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George Eliot’s third novel, Silas Marner (1861) is a powerful and moving tale about one man’s journey from exile and loneliness to the warmth and joy of the family. The story opens as Silas Marner, falsely accused of theft, loses everything, including his faith in God. Embittered and alienated from his fellow man, he moves to the village of Raveloe, where he becomes a we George Eliot’s third novel, Silas Marner (1861) is a powerful and moving tale about one man’s journey from exile and loneliness to the warmth and joy of the family. The story opens as Silas Marner, falsely accused of theft, loses everything, including his faith in God. Embittered and alienated from his fellow man, he moves to the village of Raveloe, where he becomes a weaver. Taking refuge in his work, Silas slowly begins to accumulate gold—his only joy in life—until one day that too is stolen from him. Then one dark evening, a beautiful, golden-haired child, lost and seeing the light from Silas’s cottage, toddles in through his doorway. As Silas grows to love the girl as if she were his own daughter, his life changes into something precious. But his happiness is threatened when the orphan’s real father comes to claim the girl as his own, and Silas must face losing a treasure greater than all the gold in the world. This volume also includes two shorter works by Eliot—The Lifted Veil, a dark Gothic fantasy about a morbid young clairvoyant, and Brother Jacob, a deliciously satirical fable about a confectioner’s apprentice.


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George Eliot’s third novel, Silas Marner (1861) is a powerful and moving tale about one man’s journey from exile and loneliness to the warmth and joy of the family. The story opens as Silas Marner, falsely accused of theft, loses everything, including his faith in God. Embittered and alienated from his fellow man, he moves to the village of Raveloe, where he becomes a we George Eliot’s third novel, Silas Marner (1861) is a powerful and moving tale about one man’s journey from exile and loneliness to the warmth and joy of the family. The story opens as Silas Marner, falsely accused of theft, loses everything, including his faith in God. Embittered and alienated from his fellow man, he moves to the village of Raveloe, where he becomes a weaver. Taking refuge in his work, Silas slowly begins to accumulate gold—his only joy in life—until one day that too is stolen from him. Then one dark evening, a beautiful, golden-haired child, lost and seeing the light from Silas’s cottage, toddles in through his doorway. As Silas grows to love the girl as if she were his own daughter, his life changes into something precious. But his happiness is threatened when the orphan’s real father comes to claim the girl as his own, and Silas must face losing a treasure greater than all the gold in the world. This volume also includes two shorter works by Eliot—The Lifted Veil, a dark Gothic fantasy about a morbid young clairvoyant, and Brother Jacob, a deliciously satirical fable about a confectioner’s apprentice.

30 review for Silas Marner and Two Short Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Roger Brunyate

    Two Plot Lines, Several Voices No, I was not one of those children foolishly required to read this in high school. But almost as bad: it was the novel I chose myself (because it was short) as my introduction to George Eliot. Mistake! I hated it fifty years ago, and have been off Eliot ever since. (I did succeed with Daniel Deronda a while back, but I have twice failed with Middlemarch. My loss, I am sure; but at least this attempt at reconciliation now is a step in the right direction. For yes, th Two Plot Lines, Several Voices No, I was not one of those children foolishly required to read this in high school. But almost as bad: it was the novel I chose myself (because it was short) as my introduction to George Eliot. Mistake! I hated it fifty years ago, and have been off Eliot ever since. (I did succeed with Daniel Deronda a while back, but I have twice failed with Middlemarch. My loss, I am sure; but at least this attempt at reconciliation now is a step in the right direction. For yes, this time I did like Silas Marner, quite a lot. I see what I could not stomach before—the lack of humor, an occasional tendency to preach rather than simply tell the story, and a touch of sentimentality, especially at the end. But what I remember of the plot—the miserable old miser finally redeemed when an orphan child comes to his door—turns out to be a gross simplification; no surprise, I suppose. In fact there are two stories: the one about the lonely weaver Silas Marner, and another about the sons of the local squire, Godfrey and Dunstan Cass, and Eliot gives equal time to each. The two are connected, of course, and in an important way, but the odd thing is that this connection does not really affect the course of either plot line. The effect is to give relief from the story of the title character, whose life is nowhere near as grey and un-nuanced as I had remembered. Indeed, my big surprise was to find myself sympathizing with Silas, sorry when things do not go his way, and rejoicing with him when he finds happiness at the end. The Cass story I found distinctly less gripping, though Godfrey is an interesting character, combining some aspects of both hero and villain, and morally ambiguous almost until the end. George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans, that is to say) writes in several different distinct voices. The one I like the least is that of the moral philosopher, going on for long paragraphs in a vein like this: Favourable Chance, I fancy, is the god of all men who follow their own devices instead of obeying a law they believe in. Let even a polished man of these days get into a position he is ashamed to avow, andhis mind will be bent on all the possible issues that may deliver him from the calculable results of that posiition. Let him live outside his income, or shirk the resolute honest work that brings wages, and he will presently find himself dreaming of a possible benefactor, a possible simpleton who may be cajoled into using his interest, a possible state of mind in some possible person not yet forthcoming. […]In utter contrast to this is the language of the ordinary people of Raveloe, where the novel is set. Here for instance is the midwife Dolly Winthrop, who becomes Silas’s nearest friend, trying to work out in her bumbling way the theology of what happened to him: But what comes to me as clear as the daylight, it was when I was troubling over poor Bessy Fawkes, and it allays comes into my head when I'm sorry for folks, and feels as I can't do a power to help 'em, not if I was to get up i' the middle o' the night—it comes into my head as Them above has got a deal tenderer heart nor what I've got—for I can't be anyways better nor Them as made me, and if anything looks hard on me, it's because there's things I don't know on; and for the matter o' that, there may be plenty o' things I don't know on, for it's little I know—that it is. And then there are passages of simple description which achieve a particular radiance towards the end, which make them the greatest joy in the novel. Here, for example, is Silas, his life changed by the orphan girl he calls Eppie, venturing outside of his cottage to enjoy the open air: And when the sunshine grew strong and lasting, so that the buttercups were thick in the meadows, Silas might be seen in the sunny mid-day, or in the late afternoon when the shadows were lengthening under the hedgerows, strolling out with uncovered head to carry Eppie beyond the Stone-pits to where the flowers grew, till they reached some favorite bank where he could sit down. […]. Sitting on the banks in this way, Silas began to look for the once familiar herbs again; and as the leaves, with their unchanged outline and markings, lay on his palm, there was a sense of crowding remembrances from which he turned away timidly, taking refuge in Eppie's little world, that lay lightly on his enfeebled spirit. You can’t entirely absolve such passages from the charge of sentimentality, and there are several pages (which I shan’t quote) that may well go over the line. This is exacerbated by the curious form of the book, which is divided into three: Part One (155 pages in my edition), Part Two (50 pages), and Conclusion (3). To all intents and purposes, the story is over by the end of Part One. Yes, there are some loose ends to be tied up, which Eliot takes care of in Part Two, set 14 years later, but most of that section is merely basking in the situation that had been reached at the end of the previous part. But it does end in a celebrated paragraph that, sentimental or not, brought tears to my eyes: (view spoiler)[ "No," said Silas, "no; that doesn't hinder. Since the time the child was sent to me and I've come to love her as myself, I've had light enough to trusten by; and, now she says she'll never leave me, I think I shall trusten till I die." (hide spoiler)] ====== I reread the novel in my old hardback that is long since out of print. I did go to a store, however, to consult this Barnes & Noble edition that I am ostensibly reviewing here. It has a simply gorgeous (and apt) picture on the cover. But it largely fails where I hoped it would be helpful, in providing notes on the numerous unfamiliar words and concepts. While there are indeed some notes, they are lamentably few, even for someone like me who has some experience in historical reading. [And of course, not having the actual volume, I have not read the additional stories it contains.]

  2. 5 out of 5

    eleventeen

    Why tf do people seem to hate George Eliot? I really enjoyed Silas Marner, The Lifted Veil, and to a lesser degree because it was so short, BRother Jacob. I think what I appreciated most is that these stories are dense yet still light, entertaining while still exploring the psychology of character, and most of all, they have satisfying conclusions that feel good to read. And i mean that in a different way than if I said the endings were good - because some of the writing at the end felt oddly abr Why tf do people seem to hate George Eliot? I really enjoyed Silas Marner, The Lifted Veil, and to a lesser degree because it was so short, BRother Jacob. I think what I appreciated most is that these stories are dense yet still light, entertaining while still exploring the psychology of character, and most of all, they have satisfying conclusions that feel good to read. And i mean that in a different way than if I said the endings were good - because some of the writing at the end felt oddly abrupt, but it's the plot, with all the ends tied together prior to the stylistic conclusion of the book, that felt just...right. I think half of it to me is people getting their due. This is idealistic writing, and so deeply satisfying as a result. For Silas Marner in particular I found myself rooting for almost all of the characters, at its heart this was a story about a lonely man, and there was something that just will always tug at my heartstrings about that storyline. The Lifted Veil was completely different, an odd sort of magical realism that felt like a study of human character and I ate it up as well. It had some wonderful musings on life and how we as humans treat each other and made me think. Here's the thing about Eliot - it's not easy text to read. There were paragraphs where I had to read a few times to glean the information, and I don't think it's Eliot's fault per se, just a change in language over time and the need for more philosphoical points to be thought over and considered. I found value in this, but I feel like this is the part of her writing that stops people in their tracks. It takes work and effort, it is not a casual read. It's like watchiong a foreign show with subtitles where you have to pay attention vs. the easy tv browsing many of us do today while half an eye is on tumblr or our own thoughts. I sound like a crotchety old get off my lawn person but I do feel there is a time and a place for both easy consumption AND works that require slower consideration, that's all I'm saying, and that's what this book reminded me of. I'm so glad I started reading classics a few years ago after never touching them prior, and I find myself looking forward to the next!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I had to write a paper about this for my lit class, so it is my review. (view spoiler)[George Eliot: The Style of Brilliance How could a story about the life of a miserable weaver ever become popular? Although the odds of such a story containing any intrigue seemed no better than one-hundred to one, the masterful author Mary Anne Evans did that exact thing. Setting her story in the early industrial era, Miss Evans, known as George Eliot to her readers, created a fable-like tale about a hoodwinke I had to write a paper about this for my lit class, so it is my review. (view spoiler)[George Eliot: The Style of Brilliance How could a story about the life of a miserable weaver ever become popular? Although the odds of such a story containing any intrigue seemed no better than one-hundred to one, the masterful author Mary Anne Evans did that exact thing. Setting her story in the early industrial era, Miss Evans, known as George Eliot to her readers, created a fable-like tale about a hoodwinked weaver named Silas whose life was transformed forever when disingenuous Godfrey Cass refused to live up to his responsibilities. She labeled it Silas Marner. According to George Levine, “ Silas Marner (1861) is…perhaps the most accessible to modern readers” of all of Eliot’s writings (xiii). Although the actual plot of Silas Marner is rather simple, Eliot provides “accessible” and enjoyable literature to her readers through her rich writing style, which displays itself through interludes, symbolism, and character dialects. To begin, Eliot utilized interludes to add depth, insight, and a colorful background to Silas Marner. Eliot created two interludes to educate her readers about the society of Raveloe, and to add depth to the characters of the book. Each supplemented the book with information about the people surrounding Silas and Godfrey. The first interlude began directly after Silas discovered that his precious gold had been stolen (Eliot, 39). Switching from Silas’s dilemma, the scene shifted to the town’s tavern. From this chapter it became clear that the poorer folk of Raveloe, though are poorly educated, were a close-knit group, each man proud of his position in the community, however small it is. (Eliot, 42-51). The second interlude acted similarly to the first. Set after the anxious Christmas celebrations of Godfrey, this chapter revealed the lives of the wealthy personages of Raveloe, especially Nancy Lammeter (Eliot, 83-90). Although not as closely connected to one another as their poorer neighbors, the wealthy men and women enjoyed one another’s company, but seemed to argue less than the working class (84-101). By inserting interludes into her tale, Eliot added depth and insight to Silas Marner. Secondly, Eliot steeped Silas Marner in symbolism. Eliot contributed many symbols to her book including the hearth, the loom, and Silas’s door, but one symbol in particular stood out amongst the rest: gold. At first, money was a non-issue with Silas, but after being betrayed by his nearest friends, he turned to money as a means of escape from the lonely monotony of his life (Eliot, 17-18). As he hoarded more and more gold, Silas became wound around himself; his gold acted as a symbol of his inner focus and hopelessness. Eliot wrote, “His life had reduced itself to the functions of weaving and hoarding, without any contemplation of an end toward which the functions tended” (18). When Eppie replaced Silas’s gold, she became his new most prized possession (Eliot, 109). Instead of wrapping him around himself, however, she “unwound” Silas from his selfishness, “link[ing] him once more with the whole world” (Eliot, 125). Eppie acted as a symbol of Silas’s “new gold,” pulling him away from his selfishness and back into the world. Saturated in symbolism, Silas Marner displayed Eliot’s rich writing style. Finally, Eliot’s richly unique writing style shone as she created an identifiable speaking style for each of the prominent characters in Silas Marner. Each of Eliot’s characters spoke English, but she gave each a dialect to match his position and personality. Narrated with precision and eloquence, Eliot’s educated writing style contrasted strongly with the voices of her characters, but none the less, she succeeded in making them “colorful in their ignorance and sympathetic in their narrowness” (Levine, xxvii). For example, Silas conversed like a miser, claiming Eppie as his possession: “It’s come to me—I’ve a right to keep it” (Levine, xxx; Eliot, 109). Similarly, Dolly Whinthrop murmured kindly, but ignorantly, according to her character: “If there’s any good to be got we’ve need of it I’ this world—that we have; and I hope [the cakes will] bring good to you” (Eliot, 77). Eppie, influenced by both Silas and Mrs. Winthrop, delivered a joyful combination of their two dialects: “there’s lots o’ loose stones about, some of ‘em not big” (Eliot, 140). By laying the foundation of an identifiable speaking style for each of her characters, Eliot illustrated her beautiful writing style. Despite its simple premise, Eliot’s “accessible” book has delighted and enlightened many readers. One of the reasons her tale is so loved is because of the deep and thought-provoking writing style of the author. With interludes to elucidate her readers about the background of Raveloe, Eliot gathered attention. Bloating Silas Marner with symbolism, Eliot filled the book with hidden depth and meaning. Carefully creating individual character dialects, Eliot enabled Silas Marner to be interesting to read and believable. With insightful interludes, stacks of symbolism and colorful character dialects, Eliot infused her brilliant writing style into her book. No wonder Silas Marner is so enjoyed! (hide spoiler)]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeni Enjaian

    It took me a little while to get into the title story. At first I found the narrative to be wordy and vague. I kept being distracted by the incredibly long paragraphs. Once I could devote a larger section of time to reading the book, it felt like the narrative had found its footing and moved forward at a steady, understandable pace. I still have a problem with the length of the paragraphs but such is the style of the time in which Eliot wrote. After reading the depressing Ethan Frome and selecte It took me a little while to get into the title story. At first I found the narrative to be wordy and vague. I kept being distracted by the incredibly long paragraphs. Once I could devote a larger section of time to reading the book, it felt like the narrative had found its footing and moved forward at a steady, understandable pace. I still have a problem with the length of the paragraphs but such is the style of the time in which Eliot wrote. After reading the depressing Ethan Frome and selected short stories, I must admit that I expected an equally depressing tone and ending for Silas Marner. Thankfully, Eliot chose a more wholesome, uplifting ending. I cannot say the same for the second short story included in this work, "The Lifted Veil." It's because of this short story that I rated this particular edition with three stars instead of four. I found nothing redeemable about that story. I was also not fond of the third story "Brother Jacob" but did not object to it as much as "The Lifted Veil." Although the plot of "Brother Jacob" got lost somewhere in the middle, it found its footing in the end in which each character received a suitable comeuppance. For those interested in reading the classics, I recommend this book. I care neither one way or the other in terms of recommendation for anyone else.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I am glad to say I have read a novel by George Eliot. I have tried unsuccessfully to read Middlemarch many times, so I am glad I was able to read Silas Marner. But she just gives me way too many details about village life that I just cant get into and too much information about characters who are not involve dint he story at all. George Eliot is my favorite professor's favorite author, but I just cant get into her! I am glad to say I have read a novel by George Eliot. I have tried unsuccessfully to read Middlemarch many times, so I am glad I was able to read Silas Marner. But she just gives me way too many details about village life that I just cant get into and too much information about characters who are not involve dint he story at all. George Eliot is my favorite professor's favorite author, but I just cant get into her!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    So, this is the book I decided to read for AP Lit. And I liked it. For a school book, I really liked it. Especially after Eppie showed up. The ending was really good, and the plot was interesting. I liked Silas and Eppie, althought there were some characters I really didn't like. The biggest problem was all the fluff. Some parts just took FOREVER to read because of all the fluff or just being slow. Overall, I like the book a lot, but I probably wouldn't read it again. So, this is the book I decided to read for AP Lit. And I liked it. For a school book, I really liked it. Especially after Eppie showed up. The ending was really good, and the plot was interesting. I liked Silas and Eppie, althought there were some characters I really didn't like. The biggest problem was all the fluff. Some parts just took FOREVER to read because of all the fluff or just being slow. Overall, I like the book a lot, but I probably wouldn't read it again.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate Welsh

    My first Eliot, somehow, and it definitely made me want to read more. Her moral system is fascinating.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    "Unlike the gold, which needed nothing, and must be worshiped in close-locked solitude--which was hidden away from the daylight, was deaf to the song of birds, and started no human tones --Eppie was a creature of endless claims, and ever-growing desires, seeking and loving sunshine, and living sounds, and living movements, making trial of everything , with trust in new joy, and stirring the human kindness in eyes that looked on her." Silas Marner and Two Short Stories by George Eliot is a com "Unlike the gold, which needed nothing, and must be worshiped in close-locked solitude--which was hidden away from the daylight, was deaf to the song of birds, and started no human tones --Eppie was a creature of endless claims, and ever-growing desires, seeking and loving sunshine, and living sounds, and living movements, making trial of everything , with trust in new joy, and stirring the human kindness in eyes that looked on her." Silas Marner and Two Short Stories by George Eliot is a compilation of three works of fiction by Mary Anne Evans. Including one novella (Silas Marner), and two short stories ("The Painted Veil" and "Brother Jacob"), Silas Marner offers the reader a great deal of variety regarding genre. Eliot was capable of both gloomy and dark Gothic fantasy in "The Paint Veil" and satirical comedy in Brother Jacob. "The Painted Veil" follows a young man with clairvoyant glimpses of the future, who, though he knows how terrible and bleak a future will be with a charming, mysterious young woman, can't help but feel compelled to marry her anyway. "Brother Jacob" follows a young man named David who steals from his family in order to finance a trip to the Indies that could change his fortunes. He changes everything about himself in the hope of starting a new life with better prospects. However, what he can't anticipate is that his "idiot" Brother Jacob will follow him to the ends of the earth, and David's new identity therefore won't be lasting long. The real star of the show, however, is Silas Marner. I absolutely adored this little novella. Silas Marner follows a old weaver who has become disillusioned with the world and hoards and admires his gold night after night. One day though the gold is stolen from Marner's cottage. Marner is devastated. A day later a little girl with golden hair wanders into his cottage from the cold to sit by his fire. Convinced this is a sign, Marner adopts the girl and raises her from a toddler. He names her Eppie and together they grow into a loving, supportive, father-daughter team. What Marner can't anticipate, however, is that in the wings is Eppie's biological father who decides he wants to claim her after fifteen years. How will Eppie react? What will Marner do? Will they still be a family? Silas Marner really was the cutest story. I loved the lesson on the importance of family and being a part of a community. Marner and Eppie's relationship was just adorable and reading this story was so comforting--like a bowl of chicken soup. It's a testament to Eliot's strength as a writer that her stories are really that timeless. I enjoyed also "The Painted Veil" and "Brother Jacob" for other reasons. "The Painted Veil" was intriguing, mysterious, and morbid in the perfect manner for a Gothic fantasy. "Brother Jacob" was silly and comical, especially making me giggle towards the end of the story. Overall I would give Silas Marner and Two Short Stories four out of five stars. I truly enjoyed picking up another classic, and book by George Eliot and can't wait to do it again.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Koan

    I'm so glad I re-read this book. I originally read it in Mrs. Brock's 10th Grade English Class. I remember having strong feelings about it, but I didn't really value it as much as I do now. The story of Silas Marner actually seems to be one of the most powerful classics emotionally for me. I think that one reason that this book stands the test of time is the story of redemption. It's interesting reading in the notes(of the Barnes and Noble edition) that this was written during the time when Georg I'm so glad I re-read this book. I originally read it in Mrs. Brock's 10th Grade English Class. I remember having strong feelings about it, but I didn't really value it as much as I do now. The story of Silas Marner actually seems to be one of the most powerful classics emotionally for me. I think that one reason that this book stands the test of time is the story of redemption. It's interesting reading in the notes(of the Barnes and Noble edition) that this was written during the time when George Eliot(Mary Anne Evans) had left Christianity and eventually come back to it. The story of Silas Marner follows a strange pattern to Evans personal life. I think that this story has influenced several of my favorite recent stories. The concept of a lonely recluse who watches over a child and has limited interaction with others is a trope used heavily in JJ Miller's novel, "Kenobi" and the concept of the adopted child representing the main character's heart is used in James Mangold's film, "Logan". The reason that I think that I value this book is that I value this book is that in some ways I used to identify with Marner. I've moved to new places before and not known anyone there and felt lonely before. However, like Marner, I've learned to make use of the friendships available to me...sorry, I seem to have gotten carried away there... Anyway, this gets the highest I've ever given a classic novel. It would get 7.1 out of 10, but since it's a classic, it gets the bonus point and gets a 8.1 out of 10! Highly Reccomended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Osgood

    Silas Marner was mentioned, in some other book I read recently, as a sort of gateway classic. I have no problem with the classics, but I realized I'd never read anything by George Eliot, and decided to give it a go. It's pretty good, with interesting characterizations, delightfully rustic dialogue, and musings on the consequences of people's various choices. And now I can see that The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry is totally a modern riff on Silas Marner. The first of the Two Short Stories began too Silas Marner was mentioned, in some other book I read recently, as a sort of gateway classic. I have no problem with the classics, but I realized I'd never read anything by George Eliot, and decided to give it a go. It's pretty good, with interesting characterizations, delightfully rustic dialogue, and musings on the consequences of people's various choices. And now I can see that The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry is totally a modern riff on Silas Marner. The first of the Two Short Stories began too drearily for me to go on, but "Brother Jacob" is an insightful study of a very selfish young man, and the truth he can't escape.

  11. 4 out of 5

    George

    Wonderful novel! I read "Silas Marner" many years ago (maybe in high school). I very much enjoyed reading it again. I also rented the movie version, staring Ben Kingsley as Marner. It was very good, but I liked the book more. The movie DVD came with an hour-long biopic of George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans), which was excellent!! I would rent the DVD again just to see the George Eliot life story a second time. Wonderful novel! I read "Silas Marner" many years ago (maybe in high school). I very much enjoyed reading it again. I also rented the movie version, staring Ben Kingsley as Marner. It was very good, but I liked the book more. The movie DVD came with an hour-long biopic of George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans), which was excellent!! I would rent the DVD again just to see the George Eliot life story a second time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    A quaint little fairy tale of a novella. Not particularly exciting but a nifty little moralistic tale about provincial early 19th century England. At least I can now claim that I’ve read a George Eliot novel. As for the two included short stories, I couldn't make it past the 10th page of either one. For aficionados only, I suppose. How could anyone subject high school students to this as required reading? A quaint little fairy tale of a novella. Not particularly exciting but a nifty little moralistic tale about provincial early 19th century England. At least I can now claim that I’ve read a George Eliot novel. As for the two included short stories, I couldn't make it past the 10th page of either one. For aficionados only, I suppose. How could anyone subject high school students to this as required reading?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    THIS IS NOW MY FAVORITE CLASSIC!! I loved this story so much. George Eliot’s writing was so deep and powerful. I could reread this book a thousand times and get new lessons from it each time. Please do read this book. It’s heartwarming and the characters are complex and such a great edition to her writing. (If you didn’t know, George Eliot is a pen name. The author is actually a woman!) I love this story to pieces. Yes this book was for high school, but if you go into it with a positive mindset, THIS IS NOW MY FAVORITE CLASSIC!! I loved this story so much. George Eliot’s writing was so deep and powerful. I could reread this book a thousand times and get new lessons from it each time. Please do read this book. It’s heartwarming and the characters are complex and such a great edition to her writing. (If you didn’t know, George Eliot is a pen name. The author is actually a woman!) I love this story to pieces. Yes this book was for high school, but if you go into it with a positive mindset, you will notice how hilarious the banter between the characters are and the wonderful symbols that play a huge part in this novel. I’m so glad I read this for school!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeremiah Cobra

    This is a beautiful, poetic, and light-hearted story with a tremendous insight into the nature of human beings and the importance of human connections. At times the story relies on happenstance to further the plot (which is a minor pet-peeve of mine), but overall I found it hard not to be delighted by Sila’s quest for love and friendship.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jk

    Silas Marner = 5 stars The Lifted Veil = 3 stars Brother Jacob = 4 stars

  16. 5 out of 5

    soleil

    This book was pleasant and had some very good quotes. Enjoyable. (Also, I really love this edition. The cover is gorgeous.)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cooper Renner

    Silas Marner is very fine indeed. The two stories good but not quite Marner ‘s equal. Brother Jacob is more entertaining than Lifted Veil.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I love Eppie 😊

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandon B

    Silas Marner - 4.5 "The Lifted Veil - 3.5 "Brother Jacob" - 4 Overall, a great introduction to Eliot. These are more like her "fairy tales," alongside an attempt at Gothic fiction. Silas Marner - 4.5 "The Lifted Veil - 3.5 "Brother Jacob" - 4 Overall, a great introduction to Eliot. These are more like her "fairy tales," alongside an attempt at Gothic fiction.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Grace Steele

    How I adore George Eliot. This was the first book I read of hers, and it got me hooked on her. How I love Silas and Eppie.

  21. 5 out of 5

    LizzieM

    Overall, Silas Marner is a pretty good book. The plot and the characters are pretty interesting, but it seemed a little slow in the beginning. However, once it picked up, I enjoyed it!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    Wow, Mary Anne knew how to write. You have to like "old-timey" English stories and have the patience to plow through the diction, but the plot and characters are interesting. It helps if you watch the movie first. I laughed so many times, even though the story is very sad in places. I loved Mary Anne's insights into human nature. Wow, Mary Anne knew how to write. You have to like "old-timey" English stories and have the patience to plow through the diction, but the plot and characters are interesting. It helps if you watch the movie first. I laughed so many times, even though the story is very sad in places. I loved Mary Anne's insights into human nature.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Molly Jae

    What I learned from this book is how tender and sweet love can change a person, and bring hope and purpose into a life that has long ago been dimmed by misfortune and isolation. It took me a few pages to get into the language and rhythm of Eliot's short story. It reminds me of Thomas Hardy or Charles Dickens, and just takes reading a few pages before I can hear the words correctly in my head. The story takes place in the late 1700's, in Raveloe,a small English village where Silas has come to set What I learned from this book is how tender and sweet love can change a person, and bring hope and purpose into a life that has long ago been dimmed by misfortune and isolation. It took me a few pages to get into the language and rhythm of Eliot's short story. It reminds me of Thomas Hardy or Charles Dickens, and just takes reading a few pages before I can hear the words correctly in my head. The story takes place in the late 1700's, in Raveloe,a small English village where Silas has come to settle and work as a weaver after some unfortunate dishonest acts by his friend. From the beginning to almost the end of the book Silas leads a lonely, hard and isolated life. With no one to love him, he in turn loves no one. But as events unfold and Eppie comes into his life, it is wonderful to feel the warmth emanating from the hearth in their humble cottage. I lived in fear that the ending might leave him broken hearted, but joyfully there is a sweet and peaceful conclusion.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    It's hard to know where to start in my praise for George Eliot. Though her thoughts and observations are serious and insightful, her characters are still rich, funny, lovable, and despicable all at the same time. Silas Marner is a masterfully written story of redemption and family, without ever feeling stuffy or pretentious. Although it has a certain fairy-tale element, the depictions of the characters' lives are fresh and relatable. It seems useless to go on. I. Love. George. Eliot. It's hard to know where to start in my praise for George Eliot. Though her thoughts and observations are serious and insightful, her characters are still rich, funny, lovable, and despicable all at the same time. Silas Marner is a masterfully written story of redemption and family, without ever feeling stuffy or pretentious. Although it has a certain fairy-tale element, the depictions of the characters' lives are fresh and relatable. It seems useless to go on. I. Love. George. Eliot.

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Buhler

    Five stars for 'Silas Marner.' The two short stories 3.5 stars. 'Silas Marner' is a wonderful read with a very satisfying denouement. I was pleasantly surprised to discover in George Eliot another master writer equal to Henry James I think; but that opinion is based on reading just this one book of hers. I hope to get around to reading her masterpiece "Middlemarch" sometime. Five stars for 'Silas Marner.' The two short stories 3.5 stars. 'Silas Marner' is a wonderful read with a very satisfying denouement. I was pleasantly surprised to discover in George Eliot another master writer equal to Henry James I think; but that opinion is based on reading just this one book of hers. I hope to get around to reading her masterpiece "Middlemarch" sometime.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cynda

    I am glad to have taken this opportunity to read more of Eliot's writing. I have read some of her poetry and some short stories in anthologies, all forgotten. I read her masterpiece -Middlemarch- sometime later and found it worthwhile and satisfying. I am glad to have read this collection of her work. As usual, the book -Silas Marner- was better than the good movie. I am glad to have taken this opportunity to read more of Eliot's writing. I have read some of her poetry and some short stories in anthologies, all forgotten. I read her masterpiece -Middlemarch- sometime later and found it worthwhile and satisfying. I am glad to have read this collection of her work. As usual, the book -Silas Marner- was better than the good movie.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Although sweet and well written, I wasn't exactly riveted or surprised by the action. This does make me want to read one of her more well known novels like Middlemarch. But not for a while. I think I need a break from her prose. Although sweet and well written, I wasn't exactly riveted or surprised by the action. This does make me want to read one of her more well known novels like Middlemarch. But not for a while. I think I need a break from her prose.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Liked the book better than the first time I read it in high school. Listen to the audio version and enjoyed it. I think it also helped that the introduction talked about the story being a fairy tale. That really helped me understand the novel and helped put a "glow" on the story. Liked the book better than the first time I read it in high school. Listen to the audio version and enjoyed it. I think it also helped that the introduction talked about the story being a fairy tale. That really helped me understand the novel and helped put a "glow" on the story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tori

    Not what I was expecting, but I liked it. The two short stories were just okay though.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    I have to read this when I'm WIDE awake...it's has such vocabulary that I've been tempted a time or two to look something up. I'm enjoying it and do recomend it. I have to read this when I'm WIDE awake...it's has such vocabulary that I've been tempted a time or two to look something up. I'm enjoying it and do recomend it.

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