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Children of the Sea, Volume 2

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When Ruka was younger, she saw a ghost in the water at the aquarium where her dad works. Now she feels drawn toward the aquarium and the two mysterious boys she meets there, Umi and Sora. They were raised by dugongs and hear the same strange calls from the sea as she does. Umi and Sora are not alone in their strange connection to the sea. Forty years ago, Jim met another yo When Ruka was younger, she saw a ghost in the water at the aquarium where her dad works. Now she feels drawn toward the aquarium and the two mysterious boys she meets there, Umi and Sora. They were raised by dugongs and hear the same strange calls from the sea as she does. Umi and Sora are not alone in their strange connection to the sea. Forty years ago, Jim met another young boy with the same powers. As penance for letting the boy die, Jim has been searching the world for other children with those same ties to the ocean. Anglade, a wunderkind who was once Jim's research partner, lures Sora away with the promise of answers. This leaves Umi severely depressed, and it is up to Ruka to help her new friend find his brother. But time is quickly running out...


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When Ruka was younger, she saw a ghost in the water at the aquarium where her dad works. Now she feels drawn toward the aquarium and the two mysterious boys she meets there, Umi and Sora. They were raised by dugongs and hear the same strange calls from the sea as she does. Umi and Sora are not alone in their strange connection to the sea. Forty years ago, Jim met another yo When Ruka was younger, she saw a ghost in the water at the aquarium where her dad works. Now she feels drawn toward the aquarium and the two mysterious boys she meets there, Umi and Sora. They were raised by dugongs and hear the same strange calls from the sea as she does. Umi and Sora are not alone in their strange connection to the sea. Forty years ago, Jim met another young boy with the same powers. As penance for letting the boy die, Jim has been searching the world for other children with those same ties to the ocean. Anglade, a wunderkind who was once Jim's research partner, lures Sora away with the promise of answers. This leaves Umi severely depressed, and it is up to Ruka to help her new friend find his brother. But time is quickly running out...

30 review for Children of the Sea, Volume 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    The art again is the best thing about this series, the gorgeous work Igarashi does especially with nature: any ocean creatures, water, weather… he's a little less good with people, interestingly enough, but maybe because the global/cosmic themes are actually more important to him than the characters themselves. Many of the characters are mystical and ethereal and two of them look very much like girls but are boys, to no obvious purpose… but the cast is still interesting, just not as accomplished The art again is the best thing about this series, the gorgeous work Igarashi does especially with nature: any ocean creatures, water, weather… he's a little less good with people, interestingly enough, but maybe because the global/cosmic themes are actually more important to him than the characters themselves. Many of the characters are mystical and ethereal and two of them look very much like girls but are boys, to no obvious purpose… but the cast is still interesting, just not as accomplished as the amazing art, which well fits the purposes of the story. The central idea here blends science (marine biology, in particular) and mysticism to tell a story of something peculiar and concerning about the sea and the disappearance of fish. It also features middle school kids as central characters, so that's an audience issue, to get at the complexity of the known world and communicate that to teens (and older people, too!). Two kids, Umi and Sora, have a sixth sense, though it is not about ghosts, but about the sea. Instead of seeing dead people or prescience, they can read some levels of the ocean, have a sense of what is going on with it. They also grew up IN it, not just around it, so that's a fantasy element. Ultimately, we learn as we go in the plot that we humans know very little about the sea, we are just scratching the surface and are as arrogant about it as we are about any sort of cultural or ethnic issue. The pace is slow, as Sora goes missing and Umi gets sick and we get some interesting backstory about marine biologist Jim who has known kids like Umi and Sora for forty years. He's not just a hard science guy, in other words, he gets it that the ocean is mosty unknowable and often mysterious. Much of what he is learning as a scientist is informed by Sora's mystical sixth sense, actually. Sora has been working with him. There's a big reveal at the end that is surprising and will make you/me keep reading, of course. This is a really unique manga..

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zaz

    As with the 1st volume, the story was strange. In addition, it was also far fetched and difficult to follow at some points. I enjoyed the moments in the water or on the beach, and the kids' interactions, but not really the rest. The end was quite difficult to look at. As with the 1st volume, the story was strange. In addition, it was also far fetched and difficult to follow at some points. I enjoyed the moments in the water or on the beach, and the kids' interactions, but not really the rest. The end was quite difficult to look at.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie - Books Less Travelled

    I think I'm starting to understand this series a little more. This one covered some Asian mythology, and seems to be the theme for this series. I am starting to like the characters more as I understand who everyone is. I love the artwork, and am excited to read more of this series! This is so different from the other manga I've read, but I think that's part of it's lure, that it is different, and I love that! I think I'm starting to understand this series a little more. This one covered some Asian mythology, and seems to be the theme for this series. I am starting to like the characters more as I understand who everyone is. I love the artwork, and am excited to read more of this series! This is so different from the other manga I've read, but I think that's part of it's lure, that it is different, and I love that!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rosa

    The illustrations of the animals are absolutely gorgeous. The story is getting a little bit creepy and sad but I am still enjoying it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    Ok, I've come to terms with Sora being a guy, but how in the world is Anglade a guy? Such strange art! Anyway, other than not being able to figure out characters until someone else refers to them as "him" or "her," the story continues to spin in interesting ways, now connecting to mythological stories of the sea and stars. Curious to see how it progresses, and what the final crisis is that some of the characters fear. I'm also interested to see the recent anime; I suspect that motion and color wi Ok, I've come to terms with Sora being a guy, but how in the world is Anglade a guy? Such strange art! Anyway, other than not being able to figure out characters until someone else refers to them as "him" or "her," the story continues to spin in interesting ways, now connecting to mythological stories of the sea and stars. Curious to see how it progresses, and what the final crisis is that some of the characters fear. I'm also interested to see the recent anime; I suspect that motion and color will really bring this story to life. The dialogue is not a huge part of this manga, but I like this insight about words, from Ruka:Sometimes I lose my voice too. Like with my parents and my teachers. In my head, I have so many things I want to say to them. And the thoughts go around and around...but the more I try to put them into words...the more I can't say anything. Because when you put it into words...then everything you can't say with words doesn't exist, right? (192–3)A final note: I would be much more worried about Ruka than her parents are. "Oh, our daughter ran out of the house at night during a typhoon, and we haven't heard from her in hours? Ah well, I'm sure she's fine. She'll turn up eventually."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nelson

    "... In other words, more than 90 percent of the total mass of the universe is made up of this matter we can't identify. The world is full of things we can't see. The universe is more complex than our eyes can perceive. I think the universe is a lot like people. Inside each person, small fragments of memory float around. Until by some chance, several fragments join together, and the memory gets a little larger. And that larger memory draws in more fragments of memory. And they merge to create an "... In other words, more than 90 percent of the total mass of the universe is made up of this matter we can't identify. The world is full of things we can't see. The universe is more complex than our eyes can perceive. I think the universe is a lot like people. Inside each person, small fragments of memory float around. Until by some chance, several fragments join together, and the memory gets a little larger. And that larger memory draws in more fragments of memory. And they merge to create an even larger memory. That's just like... what the birth of a star or a galaxy looks like..."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    It’s alright. Curious to find out what happens next.

  8. 4 out of 5

    E

    mythic and haunting... I'm not sure I understand the story that's going on, only partly because of having to read it in the reverse of my accustomed patterns. I think it's dreamlike to the point of incoherent in spots... and I really wish it were color illustrations all the way through, because the undersea scenes would be easier to read. mythic and haunting... I'm not sure I understand the story that's going on, only partly because of having to read it in the reverse of my accustomed patterns. I think it's dreamlike to the point of incoherent in spots... and I really wish it were color illustrations all the way through, because the undersea scenes would be easier to read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bryn (Plus Others)

    This is just not really my genre -- I will probably keep reading it until I run out of volumes loaned to me by my lovely manga-loaning friend, but I don't think I'll bother to finish the series unless it surprises me. This is just not really my genre -- I will probably keep reading it until I run out of volumes loaned to me by my lovely manga-loaning friend, but I don't think I'll bother to finish the series unless it surprises me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Child960801

    A strange phenomenon is happening to one of the boys. They all run off together to a private beach. A new character is introduced who I thought was a girl for pages and pages until someone called that character a guy. These books are weird.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Natasha Musa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was much better than the 1st book and I’m quite attached to the characters now. So sad to see Sora die. Waiting for book 3 and 4 to arrive in the mail. Book 5 is out of stock at my local bookstore, will need to hunt it down on Amazon.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Horvath

    More and more intriguing. I'm probably gonna cry abt tides, memory formation, and dark matter later, in a good way. I do wish there was more watercolor, the scarcity of which I assume just has to do with the expense of reproduction, but!! It's so stunning, I want more! More and more intriguing. I'm probably gonna cry abt tides, memory formation, and dark matter later, in a good way. I do wish there was more watercolor, the scarcity of which I assume just has to do with the expense of reproduction, but!! It's so stunning, I want more!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Geraldine

    I enjoyed reading this book. Especially that it includes the ocean and the aquatic animals. Not only is it entertaining, it is also educational. I was so engrossed in the book I finished it in less than a day. I recommend it to everyone.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ayen

    Wow

  15. 4 out of 5

    Callie *Fights Censorship*

    I continue to enjoy this story even though I'm confused at least 50% of the time. It is just so mysterious, the dugong call to me. I continue to enjoy this story even though I'm confused at least 50% of the time. It is just so mysterious, the dugong call to me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Well that took a turn I wasn't expecting! Must find out what happens next! Well that took a turn I wasn't expecting! Must find out what happens next!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Very visual, mysterious and mythic...unlike anything I’ve read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    The Georgia Book Belle

    WHAT JUST HAPPENED?!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    This incredibly unique story picks up where Vol. 1 left off and after reading the book I'm still left without any evidence on whether to call it fantasy or science fiction at this point. The fish continue to disappear but that aspect of the story fades to the background as this volume both takes a closer look at certain characters and propels Umi and Sora's plot forward. We are taken into the past and shown Jim's backstory which explains why he is the boys' guardian. A new character, Anglade, ap This incredibly unique story picks up where Vol. 1 left off and after reading the book I'm still left without any evidence on whether to call it fantasy or science fiction at this point. The fish continue to disappear but that aspect of the story fades to the background as this volume both takes a closer look at certain characters and propels Umi and Sora's plot forward. We are taken into the past and shown Jim's backstory which explains why he is the boys' guardian. A new character, Anglade, appears on the scene who promises answers to Sora. Sora's disappearance leaves Umi depressed and physically ill and Ruka helps him on his search to find Sora. A few exciting reveals are given in this volume adding more mystery to the nature of the boys' existence. The shocking ending is unexpected and will make for a major change in plot for the next volume, if all is as it seems to be. I love the science presented in this manga, the information on marine life and specific to this volume the tsunami's natural place in the ecosystem. I really enjoy the artwork, a lot of attention is paid to the background scenery in many frames and the characters are nicely drawn. One thing that did irritate me though was the new character Anglade. So far in this book, the men have been drawn to look like men, something I appreciated and had come to expect from the series. But along comes Anglade who is obviously an attractive female and referred to by name only at first then all of a sudden Anglade is referred to as he and him all the time. Otherwise, I'm finding this series incredibly intriguing and unique. The science setting of the aquarium, the involvement of marine biologists keep the possible science fiction angle open while the fantastical events are happening all around them. At over 300 pages these volumes include a lot of characterization and I've grown attachments to certain characters and found a few I'm not fond of as well. After the system jarring ending I'm really looking forward to the next volume due out this summer (2010). Re-read Aug/2013: My original review is very detailed on my impressions of this volume and I won't repeat them. I rated it a (4.5/5) For this re-read I am again just astounded with Igarashi's stunning art. His representation of marine life is captivating. The story becomes very mystical at this point. The boys themselves and Jim refer to them as not human, something I think I missed in the first read and this is an important plot-point. Also much is made of Ruka's similarities with Umi and Sora. I still don't like the way Anglade is drawn. I really hate it when they draw a beautiful girl with long flowing hair, gorgeous big eyes with long upturned eyelashes and then eventually tell you it's a him. Gag! The story is becoming very mystical with connections between both myths and science at this point and the ending is shocking and tragic. I'm willing to change my rating to a full 5/5 at this point. Anglade's looks don't affect the story, just my sensibilities LOL.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    Igarashi's drawing is still as lovely as ever. I found myself stopping page after page to adore and absorb the sketchy lines and the way he uses line shape to provoke emotion and mood. The drawings of the sea, or the animals, or the eyes, are sometimes just scratches on the paper - up close the lines recreate the swaying of the plants underwater, or the brush of a current - and when farther from the eye they create a whole scene, something moving and a moment captured. I think that's what I love Igarashi's drawing is still as lovely as ever. I found myself stopping page after page to adore and absorb the sketchy lines and the way he uses line shape to provoke emotion and mood. The drawings of the sea, or the animals, or the eyes, are sometimes just scratches on the paper - up close the lines recreate the swaying of the plants underwater, or the brush of a current - and when farther from the eye they create a whole scene, something moving and a moment captured. I think that's what I love most about this manga. The story is great, but the art is something all together new and beautiful to me. In this volume, Sora and Umi are separated. The whole volume creates something of a desolate feeling... that "typhoon building inside of you". Even Ruka's enthusiasm and spunk are muted as Umi and Sora's separation pushes Umi into a depressed funk. We learn a lot more about Jim's relation to the two boys in this book, and find out more about researchers who want to do tests on them to discover "what they really are". There's less ghost story, more legend leading to truth, and a lot more real life concern. When Sora and Umi are finally united, they share a day of joy swimming with Ruka...and in one night, as Umi's body is going through some kind of "change" ---Sora is taken by "her" ---and is dismembered by sea creatures. It's a bit graphic, and a bit curious, but it adds to the overall interest I have in this particular story from the sea. And there it ends...so I'll have to pick up the next volume!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Charliesabers

    The series as a whole is good. The story is interesting, deep and thought provoking, and weaves a fascinating tale about the origin of life, death and everything in between. I did not particularly like the main cast. They receive a bit of development, but are mostly there as vehicles for the story. Maybe Ruka, her mom, Anglade and Dehdeh could be considered the best of the bunch. The pacing is kind slow, but not in a bad way. I definitely was actively finding time to read it, but it is no page t The series as a whole is good. The story is interesting, deep and thought provoking, and weaves a fascinating tale about the origin of life, death and everything in between. I did not particularly like the main cast. They receive a bit of development, but are mostly there as vehicles for the story. Maybe Ruka, her mom, Anglade and Dehdeh could be considered the best of the bunch. The pacing is kind slow, but not in a bad way. I definitely was actively finding time to read it, but it is no page turner like Pluto or MW. The one thing I loved the most about this series is the AMAZING art. Many a frame from these books could be shown on a museum. It looks natural, organic, and the depictions of sea flora and fauna are amazingly detailed and full of life. I definitely recommend the series for the art and smart concept alone, but it could've used a bit more exposition to clear up a few confusing plot points.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Finally getting around to continuing this series. Though I guess it hasn't been that long since I read the first volume. Not much to add. More development of the sort of mysticism backed by quasi-scientific explanations or justifications that I tend to dislike, but the art and character development, as well as the mystery of what is happening is still compelling enough to draw me in. One note: I totally didn't get that Anglade is a guy at first. Even when people talking about him used "he" I assu Finally getting around to continuing this series. Though I guess it hasn't been that long since I read the first volume. Not much to add. More development of the sort of mysticism backed by quasi-scientific explanations or justifications that I tend to dislike, but the art and character development, as well as the mystery of what is happening is still compelling enough to draw me in. One note: I totally didn't get that Anglade is a guy at first. Even when people talking about him used "he" I assumed it was a misapprehension on their part, and those who knew better were simply going along with it, perhaps as deliberate obfuscation. Complicated further by the fact that I know in Japanese you can totally talk about a third party without every having to grammatically define their gender. Oh, and I think my favorite part of this volume is the simple two-page story at the end.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    This odd story about marine biologists observing peculiar phenomena that suddenly appear in Earth's oceans gets more streamlined with the second volume of the series. We get some nice scientific background to fuel sci-fi concepts that might very well turn out to be quite fascinating. And as the plot moves forward nicely and the characters get built up further, this mesmerizing exercise of dreamlike storytelling is a definite winner, promising good things ahead. This odd story about marine biologists observing peculiar phenomena that suddenly appear in Earth's oceans gets more streamlined with the second volume of the series. We get some nice scientific background to fuel sci-fi concepts that might very well turn out to be quite fascinating. And as the plot moves forward nicely and the characters get built up further, this mesmerizing exercise of dreamlike storytelling is a definite winner, promising good things ahead.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Sanford

    This series has really grown on me. I initially had issues with reading R to L, but as soon as I started this book I fell into the flow of it as if I have been reading manga my entire life. I enjoyed the pictures more and the story more. I quite like this story although it is slow. I do hate how it ends. It gets interesting as soon as it ends. I am really happy I kept at this series. I really like it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    Enchanting, moody artwork draws you into the fantastical legend of children adapted to living in the sea and what is to come to pass in the world as we know it. As a side note, this book is from 2007 mentions an ancient legend of a god's semen dropping to earth and a character comes to think that is what a meteorite is. And now in 2014 we have landed a spaceprobe on a comet and have found organic matter. hmmmm Enchanting, moody artwork draws you into the fantastical legend of children adapted to living in the sea and what is to come to pass in the world as we know it. As a side note, this book is from 2007 mentions an ancient legend of a god's semen dropping to earth and a character comes to think that is what a meteorite is. And now in 2014 we have landed a spaceprobe on a comet and have found organic matter. hmmmm

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    I'm still loving this series--the art is just really beautiful, and I love the slow, dreamy way the story is progressing, while it's also gradually growing darker. Also, I used to imagine that I should have been a sea mammal, so this series feels a little like home. Hopefully we get the final three volumes in at the library soon so I can find out what happens with Sora and Umi and Ruka--thanks, Kelly! I'm still loving this series--the art is just really beautiful, and I love the slow, dreamy way the story is progressing, while it's also gradually growing darker. Also, I used to imagine that I should have been a sea mammal, so this series feels a little like home. Hopefully we get the final three volumes in at the library soon so I can find out what happens with Sora and Umi and Ruka--thanks, Kelly!

  27. 5 out of 5

    mazohyst

    Still a beautiful series, Children of the Sea is definitely a must read. The story slowly unfolds, revealing more and more that only leaves me wanting to know more and more. There were a few panels that may cause me to have nightmares, but it's still beautiful art nevertheless. I'm finding myself to be drawn more and more into the children and the oceans itself. Still a beautiful series, Children of the Sea is definitely a must read. The story slowly unfolds, revealing more and more that only leaves me wanting to know more and more. There were a few panels that may cause me to have nightmares, but it's still beautiful art nevertheless. I'm finding myself to be drawn more and more into the children and the oceans itself.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Scott Robins

    Exactly the kind of manga I've been looking for - a mysterious and unfolding story about children that live in the sea. The ending to this volume was a shocker. Definitely looking forward to volume 3. Exactly the kind of manga I've been looking for - a mysterious and unfolding story about children that live in the sea. The ending to this volume was a shocker. Definitely looking forward to volume 3.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pinky

    The story continues with Sora running away from the aquarium and Umi and Ruka chasing after him. Sora and Umi are going through some sort of transition and we are left as Sora explodes into the ocean. Does it have something to do with the meteorite?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

    Sort of like where "Lost" meets "The X-Files", set in the ocean. All buildup and mystery, wrapped in mysticism, but no real answers. I have a feeling the end of this series might be somewhat of a letdown. Sort of like where "Lost" meets "The X-Files", set in the ocean. All buildup and mystery, wrapped in mysticism, but no real answers. I have a feeling the end of this series might be somewhat of a letdown.

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