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Twenty years have passed since Darth Bane, reigning Dark Lord of the Sith, demolished the ancient order devoted to the dark side and reinvented it as a circle of two: one Master to wield the power and pass on the wisdom, and one apprentice to learn, challenge, and ultimately usurp the Dark Lord in a duel to the death. But Bane’s acolyte, Zannah, has yet to engage her Maste Twenty years have passed since Darth Bane, reigning Dark Lord of the Sith, demolished the ancient order devoted to the dark side and reinvented it as a circle of two: one Master to wield the power and pass on the wisdom, and one apprentice to learn, challenge, and ultimately usurp the Dark Lord in a duel to the death. But Bane’s acolyte, Zannah, has yet to engage her Master in mortal combat and prove herself a worthy successor. Determined that the Sith dream of galactic domination will not die with him, Bane vows to learn the secret of a forgotten Dark Lord that will assure the Sith’s immortality--and his own. A perfect opportunity arises when a Jedi emissary is assassinated on the troubled mining planet Doan, giving Bane an excuse to dispatch his apprentice on a fact-finding mission--while he himself sets out in secret to capture the ancient holocron of Darth Andeddu and its precious knowledge. But Zannah is no fool. She knows that her ruthless Master has begun to doubt her, and she senses that he is hiding something crucial to her future. If she is going to claim the power she craves, she must take action now. While Bane storms the remote stronghold of a fanatical Sith cult, Zannah prepares for her Master’s downfall by choosing an apprentice of her own: a rogue Jedi cunning and cold-blooded enough to embrace the Sith way and to stand beside her when she at last wrests from Bane the mantle of Dark Lord of the Sith. But Zannah is not the only one with the desire and power to destroy Darth Bane. Princess Serra of the Doan royal family is haunted by memories of the monstrous Sith soldier who murdered her father and tortured her when she was a child. Bent on retribution, she hires a merciless assassin to find her tormentor--and bring him back alive to taste her wrath. Only a Sith who has taken down her own Master can become Dark Lord of the Sith. So when Bane suddenly vanishes, Zannah must find him--possibly even rescue him--before she can kill him. And so she pursues her quarry from the grim depths of a ravaged world on the brink of catastrophe to the barren reaches of a desert outpost, where the future of the dark side’s most powerful disciples will be decided, once and for all, by the final, fatal stroke of a lightsaber.


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Twenty years have passed since Darth Bane, reigning Dark Lord of the Sith, demolished the ancient order devoted to the dark side and reinvented it as a circle of two: one Master to wield the power and pass on the wisdom, and one apprentice to learn, challenge, and ultimately usurp the Dark Lord in a duel to the death. But Bane’s acolyte, Zannah, has yet to engage her Maste Twenty years have passed since Darth Bane, reigning Dark Lord of the Sith, demolished the ancient order devoted to the dark side and reinvented it as a circle of two: one Master to wield the power and pass on the wisdom, and one apprentice to learn, challenge, and ultimately usurp the Dark Lord in a duel to the death. But Bane’s acolyte, Zannah, has yet to engage her Master in mortal combat and prove herself a worthy successor. Determined that the Sith dream of galactic domination will not die with him, Bane vows to learn the secret of a forgotten Dark Lord that will assure the Sith’s immortality--and his own. A perfect opportunity arises when a Jedi emissary is assassinated on the troubled mining planet Doan, giving Bane an excuse to dispatch his apprentice on a fact-finding mission--while he himself sets out in secret to capture the ancient holocron of Darth Andeddu and its precious knowledge. But Zannah is no fool. She knows that her ruthless Master has begun to doubt her, and she senses that he is hiding something crucial to her future. If she is going to claim the power she craves, she must take action now. While Bane storms the remote stronghold of a fanatical Sith cult, Zannah prepares for her Master’s downfall by choosing an apprentice of her own: a rogue Jedi cunning and cold-blooded enough to embrace the Sith way and to stand beside her when she at last wrests from Bane the mantle of Dark Lord of the Sith. But Zannah is not the only one with the desire and power to destroy Darth Bane. Princess Serra of the Doan royal family is haunted by memories of the monstrous Sith soldier who murdered her father and tortured her when she was a child. Bent on retribution, she hires a merciless assassin to find her tormentor--and bring him back alive to taste her wrath. Only a Sith who has taken down her own Master can become Dark Lord of the Sith. So when Bane suddenly vanishes, Zannah must find him--possibly even rescue him--before she can kill him. And so she pursues her quarry from the grim depths of a ravaged world on the brink of catastrophe to the barren reaches of a desert outpost, where the future of the dark side’s most powerful disciples will be decided, once and for all, by the final, fatal stroke of a lightsaber.

30 review for Dynasty of Evil

  1. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    Peace is a lie, there is only passion. Through passion, I gain strength. Through strength, I gain power. Through power, I gain victory. Through victory, my chains are broken. The Force shall free me. - The Sith Code Path of Destruction was the beginning of an epic Star Wars story. Rule of Two was the captivating continuation. With Dynasty of Evil, Drew Karpyshyn, true master of storytelling and characterisation, wrote the perfect conclusion to his trilogy on the great Darth Bane, and my personal favour Peace is a lie, there is only passion. Through passion, I gain strength. Through strength, I gain power. Through power, I gain victory. Through victory, my chains are broken. The Force shall free me. - The Sith Code Path of Destruction was the beginning of an epic Star Wars story. Rule of Two was the captivating continuation. With Dynasty of Evil, Drew Karpyshyn, true master of storytelling and characterisation, wrote the perfect conclusion to his trilogy on the great Darth Bane, and my personal favourite Star Wars novel. This book is the only Star Wars book on my very exclusive favourites list, and the only story set in this universe that even comes close to the unreachable heights of KotOR. I have talked enough about Bane and Karpyshyn and the reasons why I ended up liking this series. Now let me talk about the one thing that made me love it. This review is a tribute to one of my favourite Star Wars characters... "You have done well, Zannah. I underestimated you. Had I known your plans, I would never have asked you to kill me." "You still have much to teach me. I will continue to study at your feet, Master. I will learn from your wisdom. I will discover your secrets, unlocking them one by one until everything you know—all your knowledge and all your power—is mine. And once you are no longer of use to me, I will destroy you." The Bane trilogy, in addition to being a rather interesting story about a conflicted man and his mission to reform the forces of darkness, is also a fascinating coming-of-age story, albeit one that’s rather different from the usual stories of that kind. This is the story of Rain, a ten-year-old little girl who loses her friends to the flames of war. In her grief and loneliness, she befriends a simple creature native to the planet she finds herself on. A couple of Jedi knights come across her, and since the creature is dangerous, they kill it to save the girl. So the little girl unwittingly grasps the power of the Dark Side of the Force and breaks their necks. Thus begins the story of Rain, who would become Zannah, who would become Darth Bane’s apprentice and learn under him to achieve mastery of Sith sorcery. "I can use my powers to conjure up your worst nightmares and bring them to life before your eyes. I can drive you mad with fear, shred your sanity, and leave you a raving lunatic for the rest of your life." Zannah is just so delightfully evil. There’s something special about reading a story set from the viewpoint of not just antiheroes, but outright villains. Bane and Zannah are the perfect Sith duo, and their like has never been seen in the Star Wars universe. Sadly the infamous Rule of Two decrees that one of the two must go, and so, when Zannah finally challenges the reign of her master on the world of Ambria, the two battle it out with all their might in one final duel to the death that will decide which of them will carry on the legacy of the Dark Side of the Force, and begin the Dynasty of Evil...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Leeanna

    Star Wars: Darth Bane #3: Dynasty of Evil, by Drew Karpyshyn "Dynasty of Evil" is, in my opinion, the best book in the Darth Bane series. This book picks up the story of Bane and his apprentice, Zannah, about a decade after the previous book. Bane is highly disappointed in Zannah because she has not yet followed his Rule of Two by challenging and beating him for the role of Sith Master. He believes that she is biding her time until he weakens from age, and this goes against his beliefs - if Zanna Star Wars: Darth Bane #3: Dynasty of Evil, by Drew Karpyshyn "Dynasty of Evil" is, in my opinion, the best book in the Darth Bane series. This book picks up the story of Bane and his apprentice, Zannah, about a decade after the previous book. Bane is highly disappointed in Zannah because she has not yet followed his Rule of Two by challenging and beating him for the role of Sith Master. He believes that she is biding her time until he weakens from age, and this goes against his beliefs - if Zannah ousts him from his position by waiting, she will not be strong enough to continue the Sith order. And then everything Bane has worked for will fall. But what is Bane to do? He is aging faster than normal due to his use of the Dark Side and his ordeal with orbalisk armor, and doesn't have the time left in his life to train another apprentice. Then, in an ancient scroll, he finds mention of Darth Andeddu, a Sith who discovered a way to extend his life indefinitely. This is Bane's answer - if he can find Andeddu's Holocron, his Sith Order will survive. However, Bane can't set off to find the Holocron without sending Zannah away as well, to divert her attention from him. Although Zannah hasn't yet challenged him, Bane isn't sure who would survive in a fight between the two; he can't risk dying before finding the secret of immortality. So he sends his apprentice to Doan, an insignificant mining planet, and also the site of a Jedi's murder. On Doan Zannah finds the trail of a Dark Jedi, one who she believes could have the potential to be her own apprentice. It's best to read the other two Darth Bane novels before "Dynasty of Evil," as Karpyshyn brings back characters from the first novel, "Path of Destruction," and winds them into a twisting plot. His writing is the best it's been yet, with the exception of a few passages that needed better proofreading. At first I couldn't believe the coincidences of so many characters meeting again, but as the novel went on, I understood how it all worked in a bigger context, and I wasn't in disbelief anymore. I rushed through this book, eager to see how everything would end, and continued until I finished it (even though I had a pretty bad headache). "Dynasty of Evil" kept my attention from beginning to end, and as I said in the beginning, I think this is the best Darth Bane book. Karpyshyn keeps the plot just unpredictable enough that you're unsure who will be victorious, and the ending is a surprise. 5/5.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Iset

    The storyline of this concluding book is much more focused than Rule of Two. In this book, the focus is very much on the inevitable duel between Darth Bane and Darth Zannah and the question of who will emerge the victor, a question which overarches the entire book and provides the connecting plot point. However, this greater focus brings with it its own problems and downsides. The reader knows that this is going to be the climactic ending of the book, and as a result, quite a lot of the precedin The storyline of this concluding book is much more focused than Rule of Two. In this book, the focus is very much on the inevitable duel between Darth Bane and Darth Zannah and the question of who will emerge the victor, a question which overarches the entire book and provides the connecting plot point. However, this greater focus brings with it its own problems and downsides. The reader knows that this is going to be the climactic ending of the book, and as a result, quite a lot of the preceding build up feels like unnecessary window dressing, kinda like the author has sat down and said to themselves "okay, I gotta write this story about this final duel but I gotta get a whole book out of this material... what can I do to fill up the rest of these 300 pages?" The answer to that is send Zannah off on a pointless side trip (view spoiler)[(Set never becomes her apprentice and Bane admits that the mission is just to get her out of the way) (hide spoiler)] , then send Bane off to get the macguffin which happens to solve the problems in the plot and waste time, and finally throw in a pointless side plot with Serra which means that people have to run all over the galaxy for a bit on a wild goose chase, and voila, 300 pages filled! The other problem is that the Rule of Two, as Bane explains it, means that the Sith Order is perpetuated because every apprentice is destined to kill their master and take up the mantle. This means essentially that the Sith Order, under the Rule of Two, can only function if the apprentice defeats the master and renews the cycle (or at the least, the master has more than one apprentice and is defeated by the final challenger). Therefore the reader almost knows well before the actual deciding duel that (view spoiler)[Zannah must win and defeat Bane. (hide spoiler)] There’s also the issue that the book is 300 pages, which is usually considered the minimum for a decent novel. Just short of 300 pages, to be exact, and it’s no surprise that other books that short in the Star Wars series have come under criticism because they could easily have been made more concise and merged with another book in order to create one solid and meatier story instead of two separate, rather sparse stories. I definitely think that this book and Rule of Two could have been condensed into one book; cutting out the unnecessary chaff from both, producing a novel meatier and grander in scope than a rather sparse 300-page offering. Lots of the action felt engineered by the author, particularly with Bane’s macguffin hunting, but also the side plot with Serra which didn’t really affect the outcome of the overall plot at all – notice how the plot with Serra is only sparked off when by pure chance, Serra learns of her father’s death and that Bane is still alive, a random discovery so unlikely that you can definitely see the author’s hand in it. My last criticism is that the characters in this, and also in Rule of Two as well, were too vague and not fleshed out enough. Rule of Two pretty much only had four main characters. Dynasty of Evil expands upon this to a grand total of six significant characters – Bane, Zannah, Serra, Lucia, Set Harth and the Iktotchi – and the other characters are barely more than references. Even these six feel lacking somehow. We’re often shown what they do, but their motivations and reasons for doing so are hard to fathom, and in some cases as a result, this must be explained in an expositional scene delving into the thoughts of the character. This is a far cry from the Bane we met in Path of Destruction. Path of Destruction Bane was fleshed out, his situation and background clear to us and permeating his choices in the present, his feelings and motivations stark and desperate, creating an anti-hero that you could understand and empathise with even as he trod ever darker paths on the journey to becoming a Sith Lord. He doesn’t do terribly much in either the previous book or this, and it feels a little bit like Bane sits on his hands whilst sending Zannah out to do all the dirty work. This is a far cry from the Bane of Path of Destruction, gripping his destiny with both hands and pursuing in relentlessly. Bane just doesn’t feel quite active enough after cutting a swathe of destruction through Path. Of all three books in the trilogy, I have to say Path of Destruction is my personal choice. That said, the story was logical and trotted along at a fair pace, enough to make me keep wanting to turn the page, and I finished the book in an afternoon, although that might be due to the book being so short. But there was a certain eagerness to finish it and read just one more chapter. The writing was competent, although it felt rather sparse and some parts felt like padded filler, it was more a sense of competent writing not reaching its potential and instead striving to spread out a thin story, rather than truly terrible writing. A competent read, certainly not atrocious and will provide decent enough entertainment, but you could miss it without any real problems. 6 out of 10.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    “Only the strong survive, because only the strong deserve to” Ten years have passed since Darth Bane lost his orbalisk armor, and he realized what we all do at one time: that he is growing old and weak. The problem is that Zannah, as his apprentice, hasn't challenged his position as Master, making Bane wonder if she is strong enough for the position. Now, he must find the “Fountain of Youth” so that he can find a new apprentice to train. I Liked: Ever since the hardcover came out, I've been chompin “Only the strong survive, because only the strong deserve to” Ten years have passed since Darth Bane lost his orbalisk armor, and he realized what we all do at one time: that he is growing old and weak. The problem is that Zannah, as his apprentice, hasn't challenged his position as Master, making Bane wonder if she is strong enough for the position. Now, he must find the “Fountain of Youth” so that he can find a new apprentice to train. I Liked: Ever since the hardcover came out, I've been chomping at the bit to sink my teeth into this novel. The entire Darth Bane series had been amazing, and I really wanted to know how it all ended (even if I could guess). Would Karpyshyn be able to make this series three for three? In short, the answer is a loud, boisterous “Yes!” Darth Bane and Darth Zannah are rejoined this time by Serra, the daughter of Caleb the healer. In what proves to be a smart move, Karpyshyn keeps his character list down; our character list is rounded out with Lucia, Serra's bodyguard, Set Harth, a Dark Jedi, and the Huntress, an Iktotchi assassin. Darth Bane continues to floor me. He is an astoundingly good character, even if he is the “villain”. He is smart, he thinks of the future, and, more importantly, he doesn't kill just because. Any time he does kill, it is meaningful. He even says at one point how it doesn't prove strength by killing everyone in his path. If one is weak, there is no point to “prove” your strength by blasting one to smithereens, even if you are powerful enough to completely destroy your antagonist. I like this pragmatic approach. Very appropriate for the secret order of the Sith. Darth Zannah also is remarkable. I like how she was planning to get rid of Bane, but first wanted to find an apprentice. Planning and patience are her keys. This next compliment is going to sound very strange coming from me, but Zannah is probably the only female character I've ever found who can use her sexuality as a tool withOUT coming off as too sexualized. One of my biggest complaints is the “sexy villainess”, that girl who would practically jump anything at any time to get what she wants. Zannah isn't that kind of woman. She is patient, cunning, calculating, and doesn't over-rely on her sexuality to compensate for her other skills (never once did I forget she could kill in the blink of an eye). And in my book, that is absolutely awesome. The new characters are really good as well. I liked how Serra could remember Darth Bane, and I liked seeing her storyline wrapped up. Even though I was pretty sure I knew how her story would end, I was still biting my teeth. Further, I liked how Karpyshyn actually had her get married (and for love!). There is too little of that in Star Wars. Lucia was a clever twist; her being part of the Gloom Walkers, her being under Des/Bane's command was a REALLY interesting obstacle, particularly when you consider how Serra views Bane as an evil man while Lucia is eager to repay him for his heroic actions in the war. Set Harth was well-written as a Dark Jedi. I definitely felt there was a difference between the darkness in him and the darkness in the Sith. Lastly, the Huntress, while having a slightly blasé name, was a good addition. She had an interesting talent and came into the story in a unique way. The story is, again, brilliant. Zannah isn't challenging Bane, so he has to think of the future—and how to extend his. In many ways, this is the book we've been anticipating from Path of Destruction: who is going to win, Bane or Zannah? Or will both lose and someone new rise in their places? We've got several characters who might take up the mantle—Set, the Huntress, even Serra. Although a portion of the novel focuses on finding Andeddu's Holocron, the story is more than just a video game “Find X to get Y”. It is about the rise and growth and passing of the torch of the new Order of the Sith; yes, some of that requires hunting for Holocrons, but the Holocron search is, in my opinion, a distant second objective to the story (who will be the master?). I also know that a lot of the book relies on miscommunication and coincidences. That is true, but I did like how the characters didn't have sudden knowledge of what the others were doing (Zannah thinks that Bane was captured because of the Holocron; Bane thinks Zannah is out to kill him; the Jedi think that they were attacked because of the Sith artifacts). Too many Star Wars novels (even my favorites by Zahn) rely on telepathy of sorts. As for miscommunication, I will say it made sense in all the cases (Bane and Zannah distrust each other, Serra kept her past a secret, etc.). Lastly, writing style. Karpyshyn's writing is engaging, quick paced, and delightful. There were times I would be reading, glance at the page count and be shocked that forty pages had gone by. He definitely keeps you interested, and there are no “saggy” sections, in which characters sit and talk about nonsense for pages on end. And yet, this isn't mindless action, there are great character moments for all our major characters as well as the differences between Jedi and Sith. I Didn't Like: I have exactly two problems with the novel. The first deals with the characters/writing and the second deals with the ending. I will denote the ending problem with big SPOILERS. It's that characters tend to summarize their life stories at odd places. The most egregious example is when Serra returns to her father's shack and then gives us a summary of the pages we've already read and then basically said: “And the moral of the story is...” This completely slows the pace to a crawl, doesn't add anything the readers, who have already read Serra's journey, already know, and feels completely out of place in such a dark novel (“Beware the Dark Side...now let's watch the Sith fight to be Master”). My final complaint is the ending. While I like the duel, the outcome is most decidedly unclear and leaves up much for interpretation. I would prefer a little more closure... SPOILER The way the novel is written, it appears that Bane might have overtaken Zannah's mind. However, reading Karpyshyn's website, he intended Bane to have been defeated, but a part of him remained. This was not, as I said above, very clear in the novel. When Zannah's hand twitches, we could easily assume that Bane won and lied when Cognus/Huntress asked if she was Bane. END SPOILER Dialogue/Sexual Situations/Violence: I can't recall anything. If there was anything, it was likely Star Wars swears. Zannah often uses her sexuality to flirt information from people. Kinda heavy. A character dies early on (within the first three or four chapters), and the body count rises as it continues. One of the more gruesome scenes involves Bane escaping prison and killing multiple guards with his bare hands. Overall: The Darth Bane trilogy has been a breath of fresh air in the somewhat stagnant Star Wars universe. By this time, you really know the characters, and you greatly anticipate the “passing of the torch”. Even the ambiguous ending can't mar the great journey that Karpyshyn has taken us on. In short, if you liked the previous two, you will definitely like this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    A great ending to a consistently good series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Doesn't always happen in a trilogy, but Karpyshyn saved the best for last. Art by TatarskiSkandal on Deviantart.com I guess this book is now officially part of the "Legends" canon, which means it didn't really (or necessarily?) happen in the mainstream Star Wars cinematic universe, which is a shame as the events depicted happened so long before even the first film I don't imagine it could affect their plotting...or could they? OK, I've held back long enough, the fact of the matter is that this book Doesn't always happen in a trilogy, but Karpyshyn saved the best for last. Art by TatarskiSkandal on Deviantart.com I guess this book is now officially part of the "Legends" canon, which means it didn't really (or necessarily?) happen in the mainstream Star Wars cinematic universe, which is a shame as the events depicted happened so long before even the first film I don't imagine it could affect their plotting...or could they? OK, I've held back long enough, the fact of the matter is that this book introduces not one, but two potential candidates for the true identity of Supreme Leader Snoke: Bane himself, who is heavily implied to have taken possession of his apprentice's body in the final throes of their final confrontation, or the cowardly but resourceful dark Jedi Harth Set, who steals the ancient Sith holocron Bane used to learn how to transfer his essence. Ultimately I don't foresee either of these possibilities happening in Episode VIII or IX, but it would be sooo cool... The finale of the series does well to keep things tight, only a small number of characters to follow and, though their actions will have great consequence on the destiny of the Sith and the galaxy writ large, ultimately what is presented is a series of very personal struggles- Bane versus Zannah for the future of the Sith, Serra versus Bane on a quest for revenge, former Sith Army soldier Lucia versus her own conscience when she realizes that she shares an old bond with the hulking Dark Lord, and so on. The enigmatic character of the Huntress and the self-serving fallen Jedi Set introduce wild variables into these struggles that will have surprising effects on the outcomes. It's not a perfect book, alas- for one, I was surprised that the Jedi did not press their investigation into the murdered Knight from the opening pages, for example. But on the whole, for those intrigued by old times Star Wars lore, this is a cracking book and one I highly recommend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    amadeus

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. i dont do reviews, but after this myyyy godddd i just had too. this is the first trilogy and books for that matter that i have enjoyed EVERY. SINGLE. PAGE. i mean for even being me that's just insane and should not be possible. there was never any moment i regretted picking up these books and questioned it. for being a super ultra mega star wars fan this was just incredible. the character development was just incredible. even though there was a whole decade between each book, you still had a conn i dont do reviews, but after this myyyy godddd i just had too. this is the first trilogy and books for that matter that i have enjoyed EVERY. SINGLE. PAGE. i mean for even being me that's just insane and should not be possible. there was never any moment i regretted picking up these books and questioned it. for being a super ultra mega star wars fan this was just incredible. the character development was just incredible. even though there was a whole decade between each book, you still had a connection too both Bane and Zannah. it was like i never left. and if that's not impressive then i don't know what is. and for being pro jedi and not so much sith before... well my eyes are wide open. i can't wait too read another sith story. Peace is a lie, there is only passion Through passion, I gain strength Through strength, I gain power Through power, I gain victory Through victory, my chain are broken

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Greer

    A great end to the Bane trilogy. The loose ends are tied up. It's fast paced, and it leaves one, dare I say it, cheering for the dark side? There are a few twists and turns that defy expectations. Thankfully, the narrator for the first two books returns for this book and he does an excellent job finishing the story. I can easily see how this trilogy fits into Sith legends, and though it's not cannon, it provides a necessary storyline which gives more perspective to the Star Wars universe. A great end to the Bane trilogy. The loose ends are tied up. It's fast paced, and it leaves one, dare I say it, cheering for the dark side? There are a few twists and turns that defy expectations. Thankfully, the narrator for the first two books returns for this book and he does an excellent job finishing the story. I can easily see how this trilogy fits into Sith legends, and though it's not cannon, it provides a necessary storyline which gives more perspective to the Star Wars universe.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    A great trilogy. I didn’t know how I’d take to it since it’s all new characters but I loved the exploration it took of the Dark Side, something a bit lacking in the films.

  10. 5 out of 5

    DiscoSpacePanther

    Not very well written - the author had a problematic tendency to infodump a character's thoughts, feelings and personal history. These would flow better if they arose as part of a conversation, or were discovered by other characters as a natural exploration of the plot. Still, I had much more fun reading it than I expected, and it was by far the best in the Darth Bane trilogy. Not very well written - the author had a problematic tendency to infodump a character's thoughts, feelings and personal history. These would flow better if they arose as part of a conversation, or were discovered by other characters as a natural exploration of the plot. Still, I had much more fun reading it than I expected, and it was by far the best in the Darth Bane trilogy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Rider

    A satisfying way to end a thrilling trilogy. This final story does a great job of concluding the saga of Darth Bane and Darth Zannah. The final chapters are exhilarating, and the novel ends with few loose ends. I'm disappointed that some of this story's most interesting characters did not have their stories more fleshed out. However, there is a lot more to applaud than criticize in this work. If you have read the other two Darth Bane novels, you owe it to yourself to read this finale. A satisfying way to end a thrilling trilogy. This final story does a great job of concluding the saga of Darth Bane and Darth Zannah. The final chapters are exhilarating, and the novel ends with few loose ends. I'm disappointed that some of this story's most interesting characters did not have their stories more fleshed out. However, there is a lot more to applaud than criticize in this work. If you have read the other two Darth Bane novels, you owe it to yourself to read this finale.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Chad Bearden

    I was tempted to give this a 4-star review, as it is, among the Darth Bane novels, the best of the bunch. I realized, however, that "Dynasty of Evil" initially seems far better than it actually is only because it has been published in the midst of a horrible spate of really bad Star Wars novels. The fact that Chrisie Golden has such a clumsy handle on things like characterization and plot make Drew Karpyshyn's handling of the same techniques seem like a life-sustaining breath of fresh air. So le I was tempted to give this a 4-star review, as it is, among the Darth Bane novels, the best of the bunch. I realized, however, that "Dynasty of Evil" initially seems far better than it actually is only because it has been published in the midst of a horrible spate of really bad Star Wars novels. The fact that Chrisie Golden has such a clumsy handle on things like characterization and plot make Drew Karpyshyn's handling of the same techniques seem like a life-sustaining breath of fresh air. So let's call it a 3.5 star review, and move on to the specifics. The specifics: Darths Bane and Zannah are still ho-humming thier way toward establishing a galaxy-conquering Sith Order. They haven't actually done much in the twenty years since Bane set out on this task, but that's in keeping with his New-Sith philosophy: slow and steady wins the race. Instead of charging all over the galaxy wreaking havoc, he and Zannah have spent all their time collecting old parchments and holocrons and Sith trinkets that will help them develop their abilities. All the while, Bane is annoyed that Zannah doesn't get on with it and challenge him for the title of Dark Lord of the Sith. You can surmise where all of this is headed. There is a lot of fun to be had here. To begin with, the protagonists are villains, which means Karpyshyn can pull out all the stops concerning the carnage he can inflict on the characters. Its a refreshing inversion of standard practice in the Star Wars EU that when new characters are created, you know they won't die unless its for some melodramatic, emotional tipping point. Not in "Dynasty of Evil". Karpyshyn creates several characters, giving them all good face time and pleasent little back-stories, some of whom are key characters and are pivotal to the plot, only to snuff them out with little warning. There is a high body count, and very little of it is used to wring false-emotion out of a scene. If they don't matter to Bane or Zannah, then screw 'em. They die; moving on. There is also the peculiar feeling that Bane and Zannah are not intended to be some kind of all-powerful evil badasses. The Sith, as written in the current "Fate of the Jedi" series, are a bunch of mustache-twirling nogoodniks, who think themselves to be rather clever, and its clear that the reader is supposed to accept that they're rather clever, only they never appear clever because they don't do anything besides stand around and brag about how clever and decietful they are. Bane and Zannah break this mold (and I like to think Karpyshyn has done this deliberately) by being written as amateur evil-doers who don't actually know what they're doing but blindly flail around trying to figure it all out anyway. This is actually in keeping with Bane's overall idea that he personally will not take over the galaxy and destroy the Jedi, but his title will be passed on to someone stronger than he, and that person will be defeated by someone stronger than they, and so on, until you get to some supremely strongest of strong person to finish the deed. Bane is a brute, but lacks subtly. His apprentice is strong in Sith sorcery, but lacks ambition and confidence. Neither of them would have a chance of overthrowing a campfire much less the entire Republic. But you can see how Bane's self-imposed Rule of Two would lead, incrimentally, to someone like Darth Sidious a thousand years later, who's mastery of politics and deception becomes to key to following through with the master plan. So we've got a coherent plot and believable characters. It's been a while, but the Star Wars writers finally get a mark in the win column. Which isn't to say everything is perfect. There are still a few niggling things that make me wonder if 'intelligent people' are still in Del Rey's target audience. When you have a main character who spends the entire novel being called only "The Huntress" you can't help but roll your eyes at the cliche goofiness. But the one thing that would have been an easy fix would be for the author to not fear writing in paragraphs! Maybe much of the EU readership suffers from some kind of ADD, and new paragraphs are intended to entrap their attention, even if the previous paragraph was only a line or two long. But Karpyshyn was doing this even with the dialogue! Bane would start lecturing Zannah on some mystical tennant of being evil, and his speech would be broken up into four or five paragraphs, each one a line or two long. It would actually get kind of confusing. When one sees a page of dialogue, each short paragraph beginning with quotation marks, he is expecting a conversation between characters. But after scanning past the third or fourth paragraph, you realize its just one person talking. It was like a picture book with one sentence on each page. Very frustrating. I guess they were trying to pad out the page count or something. Final thoughts: not the greatest Star Wars novel every written, but the best of the Darth Bane trilogy that jumps along nicely thanks to believable characters, a tightly plotted and mostly unpredictable story, and the novelty of having evil-doers as your heroes which made for lots of unnecessary but appropriate carnage.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Addyson Huneke

    4.5 stars. The ending could have been a little clearer, but, all in all, a great book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Karpuk

    Hooboy, the things I read out of various obligations. As with the other Darth books, I read this because a friend keeps loaning them to me, much the same logic that got me to read all those Orson Scott Card books. Since this is apparently the last book in this series, I finished it with a certain sense of relief, as though a Dark Force had peeled away from my soul. Darthticle (a variation of my earlier nickname, but super fun to say aloud) isn't sure his apprentice is going to slip him the saber, Hooboy, the things I read out of various obligations. As with the other Darth books, I read this because a friend keeps loaning them to me, much the same logic that got me to read all those Orson Scott Card books. Since this is apparently the last book in this series, I finished it with a certain sense of relief, as though a Dark Force had peeled away from my soul. Darthticle (a variation of my earlier nickname, but super fun to say aloud) isn't sure his apprentice is going to slip him the saber, so he's hedging his bets by going out to look for a Sith immortality spell. Since you have to kill your master to become a master under the rule of two, the whole books has a romantic comedy, "will she/won't she" dynamic that maintains an odd sort of tension. There's a lot of exciting things going on here, and I can't bring myself to really hate Karpyshyn since he's involved in one of my favorite game series (Mass Effect, which you should at the very least try), but as a prose writer he comes off as damn near amateurish. I'm going to pluck a random paragraph out of his book and articulate my issues here: "Sometimes the history of a place was faint, washed away by the passage of mundane events and insignificant people. Here the memories were strong, preserved by isolation and trapped in the currents of the Force that permeated the camp." The junkiness comes from the constant over-explained structure. A lean 250 page book ends up bloated with needless exposition and tired passive phrasing. I won't suggest I could do Karpyshyn's job better, but perhaps: "The passage of mundane events and insignificant people could wash away the history of a place. Here currents of the Force had permeated the camp, preserving strong memories, aided by isolation." Not perfect by any means, just spitballing here, but having to slog through writing this clunky to get at an action-packed story really starts to break me down after a while. Just because you're writing licensed fiction doesn't mean a refresher on the Elements of Style can't help you out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    C. L. Roberts

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. “Peace is a lie” This is the third and final book in this series; or that we know of. At long last Banes apprentice Zannah must confront her master in single combat. Bane is not willingly going without a fight. He knows his time is growing short as his body grows weak and frail from the use of drawing on the dark side for so long. At first he’s lost confidence in his apprentice ability to rule in his place; but when information reaches his ears about a sith artifact that promises immortality. Ban “Peace is a lie” This is the third and final book in this series; or that we know of. At long last Banes apprentice Zannah must confront her master in single combat. Bane is not willingly going without a fight. He knows his time is growing short as his body grows weak and frail from the use of drawing on the dark side for so long. At first he’s lost confidence in his apprentice ability to rule in his place; but when information reaches his ears about a sith artifact that promises immortality. Bane rushes to seize this power for himself. Bane’s intention isn’t to live forever but his goal is to prolong his life long enough to find a worthy apprentice. Every fiber of Banes belief is centered around the rule of two. He knows that this is the only way the sith will survive and succeed in the years to come. Drew is not only a great storey teller, but he has a great ability to bring everything full circle. New characters are introduced in this storey along with several from Banes past. And each will play a critical role in the outcome of who will be the dark lord of the sith. Drew leaves no mystery in the end who is the victor; but he does leave us with some new questions about the fate of the sith and one mysterious character that ends up with the artifact that will lead to immortality. For those who have read the first two books the third and final chapter will be no disappointment. There’s a tone of combat and the dark side is fully released in a final climatic battle between master and apprentice.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lanko

    The final book of the series concludes it in a magnificent way. Another ten years have passed, and Bane is aging and Zannah has not yet challenged him. He thinks she is merely waiting until he is too old and too weak, which goes everything he worked for. So he sets out to learn immortality. Of course, Zannah has her own plans. Here is where the Sith deception and secrecy is shown at it's best. Master and apprentice don't know what the other is plotting. It also shows the weak spots of the Rule o The final book of the series concludes it in a magnificent way. Another ten years have passed, and Bane is aging and Zannah has not yet challenged him. He thinks she is merely waiting until he is too old and too weak, which goes everything he worked for. So he sets out to learn immortality. Of course, Zannah has her own plans. Here is where the Sith deception and secrecy is shown at it's best. Master and apprentice don't know what the other is plotting. It also shows the weak spots of the Rule of Two. That would be exploited in the future, not just by Darth Sidious, but many others before him. Another character from the previous books is major in this one, seeking for justice for the wrongdoings of Bane and Zannah. Since this book is deliciously focused on the villains (villains, not anti-heroes), it's delightful to watch her fail. The last battle happens and the conclusion leaves open many possible interpretations, even though the author clarified it a bit. Don't think he should have. The controversy was nice. Excellent trilogy, specially after playing the KoToR games.

  17. 5 out of 5

    All

    This is my third Star Wars trilogy and by far my favorite. I enjoyed the Thrawn Trilogy and the Jedi Academy Trilogy, but maybe I'm just more attuned to the dark side. Either way, I think this trilogy is a great place to start for newcomers to Star Wars. I read Thrawn first as everyone recommends. But this book is set in a completely different time period, so it could stand alone as your first read if you want something Star Wars, but different from what you've seen before. This is my favorite t This is my third Star Wars trilogy and by far my favorite. I enjoyed the Thrawn Trilogy and the Jedi Academy Trilogy, but maybe I'm just more attuned to the dark side. Either way, I think this trilogy is a great place to start for newcomers to Star Wars. I read Thrawn first as everyone recommends. But this book is set in a completely different time period, so it could stand alone as your first read if you want something Star Wars, but different from what you've seen before. This is my favorite trilogy, book 2 lagged a bit to me, but book 3 brought it all home.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kazich

    Wow what a trilogy, Darth Bane is a very compelling villain and Zannah becomes even more interesting in this novel. Would recommend if you are interested in the Sith and want to learn more about the rule of two. Also if you love stories that are fast paced and have a lot of action. And even though it's no longer canon I think this is still one of the best pieces of Star Wars EU. Wow what a trilogy, Darth Bane is a very compelling villain and Zannah becomes even more interesting in this novel. Would recommend if you are interested in the Sith and want to learn more about the rule of two. Also if you love stories that are fast paced and have a lot of action. And even though it's no longer canon I think this is still one of the best pieces of Star Wars EU.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    "An end to a trilogy that will go down in Star Wars history" "An end to a trilogy that will go down in Star Wars history"

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joe Valentin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Darth Bane… This trilogy has been on my read list for awhile. I believe that one can’t simply say. “I’m a huge Star Wars fan!!!” Without reading a single one of the Star Wars books. ANY of the books… It’s not hard people. As I said before this series has been on my read list for awhile but I kept pushing it off. I felt that nothing could come close to Timothy Zan’s “Thrawn”, the trilogy, Duology, and current “Thawn” books…. I was 100% wrong. Thrawn, Darth Plagues, Darth Maul, Bane and Revan all Darth Bane… This trilogy has been on my read list for awhile. I believe that one can’t simply say. “I’m a huge Star Wars fan!!!” Without reading a single one of the Star Wars books. ANY of the books… It’s not hard people. As I said before this series has been on my read list for awhile but I kept pushing it off. I felt that nothing could come close to Timothy Zan’s “Thrawn”, the trilogy, Duology, and current “Thawn” books…. I was 100% wrong. Thrawn, Darth Plagues, Darth Maul, Bane and Revan all are characters that every TRUE Star Wars fan needs to discover. Ok, let’s get this started. The first book I finished in no time. This trilogy started off with a bang. This author loved playing with people emotions by making you think one way but then just BLOWING everything up and making (just not me) whisper “wtf…” multiple times. The development of Des to Bane and reading his growth was fantastic. The first book was jammed packed with action from start to finish. The second book. For me started off slower than the first one it picked up real fast. The author used appropriate detail for surroundings, battles, opand other characters perfectly, the dude didn’t over do it but also didn’t disappoint. Reading Bane’s and Zannah’s relationship was everything one would have thought the sith master and apprentice would be. Returning to old characters from the first book was great also. The young Jedi who lost his master going after Bane… that battle was outstanding. Bane returning to the healer and Zannah showing her full commitment by destroying her cousins mind…. My God. Amazing. Finally, the author leaving no stone unturned in the final chapter of Darth Bane. Every web from the two previous books gets connected. A past comrade, a little girl, the huntress, everything was great…But one thing… I hated, HATED The dark Jedi character. Such a waste of a good storyline. It’s a young Han Solo Jedi type guy…. Do better… Anyways. The final fight. One master and one apprentice… the apprentice must carry on the mantle of becoming a master by destroy their master. Fuck. Yes. That hand twitch at the end. Loved it. Loved every movement of it. Great series. Great read. If you have thought about reading this, for the love of God… don’t wait.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kortni

    BIG NEWS: I have actually finished a trilogy! My initial journey into Star Wars books has been great and I am so excited to keep going! I won't go into great detail with this review, just because it is the third book in the series and is the culmination of events set in motion from book one so I will do this as a non-spoiler review. This book continues to follow Darth Bane and his apprentice, Zannah, and again follows a similar format in that this book takes place about 10 years after the events o BIG NEWS: I have actually finished a trilogy! My initial journey into Star Wars books has been great and I am so excited to keep going! I won't go into great detail with this review, just because it is the third book in the series and is the culmination of events set in motion from book one so I will do this as a non-spoiler review. This book continues to follow Darth Bane and his apprentice, Zannah, and again follows a similar format in that this book takes place about 10 years after the events of book two, Rule of Two. This book really focuses more so on Bane and Zannah, but does introduce a new cast of characters which provide some differing perspectives which I think made this book (and the others) not feel as repetitive and kept the plot moving along. I feel like this book was basically like 90% red herrings on who could be the next Sith apprentice and then 10% of having your mind blown...but over a whole different aspect. In terms of of new characters, I really liked the Huntress. Her abilities made her intriguing and provided an interesting insight in the various ways that the Force works. Honestly wish we could get more about her!! Like I said, I don't want to say too much since this is a sequel, but all I want to say about the conclusion of this book/entire trilogy...it is so so so well-written. Just perfectly written to keep you guessing and thinking after you close the book (or the audiobook app, in my case). Also want to say that I managed to spoil myself on a big aspect of the story (hint: do not google character names because you want to see what they look like...oops), but still felt very invested in the story and even still shocked by the ending. In terms of the series as a whole, I have given all three books five stars, but I would personally rank them... 1. Dynasty of Evil (Book Three) 2. Path of Destruction (Book One) 3. Rule of Two (Book Two) I think this was a good place to start with the Star Wars EU, or at least in terms of Star Wars Legends books. I can't really say for sure, since these are the only ones I've read so far (except for the novelization of the Phantom Menace), but I didn't feel confused by anything mentioned in these books and actually learned a lot. My game plan from here is to listen to Darth Plagueis by James Luceno and also read the novelization of Attack of the Clones. We all know I am reading the prequel trilogy because Revenge of the Sith is my favorite of all the movies and also because I have heard the novelization is great (I know it will hurt my heart, just like the movie does). Also, my library has the audiobooks of some canon books I would like to read (Ahsoka, Queen's Shadow, Queen's Peril), so those will likely be where I start with the "new" canon stuff.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barry Mulvany

    It was obvious where the series was going with the Rule of Two and all but it was still well done and threw up a few unexpected developments. This book is set another ten years after the first book, with Bane and Zannah still in the same master/apprentice relationship, though splits are beginning to show. Bane starts off still obsessed with finding more holocrons while Zannah is starting to look for an apprentice of her own. Into this mix are thrown two figures from Bane's past and a 'Dark Jedi', It was obvious where the series was going with the Rule of Two and all but it was still well done and threw up a few unexpected developments. This book is set another ten years after the first book, with Bane and Zannah still in the same master/apprentice relationship, though splits are beginning to show. Bane starts off still obsessed with finding more holocrons while Zannah is starting to look for an apprentice of her own. Into this mix are thrown two figures from Bane's past and a 'Dark Jedi', not a full blown Sith but a Jedi who's abandoned the Jedi teachings to focus on himself. I think the new characters in this book really made it. The novel is relatively evenly split between all of the POV's and the plot moves at a good pace. I had feared in the beginning that it was going to be another re-hash but after the first quarter or so all the threads started coming together towards a pretty climatic end. There's a few cracks beginning to show in Bane's perfection which is always more interesting to read about, while Zannah has to come to terms with what she needs to do. Serra and Lucia were both deeper than initially appeared and I really liked the edge that came to Serra especially as we learned more about her. Set was a cliche but I always have a soft spot for the lazy unscrupulous decadent type, brings back certain memories both real and imagined. As always I am struck by the Star Wars universe, while technically light hearted in tone can actually be quite dark and again brings up the devastation that civilisation can bring to planets. It's constantly referenced through the many books I've read in it now, how planets are completely destroyed in the search for materials and not always by the 'bad' guys. It's never a major part but can play minor points and I'm glad so many writers include it. Overall I really enjoyed this series. There was a good mix of action and introspection that I think was handled well, it could have been all action which can get repetitive sometimes. The character's, though always leaning towards cliche, were still interesting to read about and considering the vast majority of them were villains, I still found myself kind of rooting for them. It's no longer canon as such, but I think Bane is and there's not too much contradicting it so far so it's worth a read. Please see this and other reviews at https://barrysbloodybooks.home.blog/

  23. 4 out of 5

    Graff Fuller

    3.75 Stars Interesting book. I didn't think it would end the way it did, but it was satisfying. I thought it would have a bigger punch than it did...especially after reading three books within this narrative. I'm glad that I read this trilogy and I can see why it has such a high place in the hearts of Star Wars fans. I do believe that we will eventually revisit this narrative (in some way) within the New Canon under Disney. Looking forward to the new TV series called The Acolyte...a Dark side user 3.75 Stars Interesting book. I didn't think it would end the way it did, but it was satisfying. I thought it would have a bigger punch than it did...especially after reading three books within this narrative. I'm glad that I read this trilogy and I can see why it has such a high place in the hearts of Star Wars fans. I do believe that we will eventually revisit this narrative (in some way) within the New Canon under Disney. Looking forward to the new TV series called The Acolyte...a Dark side user (female protagonist). There will be some ties to this story, I believe (I have NO inside information).

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I enjoyed this a lot more than the 2nd novel, but not as much as the 1st. Fast-paced and entertaining, although Bane hasn't been an interesting character to follow since the 1st book. His apprentice Zannah is equally dull. Evil characters are evil and strong, and there's not much else to them. The more morally ambiguous characters are far more entertaining, and there's plenty of them here. Like in the last novel the Jedi are treated like idiots here. I know it's partially down the fact that ther I enjoyed this a lot more than the 2nd novel, but not as much as the 1st. Fast-paced and entertaining, although Bane hasn't been an interesting character to follow since the 1st book. His apprentice Zannah is equally dull. Evil characters are evil and strong, and there's not much else to them. The more morally ambiguous characters are far more entertaining, and there's plenty of them here. Like in the last novel the Jedi are treated like idiots here. I know it's partially down the fact that there needs to be an excuse for them not realising the Sith are still about, but there's no nuance. Overall an enjoyable read, but I don't think the trilogy lives up to the hype it gets, and it's far from the best Star Wars has to offer.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    When reading Star Wars books, I've made it clear that I prefer the original cast. However, with that being said, I liked this one. There wasn't an original character in sight, but I liked it anyway. The new characters pulled me in. I can't say I liked Darth Bane, but he was well drawn as were his apprentice and the other apprentices. I also liked that there were other threads woven in so it wasn't only about the one thing. So 4 stars. When reading Star Wars books, I've made it clear that I prefer the original cast. However, with that being said, I liked this one. There wasn't an original character in sight, but I liked it anyway. The new characters pulled me in. I can't say I liked Darth Bane, but he was well drawn as were his apprentice and the other apprentices. I also liked that there were other threads woven in so it wasn't only about the one thing. So 4 stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    A swift, enjoyable, exciting adventure that I inhaled in a matter of hours. I was familiar with the premise of the Darth Bane books, but I'm pleased to say that Drew Karpyshyn has managed the almost impossible task of producing a fantastic third novel in a trilogy that manages to be a story in its own right, while catching-up newcomers on the series foundations with admirable, simple, straightforward background that never feels like info-dumping. A very satisfying read. A swift, enjoyable, exciting adventure that I inhaled in a matter of hours. I was familiar with the premise of the Darth Bane books, but I'm pleased to say that Drew Karpyshyn has managed the almost impossible task of producing a fantastic third novel in a trilogy that manages to be a story in its own right, while catching-up newcomers on the series foundations with admirable, simple, straightforward background that never feels like info-dumping. A very satisfying read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Straightforward ending to a trilogy. I liked the addition of the characters to make this story stand on its own two feet. The Huntress was a pretty awesome character.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marcos

    Great finish to the trilogy.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    That's how it ends?! That's it?! He has to be kidding me! I loved it, but damn, no more? No spin off? Thats alot to take in. Anyone who wants to read this story. Beware with the questions that arise. That's how it ends?! That's it?! He has to be kidding me! I loved it, but damn, no more? No spin off? Thats alot to take in. Anyone who wants to read this story. Beware with the questions that arise.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tom Rundell

    Karpyshyan does it again!

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