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Showcase Presents: DC Comics Presents: Superman Team-Ups, Vol. 1

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Superman meets DC's greatest heroes including The Flash, Green Lantern, Wonder Woman and many more in this title collecting DC COMICS PRESENTS #1-26.


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Superman meets DC's greatest heroes including The Flash, Green Lantern, Wonder Woman and many more in this title collecting DC COMICS PRESENTS #1-26.

30 review for Showcase Presents: DC Comics Presents: Superman Team-Ups, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Back when I was around eight years old, my favorite comics in the world were the team up books; Marvel Team-Up, Marvel Two-In-One, World's Finest Comics, The Brave and the Bold, etc. One team-up book stood head and shoulders above the rest: DC Comics Presents. Every month, Superman teamed up with a different guest star. The Flash, Green Lantern, Adam Strange, even He-Man and Santa Claus eventually made appearances. It was pure comics gold for a kid. For it's time, DC Comics Presents was loaded wit Back when I was around eight years old, my favorite comics in the world were the team up books; Marvel Team-Up, Marvel Two-In-One, World's Finest Comics, The Brave and the Bold, etc. One team-up book stood head and shoulders above the rest: DC Comics Presents. Every month, Superman teamed up with a different guest star. The Flash, Green Lantern, Adam Strange, even He-Man and Santa Claus eventually made appearances. It was pure comics gold for a kid. For it's time, DC Comics Presents was loaded with great artists. Jose Garcia Lopez, Rich Buckler, Ross Andru, Jim Starlin and Curt Swan all had penciling duty in the first 26 issues. The writers weren't bad either. You had Steve Englehart, Len Wein, and Marv Wolfman, among others. The first comic I remember owning was an issue of DC Comics Presents where Superman teamed up with Robin so the series has nostalgic value galore for me. As for the stories themselves? Well, my eight year old self was much easier to entertain, I guess. If you come in expecting today's kind of stories, you'll be disappointed. However, if you're looking for some superhero fun from the days before Watchmen, you'll be entertained. Come on! You've got Superman teaming with The Flash, Adam Strange, The Metal Men, Aquaman, Green Lantern, Red Tornado, Swamp Thing, Wonder Woman, The Atom, Captain Comet, Firstorm, Mr. Miracle, Black Lightning, hell, even Sgt. Rock. The list goes on and on. Superman met a lot other superheroes on a regular basis back in the day...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuel Nevers

    Very well done Bronze age team ups. Some of them are not as good as they could be but over all a really nice collection of team up stories.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eamonn Murphy

    This book collects, in glorious black and white, DC Presents Superman Team-Up # 1 through to DC Presents Superman Team-Up # 26. It came out a while ago but is still available for $700 dollars if you’re mad enough to pay that. Shop around. The cover price is £13.99. It’s worth snapping these things up when they come out to avoid being fleeced later by some dealer. The collection opens strongly with a two-part Superman and Flash story in which they have to race to the end of time, under threat from This book collects, in glorious black and white, DC Presents Superman Team-Up # 1 through to DC Presents Superman Team-Up # 26. It came out a while ago but is still available for $700 dollars if you’re mad enough to pay that. Shop around. The cover price is £13.99. It’s worth snapping these things up when they come out to avoid being fleeced later by some dealer. The collection opens strongly with a two-part Superman and Flash story in which they have to race to the end of time, under threat from evil aliens who will destroy the Earth if not obeyed. The aliens have been fighting for millennia and one side wants to stop. The other lot don’t. I liked the concept of a ‘cosmic curtain’ at the end of time which you go through to get back to the beginning. Excellent script by Martin Pasko and great art by Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, who is very much school of Neal Adams and just as good as his main influence. He’s ably inked by Dan Adkins. In issue # 3, Superman teams up with Adam Strange when the evil Kaskor boosts the zeta rays that transport Adam to Rann. So boosted are they that Earth and Rann swap places in space. Garcia-Lopez performs more wonders with the art, inking his own pencils this time. It’s still school of Adams but with hints of John Buscema on page 5, panels 2 and 5. The script was by David Micheline. Issue # 4 teams our hero with the Metal Men against the giant Chemo. Len Wein’s story was okay but the art is king again here. DC Showcase Metal Men # 1 is one of those volumes that now costs more than the cover price to buy. Like Doom Patrol, they were a quirky team. It’s beastly to say the art goes down in quality with issue # 5 and unkind to that worthy professional Murphy Anderson who provides both pencils and inks when Superman teams up with Aquaman to stop a civil war between two undersea cities, so I won’t say it. Perhaps DC Comics used the clever device of launching a new series with top talent to get the readers hooked, in the hope that they would stay on after it left. In the 60s, most new Marvel series had their first few issued pencilled by Jack Kirby for the same reason. A rocket needs the biggest boost at lift-off. Anderson is the DC house stylist par excellence and his work is easy on the eye so it’s not really a complaint but that Garcia Lopez fellow certainly packs a mean pencil. Green Lantern is Mister Kent’s next teammate when the weapons masters of Qward set Star Sapphire on him in an attempt to get his ring. The next issue is a follow up to this as Superman gets help from Red Tornado to prevent the evil Qwardians conquering Earth. Red Tornado is a logical robot trying to learn how to be more human, an old cliché now but fairly new at the time if still inexplicable. When I read how humans behave, I think we should try to be more like robots. There follows a parade of DC characters co-operating with the Kryptonian: Swamp Thing, Wonder Woman, Hawkman, the Legion of Super-Heroes, the Atom, Black Lightning, Firestorm, Zatanna, Batgirl and the Elongated Man,. Some time travel shenanigans allow Superman to go back and fight alongside Sergeant Rock and even battle Superboy. This run is pencilled by Joe Staton or Dick Dillin. Staton’s pretty good but Dillin’s art is never great and sometimes the figures look deformed. Rich Buckler pencils a team up with Mister Miracle but oddly doesn’t do his Kirby pastiche on this Kirby character. The stories by Steve Englehart, Martin Pasko, Cary Bates and Paul Levitz and Gerry Conway are generally okay. Nothing mind-blowing. This comic book series is from 1978 and there are a few talents here that I associate more with Marvel Comics, probably because I stopped reading comics in the late 70s and that’s where they were then. Steve Englehart, Gerry Conway, Marv Wolfman, Jim Starlin, Rich Buckler. Jim Starlin does a good story, the last in the book, in which Superman teams up with Green Lantern to battle an evil alien in a Ditko inspired other dimension, all floating rocks and strange shapes. Starlin’s art didn’t look as good as usual so I think the inker let him down. All in all, it’s a readable collection with some excellent nuggets. By the late 70s, DC was improving in quality and responding to the challenge from Marvel. The stories are tightly plotted but don’t go down the soap opera route which is a pleasant change. As with all these editions, a crazy person can pay hundreds of pounds for it but if you shop around it might be available cheaper. This simply emphasises the fact that fans should snap them up when they come out. DC Showcase Batman vol 6 with lots of Neal Adams art is now out so if you’re interested grab it quick. Eamonn Murphy This review first appeared at https://www.sfcrowsnest.info/

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bob Garrett

    DC COMICS PRESENTS proves a wonderful snapshot of the late 1970s-mid 1980s DC universe. In each issue, Superman teams with a different “guest star,” and we see what each character was doing and how each was interpreted for that one representative month of comics history. Take a 26 issue collection, as we have here, and you can settle in for a good two-year-plus span of super hero goodness. Heroes - both major and minor - abound. Batman seems conspicuously absent today, until one recalls that he r DC COMICS PRESENTS proves a wonderful snapshot of the late 1970s-mid 1980s DC universe. In each issue, Superman teams with a different “guest star,” and we see what each character was doing and how each was interpreted for that one representative month of comics history. Take a 26 issue collection, as we have here, and you can settle in for a good two-year-plus span of super hero goodness. Heroes - both major and minor - abound. Batman seems conspicuously absent today, until one recalls that he regularly teamed with Superman in the WORLD’S FINEST title (He does make a cameo appearance here in a Superman/Atom pair up.). I couldn’t feel too disappointed about this, however, given that the volume does include - among others - the Flash, Aquaman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern (twice), Green Arrow, the Atom, Hawkman, Swamp Thing, Firestorm, Black Lightning, Adam Strange, Batgirl, the Elongated Man, Deadman, and the Legion of Super Heroes. Thanks to a little “time bending,” we even get Superboy and Sgt. Rock! Writers and artists come and go. I’d find that annoying in a regular ongoing title, but here, where most stories are stand alone tales, anyway, it just adds to the variety. I enjoyed the cornucopia of talent, which includes such late 1970s/early 1980s DC stalwarts as writers Martin Pasko, Paul Levitz, Cary Bates, Gerry Conway, Len Wein and Denny O’Neil, and artists Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, Joe Staton, Dick Dillin, Murphy Anderson and Curt Swan. Garcia-Lopez and Ross Andru also contribute some beautiful covers, and while I would have loved to have seen the art in color, this black and white collection nonetheless provides a lot of content for a relatively cheap price (It’s worth noting, of course, that some fans prefer black and white, and some even prefer the relatively cheaper paper of these SHOWCASE collections, as they, in comparison to more expensive reprint collections, more closely resemble the paper of the original comics.). This collection is essentially an anthology, then, and as with most anthologies, quality varies. My personal favorite stories include a two part straight science fiction tale with the Flash, a quieter, more emotional adventure with Deadman, a Swamp Thing team-up with a unique twist, a cosmic jaunt with Green Lantern (featuring art by Jim Starlin), and a three-parter by Paul Levitz and Dick Dillin that focuses on Superman’s childhood pal Pete Ross, with guest star roles by Superboy, the Legion of Super-Heroes and the Phantom Stranger. Yes, there are a few subpar entries as well, but why dwell on them? A pleasing trait of anthologies is that a lesser work can be quickly forgotten with the promise of a better one following it. Since volumes such as this appeal greatly to completists, I shall give such individuals a caveat. Only the Superman team-ups from DC COMICS PRESENTS are included here. Thus, two eight-page back-up stories (“Whatever Happened to Hourman?” and “Whatever Happened to Sargon the Sorcerer?”) from DCP #s 25 and 26 are not present. Also not present is the 16 page NEW TEEN TITANS “preview” originally included in DCP #26. The preview, of course, is present in some Teen Titans reprint collections, but I suspect that one would need to hunt down the original DCP issues to obtain the Hourman and Sargon stories. That’s a bit of a shame to some, but again, there is still a great deal of content for a relatively cheap price. Ultimately, then, SHOWCASE PRESENTS: DC COMICS PRESENTS: SUPERMAN TEAM-UPS provides some lovely morsels for a comic fan’s enjoyment. All offerings might not be to one’s liking, but most are at least enjoyable, and can transport a reader back to a DC Universe of old. What more could any superhero aficionado possibly ask?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    For fans only, and dedicated ones at that. Some are solidly done, some are ridiculous. Nothing's exceptional or worth going out of your way for.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Theaker

    These stories date from perhaps the dimmest period of DC's history – long after the glories of the Silver Age, but before the 1986 reboots kicked in. Neither classic, nor in continuity, stories from this period don't seem to get referenced or reprinted as much as those before or after. These were the stories being published when I was a child, but they didn't make their way to our local newsagents so most were new to me. Two came with fond memories: I bought a German edition of issue 14 – Superm These stories date from perhaps the dimmest period of DC's history – long after the glories of the Silver Age, but before the 1986 reboots kicked in. Neither classic, nor in continuity, stories from this period don't seem to get referenced or reprinted as much as those before or after. These were the stories being published when I was a child, but they didn't make their way to our local newsagents so most were new to me. Two came with fond memories: I bought a German edition of issue 14 – Superman vs. Superboy! – during a school skiing trip to Austria when I was about ten years old, and issue 26 was reprinted in one of the hardback Superman Annuals: I think it was probably my first Green Lantern story. Reading those stories in the context of the series didn't affect my enjoyment of them for good or ill, but there are nice links here from one story to the next, especially in the first half of the book. The team-ups feel organic, a natural part of Superman's everyday life, rather than contrived. But this is a very angry, emotional Superman... He's hardly recognisable as the same character. Whether it's his jealousy of teenage girls paying attention to Mister Miracle in Steve Englehart's "Winner Take Metropolis", or leaving Pete Ross's son on an alien world for the slimmest of reasons in Paul Levitz's "To Live in Peace Nevermore", this wasn't my Superman – interesting as he was! In "Plight of the Giant Atom" by Cary Bates, he's all sunshine and light again, calling Ray Palmer "old buddy", and then he's off on a bunch of lightweight, standalone adventures that make for easy reading. Some interesting things happen: Firestorm is invited into the JLA, Superman discovers that magic is simply a form of radiation, and I discovered that Batgirl is merely a brown belt. Considering the random assortment of writers and artists involved, and the variable tone, this is a surprisingly good book; perhaps that variety is exactly what makes it so readable. No classics here, but lots of entertainment, and the artwork looks fantastic in black and white: I developed a real fondness for the work of Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez and Dick Dillin over the course of this book. I hope we'll see lots more DC comics from the late seventies and early eighties reprinted like this.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    After reading a few of these stories in Adventures of Superman I decided to pick up this B&W collection of the series DC Comics Presents #1-26. DCCP was Superman's team-up book, akin to Batman's team-up book The Brave and the Bold. Each issue starred a random hero from the DC Universe, in stories that were generally single issue. Superman had previously had a team-up book over in World's Finest, when Batman was shoved aside for a while, but that didn't last long. This series was a welcome additi After reading a few of these stories in Adventures of Superman I decided to pick up this B&W collection of the series DC Comics Presents #1-26. DCCP was Superman's team-up book, akin to Batman's team-up book The Brave and the Bold. Each issue starred a random hero from the DC Universe, in stories that were generally single issue. Superman had previously had a team-up book over in World's Finest, when Batman was shoved aside for a while, but that didn't last long. This series was a welcome addition to the DC library, and one of the few newer titles that survived the infamous DC Implosion. The Brave and the Bold had a consistent creative team, Bob Haney and Jim Aparo, but DCCP used a round robin of writers and artists. Therefore, there's not much consistency in quality. Some writers used the format better than others, and while you had really nice artists like JLGL, there was also Joe Staton, who is a fine artist in his own right, but whose cartoony style wasn't a great fit for Superman. I was surprised at how many issues were drawn by JLA artist Dick Dillin, one of my favorites, but whose characters were often stiff. The writers were mostly the core of the Superman Family: Cary Bates and Martin Pasko, with some Gerry Conway and Paul Levitz as well. Levitz ran a story line through his tales, starting with a team up with the Legion of Super-Heroes and guest starring Pete Ross, Superman's childhood friend. It involves Pete's son, Jon, and I don't want to spoil the story, but Levitz weaved the saga through three or four issues. Likewise, there were a few tales that would end in one issue, then take up in the next with a new guest star. Guests include the Flash, Metal Men, Hawkman, Phantom Stranger, the Atom, Firestorm, Zatanna, the Legion, Green Arrow, Green Lantern, Dr Fate, Adam Strange, Aquaman, Swamp Thing, Wonder Woman, Red Tornado, Sgt Rock, Mr Miracle, Black Lightning, Superboy, Batgirl, Elongated Man, Captain Comet, Superboy, and Deadman. Solid Bronze Age collection.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    Superman and Batman had a team up book together, World's Finest dating back to the 1950s. Batman had a team up book with everyone other than Superman joining him beginning in the late 1960s. In the early 1970s, DC had experimented with turning World's Finest into a comic featuring generic Superman Team ups with characters other than Batman, but that didn't work out. Giving Superman an additional was a better idea and that's why DC Comics Presents was born. This book collects Issues 1-26 of this Superman and Batman had a team up book together, World's Finest dating back to the 1950s. Batman had a team up book with everyone other than Superman joining him beginning in the late 1960s. In the early 1970s, DC had experimented with turning World's Finest into a comic featuring generic Superman Team ups with characters other than Batman, but that didn't work out. Giving Superman an additional was a better idea and that's why DC Comics Presents was born. This book collects Issues 1-26 of this series spanning issues from 1978-80. Superman in this era is fun, but no longer the goofy Silver Age hero. I like this version of Superman and there's a lot of fun to be had in this book. The first six issues are the best as it opens with a Flash team-up. No, it's not a round the world race, but a nice science fiction opera where the two heroes are forced to fight. The story with Adam Strange, a Silver Age favorite is also beautifully done in Issue 3 as Superman and Adam Strange have to stop a threat to Rann and to Earth. The book features team ups with Wonder Woman, Green Lantern (twice), the Legion of Superheroes, Superboy, Swamp Thing, Hawkman, Mister Miracle, and more. The book starts out with mostly A-listers, but B-listers dominate the second half with characters such as Black Lightning, Firestorm, Deadman, and Phantom Stranger getting to play opposite Superman. The stories of variable quality. The 18 page limit often led to head scratching stories like Issue 19. Issue 18 was interesting for its exploration of magic as science. The only on-going story arc was of aliens kidnapping the son of his old friend Pete Ross, the Legion of Superheroes urging him not to rescue the boy since he was fated to lead their Army and Superman deciding not to do so when he failed in his first rescue attempt. Then Pete Ross turns evil. This occurs in Issues 13 and 14 and is then revisited in Issue 25. Issue 26 with the Green Lantern is also a solid story with the Green Lantern's power ring being taken by an evil shapeshifting alien. Overall, this an enjoyable comic and if you like Superman, with a bit of a lighter touch, this is a great book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jason Luna

    I'm not a big fan of the 70's run on "Brave and the Bold", Batman's team-up magazine. What I like about this one, the Superman version of DC team-ups, is that Bob Haney doesn't have his boring hands all over the writing. Superman's powers and galactic spanning have a lot to do with it. It's pretty cool to have him decide to travel through time are cross galactic space at a whim, what have you, because he can. It makes the writers develop really powerful villains for him to beat up, because he's n I'm not a big fan of the 70's run on "Brave and the Bold", Batman's team-up magazine. What I like about this one, the Superman version of DC team-ups, is that Bob Haney doesn't have his boring hands all over the writing. Superman's powers and galactic spanning have a lot to do with it. It's pretty cool to have him decide to travel through time are cross galactic space at a whim, what have you, because he can. It makes the writers develop really powerful villains for him to beat up, because he's nearly invincible. The stories aren't quite "funny", but they have a novel sense of fun to them. Part of it is Clark Kent and Lois Lane and other Daily Planet people being involved, giving everything a self-aware mentality. Also, the different team-ups, while not exactly world changing, give different takes on the world. Like how the Atom and Green Lantern have a certain more "human" personality that doesn't gel with Superman's ubermensch/caretaker of the universe persona. They did a good job of mixing the team-ups and how people talk to each other, not just doing like "there's a bad guy, we need two good guys to bash their heads in". It's just good writing from good writers. The last issue, co-written and drawn by Jim Starlin, looked great (even in black and white), and Gerry Conway and Len Wein know how to throw down an entertaining story not bogged down with lame detail like Bob Haney did. 5/5

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rich Meyer

    DC Comics Presents was a team-up comic that ran for nearly 100 issues starting in the late eighties. This Showcase Presents volume reprints the first 26 issues. There are some fun stories here! First of all, you've got at least six stories each featuring artwork by comic legends Jose Luis Garcia Lopez, Joe Staton, and Dick Dillin. Curt Swan, Jim Starlin and Rich Buckler also provide artwork. The stories have some continuity, with considerably more continued (if somewhat tenuously) stories than y DC Comics Presents was a team-up comic that ran for nearly 100 issues starting in the late eighties. This Showcase Presents volume reprints the first 26 issues. There are some fun stories here! First of all, you've got at least six stories each featuring artwork by comic legends Jose Luis Garcia Lopez, Joe Staton, and Dick Dillin. Curt Swan, Jim Starlin and Rich Buckler also provide artwork. The stories have some continuity, with considerably more continued (if somewhat tenuously) stories than your usual team-up book. Three stories are linked by Superman's battle with best friend Pete Ross, over Ross's son, fated to become a warlord for a distant planet. Superman time-travels to with the Flash and Sgt. Rock, doesn't quite help Swamp Thing against Solomon Grundy, and literally moves the planet in an adventure with Adam Strange. This is nearly 500-pages of good, bronze age stories. Highly recommended!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    The Showcase reprints of DC's Batman team-ups from the Brave and the Bold series are quite well done and imaginative as well as innovative. The same cannot be said for the "DC Comics Presents" team-ups with Superman. There's something not quite right about this, most likely the fact that this was a pre-Crisis Silver Age Superman who often didn't need much help. As a result, Superman's co-stars often seem more like hangers-on or sidekicks while the Man of Steel does all the heavy lifting. There a The Showcase reprints of DC's Batman team-ups from the Brave and the Bold series are quite well done and imaginative as well as innovative. The same cannot be said for the "DC Comics Presents" team-ups with Superman. There's something not quite right about this, most likely the fact that this was a pre-Crisis Silver Age Superman who often didn't need much help. As a result, Superman's co-stars often seem more like hangers-on or sidekicks while the Man of Steel does all the heavy lifting. There are one or two exceptions, but by and large, Superman doesn't seem to really need the help of heroes the likes of Batgirl, Green Arrow, the Flash, or others who often seem to have little better than a secondary role in the action.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    Superman teams-up with a different superhero from the DC Comics' late-seventies/early-eighties stable in each of the 29 or so issues included in this pleasurable 500-page, black-and-white, phone book of a collection. There's a ton of great line work on display here, from some fairly incredible (and unfortunately under-appreciated) artists of the era.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Some of this art simply could not be improved upon. Flawless, right up there with Neal Adams and Alan Davis.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alexica

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sticks Phillips

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hektor Vokshi

  17. 4 out of 5

    leann alford

  18. 5 out of 5

    Greg Hatcher

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Higgins

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Higgins

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeff DePew

  23. 4 out of 5

    Damon

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mike Rhodes

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erik Burnham

  29. 4 out of 5

    Neil Fisher

  30. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Dale

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