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Stories from Candyland: Confections from One of Hollywood's Most Famous Wives and Mothers

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Carole Gene Marer spent her girlhood dreaming of meeting Rock Hudson, but when she finally had the chance—on her second date with her future husband, television mogul Aaron Spelling—she was so shy she hid all night in the powder room.  How Candy morphed from that quiet girl into a seemingly-confident, stylish trophy wife, mistress of the largest house in Los Angeles (70,00 Carole Gene Marer spent her girlhood dreaming of meeting Rock Hudson, but when she finally had the chance—on her second date with her future husband, television mogul Aaron Spelling—she was so shy she hid all night in the powder room.  How Candy morphed from that quiet girl into a seemingly-confident, stylish trophy wife, mistress of the largest house in Los Angeles (70,000 square feet when you count the attic) is at the heart of Stories from Candyland.  The life Candy created for her family—her husband and children Tori and Randy—was fabulous, over-the-top, and often magical.  So what if California Christmases don’t come with snow? Let’s make some on the tennis court!  How do we take a cross-country family vacation with a dad who doesn’t fly? By private train car, of course (with an extra for the fifty-two pieces of luggage).  The kids want to dress up for Halloween? No problem, why not call in Nolan Miller to design their costumes? Candy had a hand in some of the most beloved television shows of all time (she once stopped production on “Dynasty” because Krystle Carrington’s engagement ring was not spectacular enough), has entertained half of Hollywood in epic fashion, and lives an enviable life.  But under all the fun and showmanship lies a more interesting character, still wrestling with some of the insecurities of her ingénue self.  Oprah threw her into a major panic with a discussion of hoarding.  A lifelong humming habit evolved as a unique coping mechanism.  And there’s nothing like being defined as, “well, you know, complicated” by your daughter on television and in her own book. Stories from Candyland sparkles with glamour and grand gestures. But it also satisfies with some more intimate Candy concerns: why being a perfect wife and mother was so important to her, how cooking and cleaning can keep the home fires burning, why collections matter, and whether dogs are better judges of people than people are. Visit Candyland in these pages and get a glimpse of a generous, glittering world revealing many of its surprising and funny secrets for the first time.


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Carole Gene Marer spent her girlhood dreaming of meeting Rock Hudson, but when she finally had the chance—on her second date with her future husband, television mogul Aaron Spelling—she was so shy she hid all night in the powder room.  How Candy morphed from that quiet girl into a seemingly-confident, stylish trophy wife, mistress of the largest house in Los Angeles (70,00 Carole Gene Marer spent her girlhood dreaming of meeting Rock Hudson, but when she finally had the chance—on her second date with her future husband, television mogul Aaron Spelling—she was so shy she hid all night in the powder room.  How Candy morphed from that quiet girl into a seemingly-confident, stylish trophy wife, mistress of the largest house in Los Angeles (70,000 square feet when you count the attic) is at the heart of Stories from Candyland.  The life Candy created for her family—her husband and children Tori and Randy—was fabulous, over-the-top, and often magical.  So what if California Christmases don’t come with snow? Let’s make some on the tennis court!  How do we take a cross-country family vacation with a dad who doesn’t fly? By private train car, of course (with an extra for the fifty-two pieces of luggage).  The kids want to dress up for Halloween? No problem, why not call in Nolan Miller to design their costumes? Candy had a hand in some of the most beloved television shows of all time (she once stopped production on “Dynasty” because Krystle Carrington’s engagement ring was not spectacular enough), has entertained half of Hollywood in epic fashion, and lives an enviable life.  But under all the fun and showmanship lies a more interesting character, still wrestling with some of the insecurities of her ingénue self.  Oprah threw her into a major panic with a discussion of hoarding.  A lifelong humming habit evolved as a unique coping mechanism.  And there’s nothing like being defined as, “well, you know, complicated” by your daughter on television and in her own book. Stories from Candyland sparkles with glamour and grand gestures. But it also satisfies with some more intimate Candy concerns: why being a perfect wife and mother was so important to her, how cooking and cleaning can keep the home fires burning, why collections matter, and whether dogs are better judges of people than people are. Visit Candyland in these pages and get a glimpse of a generous, glittering world revealing many of its surprising and funny secrets for the first time.

30 review for Stories from Candyland: Confections from One of Hollywood's Most Famous Wives and Mothers

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Let it be known that I only tried to read this book because I love Tori Spelling and her books and I wanted to try to see her mom’s side of the story. I was really interested in reading what Candy had to say about Tori and their relationship. I wasn’t really interested in Candy’s actual story because to be honest, she doesn’t interest me. After reading a few pages, I knew this book wasn’t for me. I knew I wasn’t going to make it through the entire book and I HATE not finishing a book. However, I Let it be known that I only tried to read this book because I love Tori Spelling and her books and I wanted to try to see her mom’s side of the story. I was really interested in reading what Candy had to say about Tori and their relationship. I wasn’t really interested in Candy’s actual story because to be honest, she doesn’t interest me. After reading a few pages, I knew this book wasn’t for me. I knew I wasn’t going to make it through the entire book and I HATE not finishing a book. However, I couldn’t make it through. I decided to skim through and read chapters that dealt with Tori and her childhood or Tori and Candy’s relationship. I really didn’t care about random stories about people stealing clothes from the set of 90210…sorry, just doesn’t make for interesting book material. Candy isn’t a good writer. I’m just flat out being honest. She didn’t draw me in, she didn’t tell a strong story and she didn’t keep me interested. She was actually pretty cocky throughout the book and didn’t even come across as likeable. That’s the one thing I loved about both of Tori’s books- she seems so down to earth and normal. Candyland paints Candy to be the terrible image that she has a reputation for. Yikes, not a good read. I’d suggest skipping this one! Did anyone like this? I’d love to hear why or why not.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    I only read this book after reading Tori Spelling's book,"sTori Telling" to see what her mother had to say. This book was so so so boring. I learned that Candy Spelling has way too many collections. Also, what I found disheartening was that Candy never even mentioned "Nanny" who was Tori's African-American nanny for many years. The nanny who happened to go by the name "Nanny" has already passed away. I think Candy could have at least acknowledged the woman who spent so many years raising Candy's I only read this book after reading Tori Spelling's book,"sTori Telling" to see what her mother had to say. This book was so so so boring. I learned that Candy Spelling has way too many collections. Also, what I found disheartening was that Candy never even mentioned "Nanny" who was Tori's African-American nanny for many years. The nanny who happened to go by the name "Nanny" has already passed away. I think Candy could have at least acknowledged the woman who spent so many years raising Candy's children.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    Oh. my. gawd. I totally get it now, Tori. I should've listened to the other reviewers and not wasted my money on this book. But curiosity got the better of me. I was hoping to understand from Candy's point of view what went wrong with her relationship with Tori. And now I know: Tori's mom has a serious personality disorder. At the very least, she lacks the compassion gene. And the maternal gene. And the human gene. She just doesn't get it. Candy Spelling made a feeble attempt to excuse some of her Oh. my. gawd. I totally get it now, Tori. I should've listened to the other reviewers and not wasted my money on this book. But curiosity got the better of me. I was hoping to understand from Candy's point of view what went wrong with her relationship with Tori. And now I know: Tori's mom has a serious personality disorder. At the very least, she lacks the compassion gene. And the maternal gene. And the human gene. She just doesn't get it. Candy Spelling made a feeble attempt to excuse some of her behavior by blaming her own mother's demand for perfection and her lack of affection. She also tried to blame some of it on her husband in terms of being pressured to be the perfect trophy wife. And of course, she blamed Tori for being a selfish, lying bitch. But I didn't buy any of these excuses. She made her bed, and now she has to lie in it. I just feel even more sorry for Tori. A classic example is where Candy demands that Tori return the recipes she "stole" from the Manor (Tori explained in her first book that they were Nanny's recipes that she wanted for sentimental reasons). If it were my mom or any caring mom for that matter, she'd be happy that I wanted and had something of sentimental value. Family recipes. It wasn't like she took her mom's jewelry. She also mocked Tori for "only" getting an inheritance of $800,000. Sure, that's a lot of money for the rest of us, but when your dad is worth half a billion, yes, Candy, it's "only" $800,000. I'm sure Candy would feel the same way if her husband had left HER the same amount. Now THAT I would loved to have seen. Tori has been disappointed by this "mother" a million times over, but in the end, I think Tori will come out on top. At least she has a house full of family and friends, and Candy herself mentions in her book that she's all alone in the Manor. And that's her karma. The ultimate irony is that the ONLY reason any of us cared to read Candy's book is because of Tori. Even her dad became more famous because of Tori. Before then, Aaron was only known among industry people. Tori was the one who skyrocketed her entire family to fame.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Being a big fan of Tori Spelling's books - I know, how embarrassing - I've been interested in reading her mother's memoir for quite some time now. I'd held off because I heard it was terrible, but finally decided to give it a try; after all, how bad could it really be? It was even worse than I imagined. This was just laughingly bad. It was one of the worst written books I've ever read, to the point that it was actually painful to read. I was expecting Candy to be a nutcase witch, as she is often p Being a big fan of Tori Spelling's books - I know, how embarrassing - I've been interested in reading her mother's memoir for quite some time now. I'd held off because I heard it was terrible, but finally decided to give it a try; after all, how bad could it really be? It was even worse than I imagined. This was just laughingly bad. It was one of the worst written books I've ever read, to the point that it was actually painful to read. I was expecting Candy to be a nutcase witch, as she is often portrayed, but that wasn't the case. If I'm being perfectly honest, she came off as mentally unstable. I'm really not even trying to be mean or funny here! She seemed like she was twelve years old and living in LaLaLand. She'd start rambling about some movie she once loved and then jump to another random subject and then give us a list of things in her attic that took up three pages. It was just uncomfortable, and I was honestly left wondering about her mental state. I certainly expected this to be bad, but it was absolutely abysmal.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    I have read both of Tori's books and I was curious to read about Candy's version. I picked this one up with and open mind and tried not to be influenced by too many reviews. It seems that most people who have read Candy Spelling's memoir tend to give it more negative reviews than positive. I read this book for entertainment purposes and to hear what Candy had to say about her life. I was not going into this hoping to read the best work of literature ever published, nor did I have any unrealistic I have read both of Tori's books and I was curious to read about Candy's version. I picked this one up with and open mind and tried not to be influenced by too many reviews. It seems that most people who have read Candy Spelling's memoir tend to give it more negative reviews than positive. I read this book for entertainment purposes and to hear what Candy had to say about her life. I was not going into this hoping to read the best work of literature ever published, nor did I have any unrealistic expectations. With that said I need to review this book for what it simply is. It is the story of a woman who becomes a celebrity through marriage. Growing up I was a fan of Dynasty, The Love Boat and occasionally watched Fantasy Island. As I entered my teenage years I was a 90210 and Melrose Place fan. I looked forward to watching a new episode each week and I loved all that the shows had to offer. I knew Aaron Spelling was a very successful producer and his family was often talked about. Candy Spelling makes it a point to mention throughout that Aaron was one of the most successful and wealthy Hollywood producers. She also briefly mentions her "complicated" relationship with Tori, and of course she talks about their 70,000 plus square foot Mansion. If you don't think you care to know about the lavish life she led, then don't read this book. If your looking for a quick read and an inside look at the Spelling legacy then pick it up. This is not the best book I ever read, but it wasn't the worst either. I think that the reviewers who bash her for writing this book do it unnecessarily. It is not all that bad and it is pure entertainment.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    I know, total crap. But I want to hear her side after reading Tori's book. I checked it out from the library so she won't make any money. How could she possibly defend herself? Well she doesn't defend herself. She barely responds to the things Tori says in her book. She just says "poor me, my daughter is so mean to me in the press." I never felt sorry for her. What it comes down to is she is an insecure, people pleasing, self-absorbed person. I also might even claim that she boarderline lies or a I know, total crap. But I want to hear her side after reading Tori's book. I checked it out from the library so she won't make any money. How could she possibly defend herself? Well she doesn't defend herself. She barely responds to the things Tori says in her book. She just says "poor me, my daughter is so mean to me in the press." I never felt sorry for her. What it comes down to is she is an insecure, people pleasing, self-absorbed person. I also might even claim that she boarderline lies or at minumum, excluded important details about who she, her husband and her children really are to make herself look better. Oh and the writing is so bad it's comical. I'd read a paragraph outloud to Gregor and he'd just laugh.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    Crazy clearly runs in the family. This book is written in total old-lady rambling stream-of-consciousness style, which makes it difficult to skip to the good stuff. Candy will be describing her expensive ceramic figurines and their thoughts and feelings (seriously, she makes up pasts and romantic stories for inanimate objects) in painstaking detail and then all of a sudden will be all, "Tori is the worst daughter ever and I hate her." (paraphrase) Crazy clearly runs in the family. This book is written in total old-lady rambling stream-of-consciousness style, which makes it difficult to skip to the good stuff. Candy will be describing her expensive ceramic figurines and their thoughts and feelings (seriously, she makes up pasts and romantic stories for inanimate objects) in painstaking detail and then all of a sudden will be all, "Tori is the worst daughter ever and I hate her." (paraphrase)

  8. 5 out of 5

    juicy brained intellectual

    my bad actually it was three different gift wrapping rooms, one for normal presents and two for XL and XXL gifts very normal stuff. i feel like that's the low hanging fruit here which is literally insane. literally literally. like this family's obscene concentration of wealth should radicalize u imo. everyone always says to me candy why do u have three gift wrapping rooms in ur 70,000 square foot home doesn't that just mean you're GENEROUS and GIVING?? doesn't that simply mean your kindness know my bad actually it was three different gift wrapping rooms, one for normal presents and two for XL and XXL gifts very normal stuff. i feel like that's the low hanging fruit here which is literally insane. literally literally. like this family's obscene concentration of wealth should radicalize u imo. everyone always says to me candy why do u have three gift wrapping rooms in ur 70,000 square foot home doesn't that just mean you're GENEROUS and GIVING?? doesn't that simply mean your kindness knows no bounds? candy you are SWEET like.. hm... CANDY! why would anyone ever judge you for your wealth when through nothing but your ample generosity u throw these horrific grotesque abomination parties for your fellow obscenely rich people while so many people are living in poverty or without homes or skipping out on their medication etc etc etc. read candy open your third eye eat the rich

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jill Meyer

    I dunno, I sorta liked this book. I mean, I bought it at Costco last week, paying less than I would have on Amazon or at a local book store. I would never have bought it if I hadn't seen it at Costco: ie, paid anywhere near full price for it. But, you get what you know what you're going to get with this book. No real insights to life and a rather interesting airbrushing of her life, erasing her Jewish upbringing in LA in the '50's. THAT story would have been more interesting than what she wrote. I I dunno, I sorta liked this book. I mean, I bought it at Costco last week, paying less than I would have on Amazon or at a local book store. I would never have bought it if I hadn't seen it at Costco: ie, paid anywhere near full price for it. But, you get what you know what you're going to get with this book. No real insights to life and a rather interesting airbrushing of her life, erasing her Jewish upbringing in LA in the '50's. THAT story would have been more interesting than what she wrote. I'm giving it three stars because it was what I expected it to be, and nothing more (or less).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laurel-Rain

    “Stories from Candyland” is an unexpected and seemingly forthright tale of a woman, raised in the fifties to be the best wife and mother she could be, who is catapulted into a Hollywood dream life. She describes herself as a “shy girl,” one who fantasized about movie stars and the Hollywood life, and who pored over movie magazines as a teenager. Told in an organized fashion, this tale glides over the various aspects of this fairytale existence; she very deftly skirts the parenting issues, focusin “Stories from Candyland” is an unexpected and seemingly forthright tale of a woman, raised in the fifties to be the best wife and mother she could be, who is catapulted into a Hollywood dream life. She describes herself as a “shy girl,” one who fantasized about movie stars and the Hollywood life, and who pored over movie magazines as a teenager. Told in an organized fashion, this tale glides over the various aspects of this fairytale existence; she very deftly skirts the parenting issues, focusing on the guidance provided to mothers of her day – Dr. Spock, for one – and even offers quotes from his “Baby and Child Care” that “the perfect parent had yet to see the light of day.” She occasionally mentions the very public conflicts aired by her daughter, but instead of going into them in any depth, she simply states that she did the best she could and that if there are issues, she wishes her daughter would address them with her personally. Perhaps this is simply a case of each person having a different view of events. Clearly, Mrs. Spelling chose to take domesticity to the heights of excellence – there are several chapters devoted to how she decorated and organized their outsized home, including how she managed the social life of a very successful man – and there is a chapter dedicated to her various collections. She even strikes a humorous tone here by demonstrating how her collections are extreme, but well-organized and archived even, but that she is not one who “hoards” objects (This was in response to an Oprah show she saw on “hoarders”). In the final chapter, she shares a letter to her grandchildren (born to her daughter Tori Spelling), and then follows this up with some of her favorite recipes. In some ways, this author (who described herself as having experienced the “sixties” much differently from many) is another version of the generation in which I grew up – not a protester, she chose to smooth things over; she opted for a life of visual “confection” by surrounding herself with beautiful objects and beautiful people. She made her choices, and in the end, she states that: “I think my baby boomer generation grew up during one of the most fascinating, exciting, and confusing times in history, and I wouldn’t trade what I’ve learned and done for anything.” Her choices were not the same as some of the rest of us made, but they were definitely her choices to make. Recommended reading for anyone who wants to indulge in a peek into a glamorous, yet sometimes fishbowl world – a world of paparazzi and celebrity stalking and the very public airing of one’s personal life. If for no other reason than to be grateful NOT to be part of this world!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kourtney

    I am conflicted with how to write this review. On one hand all I wanted was a Tori Spelling rebuttal. Candy knew that was what we were all hoping for and banked on that and instead told us very boring stories about her life. I'll save you the misery and give you the bottom line - she's shy, she listens, she has money. On the other hand I was getting annoyed because she would say she wanted Tori to stop talking about her and "rewriting history" yet then she would tell a rebuttal Tori story. If yo I am conflicted with how to write this review. On one hand all I wanted was a Tori Spelling rebuttal. Candy knew that was what we were all hoping for and banked on that and instead told us very boring stories about her life. I'll save you the misery and give you the bottom line - she's shy, she listens, she has money. On the other hand I was getting annoyed because she would say she wanted Tori to stop talking about her and "rewriting history" yet then she would tell a rebuttal Tori story. If you want Tori to stop talking about you MAYBE, just MAYBE, you should not tell stories about Tori. No more Tori talk! End the "feud"!! But like my first hand wanted, I want Tori stories! If you are with my first hand then you may want to stay away from this book. The stories are very random, seem to not follow any chronological order, and are told in a very banal fashion. One chapter towards the end of the book includes snippets her friends wanted her to tell of her life. Picture that person you work with who tells those stories they find to be hilarious but you are stuck with a you-had-to-be-there feeling - that is this chapter. The whole book tries so hard to show a side of Candy we would never know to refute Tori's books. After Tori makes claims about Candy cheating on Aaron Spelling towards the end and forcing Tori to do things she didn't want to (what mother didn't?) Candy had to change her public image somehow. I just don't think this book did her any justice. But then again, I tend to not feel bad for someone who cried for a chapter about how she would ever scale down her possessions to live in a 17,000 square foot house from a 50,000 some odd foot house. My 769 square foot apartment has never looked so good.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Judy Chauvin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. WOW! What garbage this book was and such a waste of time. I read Toni's book and wanted to hear both sides of the story. I just found this book to repeat itself over and over again and borning doesn't cover it. This women spent more time talking about her paper fans and stuffed dolls then expaining where it all went wrong. So sad that such important things like real relationships seem to be the last on the list for this women. That pulling out a white glove to test for dirt is so very important WOW! What garbage this book was and such a waste of time. I read Toni's book and wanted to hear both sides of the story. I just found this book to repeat itself over and over again and borning doesn't cover it. This women spent more time talking about her paper fans and stuffed dolls then expaining where it all went wrong. So sad that such important things like real relationships seem to be the last on the list for this women. That pulling out a white glove to test for dirt is so very important in her world. How very sad! I wonder if Mr Spelling on his death bed thought my god I have had such a wonderful life because my house was so dust free. Or will Mrs Spelling for that matter?? I have never read of someone so self absorbed or materialistic in all my life..Thank god and I do mean that, that I grew up humble and real relationships mean more to me then abunch of dolls. If this women lost everything she owned in a fire and her money went up in smoke I think her life would be over. Now I am going to go through this book in the trash where it belongs.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Candy Spelling has not had a very rough life, although she would like you to think she has. She was a model at a young age and fawned over Rock Hudson as a teen. She eventually gets to meet him (how many people can say they've met their celebrity crushes?) but we're supposed to feel sorry for her because her nerves got the better of her and she didn't speak to him. They did become friends later in life. Sorry, Candy, no pity from me. Her direct comments about/to her daughter are cringe worthy. I Candy Spelling has not had a very rough life, although she would like you to think she has. She was a model at a young age and fawned over Rock Hudson as a teen. She eventually gets to meet him (how many people can say they've met their celebrity crushes?) but we're supposed to feel sorry for her because her nerves got the better of her and she didn't speak to him. They did become friends later in life. Sorry, Candy, no pity from me. Her direct comments about/to her daughter are cringe worthy. I found it very upsetting that she never mentioned "Nanny", the woman who Tori credits with raising her. Candy is so self-absorbed that she didn't even notice how big a part this woman played in her own child's life. The book is not very well-written, jumps all over the place, and ends with "Candy's Favorite Recipes". Even those aren't written well. It's fun for a laugh, for light summer reading. Just plan on losing a few Smart Points once you're done.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Had there been a half option, I would have opted for 1.5 stars. While the book was not horrible, I just was not that into it. I wanted to give Candy a "fair shake" and get her side of things on what Tori had published in her books. I found this book to dig at Tori, often at odd times. Tori seemed to be more objective than her mother. This may be because I like Tori better than her mother. Candy also seemed to complain about her life with Aaron, and how she had to go to all these Hollywood events Had there been a half option, I would have opted for 1.5 stars. While the book was not horrible, I just was not that into it. I wanted to give Candy a "fair shake" and get her side of things on what Tori had published in her books. I found this book to dig at Tori, often at odd times. Tori seemed to be more objective than her mother. This may be because I like Tori better than her mother. Candy also seemed to complain about her life with Aaron, and how she had to go to all these Hollywood events, partys, award shows, how she had to be the perfect "trophy" wife, had large houses with staff, etc. Cry me a river. Not absolutely horrible, but definatley not my favorite.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    I'm not sure if I am going to make it through this one before I have to return it. So far the the first pages are awful. Ok, I read about 1/3 of this book before I took it back. I think I get the gist. She is supposedly the 'painfully shy' Hollywood wife that is bad with numbers, hums incessantly, makes up stories about her dolls and feels the need to publish an awful book with the main purpose of debunking rumors, myths and attacks from her daughter. A magazine article could have probably done I'm not sure if I am going to make it through this one before I have to return it. So far the the first pages are awful. Ok, I read about 1/3 of this book before I took it back. I think I get the gist. She is supposedly the 'painfully shy' Hollywood wife that is bad with numbers, hums incessantly, makes up stories about her dolls and feels the need to publish an awful book with the main purpose of debunking rumors, myths and attacks from her daughter. A magazine article could have probably done the trick.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I really tried to give this a fair shake. Now I just dislike Candy Spelling more than before. This is a very bizarrely organized book, and considering it was ghostwritten, it could have been much better. Is it so wrong to write an autobigraphy in a logical order? And she is so clearly livid at Tori and made all sorts of passive aggressive comments. Needless to say, I'm sure this is a bestseller and I'm grateful to the LA Public Library for buying this so I could read it. I really tried to give this a fair shake. Now I just dislike Candy Spelling more than before. This is a very bizarrely organized book, and considering it was ghostwritten, it could have been much better. Is it so wrong to write an autobigraphy in a logical order? And she is so clearly livid at Tori and made all sorts of passive aggressive comments. Needless to say, I'm sure this is a bestseller and I'm grateful to the LA Public Library for buying this so I could read it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    If you are looking for loads of celebrity gossip this is not the book for you. However, if you are merely looking to gain insight into the drama of the Spelling family this book provides subtle insights. Though this book is clearly meant as a rebuttal to her daughter’s first autobio, it in fact cements the claims made by her daughter. I loved it. And tried one of her recipes and it was a total success. Random.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mari

    read in an effort to be fair & balanced since I also plan to read the Tori book. It was horrible. Funny but horrible. And funny because it's basically a self-righteous justification for odd choices. Oh and [random!:] there were a bunch of great recipes in the book. read in an effort to be fair & balanced since I also plan to read the Tori book. It was horrible. Funny but horrible. And funny because it's basically a self-righteous justification for odd choices. Oh and [random!:] there were a bunch of great recipes in the book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dominique

    This book is quite possibly the worst, most embarrassing book I have EVER read. Candy Spelling makes Tori look like a genius.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Wow, anyone can get a book deal these days. Horrible, choppy writing with no organization (despite her "cleverly" titled chapters). An absolute monstrosity. Wow, anyone can get a book deal these days. Horrible, choppy writing with no organization (despite her "cleverly" titled chapters). An absolute monstrosity.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Download to iPhone through Kindle/purse book (but really, reading in bed because books are too hard to hold book). So, so bad.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    I couldn't even bring myself to finish this... It just seems like a lot of rankings about her collections. I enjoyed Tori Spelling's books but this should have been called Crazy Land... I couldn't even bring myself to finish this... It just seems like a lot of rankings about her collections. I enjoyed Tori Spelling's books but this should have been called Crazy Land...

  23. 5 out of 5

    J

    Read this to balance out Tori's book. Boy, am I glad! It was soothing where Tori was jarring. Listening to Candy talk filled in some grey areas. The Spelling Manor was used heavily for business purposes as well as being their residential home. For example, her gift wrapping rooms were used for thousands of gifts given out to professional contacts each year. My thoughts: Why should her kids get any "inheritance" while she is still alive? It isn't like she is a step-mother. All the Spelling assets Read this to balance out Tori's book. Boy, am I glad! It was soothing where Tori was jarring. Listening to Candy talk filled in some grey areas. The Spelling Manor was used heavily for business purposes as well as being their residential home. For example, her gift wrapping rooms were used for thousands of gifts given out to professional contacts each year. My thoughts: Why should her kids get any "inheritance" while she is still alive? It isn't like she is a step-mother. All the Spelling assets were created and jointly held in the marriage, so they go to her after her husband's death. When she married Aaron, she actually had more money than he did. Tori asking for her "inheritance" is tantamount to saying her mother's life is irrelevant. This book is an interesting look into the life of an uber-rich old-school trophy wife. Candy shares some parts of her life, but not everything. She exists in an world of elegance and refinement. The potentially juicy or controversial bits are often glossed over. She might be just as crazy as Tori, but she was the discipline and foresight to not put her crazy on display. I respect that. Compared to Tori, I love Candy Spelling! She talks throughout the book avoiding conflict, being shy/quiet and listening rather than talking. That is generally good advice, but there are limits. I could see people having genuine trouble building a relationship with her, if she can't/won't communicate her thoughts and feelings. Candy thinks dogs are akin to gods. And she loves celebrating Halloween. I find these traits personally annoying, but not as damning as Tori's flaws. On the plus side, Candy genuinely seems to enjoy cooking, sewing, being a helpmate to her husband and doing general housewife stuff. Very 1950's perspectives. Unfortunately she does seem repressed in a real sense. There are a few things she mentions that crossed the line into unhealthy. She doesn't seem to have the ability to speak up when she really should. For example, when 4-year old Tori asked their designer friend to make her a mature custom gown "with breasts" (built in padding), Candy is horrified but says nothing. Tori gets the dress and (hopefully fake) cigarettes to complete the look. What?! Flash forward and Tori is attending lingerie parties at the Playboy Mansion. No surprise there. When Tori & Randy's teenage friends abuse staff and take liberties within the Spelling home, Candy is miffed but says nothing. When these same friends request to hold parties inside her home, she complies. What?! No wonder her daughter went off the rails so spectacularly. She never spoke up and fought for her children! I loved chapter 11 where she talks about being a fly on the wall in Hollywood. It was my favorite chapter. I can only imagine what she must have seen and overheard from her position!

  24. 5 out of 5

    James Briggs

    Terrible so-called memoir which is basically just Candy highlighting how materialistic she is by listing off all her possessions and all the great trips she has had and all the famous people she has met, like anyone would care about that other than herself. even when she claims that she is going to spill some juicy gossip or insider secret she is still remarkably tame, either by not naming names or the so-called "juicy gossip" is ridiculously tame and uneventful and not likely to shock anyone at Terrible so-called memoir which is basically just Candy highlighting how materialistic she is by listing off all her possessions and all the great trips she has had and all the famous people she has met, like anyone would care about that other than herself. even when she claims that she is going to spill some juicy gossip or insider secret she is still remarkably tame, either by not naming names or the so-called "juicy gossip" is ridiculously tame and uneventful and not likely to shock anyone at all. And she goes on and on about how amazing she is and how amazing her friends find her, how kind-hearted she is, etc. It is a complete exercise in vanity and unlikely to interest any, including the most die-hard celeb chasers. If you are looking for a juicy "tell all" celebrity memoir that spill the goss on your fave celebs LOOK ELSEWHERE!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Buchanan

    A vapid, shallow, boring book by a vapid, shallow, boring author. If you have a day where you especially hate your liver, play a drinking game where you take a shot every time the author mentions how "painfully shy" she is You'll be dead by chapter 3. A vapid, shallow, boring book by a vapid, shallow, boring author. If you have a day where you especially hate your liver, play a drinking game where you take a shot every time the author mentions how "painfully shy" she is You'll be dead by chapter 3.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marlana

    Always enjoyed Candy’s style and class. Loved being a part of her life for a little while during the reading of her book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    After reading both of Tori's books and watching her show, I wanted to see Candy's reaction to Tori's comments/stories about her childhood. Really though, there is no point to read Candy's book. She barely discusses her children. **Possible Spoilers** Here is what I did learn: her house is 56,500 sf; her attic at The Manor is 17,000 (with a salon; she is down sizing to a 17,000 sf condo (what will she do???); her husband, Aaron, was the king of ABC in the mid-80s - one third of their prime time in After reading both of Tori's books and watching her show, I wanted to see Candy's reaction to Tori's comments/stories about her childhood. Really though, there is no point to read Candy's book. She barely discusses her children. **Possible Spoilers** Here is what I did learn: her house is 56,500 sf; her attic at The Manor is 17,000 (with a salon; she is down sizing to a 17,000 sf condo (what will she do???); her husband, Aaron, was the king of ABC in the mid-80s - one third of their prime time in the mid-80s was made up of Aaron's shows; she has every script from every episode of every show Aaron worked on; she has a lot of collections; she buys her window cleaner from the 99 cent store. There are many other inane comments. Candy did retell a couple of stories that Tori discusses. One is the Marie Antoinette Halloween costume. Candy swears Tori loved it when she wore it; but now Tori has rewritten history. The dolls... Tori discusses the Madame Alexander dolls her mother gave her, but Tori was never allowed to play with. Candy says Tori loved those dolls, then one day she stopped loving them. So Candy has them in her doll museum. (OK, a doll museum? And Candy designed dolls? I'm going to give the truth of this story to Tori! Her mom loved the dolls.) The sad part is, you can tell Candy wants a relationship with Tori and her grandchildren. However, writing such in a book that Tori may or may not read is silly. Also, writing an open letter to the grandchildren? Pointless. Also sad, Candy ever showed any growth as a human. Apparently she was the same as a child as she is as an adult. Disappointing was that Candy never discussed Aaron's passing. She talks about how much they loved each other, so one would assume that would have been a crucial moment in Candy's life. Perhaps she was holding back for the next book. Anyway, read the book if you like. But don't expect too much.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    This is Candy Spelling's first book. I have already read her second book. This book also covered her marriage to Aaron Spelling and how it changed her life. From what she describes, she adored her husband but learned that working behind the scenes was best. Aaron wanted her by his side almost all the time. She got involved in buying the gifts for the all clients and employees, creating dramatic dinner parties, always being dressed to perfection and being the perfect wife and hostess. In spite of This is Candy Spelling's first book. I have already read her second book. This book also covered her marriage to Aaron Spelling and how it changed her life. From what she describes, she adored her husband but learned that working behind the scenes was best. Aaron wanted her by his side almost all the time. She got involved in buying the gifts for the all clients and employees, creating dramatic dinner parties, always being dressed to perfection and being the perfect wife and hostess. In spite of all the wealth the couple eventually acquired ~ they started out like most young couples with little to nothing. They soon learned how to become a "brand". She talks about the huge Manor they built and lived in together. She realized after Aaron passed away that she should downsize so she sold the Manor and moved. Well, reducing from a 56,500 sq. feet of living space plus a 17,000 sq. ft completed attic to just 17,000 sq. ft. on two floors of a penthouse IS downsizing, I guess. She also mentioned her children, Tori and Randy. She said that she and Aaron wanted their children to work for a living and both of them do. She said there are trust funds and college funds for the grandchildren. She also talked once again about the on-and-off relationship she has with her daughter, Tori.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ket Lamb

    If you've followed Tori Spelling's on-again/off-again feud with her mom, Candy, on the Oxygen's "Tori & Dean," you may want to balance out the picture by reading Candy's version. Don't expect lots of juicy gossip about all those Spelling TV stars, though. A silent, supportive wife to her famous, prolific, husband, Candy remains practically mum about anything interesting except to explain why her attic at The Manor could have been mistaken for Home Depot. 100s of light bulbs, dozens and dozens of If you've followed Tori Spelling's on-again/off-again feud with her mom, Candy, on the Oxygen's "Tori & Dean," you may want to balance out the picture by reading Candy's version. Don't expect lots of juicy gossip about all those Spelling TV stars, though. A silent, supportive wife to her famous, prolific, husband, Candy remains practically mum about anything interesting except to explain why her attic at The Manor could have been mistaken for Home Depot. 100s of light bulbs, dozens and dozens of paper towels, 59 boxes of Easter decorations, and everything Tori or Randy ever created or wore were just some of the things up there. Can you say "hoarding"? She did. The list of her collections (Beanie Babies, etiquette books, lorgnettes, and sugar sifters to name a few) is 3 pages long! This Girl Scout seemed to be prepared for anything, including her husband's request to messenger an 18th century painting to a business associate that she just happened to have on hand for these occasions. And yes, the 56,500 square foot Manor included a gift-wrapping room AND a bowling alley. Hmmm... wonder if she held a garage sale when she finally down-sized and moved. Now that would have been worth filming!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    A couple of the recipes look pretty good, I wrote a few of them down to try. That's the most valuable thing I got from this book. It's mainly about her stuff - how she got it, where she keeps it, how she feels about it. She seems very shallow and extremely materialistic. One weird thing I noticed is everything is "my". Normal people would say for example "I went to the garage and got in the car" where she says "I went to my garage and got in my car". The word 'my' must appear in the book 5000 ti A couple of the recipes look pretty good, I wrote a few of them down to try. That's the most valuable thing I got from this book. It's mainly about her stuff - how she got it, where she keeps it, how she feels about it. She seems very shallow and extremely materialistic. One weird thing I noticed is everything is "my". Normal people would say for example "I went to the garage and got in the car" where she says "I went to my garage and got in my car". The word 'my' must appear in the book 5000 times. The way she tells her story she lives for approval from others and doesn't feel she has anything to offer other than material objects. Kinda sad, and really hard to relate too. Going by the depth she shows in this book her stuff may be all she has to offer. Lucky for her she has a ton of it. She also often talks about how famous she is when she isn't famous at all, she just is associated with some famous people. The only reason I read this book is because I wanted to see if she gave a side to the story Tori told about the money (she doesn't really), otherwise I would never have given it a second glance. She is only fringe-famous but doesn't seem to know that.

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