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The Penguin Book Of Modern Women's Short Stories

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Over half of the short stories written during this century have been writen by women. This book is an anthology of British women's short stories and authors represented include Rebecca West, Jean Rhys, Elizabeth Bowen, Olivia Manning, Elizabeth Taylor, Doris Lessing and Rose Tremain. Over half of the short stories written during this century have been writen by women. This book is an anthology of British women's short stories and authors represented include Rebecca West, Jean Rhys, Elizabeth Bowen, Olivia Manning, Elizabeth Taylor, Doris Lessing and Rose Tremain.


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Over half of the short stories written during this century have been writen by women. This book is an anthology of British women's short stories and authors represented include Rebecca West, Jean Rhys, Elizabeth Bowen, Olivia Manning, Elizabeth Taylor, Doris Lessing and Rose Tremain. Over half of the short stories written during this century have been writen by women. This book is an anthology of British women's short stories and authors represented include Rebecca West, Jean Rhys, Elizabeth Bowen, Olivia Manning, Elizabeth Taylor, Doris Lessing and Rose Tremain.

30 review for The Penguin Book Of Modern Women's Short Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Merl Fluin

    42 SHORT STORIES IN 42 DAYS* DAY 41: Summer Picnic, by Elizabeth Jane Howard ★★ Three generations of women reflect on life and love during a picnic in a distant corner of time and space where no one has ever uttered the words "jeez, check your privilege". DAY 24: Mannequin, by Jean Rhys ★★ Meh. DAY 23: Weekend, by Fay Weldon ★ Small masterpiece, says the editor's introduction; big cowpat, says I. DAY 22: Stone Trees, by Jane Gardam ★★ Well crafted and all that, but ultimately I don't get the point of litera 42 SHORT STORIES IN 42 DAYS* DAY 41: Summer Picnic, by Elizabeth Jane Howard ★★ Three generations of women reflect on life and love during a picnic in a distant corner of time and space where no one has ever uttered the words "jeez, check your privilege". DAY 24: Mannequin, by Jean Rhys ★★ Meh. DAY 23: Weekend, by Fay Weldon ★ Small masterpiece, says the editor's introduction; big cowpat, says I. DAY 22: Stone Trees, by Jane Gardam ★★ Well crafted and all that, but ultimately I don't get the point of literary fiction where made-up characters bang on about their made-up feelings. *The rules: – Read one short story a day, every day for six weeks – Read no more than one story by the same author within any 14-day period – Deliberately include authors I wouldn't usually read – Review each story in one sentence or less Any fresh reading suggestions/recommendations will be gratefully received 📚

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    This book is what I call my "dip in " . There is a story in there that covers every mood your feeling even when I need a good cry ( read "addy"). It was a title on my literature reading list during college and im so glad it was . This book is what I call my "dip in " . There is a story in there that covers every mood your feeling even when I need a good cry ( read "addy"). It was a title on my literature reading list during college and im so glad it was .

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robert Bagnall

    A curate's egg, strong on tone and character but lacking in narrative: Taylor - have you ever actually met children? Mackay - lives of quiet desperation and all that, enjoyable if lacking in narrative Boylan - one of the stronger ones Drabble - started well, petered out Bowen - another one creating tone without a great story to tell Maitland - having got to the end of the book this has left no impression upon me whatsoever Hammick - see Bowen Spark - enjoyable waspishness Byatt - a standout here, but no A curate's egg, strong on tone and character but lacking in narrative: Taylor - have you ever actually met children? Mackay - lives of quiet desperation and all that, enjoyable if lacking in narrative Boylan - one of the stronger ones Drabble - started well, petered out Bowen - another one creating tone without a great story to tell Maitland - having got to the end of the book this has left no impression upon me whatsoever Hammick - see Bowen Spark - enjoyable waspishness Byatt - a standout here, but not sure it really works as a ghost story Howard - as per Maitland, but it's only about five pages so hardly surprising Ferguson - one of my favourites Huth - rather nice character study of middle age thickening Warner - it's incest. So what? O'Brien - another atmospheric character study Tremain - again, strong on tone and character, capturing a point of transition in lives, but all a bit static (are you seeing a pattern too?) Macauley - short, sweet but inconsequential Harris - another favourite, even if, like virtually all of them, it's more reminiscence or character study than story per se Blackwood - another good one, a character with a dilemma - and dilemma leads to decision which leads to conflict which leads to empathy which leads to reader engagement - even if it's whether to leave a dinner party for a dead dog Kesson - an engrossing study of a child having its strings pulled Devlin - I'm not sure this would have made it on Tales of the Unexpected Rhys - a character in search of a story - and a coat Fainlight - another one that I'm flicking through trying to recall. Do I have Alzheimer's or are some of these just not very memorable? Lively - I enjoyed this, even if things just seemed to get in the way of anything happening Gardam - I only read this 36 hours ago and I wouldn't be able to tell you much about in under torture Weldon - ending on an up note, even if I wanted to kill Martin. And I'm a bloke.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marsha Dermott

    An eclectic collection about the very varied lives of women, written between 1927 -1988. They reveal a growing confidence in women articulating their innermost desires, outrage, grief, humour, cynicism. The Editor, Susan Hill, describes these short stories as 'quiet, small-scale, intimate stories - about the everyday but not trivial matters - about the business of being human and about the concerns of the human heart'. I enjoyed this collection because the 70's/80's was my formative era, when th An eclectic collection about the very varied lives of women, written between 1927 -1988. They reveal a growing confidence in women articulating their innermost desires, outrage, grief, humour, cynicism. The Editor, Susan Hill, describes these short stories as 'quiet, small-scale, intimate stories - about the everyday but not trivial matters - about the business of being human and about the concerns of the human heart'. I enjoyed this collection because the 70's/80's was my formative era, when there was a steady but determined feminist presence infiltrating the non-political correctness. I chuckle that today the modern women's short stories would include so many more revelations spoken from the heart. Come on lads - where is your contribution, spoken truthfully from the heart? I feel as though men are struggling and being left behind.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claire Steele

    This was a fairly dated 'modern' collection of stories - not a single black or bame author represented and some pretty dubious accounts of bame characters in some of the stories; nothing surprising about the form or narrative approach; but having said that - the stories that are here each settled on me in a different way, and there interesting things to say about the experiences of being a woman and being a creative in a world which requires so much of women. Worth a read, although I imagine it' This was a fairly dated 'modern' collection of stories - not a single black or bame author represented and some pretty dubious accounts of bame characters in some of the stories; nothing surprising about the form or narrative approach; but having said that - the stories that are here each settled on me in a different way, and there interesting things to say about the experiences of being a woman and being a creative in a world which requires so much of women. Worth a read, although I imagine it's time for a new edition with some glaring omissions rectified.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Em

    A rather wonderful collection of short stories which I have been dipping in and out of since August, my particular favourites are Fay Weldon, A. S. Byatt and Penelope Fitzgerald but the quality overall is excellent.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Caramac

    As usual in short story compilations some wonderful ones and some less so.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Mazzuchi

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenevieve

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anna Dale

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pippi van Merwijk

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ticiane Bosak

  13. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Hitchinson

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amber Albone

  18. 5 out of 5

    Birgit

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  21. 5 out of 5

    Machteld

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jwarner

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rob Ward

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Birte Lunau Nielsen

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Staunton-lamb

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carol Leininger

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paula Magalhães

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sus Osmond

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