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How Ukraine Became a Market Economy and Democracy

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One of Europe's old nations steeped in history, Ukraine is today an undisputed independent state. It is a democracy and has transformed into a market economy with predominant private ownership. Ukraine's postcommunist transition has been one of the most protracted and socially costly, but it has taken the country to a desirable destination. �slund's vivid account of Ukraine One of Europe's old nations steeped in history, Ukraine is today an undisputed independent state. It is a democracy and has transformed into a market economy with predominant private ownership. Ukraine's postcommunist transition has been one of the most protracted and socially costly, but it has taken the country to a desirable destination. �slund's vivid account of Ukraine's journey begins with a brief background, where he discusses the implications of Ukraine's history, the awakening of society because of Mikhail Gorbachev's reforms, the early democratization, and the impact of the ill-fated Soviet economic reforms. He then turns to the reign of President Leonid Kravchuk from 1991 to 1994, the only salient achievement of which was nation-building, while the economy collapsed in the midst of hyperinflation. The first two years of Leonid Kuchma's presidency, from 1994 to 1996, were characterized by substantial achievements, notably financial stabilization and mass privatization. The period 1996-99 was a miserable period of policy stagnation, rent seeking, and continued economic decline. In 2000 hope returned to Ukraine. Viktor Yushchenko became prime minister and launched vigorous reforms to cleanse the economy from corruption, and economic growth returned. The ensuing period, 2001-04, amounted to a competitive oligarchy. It was quite pluralist, although repression increased. Economic growth was high. The year 2004 witnessed the most joyful period in Ukraine, the Orange Revolution, which represented Ukraine's democratic breakthrough, with Yushchenko as its hero. The postrevolution period, however, has been characterized by great domestic political instability; a renewed, explicit Russian threat to Ukraine's sovereignty; and a severe financial crisis. The answers to these challenges lie in how soon the European Union fully recognizes Ukraine's long-expressed identity as a European state, how swiftly Ukraine improves its malfunctioning constitutional order, and how promptly it addresses corruption.


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One of Europe's old nations steeped in history, Ukraine is today an undisputed independent state. It is a democracy and has transformed into a market economy with predominant private ownership. Ukraine's postcommunist transition has been one of the most protracted and socially costly, but it has taken the country to a desirable destination. �slund's vivid account of Ukraine One of Europe's old nations steeped in history, Ukraine is today an undisputed independent state. It is a democracy and has transformed into a market economy with predominant private ownership. Ukraine's postcommunist transition has been one of the most protracted and socially costly, but it has taken the country to a desirable destination. �slund's vivid account of Ukraine's journey begins with a brief background, where he discusses the implications of Ukraine's history, the awakening of society because of Mikhail Gorbachev's reforms, the early democratization, and the impact of the ill-fated Soviet economic reforms. He then turns to the reign of President Leonid Kravchuk from 1991 to 1994, the only salient achievement of which was nation-building, while the economy collapsed in the midst of hyperinflation. The first two years of Leonid Kuchma's presidency, from 1994 to 1996, were characterized by substantial achievements, notably financial stabilization and mass privatization. The period 1996-99 was a miserable period of policy stagnation, rent seeking, and continued economic decline. In 2000 hope returned to Ukraine. Viktor Yushchenko became prime minister and launched vigorous reforms to cleanse the economy from corruption, and economic growth returned. The ensuing period, 2001-04, amounted to a competitive oligarchy. It was quite pluralist, although repression increased. Economic growth was high. The year 2004 witnessed the most joyful period in Ukraine, the Orange Revolution, which represented Ukraine's democratic breakthrough, with Yushchenko as its hero. The postrevolution period, however, has been characterized by great domestic political instability; a renewed, explicit Russian threat to Ukraine's sovereignty; and a severe financial crisis. The answers to these challenges lie in how soon the European Union fully recognizes Ukraine's long-expressed identity as a European state, how swiftly Ukraine improves its malfunctioning constitutional order, and how promptly it addresses corruption.

38 review for How Ukraine Became a Market Economy and Democracy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Once again Aslund puts together a sound analysis of the state of affairs in a post-Soviet country. The book is well-researched and provides interesting insight into the political and economic development of Ukraine as an independent state. My only real criticism is Aslund's failure to acknowledge some of the negative realities (i.e. horrible inefficiency and weak government) brought about by the Orange Revolution and its leaders. Once again Aslund puts together a sound analysis of the state of affairs in a post-Soviet country. The book is well-researched and provides interesting insight into the political and economic development of Ukraine as an independent state. My only real criticism is Aslund's failure to acknowledge some of the negative realities (i.e. horrible inefficiency and weak government) brought about by the Orange Revolution and its leaders.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Yoko Nemchinova

    A bit angled (the western view), but interesting input on Ukraines ongoing struggle towards democracy and market economy

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ambika

    LOVE IT AT FIRST TIME.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Filip Batselé

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jula Silber

  6. 4 out of 5

    Natella Morandi

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

  8. 4 out of 5

    Max

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Daniels

  10. 5 out of 5

    Iana

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bob

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex Visotzky

  13. 4 out of 5

    Krum

  14. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Swallow

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ted

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christian Schuller

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  20. 4 out of 5

    Wojtek Botijo

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marcus

  22. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gareth Vaughan

  24. 4 out of 5

    243 64

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  26. 5 out of 5

    James

  27. 5 out of 5

    Isaac

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bailey

  31. 4 out of 5

    Olena Denysyuk

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

  33. 4 out of 5

    Eliza Sprague

  34. 5 out of 5

    Olga Tutt

  35. 4 out of 5

    Eugene

  36. 4 out of 5

    TarasProkopyuk

  37. 4 out of 5

    Volodymyr Tomyuk

  38. 5 out of 5

    Eduard

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