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Uncle Tom or New Negro?: African Americans Reflect on Booker T. Washington and UP FROM SLAVERY 100 Years Later

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On the ninetieth anniversary of Booker T. Washington’s death comes a passionate, provocative dialogue on his complicated legacy, including the complete text of his classic autobiography, Up from Slavery. Booker T. Washington was born a slave in 1858, yet roughly forty years later he had established the Tuskegee Institute. Befriended by a U.S. president and corporate titans, On the ninetieth anniversary of Booker T. Washington’s death comes a passionate, provocative dialogue on his complicated legacy, including the complete text of his classic autobiography, Up from Slavery. Booker T. Washington was born a slave in 1858, yet roughly forty years later he had established the Tuskegee Institute. Befriended by a U.S. president and corporate titans, beloved and reviled by the black community, Washington was one of the most influential voices on the postslavery scene. But Washington’s message of gradual accommodation was accepted by some and rejected by others, and, almost a century after his death, he is still one of the most controversial and misunderstood characters in American history. Uncle Tom or New Negro? does much more than provide yet another critical edition of Washington’s memoirs. Instead, Carroll has interviewed an outstanding array of African American luminaries including Julianne Malveaux, cultural critics Debra Dickerson and John McWhorter, and Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and radio talk-show host Karen Hunter, among others. In a dazzling collection bursting with invigorating and varying perspectives, (e.g. What would Booker T. think of Sean Combs or Russell Simmons? Was Washington a “tragic buffoon” or “a giver of hope to those on the margins of the margins”?) this cutting-edge book allows you to reach your own conclusions about a controversial and perhaps ultimately enigmatic figure.


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On the ninetieth anniversary of Booker T. Washington’s death comes a passionate, provocative dialogue on his complicated legacy, including the complete text of his classic autobiography, Up from Slavery. Booker T. Washington was born a slave in 1858, yet roughly forty years later he had established the Tuskegee Institute. Befriended by a U.S. president and corporate titans, On the ninetieth anniversary of Booker T. Washington’s death comes a passionate, provocative dialogue on his complicated legacy, including the complete text of his classic autobiography, Up from Slavery. Booker T. Washington was born a slave in 1858, yet roughly forty years later he had established the Tuskegee Institute. Befriended by a U.S. president and corporate titans, beloved and reviled by the black community, Washington was one of the most influential voices on the postslavery scene. But Washington’s message of gradual accommodation was accepted by some and rejected by others, and, almost a century after his death, he is still one of the most controversial and misunderstood characters in American history. Uncle Tom or New Negro? does much more than provide yet another critical edition of Washington’s memoirs. Instead, Carroll has interviewed an outstanding array of African American luminaries including Julianne Malveaux, cultural critics Debra Dickerson and John McWhorter, and Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and radio talk-show host Karen Hunter, among others. In a dazzling collection bursting with invigorating and varying perspectives, (e.g. What would Booker T. think of Sean Combs or Russell Simmons? Was Washington a “tragic buffoon” or “a giver of hope to those on the margins of the margins”?) this cutting-edge book allows you to reach your own conclusions about a controversial and perhaps ultimately enigmatic figure.

36 review for Uncle Tom or New Negro?: African Americans Reflect on Booker T. Washington and UP FROM SLAVERY 100 Years Later

  1. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Unfortunately I am having trouble with editing my review here - perhaps because it is so long. I invite you to my full review here: http://barbarah.wordpress.com/2017/03... Unfortunately I am having trouble with editing my review here - perhaps because it is so long. I invite you to my full review here: http://barbarah.wordpress.com/2017/03...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stanley Thermora

    This is a great review from respected African American intellects’ contrasting opinions on Booker T Washington. For those who are quick to champion W.E.B DuBois may find a new found respect for Booker T. Washington and his tangible contributions to the advancement of the Black race in skill AND education.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Falisha Falisha

    Love the closing chapters on scheduling and apprenticeships. A page turner as well as great Wispersync for Audible narrative. Rodney Gardiner brought the written version to Life.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    This is a compilation of perspectives on Booker T. Washington's legacy. There are some really great perspectives.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anissa Ford

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laura Wilson

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tam

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rhnee

  9. 4 out of 5

    Blair Daniels III

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ron

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel McWethy

  12. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gustavo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gureala

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chels

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tee C. Royal

  20. 4 out of 5

    Velvet

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

  24. 5 out of 5

    Yasmin

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

  26. 4 out of 5

    chukwumaonyeije

  27. 5 out of 5

    Frieda Cramer

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Prince

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charles N.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Strode

  31. 4 out of 5

    Tashawntae White

  32. 4 out of 5

    Steve Foster

  33. 4 out of 5

    Bridgette

  34. 5 out of 5

    Leah

  35. 4 out of 5

    Brandy Taylor

  36. 5 out of 5

    Dominic Mitchell

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