web site hit counter Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom

Availability: Ready to download

A warm, smart, and witty personal investigation of ethnicity and womanhood. In the second-generation immigrant home where Maria Laurino grew up, “independent” was a dirty word and “sacrifice” was the ideal and reality of motherhood. But out in the world, Mary Tyler Moore was throwing her hat in the air, personifying the excitement and opportunities of the freedom loving Am A warm, smart, and witty personal investigation of ethnicity and womanhood. In the second-generation immigrant home where Maria Laurino grew up, “independent” was a dirty word and “sacrifice” was the ideal and reality of motherhood. But out in the world, Mary Tyler Moore was throwing her hat in the air, personifying the excitement and opportunities of the freedom loving American career woman. How, then, to reconcile one’s inner Livia Soprano—the archetypal ethnic mother—with a feminist icon? Combining lived experience with research and reporting on our contemporary work-family dilemmas, Laurino brews an unusual and affirming blend of contemporary and traditional values. No other book has attempted to discuss feminism through the prism of ethnic identity, or to merge the personal and the analytical with such a passionate and intelligent literary voice. Prizing both individual freedom and an Old World in which the dependent young and old are cherished, Laurino makes clear how much the New World offers and how much it has yet to learn.


Compare

A warm, smart, and witty personal investigation of ethnicity and womanhood. In the second-generation immigrant home where Maria Laurino grew up, “independent” was a dirty word and “sacrifice” was the ideal and reality of motherhood. But out in the world, Mary Tyler Moore was throwing her hat in the air, personifying the excitement and opportunities of the freedom loving Am A warm, smart, and witty personal investigation of ethnicity and womanhood. In the second-generation immigrant home where Maria Laurino grew up, “independent” was a dirty word and “sacrifice” was the ideal and reality of motherhood. But out in the world, Mary Tyler Moore was throwing her hat in the air, personifying the excitement and opportunities of the freedom loving American career woman. How, then, to reconcile one’s inner Livia Soprano—the archetypal ethnic mother—with a feminist icon? Combining lived experience with research and reporting on our contemporary work-family dilemmas, Laurino brews an unusual and affirming blend of contemporary and traditional values. No other book has attempted to discuss feminism through the prism of ethnic identity, or to merge the personal and the analytical with such a passionate and intelligent literary voice. Prizing both individual freedom and an Old World in which the dependent young and old are cherished, Laurino makes clear how much the New World offers and how much it has yet to learn.

45 review for Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom

  1. 5 out of 5

    Morninglight Mama

    I have to say that this was not exactly what I expected from the little that I had read about it before beginning the book. I guess I expected a simple examination of the Italian, 'old world' culture versus the larger 'American' culture that the author grew up in. This was definitely tackled, but I was pleasantly surprised by the connections drawn between this train of thought and the history of feminism in America, along with the exploration of the interdependency that is inevitable in life. Ev I have to say that this was not exactly what I expected from the little that I had read about it before beginning the book. I guess I expected a simple examination of the Italian, 'old world' culture versus the larger 'American' culture that the author grew up in. This was definitely tackled, but I was pleasantly surprised by the connections drawn between this train of thought and the history of feminism in America, along with the exploration of the interdependency that is inevitable in life. Even though I didn't grow up with the Old World Italian family influences, I severely understood the dilemmas that face moms today that the author explored here. It's hard to call this a straightforward memoir, in my opinion, as it seemed to sometimes read like a history lesson, or a dissertation on public policy at other times. Nonfiction doesn't read quickly for me or seem to draw me in as strongly as fiction does, so this one took longer for me to get through, but I'm glad that I read it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Natalia

    Taking us from her childhood to the present, Maria Laurino explores what it’s like to be an Italian American woman through the lens of identity, feminism, ethnicity, motherhood, pregnancy, and economics in Old World Daughter, New World Mother. Laurino unveils the restrictions she faced as a feminist daughter, as well as all that a traditionally Italian upbringing entails. We learn of her severely over-protective mother who gets up at dawn to make the day’s meals, how this mamma’s actions and att Taking us from her childhood to the present, Maria Laurino explores what it’s like to be an Italian American woman through the lens of identity, feminism, ethnicity, motherhood, pregnancy, and economics in Old World Daughter, New World Mother. Laurino unveils the restrictions she faced as a feminist daughter, as well as all that a traditionally Italian upbringing entails. We learn of her severely over-protective mother who gets up at dawn to make the day’s meals, how this mamma’s actions and attitudes have rippled across the pond of Laurino’s life, and why this mamma did not serve as a role model for her daughter because she remained stuck within an ever “motherly” and self-effacingly sacrificial role. This theme of sacrificial motherhood is ubiquitous in the book, and Laurino later ties it in to her deep analysis of feminism and motherhood in America today. In a way, Laurino’s story is epic because it is both personal and boundless. At least part of her story—her thoughts and feelings about life lived through the stark lens of feminism—will resonate with most readers. While Laurino is fond of details her humanity broadens their reach, which is precisely what makes this book so touching, graceful, and important. Laurino shares the connections that she forms with herself and everyone around her, even when they’re not reciprocated. There is enough intimate divulgence to let us perceive our narrator’s sensitivity in the face of a callous world, and we see strength inhabit Laurino as she surpasses obstacles to evolve into the writer who lived to tell the tale. As I read, I truly marveled at the uninhibited candor and courage stemming from this person who is, in the end, so much like each of us. This book deals largely with “reconstructive feminism” or “family humanism.” Laurino explores ways in which feminism can approach class and economic equality, mitigate the difficulties of working-class parents (women in particular), and deconstruct the myth of independence anchored in American culture that leads mothers to make false choices about their careers. When she interviews Nidia, a working-class mother who lacked the opportunity to get to know her children because she had to work (with no benefits, minimal vacation time, and no flexibility to even use an office phone to call home and check that her children had gotten home safely from school) an embarrassed Laurino if Nidia is a feminist or supports the movement: “’Let me see,’ [Nidia:] replied with a sly smile, ‘is that when women fought for the right to employment?’” Essentially, Laurino believes it imperative that the “two strands of the women’s movement—one that sought to protect women’s interests as wives and mothers, the other that fought for universal human rights—converge once again.” She affirms there need not be contradiction in a “feminist motherhood agenda,” which would serve us all—mothers and otherwise—supremely well. Laurino introduces ideas for legislation to guide us in moving forward that utilizes cultural perspectives inspired by her Italian upbringing. She also suggests actions we can take right now. Appropriately, this book has reminded me that we are all linked together. We all matter because we are all riding the same wave of life, as Laurino likes to say, and injustice against one will duly impact everyone riding it—and so will compassion. This is a memoir that cruises through politics, ethnicity, motherhood, and identity politics while pulling the reader back into the palpability of these encompassing themes. Old World Daughter, New World Mother is an important and potentially paradigm-shattering book with a lot to offer feminists, especially to those privileged enough to get their hands on it. As Laurino walks us through her deconstruction of myths, prejudices, and familial ingrained ideas, her concepts breathe a tender and brave vitality onto us, and stretches our minds to blur misconceptions about motherhood, ethnicity, class, the economy, and feminism itself. This book is nourishment. Don’t miss it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gaby

    Maria Laurino's book is part memoirs and part analysis of feminism in practice. The book begins with stories of her Italian American grandparents and the lives that they built for themselves in New Jersey. Sharing anecdotes from her mother's childhood of how her maternal grandfather who came to the US at the turn of the century and created his own construction company. Growing their own vegetables and flowers, making their own wine in the basement of their home, maintaining many of their traditi Maria Laurino's book is part memoirs and part analysis of feminism in practice. The book begins with stories of her Italian American grandparents and the lives that they built for themselves in New Jersey. Sharing anecdotes from her mother's childhood of how her maternal grandfather who came to the US at the turn of the century and created his own construction company. Growing their own vegetables and flowers, making their own wine in the basement of their home, maintaining many of their traditions and habits of the lives that they'd had in Italy. In the stories of her family, Maria Laurino shares the roles that women have held and how each generation of women would balance the expectations and needs of their families with their own needs. She writes about feminism in the context of her own life and her identity as Italian American. "I explained how my father wanted me to attend any college that I chose and always supported my living away from home to pursue a career...[the journalist:] had no idea how radical the concept of establishing an independent life was for a daughter in a traditional Italian-American family." Laurino discusses how motherhood affected her understanding of everyday feminism. She also analyzes how feminism is regarded by college women and recent college graduates insofar as anecdotal research shows that less women seem to describe themselves as feminists while they have a deep commitment to gender equality in practice. Overall, I found Old World Daughter, New World Mother: An Education in Love and Freedom to be an interesting read. Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co. (April 13, 2009), 224 pages. Courtesy of Bostick Communications and the author.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    This memoir was so unexpected... I was initially captured by the title as I am an Old World Daughter and New World Mother of Italian-American stock. Early on in life, this mix has been a source of enormous confusion, frustration, embarrassment and finally understanding, reconciliation, and acceptance. With my sixtieth birthday around the corner, I have graduated from New World Mother and am on he cusp of yet another stage, New Old World Mother (which suggests I might be morphing into a likeness This memoir was so unexpected... I was initially captured by the title as I am an Old World Daughter and New World Mother of Italian-American stock. Early on in life, this mix has been a source of enormous confusion, frustration, embarrassment and finally understanding, reconciliation, and acceptance. With my sixtieth birthday around the corner, I have graduated from New World Mother and am on he cusp of yet another stage, New Old World Mother (which suggests I might be morphing into a likeness of my own Italian mother minus some of the crazy). Maria Laurino struck at the heart of matters as she attacks our national ignorance in regards to real support for real families... I am not optimistic that any of that will change. However, I am hopeful my children will nurture their offspring with new old world traditions of familial closeness and commitment because it will provide solid foundations, nourish the family spirit and give purpose to living like no other attachments can.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura de Leon

    My biggest problem with this book is that it wasn't what I expected it to be. I'm not sure it is fair to hold that against it. On the other hand, I had a hard time figuring out what the book WAS supposed to be. I liked most of the parts. It was combining them into a whole that didn't always work for me. I really, really want to give this book 3.5 stars. I was expecting a homey, somewhat funny memoir-- stories of the author's life, with some reflections on deeper meaning. What I read was a series of My biggest problem with this book is that it wasn't what I expected it to be. I'm not sure it is fair to hold that against it. On the other hand, I had a hard time figuring out what the book WAS supposed to be. I liked most of the parts. It was combining them into a whole that didn't always work for me. I really, really want to give this book 3.5 stars. I was expecting a homey, somewhat funny memoir-- stories of the author's life, with some reflections on deeper meaning. What I read was a series of loosely related essays, braiding thoughts on feminism, references to research, and homey stories of her life. (I never did find the "witty" referred to in the book blurb.) These were, for the most part, well written. Several of them leave me with questions for the author. Some make me bristle, and want to argue. A few leave me saying Yes! She gets it! That's not a bad outcome.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    When I saw this book I expected stories of big italiam families told about big italian family dinners. There was a little of this in Old World Daughter, New World Mother but not much. The book discusses family, gender issues, disability, child bearing and rearing. Basically, though, this is a book about feminism. It is the story of a woman trying to balance traditional women roles with the more modern role of powerful, working women. A little dry at times, the story could have used more stories When I saw this book I expected stories of big italiam families told about big italian family dinners. There was a little of this in Old World Daughter, New World Mother but not much. The book discusses family, gender issues, disability, child bearing and rearing. Basically, though, this is a book about feminism. It is the story of a woman trying to balance traditional women roles with the more modern role of powerful, working women. A little dry at times, the story could have used more stories about the italian family than mention of trying to break free from it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Luci

    This was a somewhat split book. I think that the Enlightenment and feminist thought was very good but I didn't get enough of the Old World realities that are inherent in growing up as a hyphenated American. It was an interesting book and worth passing along to your mother friends. This was a somewhat split book. I think that the Enlightenment and feminist thought was very good but I didn't get enough of the Old World realities that are inherent in growing up as a hyphenated American. It was an interesting book and worth passing along to your mother friends.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Heather Maguire

    loving it so far.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Roselle

    Not exactly what I expected. Less of a comparison between the old world and new world and more of a criticism of current public policy on women's rights. Not exactly what I expected. Less of a comparison between the old world and new world and more of a criticism of current public policy on women's rights.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    Feminism was the major topic of this book. I was hoping it would focus on being a first generation Italian American. It was interesting but a bit different from what I expected. Well written.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Donna

  12. 5 out of 5

    Xenia0201

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gina DiRenzi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sadie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amy Vince

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amber Lambing

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rosemarie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Medea

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura Bagnarol

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donna Jo Atwood

  24. 5 out of 5

    Signora

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cmandtp

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Monica

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marie

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  31. 4 out of 5

    Petskystone

  32. 5 out of 5

    Heathergrady

  33. 4 out of 5

    Diana

  34. 5 out of 5

    April

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Defoy

  36. 4 out of 5

    Aurora

  37. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  38. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  39. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  40. 5 out of 5

    Celia

  41. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  43. 5 out of 5

    Lori Steib

  44. 5 out of 5

    Guncha

  45. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.