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The Starman Omnibus, Vol. 3

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The acclaimed series STARMAN, starring a Gen-X super hero from the 1990s, is re-presented in high quality format, featuring spectacular art by Eisner Award winner Tony Harris. In this new, third volume, Starman's hometown of Opal City is terrorized by Dr. Pip, an eccentric bomber. And with no demands from the mad villain, both Starman and the local authorities are unable to The acclaimed series STARMAN, starring a Gen-X super hero from the 1990s, is re-presented in high quality format, featuring spectacular art by Eisner Award winner Tony Harris. In this new, third volume, Starman's hometown of Opal City is terrorized by Dr. Pip, an eccentric bomber. And with no demands from the mad villain, both Starman and the local authorities are unable to track him down. Also in this volume, Starman teams up with Batman to save the life of reformed villain Solomon Grundy, and readers learn the history of Starman's enigmatic mentor, The Shade.


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The acclaimed series STARMAN, starring a Gen-X super hero from the 1990s, is re-presented in high quality format, featuring spectacular art by Eisner Award winner Tony Harris. In this new, third volume, Starman's hometown of Opal City is terrorized by Dr. Pip, an eccentric bomber. And with no demands from the mad villain, both Starman and the local authorities are unable to The acclaimed series STARMAN, starring a Gen-X super hero from the 1990s, is re-presented in high quality format, featuring spectacular art by Eisner Award winner Tony Harris. In this new, third volume, Starman's hometown of Opal City is terrorized by Dr. Pip, an eccentric bomber. And with no demands from the mad villain, both Starman and the local authorities are unable to track him down. Also in this volume, Starman teams up with Batman to save the life of reformed villain Solomon Grundy, and readers learn the history of Starman's enigmatic mentor, The Shade.

30 review for The Starman Omnibus, Vol. 3

  1. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    More great tales, set in the modern era, but also set in the Golden Age, in Opal city, including a shocker regarding the deadly antagonist and new version of, The Mist!. 8 out of 12. I read the following comic books collected in this volume Starman (season 2) #30-38, Annual #2, Starman Secret Files (one-shot); The Shade #1-4. More great tales, set in the modern era, but also set in the Golden Age, in Opal city, including a shocker regarding the deadly antagonist and new version of, The Mist!. 8 out of 12. I read the following comic books collected in this volume Starman (season 2) #30-38, Annual #2, Starman Secret Files (one-shot); The Shade #1-4.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Here we are. The third Starman Omnibus. As I've mentioned in other Starman reviews, Starman is more than just a superhero series. It's the story of Jack Knight trying to fill his father's shoes as Starman. Jack is not your average superhero and should be relatable to a large segment of the comic reading audience. In this volume, we get the tale of The Shade and his centuries long battle against the Ludlow family, a tale of Will Payton, Sadie's past, Dr. Pip, a trip into Solomon Grundy's subconscio Here we are. The third Starman Omnibus. As I've mentioned in other Starman reviews, Starman is more than just a superhero series. It's the story of Jack Knight trying to fill his father's shoes as Starman. Jack is not your average superhero and should be relatable to a large segment of the comic reading audience. In this volume, we get the tale of The Shade and his centuries long battle against the Ludlow family, a tale of Will Payton, Sadie's past, Dr. Pip, a trip into Solomon Grundy's subconscious courtesy of Batman and the Fluoronic Man, the Black Pirate's ghost, the Mist taking down Justic League Europe, the relationship between Ted Knight and the golden age Black Canary, and more character moments between Jack and the supporting cast. Jack and Davey eating with the ghosts of the Justice Soceity was a touching moment, especially from the Red Bee. Robinson and Harris did some great work in this volume. It's not often I nearly tear up during a moment in a comic but this had one. Poor Solly. The Shade continues to be a well-rounded character. At the close of the volume, the stage is set for Jack's trip into space and Tony Harris's departure from the book. There's not much point in recommending this book. If you've read the previous omnibuses, you'll definitely want to read this one. If you haven't read any Starman, you'd be well served to start with the first omnibus or first tradepaperback, Sins of the Father. BTW, Batman's favorite Woody Allen movie is Crimes and Misdemeanors.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    It seems like Marvel and DC Comics are going out of their way to destroy the history of their characters these days with retcons and reboots run amok. DC can’t go a month without blowing up their time stream and the next thing you know, Batman is dead. Wait, no he isn’t. Well, he kind of is, and all history has changed. Or you may think that Spiderman married Mary Jane about twenty years ago. Wrong. Marvel just decided to erase that so I guess none of those stories are ‘real’ now. (Thanks for le It seems like Marvel and DC Comics are going out of their way to destroy the history of their characters these days with retcons and reboots run amok. DC can’t go a month without blowing up their time stream and the next thing you know, Batman is dead. Wait, no he isn’t. Well, he kind of is, and all history has changed. Or you may think that Spiderman married Mary Jane about twenty years ago. Wrong. Marvel just decided to erase that so I guess none of those stories are ‘real’ now. (Thanks for letting me spend all that time and money reading Spiderman only to tell me twenty years later that it’s all fake, Marvel.) I know that with decades of history for comic characters, a writer can’t be a slave to continuity. But that doesn’t mean you have to destroy it either. One of the things I’m really enjoying about these Starman collections is that James Robinson has crafted a timeline that embraces all that was both good and goofy about decades of continuity of several variations of a minor character and turned it into an epic storyline. Robinson’s writing shows a great fondness and respect for the Golden and Silver Age super-heroes, and he put a great modern twist on the tale of Jack Knight reluctantly taking on the role of Starman that his father began . I didn’t read these comics back in the ‘90s when they originally appeared, and I love how Robinson was bucking the trend of dark, gritty and ultra-violent super-heroes in that era where everyone was imitating Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns. (Although a very Frank Miller-ish-style Batman does do a guest appearance here.) Starman is a serious story, but it embraces a sense of wonder, fun and history that’s still missing in a lot of comic’s today.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    After reading the first three installments of James Robinson's Starman series - Starman: Sins of the Father , Starman: Night and Day and Starman: A Wicked Inclination - in trade paperback, I switched over to these hardcover omnibus editions, beginning with volume two, which was mostly a recap. This third omnibus volume is therefore the first new Starman material that I've read in some time, and I enjoyed it immensely! Here we learn more of the history of that morally ambiguous villain- After reading the first three installments of James Robinson's Starman series - Starman: Sins of the Father , Starman: Night and Day and Starman: A Wicked Inclination - in trade paperback, I switched over to these hardcover omnibus editions, beginning with volume two, which was mostly a recap. This third omnibus volume is therefore the first new Starman material that I've read in some time, and I enjoyed it immensely! Here we learn more of the history of that morally ambiguous villain-hero, The Shade, and are introduced to another past Starman, Will Payton. The O'Dare family makes an appearance, as does Jack's dead brother David, who, in Talking With David, '97, brings him to a banquet of fallen superheroes. The ghost of a hanged pirate, determined to clear his name, a mad bomber terrorizing Opal City, the dying Solomon Grundy, and the psychotically vengeance-focused Mist, all appear in these pages. But like the previous entries in the series, it is the father-son relationship between Ted and Jack Knight - the Starman of yesterday and today - that gives the work its real emotional power. Robinson continues to build upon that relationship here, and although the widening story arc (as well as the afterword) make it clear that there are momentous events in the offing, the volume closes with a poignant scene - in which father and son, though apart, share a moment of connection - that focuses our attention on the familial drama. I continue to enjoy the Starman series - its characters, story, and art - and am looking forward to the release of the fourth omnibus volume, sometime later this year. MUST have more!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Starman to me will always be a singular moment in a fictional time and place that too briefly shined like a jewel; we will never see its like again, simply because the act of returning would change everything. The magic would be gone, even if the city and its people came back to us. I probably should have said that for the final volume but I'll forget it if I don't say it now! Starman to me will always be a singular moment in a fictional time and place that too briefly shined like a jewel; we will never see its like again, simply because the act of returning would change everything. The magic would be gone, even if the city and its people came back to us. I probably should have said that for the final volume but I'll forget it if I don't say it now!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Unfortunately, I'm giving up on this series. I made it about halfway through this volume before I came to grips with the fact that I was dreading picking it up, and the idea that I'm only roughly halfway through this interminable slog was just too much to handle. So, adios Starman, I'll never know how you turned out. My guess is pretentious and boring. I'm sure this type of character appealed greatly to comic readers in the early 90s. This was the Golden Age of snobby, nostalgia-obsessed Comic Bo Unfortunately, I'm giving up on this series. I made it about halfway through this volume before I came to grips with the fact that I was dreading picking it up, and the idea that I'm only roughly halfway through this interminable slog was just too much to handle. So, adios Starman, I'll never know how you turned out. My guess is pretentious and boring. I'm sure this type of character appealed greatly to comic readers in the early 90s. This was the Golden Age of snobby, nostalgia-obsessed Comic Book Guys, and Starman himself is one of the most annoying of them. There's even a scene where a nondescript woman he's dating points out to him how pointless his nostalgia obsession is, but he defends it in a way that I think is meant to make him seem right? Unclear. Regardless, it made me scream. Also, I don't know who this woman is or why they're dating, as every character in this series outside of Jack Knight is utterly unremarkable. If I'd read this in the 90s and also been an actual character in the movie Clerks, I think I might've enjoyed this. As it stands, I just can't deal with it. The prose is languid, the plots are forgettable, the character development is flat and empty. I don't care about a single thing happening in this series, and I think that's an excellent sign that it's time to move on. More power to anyone who's able to enjoy this, but it ain't for me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Randy Lander

    This is the volume where original artist Tony Harris left and original (and legendary) editor Archie Goodwin died. I knew that my enjoyment of the series took a hit about this time, but I'd never quite put it together that this was why. The look of the book became less consistent, and often the art didn't quite fit the tone of the story. There's a lot of good, even great, art here, but there is also some artwork that was on the weak side, especially compared to the visual tone Harris and Von Graw This is the volume where original artist Tony Harris left and original (and legendary) editor Archie Goodwin died. I knew that my enjoyment of the series took a hit about this time, but I'd never quite put it together that this was why. The look of the book became less consistent, and often the art didn't quite fit the tone of the story. There's a lot of good, even great, art here, but there is also some artwork that was on the weak side, especially compared to the visual tone Harris and Von Grawbadger had set. On top of that, some of Robinson's writer's tics, notably his tendency to have the characters go off on esoteric pop culture tangents in the middle of situations in which no human being ever would be thinking about pop culture tangents, became exaggerated. And his tweaking of the Golden Age characters (and even modern age characters) that were the foundation for Starman's world got a touch out of hand. Examples: The Black Canary/Ted Knight affair which, while handled reasonably well, essentially needlessly tarnished both characters. The slaughter of a few C-list characters to show how deadly the Mist was, which wasn't terribly effective given that Robinson had to cheat how the powers/vulnerabilities of said characters work in order to make her so effective. And the Sadie "reveal" took an already somewhat annoying character and made her situation cartoonish. In fact, that whole "romance" annual is one of the low points of the series, in terms of art and writing. That said, there's still plenty to like here. While Robinson's Batman is a bit off, the rest of the story featuring Jack and friends going into Solomon Grundy's consciousness ala Moore's Swamp Thing was a great take on the Grundy character and a pretty entertaining read. The Shade miniseries was a lot of fun, even though The Shade tended to be a character where Robinson could really indulge his tendency to overwrite. And the Dr. Pip story, while a bit disjointed thanks to its meanderings into other plots and subplots, is a pretty decent bit of Golden Age style mad bomber story brought into Starman's retro-modern superhero style. The book regains a bit of its even keel when Peter Snejbjerg steps in as regular artist, but even then Robinson's tendency to meander does damage to both Jack's space odyssey and the Grand Guignol story that closes everything out. In a lot of ways, the first two volumes are Starman at its best. This is the book at its weakest, but even at its weakest, there are spots that really shine. If I could, I'd give it 3 and 1/2 stars, and even knowing every beat of where we're going from here isn't for me, I know that I love so much of it that I'll definitely pick up the final hardcovers.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    One of the best things about this series is how seamlessly it moves the story forward while integrating continuity, often decades-old, into its narrative tapestry. Surely, this is a DC lover’s book. It’s impressive how Robinson not only fleshes out, but humanizes forgotten characters like the Shade, Brian Savage, Mikaal Tomas, Will Payton, and even Justice League Europe. They feel important, like they were just waiting for Robinson to come along and dig into their history. And what he does with One of the best things about this series is how seamlessly it moves the story forward while integrating continuity, often decades-old, into its narrative tapestry. Surely, this is a DC lover’s book. It’s impressive how Robinson not only fleshes out, but humanizes forgotten characters like the Shade, Brian Savage, Mikaal Tomas, Will Payton, and even Justice League Europe. They feel important, like they were just waiting for Robinson to come along and dig into their history. And what he does with Solomon Grundy here is something I’d never thought possible with the character. Elsewhere in this omnibus, we really start to see Jack change. He’s becoming closer with his dad, gaining a greater understanding of his relationship with David, and is generally more reflective and mature towards his role as Starman. I can tell at this point that Robinson has an end goal for Jack and the supporting players. This series has always felt purposeful in its storytelling, and it’s here where that purpose begins to shine even brighter. This volume also contains my favorite issue so far: “Talking with David ‘97”, where ghost David and various Golden Age heroes host Jack for a meal while offering him advice. Before Starman - before this issue, in fact - most of these heroes barely had distinct personalities let alone pathos. But, again, what Robinson does in just twenty pages makes them seem so real and vital to the DC universe. That’s the mark of a great comics writer: building on and respecting what came before, all the while putting your own lasting stamp on these characters.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Much of this volume is spent setting up what will follow later in the series, so it can be a bit slow-going at times. But it certainly can pack an emotional impact, especially in the resolution of Grundy's storyline and in this volume's dream of David, including this time some deceased Golden Age heroes. (I am not a fan of the infidelity storyline, but I can put that aside in light of what is otherwise an excellent issue.) There's also the Shade miniseries, brief incidents in the life of Shade, Much of this volume is spent setting up what will follow later in the series, so it can be a bit slow-going at times. But it certainly can pack an emotional impact, especially in the resolution of Grundy's storyline and in this volume's dream of David, including this time some deceased Golden Age heroes. (I am not a fan of the infidelity storyline, but I can put that aside in light of what is otherwise an excellent issue.) There's also the Shade miniseries, brief incidents in the life of Shade, in the light of the vendetta the Ludlow family had against him. (Side note here: this reminded me of nothing so much as the Hunters from Gargoyles, another family dedicating themselves to revenge against an immortal creature and succeeding only in ruining themselves for generations. And hey, written at nearly the exact same time.)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt Smith

    This is another book I stalled out on for a year. I stalled out so long, in fact, that I often remember points where I yearned for that early Starman, that good Starman. The problem with this book, and Robinson says as much in his afterword, is that it’s the point where he’s about halfway. The story’s been going for a while, things are continuing on, he has an ending, but it’s a long way off. It makes most of this book less than compelling... I feel like there’s a ton of Batman in this whereas I This is another book I stalled out on for a year. I stalled out so long, in fact, that I often remember points where I yearned for that early Starman, that good Starman. The problem with this book, and Robinson says as much in his afterword, is that it’s the point where he’s about halfway. The story’s been going for a while, things are continuing on, he has an ending, but it’s a long way off. It makes most of this book less than compelling... I feel like there’s a ton of Batman in this whereas I don’t know if he actually is or it just felt that way for a while. And I like what Robinson’s doing here. An issue that’s all old heroes talking about their pasts and Jack’s future, the one issue story where Mist takes down the newly formed Justice League France, all of the Grundy mythology (which I think is new in this book and has since become definitive Solomon Grundy).... but it never grabbed me like the first two volumes. And I am interested in where it’s going. But maybe a change for a while before jumping back in.... At least I’m halfway done... if only there wasn’t so much left.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Only nine actual issues of Starman in this one - four parts of Infernal Devices (very good, though the Black Pirate back story is maybe a tad too long), the two-part Grundy origin (very good), the finale of the infamous Dr. Pip (the Genesis tie-in feels awkward now, and Shade's deus ex machina return as well, but otherwise, good), a Times Past with Will Payton (solid) and the Mist's murder of the JLE (a little convenient, esp. given Nash's patsiness in the end - though I do like how Robinson men Only nine actual issues of Starman in this one - four parts of Infernal Devices (very good, though the Black Pirate back story is maybe a tad too long), the two-part Grundy origin (very good), the finale of the infamous Dr. Pip (the Genesis tie-in feels awkward now, and Shade's deus ex machina return as well, but otherwise, good), a Times Past with Will Payton (solid) and the Mist's murder of the JLE (a little convenient, esp. given Nash's patsiness in the end - though I do like how Robinson mentions being called out for cheap deaths, but nowadays that body count fits into half an issue, easily). Other issues included: four-issue Shade miniseries, which is very good. Starman Annual 2 and Starman Secret Files, the former of which has flashbacks to Scalphunter, the Starman/Black Canary affair, and a David Knight-as-Starman tale, and reveals that Sadie is Will Payton's sister, the latter has a sweet parallel tale of Jack and Ted talking about each other's history and evolution as a hero. Both quite good.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    The genius of James Robinson in Starman is that he succeeds at doing things which on other writers come off as pretentious or far too twee. This book collects the four issue Shade Mini-Series as well as Issues 30-38 of Starman, Starman Annual #2, and Starman Secret Files #1. The Shade mini-series is all about the anti-hero turned hero Shade running into a family in the 1840s with a murderous secret that he stops and how he finds himself haunted by them for centuries. It's an incredibly story and The genius of James Robinson in Starman is that he succeeds at doing things which on other writers come off as pretentious or far too twee. This book collects the four issue Shade Mini-Series as well as Issues 30-38 of Starman, Starman Annual #2, and Starman Secret Files #1. The Shade mini-series is all about the anti-hero turned hero Shade running into a family in the 1840s with a murderous secret that he stops and how he finds himself haunted by them for centuries. It's an incredibly story and shows how much Robinson did on re-invigorating the character. The main body of the book is somewhat unremarkable. There are no big DC events, no earth-shattering threats to Opal City. Much like its antique owner hero Jack, it has a great sense of nostalgia but makes that nostalgia seem cool and intriguing. The book dives into the history of Opal City and even into the far more obscure 1988-1992 Starman. The book is not perfect. The idea of Jack meeting his dead brother is a bit of an oddity. That it happens every year to the point that the story here references the year as an annual is a bit nuts in a series that comes out with one issue a year. Still, while the book isn't perfect, it's beautifully written and quite stylish.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    This is a series that defies logic all the time and that's not necessarily a bad thing. James Robinson is still much too wordy, especially when describing things that don't matter. Jack's relationship with his father is still what makes the book work. The book is steeped in history but at times it weighs so heavily on the title that parts are a slog to get through. The art had highs a lows. Tony Harris is still a delight especially his amazing covers. Overall, this is a tough book to get into bu This is a series that defies logic all the time and that's not necessarily a bad thing. James Robinson is still much too wordy, especially when describing things that don't matter. Jack's relationship with his father is still what makes the book work. The book is steeped in history but at times it weighs so heavily on the title that parts are a slog to get through. The art had highs a lows. Tony Harris is still a delight especially his amazing covers. Overall, this is a tough book to get into but if you can its worth a read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    The Shade #1-4. It’s interesting to see a series focused on the Shade, though I think the character unfortunately accentuates Robinson’s tendency toward wordiness (rather than letting the comics speak for themselves). I also think the whole Ludlow feud gets strung out too long (and is repetitive with stuff from the ‘90s like the family feud in the Flash). With all that said, this book has some good moments in it and is worth reading [7/10]. Infernal Devices (30-35). This is the first longer arc i The Shade #1-4. It’s interesting to see a series focused on the Shade, though I think the character unfortunately accentuates Robinson’s tendency toward wordiness (rather than letting the comics speak for themselves). I also think the whole Ludlow feud gets strung out too long (and is repetitive with stuff from the ‘90s like the family feud in the Flash). With all that said, this book has some good moments in it and is worth reading [7/10]. Infernal Devices (30-35). This is the first longer arc in Starman that wasn’t great. It’s OK, mind you, but it’s just well-written superhero fare, as opposed to the more magnificent work that appears in some of the earlier stories [7/10]. The Grundy interlude that falls in 33-34 is more interesting for its interaction with the wider world of heroes, its insight into Grundy, and its conclusion [8/10]. Times Past: 1990 (36). Unfortunately the Will Payton Times Past is clumsy, with an awkward interweaving of his life story with a plot of minor interest [6/10]. Starman Annual #2. The romance element of this annual is fun, and the stories are generally emotionally touching. However, it’s Sadie’s reveal and the results that really make the story (though I’m not convinced that Sadie’s story isn’t a retcon) [7+/10]. Talking with David ‘97 (37). And at last we get a *good* Talking with dDavid, likely thanks to the focus on the JSA instead of David. Robinson does a great job of going to the hearts of their characters in a few pages each [8/10]. La Fraternite de Justice et Liberte (38). Not too thrilled with the have-a-villain-prove-herself-evil-by-killing-a-bunch-C-grade-heroes plot [6/10]. Secret Files #1. The Ted & Jack story gives some nice insights into their characters, but tries too hard. [7/10] Overall, this was a somewhat disappointing volume (in the scope of things). Whereas the previous volumes were great, this one is just good, mostly because none of the arcs was as great as those in previous omnibuses.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael P

    Starman is not a super hero comic. Well, I take that back. Starman is a super hero book, but through its heart and depth of character it outshines its counterparts and contemporaries. James Robinson's greatest work continues to reverberate years after its initial printing not because Jack Knight, the seventh Starman, has a cool costume - in fact he barely has one, settling for the practicality of a jacket over the flash of a cape - or a grim and gritty demeanor - he's actually laid back, though Starman is not a super hero comic. Well, I take that back. Starman is a super hero book, but through its heart and depth of character it outshines its counterparts and contemporaries. James Robinson's greatest work continues to reverberate years after its initial printing not because Jack Knight, the seventh Starman, has a cool costume - in fact he barely has one, settling for the practicality of a jacket over the flash of a cape - or a grim and gritty demeanor - he's actually laid back, though high strung when a super villain attempts to kill him. No, Starman soars because it's about character over action, and in this third volume of Robinson's opus we're privy to Jack Knights continued evolution as a person. Ultimately, it's a book about a man growing up; a son embracing his father's legacy, as well as admitting his love and respect for him; it's about recognizing that being a hero is about more than throwing a good punch, or shooting off a high energy laser beam. Its a book that fully embraces its pulpy roots, but never allows itself to become weighed down in super hero tropes - perfect example, when Jack falls in love we're not met with the cliche of the girlfriend that is unaware of his identity, but rather a woman who gets to decide for herself whether or not she can be a man who could potentially die on his next great adventure. With its eye on the future but its heart in the past, Starman continues to demonstrate why its a book for the ages.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    "Matt, are you really going to give five stars to every volume of Starman?" In a word: yes. In a few more words: This book continues to be, for me at least, the best superhero comics has to offer. It's a longform narrative by auteurs. This volume in particular, reaching the halfway point of the larger series by its end, shows James Robinson coming into the difficult second act of his larger work with a bit of a stumble that bears strong fruit by the volume's end. And Tony Harris' art provides such "Matt, are you really going to give five stars to every volume of Starman?" In a word: yes. In a few more words: This book continues to be, for me at least, the best superhero comics has to offer. It's a longform narrative by auteurs. This volume in particular, reaching the halfway point of the larger series by its end, shows James Robinson coming into the difficult second act of his larger work with a bit of a stumble that bears strong fruit by the volume's end. And Tony Harris' art provides such an essential voice that in one particular issue, when Harris' art signals one character's entrance to "save the day," it's Harris who becomes the more exciting cavalry. Are there stronger instances in the superhero comics medium? Sure. But this one, over 80 issues plus annuals and specials, encompasses the journey of its creators as much as its plot and characters, and that's pretty damn priceless.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Blake Petit

    The third collection brings us halfway through James Robinson's brilliant reimagining of Starman. In addition to another nine issues of the series, this volume also includes the second Starman annual, the Starman Secret Files, and the four-issue Shade miniseries, which is brilliant in its own right. This book includes the introduction of the Black Pirate into the Starman mythos, the fate of Solomon Grundy, another "Talking With David," story, and the beginning of the story threads that would ult The third collection brings us halfway through James Robinson's brilliant reimagining of Starman. In addition to another nine issues of the series, this volume also includes the second Starman annual, the Starman Secret Files, and the four-issue Shade miniseries, which is brilliant in its own right. This book includes the introduction of the Black Pirate into the Starman mythos, the fate of Solomon Grundy, another "Talking With David," story, and the beginning of the story threads that would ultimately lead Jack Knight into space to search for the missing Starman, Will Payton. Robinson's ability to pull together so many different characters from different points of DC continuity and make them one deep, rich, cohesive story is nothing short of remarkable. This is one of those comics I've always been sorry I missed out on in the original publication, and I'm thrilled that this remarkable omnibus series is allowing me to catch up.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ikea Monkey

    Ah, Starman. Starman is my all-time favorite series from the 90's. Starman was my first introduction to the great James Robinson and the great Tony Harris. This series has it all, action, comedy, horror, romance, superheroes, aliens, gods, etc. James Robinson writes fantastic stories, brings long forgotten characters back to the spotlight, he builds a world that has so many cool things, I can't even remember them all. Tony Harris is the artist that does most of the art. I believe this was his fi Ah, Starman. Starman is my all-time favorite series from the 90's. Starman was my first introduction to the great James Robinson and the great Tony Harris. This series has it all, action, comedy, horror, romance, superheroes, aliens, gods, etc. James Robinson writes fantastic stories, brings long forgotten characters back to the spotlight, he builds a world that has so many cool things, I can't even remember them all. Tony Harris is the artist that does most of the art. I believe this was his first series. His art starts out good and it gets better and better, as the series goes on. I really miss this series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    Even 10+ years later, James Robinson's Starman run remains the pinnacle of straight superhero comics. JR somehow managed to pull off a superhero book that respected the long history of DC comics while avoiding the usual superhero retardery. Skeptical without being cynical and self-referential without the clever wink-wink of today's cape stories, Starman is the best silver age comic you'll find. And the art managed to stay consistently similar, even though about 25 guys drew it in and around Tony Even 10+ years later, James Robinson's Starman run remains the pinnacle of straight superhero comics. JR somehow managed to pull off a superhero book that respected the long history of DC comics while avoiding the usual superhero retardery. Skeptical without being cynical and self-referential without the clever wink-wink of today's cape stories, Starman is the best silver age comic you'll find. And the art managed to stay consistently similar, even though about 25 guys drew it in and around Tony Harris' run.

  20. 5 out of 5

    MIchael

    I love Starman, but other than The Shade miniseries stuck in this volume, it doesn't stand up to the last 2 volumes at ALL. I paced my way through this over a long period of time because I just wasn't that interested in the story. Once I finished it I was amped up for the next volume...and then immediately bought volumes 5 & 6...this series is spectacular, but this volume was a lull in what is a great epic. I love Starman, but other than The Shade miniseries stuck in this volume, it doesn't stand up to the last 2 volumes at ALL. I paced my way through this over a long period of time because I just wasn't that interested in the story. Once I finished it I was amped up for the next volume...and then immediately bought volumes 5 & 6...this series is spectacular, but this volume was a lull in what is a great epic.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    My love for Starman is such a THING that sometimes I forget it started with some pretty damn good comics. Reading this reminded me. Solly's final issues are just as heartbreaking as I remembered, and the Shade miniseries was great stuff all the way through. I had also completely forgotten all about that amazing Talking with David and a bunch of random dead Golden Age superheroes and the really good Times Past with Will Payton that introduced the Bodines. My love for Starman is such a THING that sometimes I forget it started with some pretty damn good comics. Reading this reminded me. Solly's final issues are just as heartbreaking as I remembered, and the Shade miniseries was great stuff all the way through. I had also completely forgotten all about that amazing Talking with David and a bunch of random dead Golden Age superheroes and the really good Times Past with Will Payton that introduced the Bodines.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matt Sadorf

    Seriously, I fall further in love with this book as I delve further into it's mythos. Robinson knows how to weave an entertaining and engrossing story, couple that with amazing artists and you have one hell of a book. I just keep going with this series, and it is slightly sad that I know this is the halfway point for the omnibuses, but the fact that these editions even exist is something great for a collector and lover of the work such as myself. Seriously, I fall further in love with this book as I delve further into it's mythos. Robinson knows how to weave an entertaining and engrossing story, couple that with amazing artists and you have one hell of a book. I just keep going with this series, and it is slightly sad that I know this is the halfway point for the omnibuses, but the fact that these editions even exist is something great for a collector and lover of the work such as myself.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pturingan

    I didn't like this one as much as I liked Volume 2. Still a really nice series so far though. I just thought that the Dr. Pip and Solomon Grundy adventures were a few notches below the stories in the previous volume. I thought Shade miniseries was well done though and the issue were Starman had dinner with the ghosts of dead superheroes was also pretty good. I didn't like this one as much as I liked Volume 2. Still a really nice series so far though. I just thought that the Dr. Pip and Solomon Grundy adventures were a few notches below the stories in the previous volume. I thought Shade miniseries was well done though and the issue were Starman had dinner with the ghosts of dead superheroes was also pretty good.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    An excellent read. I enjoyed the art and story. The Shade back story was good. Not knowing anything about him before reading Starman this gave a good back ground for him as a character. The continuing stories of Jack Knight are worth the read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John

    I like these (and James Robinson) less and less as the story progresses.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I had a hard time with all the Shade nonsense at the beginning. I like the character but somehow the writing was dull.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    You simply can't beat this series. You simply can't beat this series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    The biggest reasons to read this volume? The Shade miniseries, which is amazing, and Infernal Devices, which is another one of the great, long-form arcs the series had.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mike McDevitt

    Jack Knight is so well-drawn a character I cannot relate to him as well as his generic counterparts of the same era- Kyle Rayner, Conner Kent, or Bart Allen. Really, really good writing anyway.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Declan

    Some of the best comics I've read. Love it. Some of the best comics I've read. Love it.

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