters that were exactly the same as the previous books. So that's me done with Spatterjay. I have to say that I am done with Spatterjay. This one tipped the balance where I no longer care about what happens in this story. It was all a bit too much. I feel like I read a story about one continuous long battle with high tech weaponry. It just didn't take a break and try to develop a story. It felt like it was a battle wrapped around some characters that were exactly the same as the previous books. So that's me done with Spatterjay.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris Berko

    I loved this one, maybe my favorite Spatterjay novel.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Brown

    Well at least it was not pirate ship stories like the other spatterjay novels. This one is back to space where it belongs. I was jolted out by multiple pop culture references that make no sense in context. Otherwise it was a decent read but I’m glad to move on from Spatterjay.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam From the Square Groot

    Perhaps the last truly excellent book by Neal Asher. I am a huge fan of Asher, and I had the opportunity to interview him for the Fantasy Book Club by the Square Groot. Lovely man, great laugh, check it out on squaregroot.com. However, the big negative or criticism I have of his books after this one is that its very samey, in that the plot of his stories are the plan of one AI or entity (spoilers, kind of). This worked once for a series of books he did in the past, and even then everything you r Perhaps the last truly excellent book by Neal Asher. I am a huge fan of Asher, and I had the opportunity to interview him for the Fantasy Book Club by the Square Groot. Lovely man, great laugh, check it out on squaregroot.com. However, the big negative or criticism I have of his books after this one is that its very samey, in that the plot of his stories are the plan of one AI or entity (spoilers, kind of). This worked once for a series of books he did in the past, and even then everything you read that happened wasn't preordained or planned out by one thing. But since 2010 EVERYTHING is, and that for me spoils the books. Orbus, however, isn't like that. There are characters that are powerful and intelligent, but they individually have parts of the puzzle, not all of it, so when pieces get put together there are surprises and tension and real stakes in that things could end up in destruction and death for all concerned. The characters are great, Orbus is the main character, and he has a real arc, he grows and changes, which is excellent. Sniper the war drone is back, as quippy and sarcastic as ever. Vrell has a massive part to play and has a great overall arc too. New characters such as the Golgolgoth, and the king of the prador are scary and menacing and though alien there goals and objectives are clear. The one thing that makes this book for me is the battle, or all out war, that occurs at the end. It is by and far the best space battle I have ever read. It is superbly written and described, Asher doesn't waste page space with boring details, it is visceral, hard hitting, tense. It is that good. This battle alone tips the book into five star territory. There are one or two lulls in the story before this point, Asher had a habit of going into intricate details about how to solve a problem, or how this character MacGyver's a situation, which is tedious. A couple of characters are just there with no real personality. However, this all leads to this epic battle, which is definitely worth the wait. A brilliant book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    3 Stars Orbus, book three in the Spatterjay trilogy is a far fall from the wonders and sheer awesomeness of the first book. I confess that due to my love of the genre that this was more like a 4 star read to me that I get had to take away from my score because it does not compare to the start of the series. I absolutely loved books one and two with the first one being a knock out. The world of Spatterjay is a science fiction and technological dream. The Hoopers are one of the greatest fictional 3 Stars Orbus, book three in the Spatterjay trilogy is a far fall from the wonders and sheer awesomeness of the first book. I confess that due to my love of the genre that this was more like a 4 star read to me that I get had to take away from my score because it does not compare to the start of the series. I absolutely loved books one and two with the first one being a knock out. The world of Spatterjay is a science fiction and technological dream. The Hoopers are one of the greatest fictional characters ever created... Orbus is a very narrowly scoped book that really can summed up in just a few sentences. A very large and unkillable man, a sentinent war drone, and a sidekick come to head against two extremely genetically mutated bugs/squids/men/machines in a bad place called the Graveyards. They all find out that their is a really, really,really big bad out there that appears to be coming back. Gun fights ensue. Killings, maiming, and mutilating also occur. Orbus is an amazing larger than life Hooper that is a great addition to the series. The Old Captains should have many more novels written about them as they are sheer awesomeness. Sniper is back and is just as bad ass and wise cracking as before. The Prador are scary, gross, and really freaking cool. I love Neal Asher and cannot wait to read more of his books as there are many. The world of Spatterjay is a must read for ALL science fiction lovers. Unfortunately, this one is not necessary to read to appreciate the world that Asher has built.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lady*M

    Orbus, an Old Captain from Spatterjay, has left his sadistic ways after the near death experience and decided to change the climate. As a captain of the trade space ship he goes go Graveyard carrying with him the two drone stowaways. Soon, it becomes clear that they we all manipulated by ruling AIs, because the Prador runaway Vrell, mutated by Spatterjay virus has gone in the same direction. Both Prador king and the Polity take the interest in the situation as well as their weapons. The Spatterj Orbus, an Old Captain from Spatterjay, has left his sadistic ways after the near death experience and decided to change the climate. As a captain of the trade space ship he goes go Graveyard carrying with him the two drone stowaways. Soon, it becomes clear that they we all manipulated by ruling AIs, because the Prador runaway Vrell, mutated by Spatterjay virus has gone in the same direction. Both Prador king and the Polity take the interest in the situation as well as their weapons. The Spatterjay virus has its own secrets and it will take the combine forces of former enemies to stop the danger to all civilized universe. This was a wild ride through and through. Once the action starts, it continues to the very end. The last part of the book is explosive and had me at the edge of my seat. Did I mentioned before that I like Sniper? But, in this book some of the Prador gained much needed complexity as well and I was very satisfied with the outcome. Orbus was not as awesome as the first book in trilogy, but it was much better than the second one. Great addition to the series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pippa Jay

    Of all the Neal Asher books I've read so far, this is my favourite. The story is fast-paced and full of gloriously grim descriptions. The sardonic interplay between Old Captain Orbus and his disgustingly-named crewmate Drooble are hilarious, as is the strange relationship between the drones Sniper and Thirteen. And over it all looms the mutating Prador Vrell, being hunted by the Prador King and a mythical monster of Prador nightmares, the Golgoloth. Gripping, chilling and entertaining. Not recom Of all the Neal Asher books I've read so far, this is my favourite. The story is fast-paced and full of gloriously grim descriptions. The sardonic interplay between Old Captain Orbus and his disgustingly-named crewmate Drooble are hilarious, as is the strange relationship between the drones Sniper and Thirteen. And over it all looms the mutating Prador Vrell, being hunted by the Prador King and a mythical monster of Prador nightmares, the Golgoloth. Gripping, chilling and entertaining. Not recommended to Asher newcomers but to the seasoned veterans!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ben Hatfield

    Way better than The Voyage of the Sable Keech, but not up to the level of The Skinner. Really this book is all about following some already established characters, but to say this book is a continuation of the first two books would be misleading. Instead of the wildly exotic Spatterjay environment, we follow an old ship captain, a mutated prador, and a war drone through their struggles in and around various space ships. Really this book is way more about the characters than the environment, wher Way better than The Voyage of the Sable Keech, but not up to the level of The Skinner. Really this book is all about following some already established characters, but to say this book is a continuation of the first two books would be misleading. Instead of the wildly exotic Spatterjay environment, we follow an old ship captain, a mutated prador, and a war drone through their struggles in and around various space ships. Really this book is way more about the characters than the environment, where as The Voyage of the SK is a lot about the events on a single large boat on Spatterjay, and The Skinner is all about the various dangers of the planet itself. There actually is a trend to how the series of books has been conceived. I enjoyed following the three main characters, and even the 5 or so important characters around them - action, bloodshed and transformations. Fun to see bitter enemies become unwilling allies, working together out of need. While entertaining, and worth reading - I really pine for content from The Skinner. The brutality and mystery of that environment is really only captured in that book and a short story or two. Part of the mystery of Spatterjay becomes a crucial story element in Orbus, and I didn't like the clear explanation of what the Spatterjay virus is, and why it exists - it's that clear explanation of how it all fits together that I don't like. If there is ancient genetic code with deep secrets from super intelligences... perhaps the pandora's box effect doesn't need to have such a clear explanation - I'd rather the Spatterjay virus had yet unexplained depth, but I don't see how that is possible with how this book explores that content. Just my opinion - and not really a huge hit to this book, but Neal seems to understand the importance of maintaining mystery, so I was surprised how this was handled.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    One could guess that some plausibly deniable mayhem might ensue. A really satisfying end to what has been an absolute joy of a trilogy. I've seen quite a few reviews (especially of The Voyage of the Sable Keech) complain about these books getting a bit samey, and they're not wrong. But if you leave a bit of time between reading each, especially between the first two, having more of the same is THE BEST. I love plausibly deniable mayhem. Orbus is quite different in that it takes us away from Sp One could guess that some plausibly deniable mayhem might ensue. A really satisfying end to what has been an absolute joy of a trilogy. I've seen quite a few reviews (especially of The Voyage of the Sable Keech) complain about these books getting a bit samey, and they're not wrong. But if you leave a bit of time between reading each, especially between the first two, having more of the same is THE BEST. I love plausibly deniable mayhem. Orbus is quite different in that it takes us away from Spatterjay, and has a much greater focus on the Prador and the Prador King (who is epic). However, the virus is still at its centre, and it features Sniper, in all his glory, and Vrell, who turns out to be great. Who'd have thought I'd be rooting for a Prador? Orbus himself is more haunted by his past than the other Old Captains, and for most of this book I was a little puzzled about why it was named for him, since he doesn't actually feature all that much. But I think, in the end, he is the symbol of a lot of themes in the book--a denial of learned behaviour, overcoming prejudices and, as always, an intense will to survive. It would be awesome to read about his and the surviving crew's adventures after the conclusion of this book (I haven't checked, but I suspect we don't revisit them in future novels. What a pity). Star rating: I dock one star because the technobabble gets a little bit much at times, but add one because the action and huge battles are really well rendered and the book wraps the series up well, making the total five again. Also there weren't any pointless subplots (I'm looking at you, giant whelk).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nia Sinjorina

    And so we step off of the planet where every drop of ocean water is as likely to eat you as wet you and into a space opera classic: giant capital ships, huge weapons, mega explosions, and lots of sneaking around in between pitched battles.  It's Asher doing what he does best: massive tech on a stellar scale. Full of twists and turns an electric pace, and moments of comedy, Asher also explores the more rational side of the Prador - some of them anyway - a race it would be easy to paint as monochro And so we step off of the planet where every drop of ocean water is as likely to eat you as wet you and into a space opera classic: giant capital ships, huge weapons, mega explosions, and lots of sneaking around in between pitched battles.  It's Asher doing what he does best: massive tech on a stellar scale. Full of twists and turns an electric pace, and moments of comedy, Asher also explores the more rational side of the Prador - some of them anyway - a race it would be easy to paint as monochrome monsters. Of great interest was the development of the Jain side of the universe, just whispers up until now but setting the scenes for more discussions of the older races in the more recent books (I think I'm reading backwards ;-)) An excellent third book that offers a satisfying conclusion and a reluctant farewell to some fabulous characters. Fleecy Moss, author of the Folio 55 SciFi fantasy series (writing as Nia Sinjorina), End of a Girl, Undon , and 4659 now available on Amazon.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fred

    Wasn’t sure this would be a good one since Orbus is not a very exciting character. However I soon realized that this but was not so much about Orbus, as it was about the much cooler characters of Spider the killer AI and Vrell the vicious Prador. In fact I don’t understand why this book was named after Orbus. Vrell would have been a better name. Anyways awesome book about the Prador and the Jain super soldiers. Much better than the 2nd Spatterjay book, and almost better than the 1st Spatterjay b Wasn’t sure this would be a good one since Orbus is not a very exciting character. However I soon realized that this but was not so much about Orbus, as it was about the much cooler characters of Spider the killer AI and Vrell the vicious Prador. In fact I don’t understand why this book was named after Orbus. Vrell would have been a better name. Anyways awesome book about the Prador and the Jain super soldiers. Much better than the 2nd Spatterjay book, and almost better than the 1st Spatterjay book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    L.R.J. Allen

    A great finish to the trilogy. It never sets foot on the planet Spatterjay but the Spatterjay virus is, effectively, the central plot piece that ties everything together. Whilst the plot mechanisations are swiftly dealt with in the first half, it’s later half is a series of ever escalating set pieces that are just enormous. It’s a testament to how much I enjoy Asher’s work that, even though it wouldn’t feature in my top 3 favourites, it’s still worthy of a 5 star rating. It’s just a blast.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Miki

    More a three-and-a-half-star book. Asher shading into space opera, and doing so in somewhat undistinguished fashion. Lots of Prador history exposition, but with confused results, making them a little more human but inconsistently so. Similarly indeterminate humanization of Orbus himself, with a scattering of psychological vignettes but no real depth. Maybe not three-and-a-half after all.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marco Paganini

    The book tells the story of captain Orbus, a troubled "Old Captain" from planet Spatterjay looking for a new chapter in his life. Seeking new horizons, he leaves planet Spatterjay and becomes the captain of the space cargo hauler Gurnard, but soon realizes there's a bit more to his new job that it seems. He reacquaints himself with some old friends (from the previous books) and some new characters as well (which I won't say here, to avoid spoiling the fun.) In contrast to the previous books in th The book tells the story of captain Orbus, a troubled "Old Captain" from planet Spatterjay looking for a new chapter in his life. Seeking new horizons, he leaves planet Spatterjay and becomes the captain of the space cargo hauler Gurnard, but soon realizes there's a bit more to his new job that it seems. He reacquaints himself with some old friends (from the previous books) and some new characters as well (which I won't say here, to avoid spoiling the fun.) In contrast to the previous books in the series, the story in "Orbus" happens entirely in space. There's a limited (but important) set of well known characters, and a few very unexpected new ones. This book is action-packed from beginning to end and also closes a lot of gaps from previous books in the Polity series. In my opinion, the best book in the Spatterjay trilogy, and a complete page turner for me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mike Gilbert

    This is probably my least favorite of the Spatterjay books. Too much AI (even though Sniper is pretty cool) and too much Jain, all of the things that sort of wore me out of the latest two trilogies. The story is still good - and it’s cool to continue along with Vrell as a lead character and to even see things from the eye-stalks of a few other Prador. Maybe I just need a break from oversight of Earth Central...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ralph

    The good: Better then Sable Keech. Yeah seemingly one long battle, but there were never the less some interesting discussions in there about age, PTSD, redemption perhaps, and the list goes on. Of course it also introduced the next chapter in the ongoing Polity saga. Of course there were still snarky AIs and what not. The not so good: The battle stuff on occasion was just a bit over the top - towards the end I just flipped the pages a bit. All in all a good read and not that boring.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lee Belbin

    A good read as a logical continuation of the Spatterjay series. Obviously, this one is centered around one of the old (and quirky) Spatterjay Captains, Orbus. It is Orbus, Sniper and Thirteen up against, but not quite, the Prador and another prior party, the Jain. As ever, more action than you can easily handle, plenty of twists and turns. A solid read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    BeefSupreme

    The 3rd book in this series is the strongest one. It could have been a free standing book since there is not much story from the previous 2 books. The previous 2 books is a good addition to the whole story of the universe though. Action filled book with not much downtime, the ending leaves a big opening for a 4th book or a new series entirely without making you feel that it ends abruptly.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Everyone

    I agree with other readers that the switch to first-person storytelling is a bit jarring. One does get used to it, however. At the beginning I had doubts but I ended up thoroughly enjoying the book. If you have read the other two in the Spatterjay series - or even if you have not - I would recommend giving this one a go. If you can find it that is...

  21. 5 out of 5

    A3an

    I've just found Neal Asher on Goodreads. I'm not going to leave a review, except to say that I own every. single. one. of his books in paperback. Books are expensive in South Africa, and I *really* don't have a lot of money. I buy them anyway, and cut back on other costs for the month. He's that good. I've just found Neal Asher on Goodreads. I'm not going to leave a review, except to say that I own every. single. one. of his books in paperback. Books are expensive in South Africa, and I *really* don't have a lot of money. I buy them anyway, and cut back on other costs for the month. He's that good.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Cox

    I didn't love the style of this one as much - told in a different person than the first two, and it was a little jarring. But the story was good, made sense of a lot more about the prador and the spatterjay virus, and generally tied up a lot of loose ends. If you enjoyed the first two at all, definitely will like this one. I didn't love the style of this one as much - told in a different person than the first two, and it was a little jarring. But the story was good, made sense of a lot more about the prador and the spatterjay virus, and generally tied up a lot of loose ends. If you enjoyed the first two at all, definitely will like this one.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alexey Sinyuk

    Didn't get why book called Orbus?! Liked reading, but there are two problems that bothers me : 1) There is no any description of alien soldiers they fighting in the end. Faceless enemies, destroying everything. This makes no sense. 2) There are so many terms without any explanation of them Didn't get why book called Orbus?! Liked reading, but there are two problems that bothers me : 1) There is no any description of alien soldiers they fighting in the end. Faceless enemies, destroying everything. This makes no sense. 2) There are so many terms without any explanation of them

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joel Steele

    Full tilt sci fi action rounding out the spatterjay trilogy. This is the 13th consecutive polity book I have read and number 16 from neal so things are getting kind of serious. These books tickle my science bone.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Trickyplayer

    Just reread again - superb ending to Spatterjay sequence Just reread the Spatterjay sequence. Love these books. The humour, action and character play (between different species and drones/ AIs) is great.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Loki

    After a couple of novels of entertaining but apparently pointless messing about on Spatterjay, the conclusion of the trilogy kicks it into high gear, racing toward a satisfying conclusion of galactic importance. Interesting to see where the series goes in the wake of it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gregg Kellogg

    Pretty enjoyable way to wrap up the series, tie it back to the Polity and flesh out the boggy-man Prador. The Jain get fleshed out as well, although their story will doubtless take much more time to resolve.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julie T.

    Great ending to the Spatterjay series. I love Cormac novels but Spatterjay trilogy is really fun. There’s a lot of new world building you get. Also, I’m usually a big proponent of publication reading but I would recommend reading this trilogy back to back. Seeing Vrell’s development is great! Spatterjay, the virus, Old Captains, Prador, drones, sub-minds, bees (!), reifications, the Graveyard, Jain, Prador War crimes, etc, all get some page time and it’s fascinating! I did have some frustrations Great ending to the Spatterjay series. I love Cormac novels but Spatterjay trilogy is really fun. There’s a lot of new world building you get. Also, I’m usually a big proponent of publication reading but I would recommend reading this trilogy back to back. Seeing Vrell’s development is great! Spatterjay, the virus, Old Captains, Prador, drones, sub-minds, bees (!), reifications, the Graveyard, Jain, Prador War crimes, etc, all get some page time and it’s fascinating! I did have some frustrations with book 1 and 2, they felt a bit formulaic in some parts but enjoyable nonetheless.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ion Marius

    Some of the best military sci-fi I've ever read. A bit more "grounded" than the other Polity books I've read and, surprisingly, each book better than the previous one. Good read ;) Dan Some of the best military sci-fi I've ever read. A bit more "grounded" than the other Polity books I've read and, surprisingly, each book better than the previous one. Good read ;) Dan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Linda Sutherland

    Really enjoyed the, Spatterjay books, I recommend them to all readers of, Sci-fi books, you don't just won't want to, put them down, Thank-you, Neal Asher... Really enjoyed the, Spatterjay books, I recommend them to all readers of, Sci-fi books, you don't just won't want to, put them down, Thank-you, Neal Asher...

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...