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Power and Terror, Noam Chomsky's highly anticipated follow-up to 9-11, is drawn from a series of public talks that Chomsky gave during the spring of 2002, as well as a lengthy unpublished interview. It presents Chomsky's latest thinking on terrorism, U.S. foreign policy, and alternatives to militarism and violence as solutions to the world's problems. Chomsky challenges th Power and Terror, Noam Chomsky's highly anticipated follow-up to 9-11, is drawn from a series of public talks that Chomsky gave during the spring of 2002, as well as a lengthy unpublished interview. It presents Chomsky's latest thinking on terrorism, U.S. foreign policy, and alternatives to militarism and violence as solutions to the world's problems. Chomsky challenges the United States to apply to its own actions the moral standards it demands of others, and arrives at a surprisingly optimistic conclusion rooted in his faith in the power of an informed public.


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Power and Terror, Noam Chomsky's highly anticipated follow-up to 9-11, is drawn from a series of public talks that Chomsky gave during the spring of 2002, as well as a lengthy unpublished interview. It presents Chomsky's latest thinking on terrorism, U.S. foreign policy, and alternatives to militarism and violence as solutions to the world's problems. Chomsky challenges th Power and Terror, Noam Chomsky's highly anticipated follow-up to 9-11, is drawn from a series of public talks that Chomsky gave during the spring of 2002, as well as a lengthy unpublished interview. It presents Chomsky's latest thinking on terrorism, U.S. foreign policy, and alternatives to militarism and violence as solutions to the world's problems. Chomsky challenges the United States to apply to its own actions the moral standards it demands of others, and arrives at a surprisingly optimistic conclusion rooted in his faith in the power of an informed public.

30 review for Power and Terror: Post-9/11 Talks and Interviews

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    "If you want to end terrorism, stop participating in it". That is the central message of Power and Terror, a set of talks and interviews given by Noam Chomsky following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. 2700 civilians killed; a terrible crime, indefensible. This we can all agree on. 2700 - approximately the number of civilians killed by the US military in a typical week during the Viet Nam war. Or the number of Kurd civilians killed in a week by the Turkish government with the blessing "If you want to end terrorism, stop participating in it". That is the central message of Power and Terror, a set of talks and interviews given by Noam Chomsky following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. 2700 civilians killed; a terrible crime, indefensible. This we can all agree on. 2700 - approximately the number of civilians killed by the US military in a typical week during the Viet Nam war. Or the number of Kurd civilians killed in a week by the Turkish government with the blessing and support of the Clinton administration. Or the number of civilians killed in a typical week in East Timor with the blessing and support of the Eisenhower administration, and again by the Clinton administration. Or the number of civilians killed in a couple of weeks by the CIA in Nicaragua when it attacked the democratic government there in the 1980s, with Reagan's support and blessing. Or the number of Kurds killed by Saddam Hussein with the support and blessing of the Bush I administration. A pattern emerges: it's only terrorism if it is done by oppressed people, and only if it is done to privileged people. If it is done by us, or by Israel, or by South Africa (until 1990), or by one of our puppet states (Iraq before the attack on Kuwait, Indonesia, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala), then it is not terrorism. It is counter-terrorism, or it is proactive response to terrorism, or it is legitimate security concerns. If a bus is blown up by a Palestinian and 10 Israelis are killed, that is news, for days and weeks - and rightly so. If a village is destroyed by Israeli tanks and 50 Palestinians are killed, that is not news. It is not even reported in the US press, as often as not. Chomsky reserves special scorn for western liberal intellectuals. In his view they simply promulgate the colonialist/neo-imperialist line, and are unable or unwilling to take a moral stance when evaluating the causes and effects of organized violence. He points out case after case of state terrorism, conducted by Israel, by the United States, or by a US puppet government, that are not reported in the mainstream media at all, or if reported is never reported as the terrorism that it is. On a slightly different topic, Chomsky mentions a study that was done that found a near perfect correlation between US foreign aid and torture. US foreign aid is actually miniscule, compared to other wealthy countries. But such aid as there is goes predominantly to governments that torture their citizens. Chomsky notes that correlation does not imply causation, and in fact he believes that the US government is not especially interested in promoting torture (remember: this was written before the revelations of torture at Guantanamo, Abu Ghraib, extraordinary rendition and so on). He cites another more comprehensive study that sought to correlate US foreign aid with a wide variety of factors. That study found near perfect correlation between foreign aid and the ease of foreign 'investment' - i.e. the ease with which US and other international corporations can take over a country's natural resources. Chomsky's take on this is that in such countries repression is necessary because people naturally do not like to have their resources taken away by foreign corporations. So in those countries there is brutality against labor organizers, peasants, and so on. You can like Chomsky, or not. But I would challenge you to contest his facts, and I would wonder what conclusions you would draw differently from those facts.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Syed Fathi

    Noam Chomsky is a professor of linguist at MIT, but he was widely popular for his works in the political sphere. Where he along with Howard Zinn were a fierce critics of the US foreign policy. The book discussed in depth the role that the US has played in the international stage, rampaging small countries and using force to dominate the oil reserved. Chomsky is a bit witty in his remarks, he mark Israel as thug operated by their master, the mafia don, which refers to the US. In his words “when th Noam Chomsky is a professor of linguist at MIT, but he was widely popular for his works in the political sphere. Where he along with Howard Zinn were a fierce critics of the US foreign policy. The book discussed in depth the role that the US has played in the international stage, rampaging small countries and using force to dominate the oil reserved. Chomsky is a bit witty in his remarks, he mark Israel as thug operated by their master, the mafia don, which refers to the US. In his words “when the master speaks, the servant obeys”. This is in light of the optimism that people had when they see that the US now seems to have some consideration for the Palestinian cause. In fact it wasn’t, argued Chomsky. What happen was that the tanks in Palestinian soil seems to interrupt Dick Cheney’s mission. That is why the US politely asked Sharon to withdraw them. Israel is the American base in the middle east, it supported the US policy and help them to be accomplished. This reason alone, made it valuable to US. For example in 1967 Israel crushed Arab Nationalist, this service is done to ensure that the US influence in the region remain firm, an independent and democratic society in the middle east will undermine US strategic interest. Chomsky also elaborate on how the US consistently blocking the peace settlement, by vetoing the UN resolution. The Geneva Convention also can be seen as a perfect example on how the US is alone in international views. The forth Geneva Convention makes what US and Israel did to the occupied territory a war crime. In 2000 the UN security council voted that the Geneva Convention applies to Israeli Occupation, the vote was 14 to 0, but the US choose to abstained. What the US used as a pretext to invade other countries seems paradoxical to Chomsky’s thought. They said that it is the ‘war on terror’. Saddam Hussein is a maniac which kills his own people with poison gas, that is why the US need to come and free the Iraqi from this brutal tyrant. The only missing fact is that the tyrant atrocities was done using military equipment supplied by the US. To end terror, Chomsky note “everyone’s worried about stoping terrorism. Well, there’s a really easy way: stop participating in it”.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael Anderson

    Chomsky talks and a long interview about terrorism and (primarily) US actions in the middle east — in short, it’s terrorism when the other guy does it, but if you, the powerful, does it, it’s counterterrorism or a just war. And how good it would be if the US and other centers of power applied the same moral standards to their actions that they demand from the rest of the world. Interesting ideas, enlightening to some and naive lies, I’m sure, to others.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim Bennett

    There are no readers indifferent to Noam Chomsky. At one point he and his wife agreed, if he continued as an activist and they had children, she'd better have a good job because he could be in jail. Later, he commented that, being part of the establishment he wasn't that vulnerable any more. (Chomsy has contributed new insight to language, especially its development in children.) With that background, let me tell you what this book is: it's a series of questions and answers about the US and its There are no readers indifferent to Noam Chomsky. At one point he and his wife agreed, if he continued as an activist and they had children, she'd better have a good job because he could be in jail. Later, he commented that, being part of the establishment he wasn't that vulnerable any more. (Chomsy has contributed new insight to language, especially its development in children.) With that background, let me tell you what this book is: it's a series of questions and answers about the US and its activities worldwide. I will give you a couple of sentences from Page 115, The United States in the World. Q: How do you explain the recent shift in U.S. policy to support Palestine and the possible creation of a Palestinian state? CHOMSKY: I explain it the same way I explain the U.S. shift in policy to dismantle the military sytem and hand it over to Andorra. Since it didn't happen, there is nothing to explain. There is no shift in policy whatever. It is a total farce. What happened is that Dick Cheney is running around the Middle East trying to get support for the upcoming war in Iraq, which is very hard because nobody wants it .... If you are a blind patriot, this book will enrage you. If you wonder why bad things happen, this book will enlighten you.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Josepha

    A typical Chomsky book that compares non-state terrorism (Al Qaida) with state terrorism (coups in Guatamala, war in Vietnam). Although Chomsky always seems to be generally caring about the suffering of all peoples his refusal, more than 21 years after the Islamic revolution in Iran, to acknowledge the repression, torture, murder, unlawful trials, unjust imprisonment and rape in Iran under the ayatollah and the mullahs shows he picks his dictatorships as he pleases. I guess one peoples suffering A typical Chomsky book that compares non-state terrorism (Al Qaida) with state terrorism (coups in Guatamala, war in Vietnam). Although Chomsky always seems to be generally caring about the suffering of all peoples his refusal, more than 21 years after the Islamic revolution in Iran, to acknowledge the repression, torture, murder, unlawful trials, unjust imprisonment and rape in Iran under the ayatollah and the mullahs shows he picks his dictatorships as he pleases. I guess one peoples suffering can be worth less than another as long as that dictatorship appears to be anti-America and anti-Israel.

  6. 4 out of 5

    C. Scott

    Chomsky has an amazing ability to see the big picture. Compared to others, the big picture he sees is like a remastered 72mm technicolor print of Lawrence of Arabia at a theater... and everybody else is midnight movies on a 12 inch black and white TV with no rabbit ears.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Tse

    This book was loaned to me for the weekend by a work colleague who knew my political stances and thought I would like to read it. Embarrassingly, my knowledge of Noam Chomsky before this was limited to what I’d read on his Wikipedia page and any mentions of him in the 2016 movie ‘Captain Fantastic’ (GREAT film that I’d highly recommend to any self-identifying socialists, btw). So beginning this book, I knew about Chomsky’s political alignments and his career as a linguist, but I’d never actually This book was loaned to me for the weekend by a work colleague who knew my political stances and thought I would like to read it. Embarrassingly, my knowledge of Noam Chomsky before this was limited to what I’d read on his Wikipedia page and any mentions of him in the 2016 movie ‘Captain Fantastic’ (GREAT film that I’d highly recommend to any self-identifying socialists, btw). So beginning this book, I knew about Chomsky’s political alignments and his career as a linguist, but I’d never actually read anything written/spoken by him, and this book was a great place to start. It’s basically a collection of talks and interviews given by Chomsky on topics related to power and terror (ofc, the clue is in the title) and I found it an interesting read, yet short and broken down enough to make it user-friendly and to hold onto my attention. Overall, I found Chomsky’s views to be impressive, refreshing, reassuring, and - although these interviews are certainly not new and taken from over a decade ago - still very relevant. It is certainly somewhat comforting to be reminded that there are some strong individuals out there who have been calling out the media and politicians on their total dismissal of factual evidence in favour of furthering their own causes. It was nice to see someone willing to stand up to the widely accepted narrative of the U.S. leading a “war on terror” and actually highlighting that historically it has caused far more terror than it has ever prevented. All in all, really well argued.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Richards

    Having listened to and watched videos of Noam Chomsky deliver his ideas, this is the first book of his that I have read. It seems clear that despite the criticism he receives his attitude and unerring commitment to calling out international terrorism for what it is is vitally important. We live in paradoxical times, on one hand we have the internet and as such a dearth of information literally at our fingertips, yet on the other information is as tightly withheld as ever. There has been created Having listened to and watched videos of Noam Chomsky deliver his ideas, this is the first book of his that I have read. It seems clear that despite the criticism he receives his attitude and unerring commitment to calling out international terrorism for what it is is vitally important. We live in paradoxical times, on one hand we have the internet and as such a dearth of information literally at our fingertips, yet on the other information is as tightly withheld as ever. There has been created a predatory culture of silencing or criticizing free-thinkers because it causes cognitive dissonance to the reader. We are saturated with news, information and our brains it seems cannot delineate between truth and fiction because there are forces out there who would have you believe your nation is true and just. You Americans and we British, we are citizens of the most corrupt powers of this century and the last, which is not to say I am proud of our accolades but we must not shy away from holding accountable murderous leaders who commit heinous crimes in our names. Chomsky, in his lucidity, enables us to confront the reality of our privileged existence.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Georgia Roybal

    In this book, Noam Chomsky has interviews and essays from the period following 9/11. As always, his thoughts are provocative. In this book, he discusses the fact that we often label terrorism as the actions from the "other." When it is us performing similar actions, we call it something else. He points out repeatedly that it is not just the United States that does this: it is any country in a position of relative power. A couple of things new to me are studies showing that there is a high correl In this book, Noam Chomsky has interviews and essays from the period following 9/11. As always, his thoughts are provocative. In this book, he discusses the fact that we often label terrorism as the actions from the "other." When it is us performing similar actions, we call it something else. He points out repeatedly that it is not just the United States that does this: it is any country in a position of relative power. A couple of things new to me are studies showing that there is a high correlation between foreign aid from the United States and the use of torture by dictators in Latin America. The other was that Honduras was the base for United States' terror activities in the region. Chomsky's thoughts are very relevant to our current situation. The migrants Trump is targeting in Mexico are mostly from Honduras. Now he's militarizing the border and threatening to shoot people even if they throw rocks at the troops. What would happen if Mexico did that to us?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gita

    Not typically a non-fiction reader, but the title, "Power and Terror" caught my interest. Great read. Gave justification to sentiments I have already held about the U.S. intuitively. Has definitely piqued my interest in U.S. foreign policy/criticism of U.S. foreign policy. Chomsky reiterates throughout the various talks transcribed in the book that many of the horrors committed by the U.S. (directly, via foreign aid, via voting record, etc.) aren't widely known even among intellectuals. That's p Not typically a non-fiction reader, but the title, "Power and Terror" caught my interest. Great read. Gave justification to sentiments I have already held about the U.S. intuitively. Has definitely piqued my interest in U.S. foreign policy/criticism of U.S. foreign policy. Chomsky reiterates throughout the various talks transcribed in the book that many of the horrors committed by the U.S. (directly, via foreign aid, via voting record, etc.) aren't widely known even among intellectuals. That's probably one of the most valuable aspects of this book, that it contains otherwise elusive justification for criticism. Like anything, take it with a grain of salt, but definitely worth a read. Looking forward to getting into Chomsky's written (this was all oral/transcribed) work in the future!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lorna

    Another enlightening Chomsky read, Power and Terror is essential reading for those wanting to understand America's relationship with the rest of the world. Although slightly outdated, this is highly relevant material and can even extend beyond America's relationships to broader "Western" relationships. Wish that this had been essential reading for my political science degree! Another enlightening Chomsky read, Power and Terror is essential reading for those wanting to understand America's relationship with the rest of the world. Although slightly outdated, this is highly relevant material and can even extend beyond America's relationships to broader "Western" relationships. Wish that this had been essential reading for my political science degree!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    Chomsky's commentary is insightful and spot-on as ever - and, reading this in 2018, unsettlingly prescient in many ways. Chomsky's commentary is insightful and spot-on as ever - and, reading this in 2018, unsettlingly prescient in many ways.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jorgen Peterson

    I like the way he thinks

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    Can rarely go wrong with some good ol' Chomsky. Very easy read in interview format. Can rarely go wrong with some good ol' Chomsky. Very easy read in interview format.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Natassia

    Eye opening and enraging. The world is so much richer for Chomsky’s work.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

    Its good to read chomsky at least once a year just to remind oneself where the blame lies for most of the evil that exists in the world. Read it and have your eyes opened.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Partha Goswami

    A must read to understand the world politics, what's going on during last 70 years A must read to understand the world politics, what's going on during last 70 years

  18. 5 out of 5

    Farheen

    Chomsky's style as usual to the point and no sugar-coating. The book is laid out in a Q&A format although some of his longer answers are taken from his talks and presentations. There are three parts of the book with a fourth section on Recommended readings and about the film Power and Terror. The third part has an excerpt of a talk he gave in 2002 to benefit the legal defense of a friend and Israeli Arab member of the Knesset, Azmi Bishara. It was delivered at Hunter College, NYC. Titled Visitin Chomsky's style as usual to the point and no sugar-coating. The book is laid out in a Q&A format although some of his longer answers are taken from his talks and presentations. There are three parts of the book with a fourth section on Recommended readings and about the film Power and Terror. The third part has an excerpt of a talk he gave in 2002 to benefit the legal defense of a friend and Israeli Arab member of the Knesset, Azmi Bishara. It was delivered at Hunter College, NYC. Titled Visiting the West Bank, it traces Chomsky's visit to the troubled and anguished area. His accounts from Nablus where there was eve more large scale destruction compared to Jenin, relates how the locals coped with life after the devastation. "Of all the villages we went to, the most dramatic case was the village that had become famous a couple of days earlier, namely Beita. Beita is a traditional conservative village nestled in the hills not far from Ramallah... It clearly had been a very attractive place, with old houses, hundreds of years old. "At that time, Beita had been attacked and partially destroyed by Israeli forces. The reason was that a group of Israeli hikers from a nearby Israeli settlement had entered the fields of Beita. They were led by Romam Aldubi, a criminal extremist, and the only Jew ever to have been barred by the military authorities from entering any Arab areas. The hikers found a shepherd in the field and killed him. They were brought into the village, where they killed a couple of other people. Following that, the mother of one of the people who was killed, threw a stone at Aldubi, and he fired and killed an Israeli girl, Tirza Porat, who was one of the hikers. That led to a hysterical reaction in Israel including calls to destroy the town and drive the whole population out. The Israeli army knew exactly what had happened and told people. But for whatever reason, maybe to cut back on a more serious reaction among the settlers, the army went into town and smashed it up." Chomsky then details his personal account describing that what they saw in the town at the time showed a devastation that was more grave than what was officially reported (almost double the number of houses destroyed and it was obvious there was no time given for them to leave). "Though it was well known that Adulbi was the killer of both the Palestinians and of the Israeli girl, he was never punished, although he did come to trial. The authorities determined that the tragic events that happened were already punishment enough for him. So it was only the people in the village who had to be punished, and they were." This chapter also captures his conversations with residents there. "At the time we were there, it happened to be a bitter cold rainy day, as happens in that season, April - the people whose houses were demolished were living outdoors, trying to cook outdoors and so on. It was a pretty ugly and painful scene. Their attitudes were striking. They were not resigned. They were quiet and determined. We asked them whether they would be willing to accept assistance from Israeli Jews to rebuild what they had destroyed, and they told us they would, under certain conditions. If the assistance was given honestly, they would accept it happily. If it was given as an effort to create an image of what's called "the beautiful Israel", a term that's used in Israel in Hebrew as a term of contempt for a disgraceful posture that's familiar, they didn't want anything to do with it. Strikingly, there was no call for revenge or any retaliation, just the quiet determination to continue." He quotes other incidences from his trip and again notes the same quiet determination with no retaliation or revenge. "All this reveals a very remarkable fact about the military occupation. It went on for 34 years and was harsh, brutal, and repressive from the beginning, with robbery of land and resources. But there was no retaliation, not from the occupied territories. Israel was immune from any attack from within the territories. .... And when I refer to Israel, I mean the United States and Israel, because everything that Israel does is done up to the limits that the United States supports and authorizes." Besides this account, Chomsky also focuses on Afghanistan, Iraq, and the relationship of United States with the world (an entire chapter on that). A quick read, this book is only 150 pp long. Recommended for anyone wanting to understand the dynamics of power and how it is so easily used and abused.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Karlo Mikhail

    Chomsky still chocks up the now typical indignation against the 9-11 terror attacks, the social injustices that had a hand in fueling the attacks, and the U.S. state's own terrorist response as exemplified by the U.S. "War on Terror." Chomsky also unveiled the myriad ways in which the corporate media supported the U.S. war of aggression against Afghanistan by propagating baseless details that justify the American imperialist project. However, I cannot help but frown at some of the outlandish noti Chomsky still chocks up the now typical indignation against the 9-11 terror attacks, the social injustices that had a hand in fueling the attacks, and the U.S. state's own terrorist response as exemplified by the U.S. "War on Terror." Chomsky also unveiled the myriad ways in which the corporate media supported the U.S. war of aggression against Afghanistan by propagating baseless details that justify the American imperialist project. However, I cannot help but frown at some of the outlandish notions proposed by Chomsky. For instance, Chomsky makes it a point to emphasize that the new thing about 9-11 is its being the first time U.S. territory was actually hit by a foreign attack since 1812. He clarifies that the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor did not count because it's not part of the American mainland and it is technically a U.S. colony, so analogies to it miss the point. But Chomsky stretches things when he asserts that 9-11 is also the first time that the colonized of the world had the guns directed the other way. He reminds us, and rightly so, of the long list of U.S. and European imperialist crimes but concludes that with 9-11, their foreign victims are attacking them for first time: "the guns are now aimed in a different direction, something quite new in the history of Europe and its offshoots." The guns have been aimed at the U.S. and European imperialists way before 9-11. All history, after all, has been a history of the struggle between the oppressor and the oppressed. With the emergence of imperialism as the monopoly stage of capitalism at the turn of the 20th Century, the oppressed peoples of the world have fought several wars of national liberation to throw off the yolk of colonialism and neocolonialism. How does Chomsky categorize the victorious revolutions in China and Vietnam, among many others, if not a case of guns being aimed at a different direction? After all, as Mao once said, "political power comes out of the barrel of the gun," and several social movements from past to present have not been shy at taking up arms as a way of resisting imperialist aggressors and their local puppet rulers. Things get even more bizarre when Chomsky claims that "what happened in September 11 has virtually nothing to do with economic globalization." It is a strange assertion for a self-professed radical to claim because globalization, another word of the economic division of the entire world by gigantic monopolies based in the advanced capitalist powers like those in North America, Europe, and Japan, goes side by side with the territorial division of the world by these powers. It is precisely this dynamic that generates war and armed conflict, including state terror and asymmetric warfare, and the 9-11 attack can surely be situated in this context.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My summary: This book follows up his "9-11" book with lots of later interviews and talks about the U.S. government's reaction to 9-11. Specifically, the approach of the war in Afghanistan and the general use of force to get back at the terrorists responsible for 9-11. Chomsky once again points out examples of why the U.S. continues to sponsor terrorist acts, but calls it "anti-terrorism" because it is done by the U.S. The idea of invading a nation to root out terrorists is described as a facade s My summary: This book follows up his "9-11" book with lots of later interviews and talks about the U.S. government's reaction to 9-11. Specifically, the approach of the war in Afghanistan and the general use of force to get back at the terrorists responsible for 9-11. Chomsky once again points out examples of why the U.S. continues to sponsor terrorist acts, but calls it "anti-terrorism" because it is done by the U.S. The idea of invading a nation to root out terrorists is described as a facade since the people of the country are the ones that suffer, not the terrorist organizations themselves. He talks about how the U.S. acts unilaterally and ignores European opinions as well as the opinions of its own people. The driving force behind the current military actions is not finding the people responsible for the specific attack against the U.S., but rather to further increase our sphere of influence across the world. Through using the events of 9-11 the U.S. government can justify eliminating foreign governments that do not aid our military objectives. He goes into examples of how else our goal of controlling valuable resources has led to our sponsorship of Israel and the continuation of war in the Middle East. He specifically mentions how the U.S. has actually barred the peace process in order to maintain our influence in the Middle East. The same argument is made for Turkey, where the U.S. sponsors state terrorism because the government allows the U.S. military to use Turkish soil, airspace, etc. for its purposes. He also brings up the general rule of state terrorism and its relation to U.S. foreign aid. In other words, the more money the U.S. gives to any country, the more state terrorism occurs in that nation. Overall, Chomsky describe the U.S. as a great manipulator moving the "chess pieces" of the world through any means necessary. He also appeals to the educated classes to take notice of the ruthlessness of the U.S. government and to work towards a reduction in state terrorism in order to reduce the motivation of foreign terrorists against the U.S.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    Before you form an opinion on global terrorism, I would suggest reading this book. It's brief but effective in shedding light on the involvement of first world countries (most dominantly the United States) in global terrorism and also how malleable and controlled the media is. Noam Chomsky gives facts point blank and without sugar coating the truth. It's very brief but manages to cover quite baffling information regarding the American atrocities across the world for many of which media records a Before you form an opinion on global terrorism, I would suggest reading this book. It's brief but effective in shedding light on the involvement of first world countries (most dominantly the United States) in global terrorism and also how malleable and controlled the media is. Noam Chomsky gives facts point blank and without sugar coating the truth. It's very brief but manages to cover quite baffling information regarding the American atrocities across the world for many of which media records are unavailable. He also bravely points out the misuse of veto power by the United States and the truth hidden between the lines in declassified government records. He also shows how the US justifies its acts of terrorism as war on terror and uses its power to silence anyone who would not accept such a justification and hushes up the issues with phrases such as "unavoidable casualties". One couldn't help but think if people were keeping quiet because they are ignorant or because they are afraid. I have read many of Noam Chomsky's articles and have been impressed by the wisdom and bravery this man holds.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Diz

    This book collects several talks and interviews of Noam Chomsky that occurred shortly after 9/11. The main idea running through this book is that we shouldn't use a double standard when talking about acts of terrorism. Whether an act of terror is committed by non-state groups or by well-established states, it is still terror. Chomsky argues that western nations, by failing to understand that the atrocities they commit overseas are in fact terrorism, are creating the conditions that breed the ter This book collects several talks and interviews of Noam Chomsky that occurred shortly after 9/11. The main idea running through this book is that we shouldn't use a double standard when talking about acts of terrorism. Whether an act of terror is committed by non-state groups or by well-established states, it is still terror. Chomsky argues that western nations, by failing to understand that the atrocities they commit overseas are in fact terrorism, are creating the conditions that breed the terrorism they fear. I felt it was an interesting read. One thing to note is that these talks and interviews refer to current events--some of which have fallen from current political consciousness. Depending on what kind of reader you are, this could frustrate you, or it could inspire you to dig into recent history.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stven

    I found this an excellent introduction to Noam Chomsky and his approach of researching official government documents which seldom reach our conventional news outlets because it's from 2002 and we have a bit of the perspective of history. Chomsky is fundamentally right about terrorism being the (mostly) covert practice of powerful governments all the time, not excepting our own. In fact he makes a good case that the first thing you'd want to do to stop terrorism would be for the USA to stop endor I found this an excellent introduction to Noam Chomsky and his approach of researching official government documents which seldom reach our conventional news outlets because it's from 2002 and we have a bit of the perspective of history. Chomsky is fundamentally right about terrorism being the (mostly) covert practice of powerful governments all the time, not excepting our own. In fact he makes a good case that the first thing you'd want to do to stop terrorism would be for the USA to stop endorsing, abetting, and practicing terrorism. Chomsky is fantastically well informed, articulate, and plainspoken. Politics is about who dies, about which genocides are going to be permitted. There are endless complications, but that's the fact at the bottom of the iceberg.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    A must for those wishing to familiarize themselves with Chomsky, though die-hards will probably find this work too breezy and light. Contains interview and speech excerpts from the socio-linguist cum political activist, especially as they pertain to the role rhetoric, language, and definition play in igniting terrorism/counter-terorism, and their collateral fires. Pieces are aptly selected, and, on the whole, the collection well-edited.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I learned from reading this book that there are more atrocities that have been committed by the government/policy makers and executors of the United States of America than I realized before. Haiti, El Salvador, Guatemala, Cuba, Argentina, Germany, Japan, Bosnia, Kosovo, Grenada, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq... I don't believe every word I read in a book just because it's a book, but I know from other sources facts about U.S. atrocities. It still surprises me to learn new bits. I learned from reading this book that there are more atrocities that have been committed by the government/policy makers and executors of the United States of America than I realized before. Haiti, El Salvador, Guatemala, Cuba, Argentina, Germany, Japan, Bosnia, Kosovo, Grenada, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq... I don't believe every word I read in a book just because it's a book, but I know from other sources facts about U.S. atrocities. It still surprises me to learn new bits.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Guillermo Galvan

    I read Chomsky's "9-11" and found it very informative so it was only natural that I'd pick up the follow up. You don't have to read them in any particular order but I do see them as a set. It's interesting how people label Chomsky a radical when he follows every rule of making a rational argument. If you're concerned about the War on Terror and need some clarification, then you'll want to read this. I read Chomsky's "9-11" and found it very informative so it was only natural that I'd pick up the follow up. You don't have to read them in any particular order but I do see them as a set. It's interesting how people label Chomsky a radical when he follows every rule of making a rational argument. If you're concerned about the War on Terror and need some clarification, then you'll want to read this.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Raghav Bansal

    Splendid work by Noam Chomsky: 9-11 incidence has revealed the real face of US and its atrocities over the rest of the world.According to Chomsky,THE US practice terrorism under the name of war against terrorism.And what is terrorist attack and who is terrorist depends upon who and where it took place. If you want to you the real face of global terrorism must go for it

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Very enlightening and thought provoking, but not very even handed and left me wondering a bit at how much of Chomsky's statements should be taken at face value. For what it was though ( a short compilation of interviews and speeches ) I found it worth reading. Very enlightening and thought provoking, but not very even handed and left me wondering a bit at how much of Chomsky's statements should be taken at face value. For what it was though ( a short compilation of interviews and speeches ) I found it worth reading.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sondra

    He goes on a bit here. I would have preferred a written analysis of the problem rather than interview excerpts. Mr. Chomsky discusses the roots of terror but fails to propose a solution.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    post 9-11 chomsky is interesting. we live in a different world today, a state of fear for sure. if you like chomsky and current events then this is a good read.

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