web site hit counter The North Will Rise Again: Manchester Music City 1978-1996 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The North Will Rise Again: Manchester Music City 1978-1996

Availability: Ready to download

The real story of the Manchester music scene in the words of the musicians, promoters, club owners, managers and pundits.


Compare

The real story of the Manchester music scene in the words of the musicians, promoters, club owners, managers and pundits.

52 review for The North Will Rise Again: Manchester Music City 1978-1996

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ben Winch

    P.S. Goodbye The Chameleons UK (July 2014, handwritten, keyed in March 2015) It’s 9 a.m. of a school day, I’ve driven 45 minutes across the hills to technical college only to find the lesson’s cancelled, and I’m in a cafe with some rare downtime, far from a computer (which would consume my mind with web design and book/record-release plans) and―having listened to most of the Chameleons’ second album What Does Anything Mean? Basically on the way here―thinking of Manchester. Funny thing about the Cham P.S. Goodbye The Chameleons UK (July 2014, handwritten, keyed in March 2015) It’s 9 a.m. of a school day, I’ve driven 45 minutes across the hills to technical college only to find the lesson’s cancelled, and I’m in a cafe with some rare downtime, far from a computer (which would consume my mind with web design and book/record-release plans) and―having listened to most of the Chameleons’ second album What Does Anything Mean? Basically on the way here―thinking of Manchester. Funny thing about the Chameleons―nowhere, not even in this otherwise balanced/exhaustive study by Blackpool native and Manchester rock music stalwart John Robb, have I seen their story told beyond a mention (that’s what Robb gives them, and it’s more than they usually get) yet in Manchester they’re revered, despite never having infiltrated the Factory Records/Hacienda scene. Truth is, even in Manchester their audience is small, if passionate. But this is not an obscure or “experimental” group. Think U2, Cure, “shoegaze” forerunners with northern soul―the soul of the Roses and Verve and Joy Division. These guys mean it. No, unlike Joy Division (to this day, cliche be damned, my pick for pre-eminent northern, English, postpunk and maybe even modern rock band) they’re not sophisticated. No mad-hatter producer or Throbbing Gristle obsession here. Not much urban paranoia either. Hailing from Middleton, a small former industrial town 5 miles north of Manchester (in the UK, enough to qualify them as not quite a Manchester band), it’s just possible the Chameleons felt more country (or outer suburban) than city, and in their sad, spacious atmospherics there’s a romantic sense of forces massing at the edge of consciousness rarely present in their peers. (Joy Division, though having ties to semi-rural Macclesfield, coalesced, rehearsed and gigged in Manchester, from which, I assume, issued the near-fatal sense of doom―of life and its rituals and systems gone to seed―which makes their mechanical, near anti-melodic groove more futuristic than nostalgic.) In other words, here―in the Chameleons, in Joy Division―are two responses to the spread and near-demise of industrialisation from the epicentre. (Manchester, “Birthplace of the Industrial Revolution,” and: “Oh Manchester, so much to answer for,” sings Morrissey.) I can hardly warrant it, feel slightly embarrassed saying it, but in this music is something that pulls and pulls at my heart―that seems to be the land singing, against all odds, through the sheen of eighties production (mostly held in check), through the pop structure that the Chameleons (unlike Joy Division) still are constrained by. The melodies! Here is the difference: even the Roses (folk and Mary Chain-infused, rock-classicist, and residents―except bassist Mani―of breezier, leafier, middle class southern suburb Altrincham) didn’t have this. Every note is rationed, thought-out, placed exactly, as if to waste colour were reckless, but through the discipline of this limited palette singer/bassist/everyman philosopher Mark Burgess speaks from the heart: Whatever lies in my past Or what is yet in the future Time passes so fast Suppose there’s always the danger I won’t pull through I’ll have to think this thing through Despite my fear it helps to Share my nostalgia with you (Nostalgia) No blasted, gothic eloquence (a la Ian Curtis) here. The words are plain but heartfelt. Did the communist tradition so prevalent in the north (in Manchester, Sheffield, Liverpool) influence the democratism of its bands, or the direct, populist (but not crass) delivery of Mark Burgess? Don’t get me wrong, there’s beauty here, lots of it, but never is it florid or lavish. Still, nor were the Chameleons an “indie” band. Disqualified from the eighties UK indie charts by their associations with three major labels, after small-scale, typical, frustrating label problems they signed eventually with Geffen in the U.S., after which their manager died, the band split and they left behind a small back catalogue owned by three labels on two continents, who couldn’t or wouldn’t work together to promote it. For my part, I might not have heard them if not for a Mancunian I met in Sydney shortly before I moved to Manchester in 2009, who berated me for my Joy Division fixation and exhorted me: “Get into some real Manc. music,” thus ensuring my first months in Manchester―on the bus through leafy suburbs and the train through treeless hills in the Peak District, in the gym or my Withington bedsit with the rain outside, in pockets of woods by the Mersey under the freeway overpasses or riding by the ship canal with warehouses and empty lots and long grass all around―were saturated and infiltrated by this music. To this day, the Chameleons are the sound of Manchester to me, not Joy Division, the Roses, the Smiths, the Mondays, all of which I’d heard long ago in other places. To me, What Does Anything Mean? Basically, despite the shabby title, is their masterpiece, and it sings. If Joy Division’s Closer (aside from the two lyrical tracks that close it) is the machines or the future singing, this is the blighted near-beaten resilient earth. In urban gardens, in repurposed industrial spaces, in canals flushed of gunk and made picturesque, maybe, yes, the North Will Rise Again. Read this book, it’s great, probably as transparent a document of the era as you’ll find. John Robb knows his stuff. He has kind words for everyone and an insider’s access to the bands that shows in the in-depth quotes he conjures from them. But spare a thought for the also-rans, who were never packaged like their more famous brethren but who sang for and from the north with voices just as pure, just as heartfelt. The night’s growing colder The enemy bolder But as you grow older You cease to care (Home is Where the Heart Is) Brother can you hear my voice? Every second that you cling to life You have to feel alive (Intrigue in Tangiers) I realise a miracle is due I dedicate this melody to you (Second Skin)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amelia Barlow

    I left my copy of this in St Anne's Square during the memorial following the attack at Manchester Arena in May this year. I thought there would be a poignant message in the title given the context of my home city mourning en-mass after such an unspeakable tragedy, thanks John Robb for giving us something permanent to give back at a time when we all needed reminding of our strength and solidarity. I left my copy of this in St Anne's Square during the memorial following the attack at Manchester Arena in May this year. I thought there would be a poignant message in the title given the context of my home city mourning en-mass after such an unspeakable tragedy, thanks John Robb for giving us something permanent to give back at a time when we all needed reminding of our strength and solidarity.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Martinxo

    I enjoyed the pre-punk, punk and post-punk sections of this book but quickly tired of reading about Hacienda playlists, DJs and stuff. The chapters on The Smiths, Stone Roses and Oasis weren't of interest as I'm not a big fan of those bands. I enjoyed the pre-punk, punk and post-punk sections of this book but quickly tired of reading about Hacienda playlists, DJs and stuff. The chapters on The Smiths, Stone Roses and Oasis weren't of interest as I'm not a big fan of those bands.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    Another excellent oral history from Mr Robb. Best read straight after a Johnny Marr biog and any number of Tony Wilson/Factory/Hac biogs!

  5. 4 out of 5

    M

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrey Moseykin

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Guenard

  10. 4 out of 5

    Thijs

  11. 4 out of 5

    Annika_D

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Thompson

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Gilmour

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marta

  15. 5 out of 5

    Luca

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sue Pierce

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Gawthorpe

  18. 5 out of 5

    Leanne

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mehmet Ali Bortucene

  20. 4 out of 5

    Soph.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan

  22. 5 out of 5

    René

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt Ó Garmaile

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tom Sihap

  25. 5 out of 5

    Simon

  26. 5 out of 5

    Richard Chaplin

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sulo Robinson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paul Crabtree

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fredrik Bergqvist

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mark Desrosiers

  31. 4 out of 5

    Alma

  32. 4 out of 5

    R

  33. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

  34. 5 out of 5

    Vaughan Walton

  35. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  36. 4 out of 5

    Ian "Marvin" Graye

  37. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  38. 4 out of 5

    Emilie Bertrand

  39. 4 out of 5

    Angela Reilly

  40. 5 out of 5

    Valtteri Pukkila

  41. 5 out of 5

    Claire

  42. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  43. 5 out of 5

    danyell

  44. 5 out of 5

    Sara Habein

  45. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  46. 5 out of 5

    Santasviolettas

  47. 4 out of 5

    L Joy Williams

  48. 5 out of 5

    Lauri

  49. 5 out of 5

    Fabiola

  50. 4 out of 5

    Manwith Beard

  51. 4 out of 5

    Steven Pilling

  52. 5 out of 5

    Regan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.