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NBC-TVUs senior vice Washington bureau chief and host of Meet the Press offers an intensely personal and charming memoir of American life in the 1950s and the special bond he shares with his fatherQthe irrepressible Big Russ. From the lessons he learned from his father and his Catholic upbringing to his passion for the Buffalo Bills and the New York Yankees to the grace of NBC-TVUs senior vice Washington bureau chief and host of Meet the Press offers an intensely personal and charming memoir of American life in the 1950s and the special bond he shares with his fatherQthe irrepressible Big Russ. From the lessons he learned from his father and his Catholic upbringing to his passion for the Buffalo Bills and the New York Yankees to the grace of daily obligations and patriotism, Russert's reflections hit the very epicenter of American values. Includes 16 pages of color and b&w photos. 1-40135-208-1$22.95 / Time Warner Book Group


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NBC-TVUs senior vice Washington bureau chief and host of Meet the Press offers an intensely personal and charming memoir of American life in the 1950s and the special bond he shares with his fatherQthe irrepressible Big Russ. From the lessons he learned from his father and his Catholic upbringing to his passion for the Buffalo Bills and the New York Yankees to the grace of NBC-TVUs senior vice Washington bureau chief and host of Meet the Press offers an intensely personal and charming memoir of American life in the 1950s and the special bond he shares with his fatherQthe irrepressible Big Russ. From the lessons he learned from his father and his Catholic upbringing to his passion for the Buffalo Bills and the New York Yankees to the grace of daily obligations and patriotism, Russert's reflections hit the very epicenter of American values. Includes 16 pages of color and b&w photos. 1-40135-208-1$22.95 / Time Warner Book Group

30 review for Big Russ and Me Father and Son: Lessons of Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jenni

    I have been wanting to read this book for a long time, and just never remembered it when I got the library or bookstore. Last week, upon perusing books on CD at my local library, I stumbled onto "Big Russ & Me." Having an hour-long round trip commute every day, I thought it would give me something to listen to in the car. Something to keep my mind off the traffic. Most of you know Tim Russert for his role as moderator on "Meet the Press." I now feel like I know him and his father as two wonderful I have been wanting to read this book for a long time, and just never remembered it when I got the library or bookstore. Last week, upon perusing books on CD at my local library, I stumbled onto "Big Russ & Me." Having an hour-long round trip commute every day, I thought it would give me something to listen to in the car. Something to keep my mind off the traffic. Most of you know Tim Russert for his role as moderator on "Meet the Press." I now feel like I know him and his father as two wonderful men. Mr. Russert's memories of things his father taught him is very vivid. I loved that the entire book was actually read by Tim, also. He has a great knack for sharing his life, humorous or poignant. He graciously allowed us into his life as he shared his thoughts, experiences and even first-hand account of everything from the Buffalo Bills string of Super Bowl losses to meeting the Pope, to meeting his wife for the first time. I would definitely recommend this book. I found myself tearing up during his recollection of his visits with the Pope or hearing him discuss the death of some people close to him. I also laughed out loud during the stressful ride to work listening to his antics as a child, and the antics that later continued through his life. Tim Russert and "Big Russ" as his dad is affectionately named, are two people you need to get to know. Check out the book. It's a must read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bark | Ladies Of Horror Fiction

    I don’t know who the heck this Tim Russert guy is but apparently he’s a pretty famous figure in tv news land. I try to avoid the news for the most part because it either makes me sad or irritates me. I picked this book up because I saw it on the “new audiobook” shelf at my library. I have a long drive and will grab anything new they have up for offer. Sometimes it works out, sometimes not so much. This book is a love letter of sorts written to the author’s dad “Big Russ”. But it’s more than that. I don’t know who the heck this Tim Russert guy is but apparently he’s a pretty famous figure in tv news land. I try to avoid the news for the most part because it either makes me sad or irritates me. I picked this book up because I saw it on the “new audiobook” shelf at my library. I have a long drive and will grab anything new they have up for offer. Sometimes it works out, sometimes not so much. This book is a love letter of sorts written to the author’s dad “Big Russ”. But it’s more than that. It tells the story of Tim’s childhood in the 50’s which seems pretty darn ideal and gives a clear picture of what growing up during that time frame was all about. Men worked two jobs to bring home the bacon and wouldn’t be caught dead living on welfare, they taught their kids responsibility and manners while a loving mom stayed home to cook and pretty up the house. Their kids didn’t complain and whine because dad was working too much or they didn’t have the latest new kicks. Our world has changed so much, some of it for the better, I could never stay home and cook bacon all day (though I wouldn’t mind staying home and reading all day), but some of the changes I could do without. It was nice to spend some time in a world so very different from my own. As a youngster Tim seems to have been untouched by the ugliness that too many of us grow up with as wee children be it abusive parents, divorce, suicide, alcohol, poverty and has a nice thing to say about everyone. I wish I could be half as kind on any given day. There were some darker moments when he describes Big Russ’s time in the military but he doesn’t dwell on the darkness. Instead he uses those experiences to explain how Big Russ became the strong, loving, father figure that he later became. Tim was a good boy who seems to have grown up to be a very nice man. This book was very sweet and down to earth and I did enjoy listening to most of it. I can’t say I exactly identified with any of it all that much having grown up in the 70’s with a very different set of parents, and being a girl, but it was nice to read about a family who was always decent to their kids and taught them to work hard and take responsibility for their actions. Tim seems like a very lucky guy who lived an almost charmed life and was blessed to have met several influential and inspirational people in his life who nudged him in the right direction. I can’t say this was a gripping read, and many of the later bits focusing on sports and politics just didn’t interest me at all, but for the most part it was pleasant enough to district me from glaring at other drivers jabbering away on their cell phones.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Spudsie

    I confess I tend to be prejudiced against books written by people who are very successful in forms of visual media. The best books are written by people who make their living by using the written word rather than the spoken word right? Until almost a month ago I hadn’t realized I had the prejudice. Or at least I wouldn’t have been able to articulate it if asked. I probably would have simply said “I prefer fiction to nonfiction.” But sadly, it has been true. I have avoided books written by movie s I confess I tend to be prejudiced against books written by people who are very successful in forms of visual media. The best books are written by people who make their living by using the written word rather than the spoken word right? Until almost a month ago I hadn’t realized I had the prejudice. Or at least I wouldn’t have been able to articulate it if asked. I probably would have simply said “I prefer fiction to nonfiction.” But sadly, it has been true. I have avoided books written by movie stars, politicians, music geniuses and television stars. I, along with a surprisingly large number of people, found myself unexpectedly moved by the untimely death of Tim Russert. All I knew of Tim was what I saw on television Sunday mornings on “Meet the Press” and during the campaign coverage on MSNBC. (As a self proclaimed political news junkie, this meant I’d been seeing a great deal of him during this campaign season.) To a person it seemed, everyone who talked of Tim talked of the wonderful books he had written and spoke with great fondness of Big Russ and were so grateful Tim had written these books. How on earth did I manage to miss his books when they were originally published I wondered. The more I thought about it them more I realized I had been overlooking an entire genre simply because the authors presented their “authorship” as a second job rather than their primary calling. This narrow-minded (though completely unintentional) thinking has caused me to miss a number of good and even great books I suspect. And as I mourn the loss of Tim, I also regret that I was not able to read his books without a touch of sorrow. As I read them now I am always mindful that his spirit left the earth far too early. Others (more articulate and erudite than I) have penned poignant reviews of “Big Russ & Me.” I do not possess the vocabulary to adequately explain what “Big Russ & Me” means to me. In short I found it to be a moving tribute to a man who worked hard to achieve more than he dreamed possible and yet never lost touch with his roots and his family. Remarkably it was written by the man himself. A rare treat. Well worth reading. And well worth overcoming old (and pointless) prejudices towards those who achieve in a visual media.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    I went to see Luke Russert speak about his father on Father's Day this year at Politics & Prose. His father would have been so proud of him. I'm sure that wasn't an easy thing to do. This book is a lovely tribute to lives well lived. The book is divided into chapters centered around topics such as: respect, work, faith, food, baseball, fatherhood, Sister Kennedy, etc. For any boomer who had a Catholic upbringing, it will resonate in parts. For any boomer whose father was passionate about basebal I went to see Luke Russert speak about his father on Father's Day this year at Politics & Prose. His father would have been so proud of him. I'm sure that wasn't an easy thing to do. This book is a lovely tribute to lives well lived. The book is divided into chapters centered around topics such as: respect, work, faith, food, baseball, fatherhood, Sister Kennedy, etc. For any boomer who had a Catholic upbringing, it will resonate in parts. For any boomer whose father was passionate about baseball and had a favorite home team, it will resonate. For anyone who grew up with family cookouts and beer, it will resonate. This book will make you wish for simpler times. And, yet Tim Russert had amazing opportunities, too and remained humble. He met presidents, celebrities and even the Pope! That he remained grounded in life is the true testament to his upbringing. I read this book slowly and took my time with it. (Plus, it was an autographed copy, so, it didn't go to the beach with me.) For me, the most moving chapter was the one entitled "Loss." And, I quote "To accept faith, we have to resign ourselves as mortals to the fact that we are a small part of a grand design."

  5. 4 out of 5

    David

    I thoroughly enjoyed this memoir from the late Tim Russert, about the lessons he learned from his father, Big Russ. The book goes through various aspects of Russert's childhood: school, religion, work, etc., and in every aspect of his life there is something that Big Russ taught him. Big Russ came from that "Greatest Generation" who did their jobs, didn't brag, didn't complain, didn't talk about themselves or feel that they were deserving of any special treatment. It really makes me think about I thoroughly enjoyed this memoir from the late Tim Russert, about the lessons he learned from his father, Big Russ. The book goes through various aspects of Russert's childhood: school, religion, work, etc., and in every aspect of his life there is something that Big Russ taught him. Big Russ came from that "Greatest Generation" who did their jobs, didn't brag, didn't complain, didn't talk about themselves or feel that they were deserving of any special treatment. It really makes me think about how different we are today, with our exhibitionist culture and need to "share" and talk about our "feelings," and it makes me feel like maybe we have lost a step since Big Russ's day. From Big Russ, son Tim learned the importance of hard work, faith, and family, and this carried him to his long run as the tough but fair moderator of Meet the Press. I watched Meet the Press for over 10 years with Tim Russert at the helm, and his untimely death really saddened me. Now this book serves as a tribute to the man he most admired, who taught him the important lessons that made him such a respected newsman, who many will miss.

  6. 4 out of 5

    M.A. Kropp

    I read this book for a few reasons. One is that I have always admired Tim Russert as a journalist. He was a direct, uncompromising interviewer, and always spoke with intelligence and fairness on all the subjects he touched. And the second is that the book was recommended by my own father a few years ago. I'm glad I listened. The book is part memoir, part biography. It is a tribute to Russert's father, known as Big Russ, and a man the younger Russert truly admired and looked up to his whole life. I read this book for a few reasons. One is that I have always admired Tim Russert as a journalist. He was a direct, uncompromising interviewer, and always spoke with intelligence and fairness on all the subjects he touched. And the second is that the book was recommended by my own father a few years ago. I'm glad I listened. The book is part memoir, part biography. It is a tribute to Russert's father, known as Big Russ, and a man the younger Russert truly admired and looked up to his whole life. Big Russ was an Army veteran who served in WWII where he was seriously injured. He came home and settled in Buffalo, NY, where he worked as a sanitation worked by day and drove a newspaper delivery truck at night to support his wife and four children. He believed in hard work, discipline, faith and family values, and passed those on to his children. Tim Russert had a fairly typical life as he grew up in a largely Irish Catholic neighborhood. He went to Catholic schools throughout his education. He worked to earn money for college. Through it all, he looked up to his father for the example the elder Russert showed, and for wisdom and advice that Tim relied on during his whole life. There are a lot of anecdotes and memories, both from Big Russ' life, and Tim's own. The book is written in a companionable, easy to read style and only falls into what some might consider preaching on a few occasions. Mostly, it is a loving, down to earth, and honest account of growing up in middle class America in the 1950's and 1960's, and a tribute to a truly special relationship between father and son, and a thoroughly enjoyable read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Faith

    I really loved this book. Tim Russert~What a GUY! I read it when it first came out and loved the way he told the story of growing up in Buffalo. He accomplished a lot and was so determined. His Dad, Big Russ, was such an integral part of his life. Big Russ was such a supportive Dad and a hard working one. Tim Russert got his work ethics from the example his dad set for him. I certainly miss Tim Russert. I originally read the book when it first came out because I loved Tim from Meet The Press and I really loved this book. Tim Russert~What a GUY! I read it when it first came out and loved the way he told the story of growing up in Buffalo. He accomplished a lot and was so determined. His Dad, Big Russ, was such an integral part of his life. Big Russ was such a supportive Dad and a hard working one. Tim Russert got his work ethics from the example his dad set for him. I certainly miss Tim Russert. I originally read the book when it first came out because I loved Tim from Meet The Press and all of his political analysis on NBC. What an amazing, intelligent, and successful man! And all through his life he never forgot the lessons he learned from Big Russ. A lot of autobiographies are superficial and inflated, but this one is none of those things. It is down-to-earth and real.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dorry Lou

    I enjoyed this book as much as any I have ever read. It is somewhat a book from rags to riches,as Tim's father worked 2 jobs to support his family. His teachings made Tim the son, one of the greats of this time. Its a memoir of life in the 50's as young Tim grew up in Buffalo New York. Regardless of how well known he became he remained loyal to the values he learned and stayed close to his family & friends & especially his dad. He gave him much credit for who he became. He held many responsible I enjoyed this book as much as any I have ever read. It is somewhat a book from rags to riches,as Tim's father worked 2 jobs to support his family. His teachings made Tim the son, one of the greats of this time. Its a memoir of life in the 50's as young Tim grew up in Buffalo New York. Regardless of how well known he became he remained loyal to the values he learned and stayed close to his family & friends & especially his dad. He gave him much credit for who he became. He held many responsible jobs but the one he became best known for the was "Meet the Press". I would recommend this book to everyone!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Terry Walsh

    I read this several years ago. Loved it! The down to earth life story told by Tim Russert, who was already a celebrity, made it all the more enjoyable. Also his tales of growing up in Catholic school, high school, and college, made it all the more fun as I could relate to much of it. Big Russ sounded like a great father, a good man who strove to imbue his family with the core values of hard work, strong character, and a strong foundation in religion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Huguette Larochelle

    very good stories , about his Dad, a son that really respect his Dad. a view in the life , love the details very enjoying read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Hidden

    Big Russ and Me, written by Tim Russert, is a memoir of growing up in South Buffalo as the son of Big Russ, a hard-working man who worked two jobs to provide for his family and educate his children. The writing style is very engaging: conversational, honest, and eloquent, and his observations on the "characters" in his life seem very astute. Like his father, you can't help but admire Tim for his intelligence, determination and work ethic. It seems to me that he made a lot of smart decisions that Big Russ and Me, written by Tim Russert, is a memoir of growing up in South Buffalo as the son of Big Russ, a hard-working man who worked two jobs to provide for his family and educate his children. The writing style is very engaging: conversational, honest, and eloquent, and his observations on the "characters" in his life seem very astute. Like his father, you can't help but admire Tim for his intelligence, determination and work ethic. It seems to me that he made a lot of smart decisions that contributed to his career path. Tim Russert is Irish Catholic, as he frequently talks about in his book, and his faith is an ongoing theme, from his early years in Catholic school, to having to pay half his tuition in order to attend a prestigious Catholic high school, to meeting the Pope. There is also a good bit of content about politics. Politics and religion are two topics I generally don't enjoy reading about, but Russert's engaging style kept me reading to the last page. I enjoyed that Russert always admired his dad, and how his dad remained one of his closest advisors. What a great tribute to a successful father/son relationship!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Avid Reader

    Perspective: I grew up in South Buffalo in the 60s and 70s. That said, this book was a nostalgic and loving tribute to the values of the greatest generation, through the lens of a loving father-son relationship. This book touches on the selflessness of WW II vets, and subtly touched on the darkness of war through silence, or heavy alcohol use at VFW posts. It describes an almost idyllic childhood when a lack of things was not seen as a void. It was an opportunity to be creative, to make do with Perspective: I grew up in South Buffalo in the 60s and 70s. That said, this book was a nostalgic and loving tribute to the values of the greatest generation, through the lens of a loving father-son relationship. This book touches on the selflessness of WW II vets, and subtly touched on the darkness of war through silence, or heavy alcohol use at VFW posts. It describes an almost idyllic childhood when a lack of things was not seen as a void. It was an opportunity to be creative, to make do with less, to come together as a community. It describes a time when Sisters recognized talent in students and pushed kids and their families to achieve beyond their parochial neighborhoods. I loved that the village all took accountability for the kids, from the mailmen, to the pub patrons, and best of all, the prefect at Canisius high school, whom I paraphrase: "Mercy is for God, I deliver justice." I read this book quickly which made me laugh, tear up, reminisce, wish for simple wisdom on many days, nod in agreement, revel at days gone by. A light read with a lasting message, which is a high recommendation. Genius is making the complex simple. Tim Russert accomplished this here.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy Sheehan

    His [Luke:]letter went something like this: "Dear Mr. President, Thank you for introducing me to the Hall of Famers and for showing me the Oval Office. I think if I work really hard I will have a chance for both." The next time I saw the president I told him about my son's ambitious plans. His response was beautiful: "Never get between a boy and his dreams" "Timmy, we have to find a way to channel your excessive energy. I am starting a new school newspaper and you going to be the editor . . . God His [Luke:]letter went something like this: "Dear Mr. President, Thank you for introducing me to the Hall of Famers and for showing me the Oval Office. I think if I work really hard I will have a chance for both." The next time I saw the president I told him about my son's ambitious plans. His response was beautiful: "Never get between a boy and his dreams" "Timmy, we have to find a way to channel your excessive energy. I am starting a new school newspaper and you going to be the editor . . . God has blessed you with a great deal of potential, it is up to you turn it into something productive."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pat Williams

    What an enjoyable read! A feel good book in the form of a personal memoir that is both historical and anecdotal. Tim Russert was such a "down to earth" and real guy! I felt like I was sitting around a table listening to him tell stories to a bunch of friends. I smiled, I laughed and I cried. You can taste Tim's zest for life. And what an honorable man, despite the fact that he had a bit of the devil in him! The last two chapters take on new importance after his premature passing. A wonderul trib What an enjoyable read! A feel good book in the form of a personal memoir that is both historical and anecdotal. Tim Russert was such a "down to earth" and real guy! I felt like I was sitting around a table listening to him tell stories to a bunch of friends. I smiled, I laughed and I cried. You can taste Tim's zest for life. And what an honorable man, despite the fact that he had a bit of the devil in him! The last two chapters take on new importance after his premature passing. A wonderul tribute to Tim's Dad. I am so happy that Tim's son, Luke, has this book to hold on to forever. What a gift his father has left him. And all of us.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    While I can relate, via stories from my parents and uncles, to some of the aspects of this book, it seems less about a father-son relationship and more about a nostalgic look at Big Russ's life. It's not overly emotional, nor overly well written. I found myself skipping chapters devoted to football and to the Catholic faith but there were also endearing tales of the Russert's life. I did enjoy the retelling of Big Russ's life in the military. I think I could relate to it because my parents/uncle While I can relate, via stories from my parents and uncles, to some of the aspects of this book, it seems less about a father-son relationship and more about a nostalgic look at Big Russ's life. It's not overly emotional, nor overly well written. I found myself skipping chapters devoted to football and to the Catholic faith but there were also endearing tales of the Russert's life. I did enjoy the retelling of Big Russ's life in the military. I think I could relate to it because my parents/uncles are so much older than most of my generation's relatives. I seriously doubt it would be relatable to the younger generations today.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bill Subalusky

    The worth of a book is sometimes reflected in more than its content and writing style. My daughter, Leah, gave me this book for Father's Day, and the thoughtfulness of the gift was worth a million dollars. Although the book seemed to be more of an autobiography of Tim Russert, with periodic mention of his father, it was a good read. I now have a much better understanding of where Russert was coming from in his media coverage. I was not aware that he was such a fine man, and I wish I had read the The worth of a book is sometimes reflected in more than its content and writing style. My daughter, Leah, gave me this book for Father's Day, and the thoughtfulness of the gift was worth a million dollars. Although the book seemed to be more of an autobiography of Tim Russert, with periodic mention of his father, it was a good read. I now have a much better understanding of where Russert was coming from in his media coverage. I was not aware that he was such a fine man, and I wish I had read the book before his recent and untimely passing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Simpson

    I listened to the audio version of this book, which helped to win me over since Tim Russert narrated the book. I loved to watch him on Meet the Press and at other events, and I remember greatly missing his presence during the night of the 2008 election coverage. I would have loved to hear his perspective as the results came in that evening. I greatly enjoyed the book, and found it very interesting to hear about his journey to NBC and the Today show. I also loved hearing about his relationships w I listened to the audio version of this book, which helped to win me over since Tim Russert narrated the book. I loved to watch him on Meet the Press and at other events, and I remember greatly missing his presence during the night of the 2008 election coverage. I would have loved to hear his perspective as the results came in that evening. I greatly enjoyed the book, and found it very interesting to hear about his journey to NBC and the Today show. I also loved hearing about his relationships with his son and father. If you were a Tim Russert fan, I strongly recommend the audio book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lea Ann

    Tim Russert died far too young and I still miss him on TV and especially missed him during this year's primary election. The other political reporters on TV can't touch him in knowledge and enthusiasm. As a huge Russert fan for many years, this book not only detailed his close relationship with his Dad, but it also detailed the amazing life he had during his all too short life. He wrote just like he talked, so it was like he was there telling the story to me. The book also took me back to simple Tim Russert died far too young and I still miss him on TV and especially missed him during this year's primary election. The other political reporters on TV can't touch him in knowledge and enthusiasm. As a huge Russert fan for many years, this book not only detailed his close relationship with his Dad, but it also detailed the amazing life he had during his all too short life. He wrote just like he talked, so it was like he was there telling the story to me. The book also took me back to simpler times in the fifties/sixties and parallels my own life. I really enjoyed reading it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    I wish I would have read this sooner. What a nice memoir. It's a great tribute to his father and all the people in his life that affected him. The book is filled with all kinds of nostalgia, but it always includes a positive spin on how it applies to the future. I found myself laughing and crying intermittently. If you ever feel you need an infusion of optimism, or some solid fatherly advice, definitely pick up this book. I wish I would have read this sooner. What a nice memoir. It's a great tribute to his father and all the people in his life that affected him. The book is filled with all kinds of nostalgia, but it always includes a positive spin on how it applies to the future. I found myself laughing and crying intermittently. If you ever feel you need an infusion of optimism, or some solid fatherly advice, definitely pick up this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    David Duez

    A wonderful book. Made me think of my father and being a father to my son. The lessons in this book are American. The greatest generation understood what sacrifice and hard work are all about. We need to be reminded of their efforts daily. Tim Russert was an incredible person. If you are just now coming to read his two books after his passing, run don't walk to pick up copies. He left a great treasure before he passed on, Thanks Tim! A wonderful book. Made me think of my father and being a father to my son. The lessons in this book are American. The greatest generation understood what sacrifice and hard work are all about. We need to be reminded of their efforts daily. Tim Russert was an incredible person. If you are just now coming to read his two books after his passing, run don't walk to pick up copies. He left a great treasure before he passed on, Thanks Tim!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cara

    This book is the culmination of all the lessons Tim Russert learned from his father, the same ones that he wanted to pass down to his son. It is a touching memoir about being a father and being a son that mattered so much to Russert. Stories about his life capture the best side of his hometown of Buffalo, and the people who make up the city, and it was a heartwarming and funny and beautiful read. I would definitely recommend this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karol

    I absolutely loved this book. Russert wrote about his dad and the impact Big Russ had on him. So many important life lessons were learned from his father -- lessons the younger Russert never forgot. Lessons that he also tried to pass on to his own son. A great look at how the lessons of our fathers are passed from one generation to the next.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I found Big Russ and Me especially moving, because I listened to the audio version. Listening to Tim Russert talk about his dad, his mentors, and his experiences in politics and in the news business was entertaining, funny, and thought-provoking. It made me even more grateful for the relationship I have with my dad.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marti

    This was the June selection for our book group. I was glad to have a nonfiction choice after a number of fiction ones which did not appeal. This was nicely written, though I thought that a few sections were rather repetitious--for example, the part about his father surviving the plane crash in the war. Hard to recall anything about his mother--other than his parents separating after 30 years.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    My mom made me read this book and in big print even. I have been reading it in little snatches and am almost done. Tim Russert sure was a great guy and I enjoy his musings but not that great of a writer.

  26. 5 out of 5

    MisterFweem

    I guess I'll never understand the Boomer fascination with baseball. And this book doesn't help. The chapter where Russert spent reminiscing about baseball was interminable. This is, however, an unusual autobiography. Not full of blather. Sorry. This is a terrible review. I'm exhausted. I guess I'll never understand the Boomer fascination with baseball. And this book doesn't help. The chapter where Russert spent reminiscing about baseball was interminable. This is, however, an unusual autobiography. Not full of blather. Sorry. This is a terrible review. I'm exhausted.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Doughty

    This is a thoroughly enjoyable book that is a super quick read. It offers great insight into why Tim turned out the way he did, where he came from and why more than anything else he kept pushing forward. Unfortunately he is no longer with us, but this book is a treasure.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary Anderson

    I loved this book. The wisdom and common sense approaches he shared are priceless. It was interesting to read about his rise to power. I had basically only watched him on Meet the Press and was impressed, which is why I bought his book. I would recommend this book to everyone.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I should know better than to read one of those Reader's Digest condensed versions that DMIL foists upon me - should have read the REAL book. That said, I did like it, and can see why he was so well-loved and respected. I should know better than to read one of those Reader's Digest condensed versions that DMIL foists upon me - should have read the REAL book. That said, I did like it, and can see why he was so well-loved and respected.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennie-Lynn Knox

    Just loved this book. What a super relationship Tim and Big Russ had...as well as Tim and his son Luke. I loved the read...the warm and thoughtful memories...what an interesting life. I so very much miss him...but am thankful we were Blessed with his presence and wisdom.

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