web site hit counter The Girl from Junchow - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Girl from Junchow

Availability: Ready to download

China, 1929. For years Lydia Ivanova believed her father was killed by the Bolsheviks. But when she learns he is imprisoned in Stalin-controlled Russia, the fiery girl is willing to leave everything behind--even her Chinese lover, Chang An Lo. Lydia begins a dangerous search, journeying to Moscow with her half-brother Alexei. But when Alexei abruptly disappears, Lydia is China, 1929. For years Lydia Ivanova believed her father was killed by the Bolsheviks. But when she learns he is imprisoned in Stalin-controlled Russia, the fiery girl is willing to leave everything behind--even her Chinese lover, Chang An Lo. Lydia begins a dangerous search, journeying to Moscow with her half-brother Alexei. But when Alexei abruptly disappears, Lydia is left alone and penniless in Soviet Russia. All seems lost, but Chang An Lo has not forgotten Lydia. He knows things about her father that she does not. And while he races to protect her, she is prepared to risk treacherous consequences to discover the truth.


Compare

China, 1929. For years Lydia Ivanova believed her father was killed by the Bolsheviks. But when she learns he is imprisoned in Stalin-controlled Russia, the fiery girl is willing to leave everything behind--even her Chinese lover, Chang An Lo. Lydia begins a dangerous search, journeying to Moscow with her half-brother Alexei. But when Alexei abruptly disappears, Lydia is China, 1929. For years Lydia Ivanova believed her father was killed by the Bolsheviks. But when she learns he is imprisoned in Stalin-controlled Russia, the fiery girl is willing to leave everything behind--even her Chinese lover, Chang An Lo. Lydia begins a dangerous search, journeying to Moscow with her half-brother Alexei. But when Alexei abruptly disappears, Lydia is left alone and penniless in Soviet Russia. All seems lost, but Chang An Lo has not forgotten Lydia. He knows things about her father that she does not. And while he races to protect her, she is prepared to risk treacherous consequences to discover the truth.

30 review for The Girl from Junchow

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aviva

    This is the sequel to The Russian Concubine and even if I didn't like Kate Furnivall I would have picked it up just to see how the story ended. Lydia Ivanova ends up going back to Russia to track down her father who is still alive and in a labor camp. Her half brother Alexei travels with her and she gets a protector in the guise of the big grizzly bear of a man from the first novel. It's a bit of a harrowing journey for Lydia for two reasons, 1) it's a pretty harrowing journey for anybody who's This is the sequel to The Russian Concubine and even if I didn't like Kate Furnivall I would have picked it up just to see how the story ended. Lydia Ivanova ends up going back to Russia to track down her father who is still alive and in a labor camp. Her half brother Alexei travels with her and she gets a protector in the guise of the big grizzly bear of a man from the first novel. It's a bit of a harrowing journey for Lydia for two reasons, 1) it's a pretty harrowing journey for anybody who's not used to Communist Russia to have to travel through Communist Russia and not get sent to a labor camp or shot, and 2) because she doesn't know if her lover from the first novel, Chang An Lo, is okay. Chang stuck around China to help with the People's Revolution so he's pretty unavailable for comment for the first third of the book. He resurfaces and his and Lydia's relationship is just as yummy as I remember, though some might say his ability to sweep in and save teh day every single time Lydia needs him might be just a titch contrived. Lydia is able to track down her father and she sortof plays at seducing a higher up in the Communist Party who almost screws her over (doesn't it suck when you can't totally coast on your good looks?) and that particular scene seriously pissed me off if only because we've discussed before my disdain for rape as a plot device. Although, it worked within the novel's universe and the way it resolved actually made sense. At the end of the day Lydia doesn't get a complete happy ending. She finds out things she probably didn't want to know, she betrays and gets betrayed, her relationship with Chang is tested and Chang's own belief system is challenged a time or two. Kate Furnivall doesn't disappoint, but there were a few places where the reader's going to have to suspend disbelief a little.

  2. 4 out of 5

    NatalyaVqs

    As most sequels are, not as good as the first book, but only because the introduction to the author already happened, her level of excellence in writing is expected. As far as sequels go, its one of the better ones, I would have rated it 3.5 stars, because the first book was a four, and I rate as threes those books which I do not normally recommend to friends. I enjoy the way Furnivall writes, weaving the magic, blending the cultures, all in natural ways that don't seem forced. She makes the As most sequels are, not as good as the first book, but only because the introduction to the author already happened, her level of excellence in writing is expected. As far as sequels go, its one of the better ones, I would have rated it 3.5 stars, because the first book was a four, and I rate as threes those books which I do not normally recommend to friends. I enjoy the way Furnivall writes, weaving the magic, blending the cultures, all in natural ways that don't seem forced. She makes the most outlandish events come to life realistically. The beginning and ending were really good, the main part dragged on a bit. She has truly unique characters, so it was a pleasure to follow them some more. I loved the part where Alexei says "I have to report this incompetence immediately!," I was a bit taken with him, glad things worked out for his love life towards the end.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    ATTENTION EVERYONE THAT IS INTERESTED IN THIS BOOK.... MAKE SURE TO CHECK PAGES 248/249!!!!! I HAD A FAULTY BOOK, AND WHEN I CALLED B&N ALL OF THEIR COPIES WERE LIKE THAT!!!! So please make sure to check your copy BEFORE you buy it, or else you would end up disappointed and angry like me because you can't continue reading till the bookstore gets in a new shipment at the end of the week...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Esther Bradley-detally

    Loved it; having lived in Russia and read about China extensively - I now have read all her Russian books and am on to others; loved them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Euphemia

    I give up, I couldn't even finish this book. I've read about 3/4 of it and I'm done, got bored to death. I like historical fiction and all but this one was not my cup of tea. No character development, nothing driving the plot...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kaye

    Once again Furnivall managed to captivate me with her story of Lydia Ivanova. This story picks up where The Russian Concubine left off as Lydia, her half brother Alexei and Lydia's Cossack friend Popkov board the train from Junchow to Russia in search of her father, Jens. Lydia has not seen her father since she was five years old but what memories she has of him are loving ones. To think that he is still in a labor camp in Siberia is heartbreaking to her. Being a stubborn willed seventeen year Once again Furnivall managed to captivate me with her story of Lydia Ivanova. This story picks up where The Russian Concubine left off as Lydia, her half brother Alexei and Lydia's Cossack friend Popkov board the train from Junchow to Russia in search of her father, Jens. Lydia has not seen her father since she was five years old but what memories she has of him are loving ones. To think that he is still in a labor camp in Siberia is heartbreaking to her. Being a stubborn willed seventeen year old, Lydia sometimes acts before she thinks. Fortunately for her she has the intrepid Popkov, a great bear of a man, to watch out for her. It's a good thing too as he manages to get Lydia out of some very dangerously sticky situations. Although Alexei secretly thinks their father could not possibly have survived the brutal labor camps, he travels with Lydia in the off chance Jens is still alive and that they could possibly rescue him. Alexei manages to get into his own sticky situation, namely getting involved in the Russian mafia through no wish of his own. Meanwhile back in China, Chang An Lo, Lydia's Chinese lover, has become more embroiled in the Communist Party moving up through the ranks. Chang manages to get a committee sent to Russia to view the new factories being built by the reigning Stalinist regime. Chang is a member of the committee and against all odds, he hooks up with Lydia no matter what the danger and tries to help her rescue her father. At one point in the story while searching for Jens, Chang An Lo and Lydia have been separated under extremely horrifying circumstances. Chang agonizes over not being able to find her again. Furnivall shows us his emotion in the following gorgeous and passionate writing. "Chang would not give up. He'd find her. Or die. There was no middle path. He called her name without ceasing,but the flames swallowed his words. The smoke suffocated life. He could feel it dying in his own lungs, and his fear for Lydia tore his heart into pieces. He called out. He roared her name into the fire and the flames roared back at him, their laughter in every crackle and explosion that they spat in his face. He could see nothing beyond the inferno towering around him whichever direction he turned, and quite suddenly he realized he was looking with the wrong sense. Eyes could lie and confuse and panic. So he closed them. He stood totally still and exhaled the poisons from his lungs. He listened for her again. But this time he listened with his heart." I just love Furnivall's writing. She manages to get me invested in the characters' lives so completely that it is almost hard to believe it is all fiction and to come back to the real world. Combined with beautiful writing, the addition of interesting, multi-faceted characters, heart stopping moments, and an historical overview of Russia during early 1930 made this book very difficult to put down. The ending leads me to believe there will be a sequel. If so, I will be eagerly anticipating it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    Review for The Girl From Junchow Synopsis: China, 1929. For years Lydia Ivanova believed her father was killed by the Bolsheviks. But when she learns he is imprisoned in Stalin-controlled Russia, the fiery girl is willing to leave everything behindeven her Chinese lover, Chang An Lo. With her half brother, Alexei, Lydia sets out on a dangerous journey. Tension grows between the two as Alexeis search for his past threatens Lydias quest to find her father and forge a new future for herself. But when Review for The Girl From Junchow Synopsis: China, 1929. For years Lydia Ivanova believed her father was killed by the Bolsheviks. But when she learns he is imprisoned in Stalin-controlled Russia, the fiery girl is willing to leave everything behind—even her Chinese lover, Chang An Lo. With her half brother, Alexei, Lydia sets out on a dangerous journey. Tension grows between the two as Alexei’s search for his past threatens Lydia’s quest to find her father and forge a new future for herself. But when Alexei abruptly disappears, Lydia is left alone, penniless in soviet Russia. As she continues her search for information, Lydia finds herself caught in a perilous entanglement with a Russian officer. But Chang An Lo has not forgotten Lydia. He knows things about her father that she does not. And while he races to protect her, she is prepared to risk treacherous consequences to discover the truth… Review: 5 out of 5 After reading Kate Furnivall’s earlier novel, The Russian Concubine, I was extremely excited when I found this follow up novel. The Girl From Junchow does not disappoint. This second novel picks up where the first one left off. We are following Lydia on her journey to find her long lost father, Jens Friis. She, Alexei, and Liev Popkov travel to Moscow after discovering that Jens is being held in a secret prison there. Although the trio has made it to their destination danger lurks around every corner. Lydia is one of my favorite protagonists in a book. I love her fiery temperament and will to protect those that she cares for. It’s very hard to believe that this girl is only seventeen. She has matures greatly since the previous novel. This, I feel, is a positive because she was very naive in the first book, which often leads to trouble, and hindered some of her confidence. Lydia, in this novel, possesses a strong will to find her father and literally stops at nothing to accomplish her goal. In regards to the other characters in this novel, each one of them payed complex roles in that single goal of finding Jens Friis. I was truly astounded at how each of the new characters introduced were in some way connected to Lydia’s goal. There were a few new characters introduced; including a young street urchin with a pup named Misty, a former prostitute, and a Colonels wife who’s looking for a happiness that’s a void in her married life. Each of the new character brings an emotional complexity to this story. Furnviall allows readers to get into these character’s heads so we can find out exactly what they’re thinking. Although, there are some characters whose intentions fool readers. Drama fills almost every page of this novel. Between the passionate relationship between Lydia and Chang An Lo and Alexei’s involvement with an infamous group of criminals, this novel keeps your attention page after page. The Girl From Junchow bring a stunning cast of character to life with realistic imagery and intense drama that will keep you hooked until the very end.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Toni Osborne

    Also published under the title "The Concubine's Secret" This novel is a captivating and fascinating sequel to "The Russian Concubine", a tale of love and danger set in the late 1920's Junchow and Moscow. The story takes us on a journey, surrounding the intricacies of Lydia Ivanova's life, a life of drama graced with a touch of passion. Lydia believes her father, Jens Friis, is still alive but held captive in Stalin's Russia. Determined to find him she teams up with her brother Alexie and close Also published under the title "The Concubine's Secret" This novel is a captivating and fascinating sequel to "The Russian Concubine", a tale of love and danger set in the late 1920's Junchow and Moscow. The story takes us on a journey, surrounding the intricacies of Lydia Ivanova's life, a life of drama graced with a touch of passion. Lydia believes her father, Jens Friis, is still alive but held captive in Stalin's Russia. Determined to find him she teams up with her brother Alexie and close friend Popkov. The dangerous search leads them to bars of the seedy underworld where bribery of camp workers is one of their prime sources of information. In a world where they have to continually watch their backs, they befriend and betray those with key information, a treacherous game that eventually directs them to Moscow. In Russia, with everything at stake Lydia becomes entangled with a soviet officer and Alexei is drawn into the hands of Russian criminals. Popkov finds himself in the precarious position of trying to keep his friends safe even at the risk of his own live. On another front, Chang An-Lo, a high ranking officer who is advancing rapidly in the Communist party of China, is delegated to view the factories built by the Stalinist regime. He so happens to be Lydia's romantic partner while she was in China. As fate would have it, Lydia and Chang meet up at a party honouring the Chinese delegation and discuss old times. Their past strong romantic connection quickly has Chang sympathizing with her predicament and vowing to help her gather information and help in the possible rescue of her father. Ms. Furnivall rich writing is very entertaining, gripping and provides all the thrills we are accustomed to. The dialogue is crisp and the setting vividly recreates Stalin era Russia. Lydia is maturing beautifully and is portrayed as a strong and loveable character; we easily fall into her spell. Some of the plotting may lack realism with its characters getting out of sticky predicaments and injuries a bit too easily for the times, but the interaction between characters is outstanding and is one of the attributes that makes this fantasy novel one of the best

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I think I enjoyed this book more than the previous novel, but of this series the prequel about Valentina and Jens is still my favourite. I disliked how Lydia kept ignoring Alexei and Chang An Lo's warnings about passing notes into the prison to her father, she knew it was dangerous but she didn't care. She continued to do it even after Liev Popkov was shot (but thankfully not killed). She was reckless and it's no wonder it didn't pay of as she wanted. I didn't like how a lot of the time in this I think I enjoyed this book more than the previous novel, but of this series the prequel about Valentina and Jens is still my favourite. I disliked how Lydia kept ignoring Alexei and Chang An Lo's warnings about passing notes into the prison to her father, she knew it was dangerous but she didn't care. She continued to do it even after Liev Popkov was shot (but thankfully not killed). She was reckless and it's no wonder it didn't pay of as she wanted. I didn't like how a lot of the time in this novel Alexei seemed like a cold hearted creep when talking about or to members of the Vory, a secret gang of thieves who consider one-another brothers and the leader their father. I also disagree with Furnivall killing Jens Friis. I mean what was the point in basing this whole book on finding him and getting him out of the prison camps just for him to exchange a few words with the daughter he had not seen for about 12 years. I don't feel that was a very fair thing to do but I can't see a way of Lydia's life working out with Jens Friis in it. I'm glad this plot was simpler but there still seemed to be a lot going on, a communist war in China, finding Jens Friis, Liev Popkov and Alexei Serov finding partners in unlikely places, Alexei joining a gang of thieves and working out personal traumas. I still feel Lydia never really works through who parents deaths. When Valentina died she was upset but she seemed to recover quickly and when Jens Friis' death in this novel she was again upset but recovered far to quickly, though I suppose this one makes more sense since she had already lost her father once. The ending left this novel quite open, I feel if the author desired she could write another novel for this series but it would also be quite difficult to work out. So in summary this novel was better than "The Russian Concubine" but I preferred "The Jewel of St. Petersburg" to this one. I don't know, maybe it's just the characters in the prequel that I liked. If you're looking for a couple of soppy historical romance novels with a busy plot then these may be the books for you.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ambrosia Sullivan

    Written for Fire & Ice Again we join up with Lydia and her rag tag group of her Brother Alexei and Leiv but this time they are going across Soviet Russia. Just when things look the darkest when her brother has seemed to go away and leave her behind. Chang An Lo shows up and things for them seem to pick up right where they left off. This is a wonderful book that brings to life the same pictures and ideals that you had painted for you in the last book. This time however instead of a bright Written for Fire & Ice Again we join up with Lydia and her rag tag group of her Brother Alexei and Leiv but this time they are going across Soviet Russia. Just when things look the darkest when her brother has seemed to go away and leave her behind. Chang An Lo shows up and things for them seem to pick up right where they left off. This is a wonderful book that brings to life the same pictures and ideals that you had painted for you in the last book. This time however instead of a bright flower like china being painted we get Soviet Grey and really a feeling for how things were in those days in Russia. While things were dark and gloomy some people bound together. I really enjoyed the twists and turns this novel took including where Alexei ended up, never would have thought it of him and yet at the same time it seemed to suit. If you enjoyed the Russian Concubine I think this second installment will be on the top of your list as well. I know I did!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Kate Furnivall's improvement in writing and storytelling is much more evident in this sequel to 'The Russian Concubine' than it's predecessor. I thoroughly enjoyed losing myself in her elaborate descriptive narration, and falling in love with the characters that she creates. She manages to pull so much beauty and love out of such a dismal place and time (1929 Soviet Russia) in the form of her characters. I absolutely love Lydia - she is a heroine we can all look up to, as well as Chang, Lydia's Kate Furnivall's improvement in writing and storytelling is much more evident in this sequel to 'The Russian Concubine' than it's predecessor. I thoroughly enjoyed losing myself in her elaborate descriptive narration, and falling in love with the characters that she creates. She manages to pull so much beauty and love out of such a dismal place and time (1929 Soviet Russia) in the form of her characters. I absolutely love Lydia - she is a heroine we can all look up to, as well as Chang, Lydia's handsome Chinese lover. In fact, the story reminds me a little of a Hayao Miyazaki film: where all the main characters each have flaws, but are just as loveable in their own ways, and there is an amazing, powerful romance story entertwined with the main plot. Beautiful story and beautifully written. I can't wait to get my hands on another book by Ms Furnivall.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lena Vera

    I love the way Kate writes. She has a great way to capture the readers with such details. I can close my eyes n visualize exactly what she's describing. I love Lydia Ivanova.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Janine Matsko-Bolacker

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. While I really enjoyed The Russian Concubine and it's sequel The Girl from Junchow I have to say I was left with the overall feeling that neither Lydia or Chang ever saw each other again, both being killed in the respective countries. I realize that, as the author, you can have a book end any way that you want but this book is filled with the harsh realities of Communist Russia as well as Communist China. That being said I don't think, realistically, that Chang would be set free to go live his While I really enjoyed The Russian Concubine and it's sequel The Girl from Junchow I have to say I was left with the overall feeling that neither Lydia or Chang ever saw each other again, both being killed in the respective countries. I realize that, as the author, you can have a book end any way that you want but this book is filled with the harsh realities of Communist Russia as well as Communist China. That being said I don't think, realistically, that Chang would be set free to go live his life in Hong Kong. Similarly, I don't think that Lydia was going to make it past the soldier checking papers at the train station. I believe that they would probably die before they found each other again. That ending was foreshadowed at times in this book. But of course their love is the love of soulmates and cannot be denied. I have to say I was disappointed by the ending. I would have preferred it ending with Lydia and Chang safe in their new life but these 2 books have been nothing if not brutally honest about the world in which these 2 protagonists live their lives.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susanna Lynley

    The Concubines Secret continues Lydias story. Her mother, Valentia is dead; her lover, Chang An Lo has returned to his unit in the hills to wage Maos revolutionary war and she is travelling to Russia along with her half-brother, Alexi Serov and their bodyguard, Popov, a Cossack, to rescue Jen Friis, her Danish father who has been imprisoned by Stalin. Lydia and Alexi share the same father but it seems Furnivall couldn't make up her mind as to the status of the relationship which swung first this The Concubine’s Secret continues Lydia’s story. Her mother, Valentia is dead; her lover, Chang An Lo has returned to his unit in the hills to wage Mao’s revolutionary war and she is travelling to Russia along with her half-brother, Alexi Serov and their bodyguard, Popov, a Cossack, to rescue Jen Friis, her Danish father who has been imprisoned by Stalin. Lydia and Alexi share the same father but it seems Furnivall couldn't make up her mind as to the status of the relationship which swung first this way, then that. The plot likewise went from silly to ridiculous, as the team, supplemented by Chang An Lo who appears in Moscow as part of a Chinese delegation, is bolstered by members of the Russian Mafia in their attempt to rescue Friis. As for the twist at the end, when that emerged, I bolted. The first book was passable, the sequel – not worth the trouble. And as for the title? Again it was totally inappropriate.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joyce

    The novel was the sequel to The Russian Concubine and the 3rd in a series. In the Russian Concubine, Lydia finds out that her father. whom she had believed dead for many years. is still alive in a Russian labor camp. In the Girl from Junchow, the setting moves back to Russia and is set in 1929. Lydia leaves China to return to Russia to find her father. She is accompanied by her Russian friend, Liev Poplov, and half-brother Alexei. Her Chinese lover, Chang, has remained in China to fight for The novel was the sequel to The Russian Concubine and the 3rd in a series. In the Russian Concubine, Lydia finds out that her father. whom she had believed dead for many years. is still alive in a Russian labor camp. In the Girl from Junchow, the setting moves back to Russia and is set in 1929. Lydia leaves China to return to Russia to find her father. She is accompanied by her Russian friend, Liev Poplov, and half-brother Alexei. Her Chinese lover, Chang, has remained in China to fight for Communist forces. Her quest for her father is a very difficult and dangerous one which will result in each one of them nearly losing their lives. Chang ends up in Moscow as part of a Chinese Communist delegation and becomes involved in Lydia's quest. I loved this series not only because of the history of both Russia and China which is vividly portrayed but also because of the characters in the series. They are all so complex and 'bigger than life' in their passions, their courage and boldness, and their cunning and intelligence. The story definitely pulls the reader in and the ending was satisfying---not a perfect happy ending but satisfying, nonetheless.

  16. 4 out of 5

    The Forgiven Former Feminist

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Kate Furnivall's Russian Concubine series is an absolutely heart wrenching trilogy. These books tie the struggle of communist Russian and China together in a way that opened my eyes to what life was really like for the people that were collectively swept up in the advancement of the communist cause. Furnivall's writing is: -smooth and elegant when describing white Russia in The Jewel of St, Petersberg, -steamy and expansive while describing the life of Russian refuges in The Russian Concubine, Kate Furnivall's Russian Concubine series is an absolutely heart wrenching trilogy. These books tie the struggle of communist Russian and China together in a way that opened my eyes to what life was really like for the people that were collectively swept up in the advancement of the communist cause. Furnivall's writing is: -smooth and elegant when describing white Russia in The Jewel of St, Petersberg, -steamy and expansive while describing the life of Russian refuges in The Russian Concubine, -conveys the bleak and miserable lumber through life amid communist Russia in The Girl from Junchow. What I Loved: The dedication of Liev, he was unwavering in his loyalty. The fact that Lydia and her brother worked together to achieve a goal. What I didn’t like: I did not care for how incredibly reckless Lydia was with the lives of the people who cared for her. I also was devastated at the ending of the book. I don’t want to give it away, but it truly had me sobbing while turning the final pages. Now, each of these books have problematic elements. Extramarital affairs, premarital sex, unplanned pregnancy, and sex used as a bartering tool are present in these books periodically. While Furnivall does write the scenes out clearly, I do believe that they serve as an accurate representation of what would have happened in the given circumstances. This is not a matter of the author just throwing gratuitous sex into the story to keep people reading. But, with that being said, even though the writing is excellent and the story is consuming… the highest that I can give this series is a B+. I cannot give it an A+ because of all the immoral sexual activity. But, in every other aspect I think these books are wonderful. So, if you decide that you want to read them, use caution with the sexual content. I just skipped past those pages. If you are listening to it as an audiobook, just fast forward. I would also caution parents that these books handle (with grace) some very adult themes and this is not a book that I would recommend for anyone under 16 and at that age I would caution that it needs to be discussed carefully.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

    I may have found a new favorite author. This book was so engaging and gripping to read. At no point did I feel bored with the story. It was truly a fantastic read! The Girl from Junchow is the second and last book in The Russian Concubine series by Kate Furnivall. The story picks up where the first book left off. Lydia is off to Russia with her half-brother Alexei to search for their father, a Danish engineer trapped in a Soviet prison camp. Meanwhile Lydias lover, Chang An Lo, finds himself I may have found a new favorite author. This book was so engaging and gripping to read. At no point did I feel bored with the story. It was truly a fantastic read! The Girl from Junchow is the second and last book in The Russian Concubine series by Kate Furnivall. The story picks up where the first book left off. Lydia is off to Russia with her half-brother Alexei to search for their father, a Danish engineer trapped in a Soviet prison camp. Meanwhile Lydia’s lover, Chang An Lo, finds himself fighting in the Chinese Communist Army at a time when China is in the middle of a civil war between the communists and the nationalists. Drama, love, family and hope fill the pages of Kate Furnivall’s novel, The Girl from Junchow , and it is a fantastic journey to be taken along on. Full Book Review at MarissaLongo.com

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    The Concubine's Secret by Kate Furnivall continues the story started in the Russian Concubine by this author. In this story, the heroine, Lydia Ivanova is searching for her father who vanished from her life decades ago, condemned to the fields of Siberia. Lydia travels with her half brother Alexei across Russia facing many dangers from the Russian police and the powerful followers of Stalin. At her side is her Chinese lover Chang An Lo who seeks to protect Lydia and also learn all he can from The Concubine's Secret by Kate Furnivall continues the story started in the Russian Concubine by this author. In this story, the heroine, Lydia Ivanova is searching for her father who vanished from her life decades ago, condemned to the fields of Siberia. Lydia travels with her half brother Alexei across Russia facing many dangers from the Russian police and the powerful followers of Stalin. At her side is her Chinese lover Chang An Lo who seeks to protect Lydia and also learn all he can from the Communist Party in Russia so he can take the information on how to build the party in China. Filled with romance, terror, danger and a push to reach a goal despite obstacles, the Concubine's Secret is a pager turner as was the Russian Concubine.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    I was so glad there was a sequel to The Russian Concubine! This was another wonderful book that I didn't want to end. I was drawn right back into the story of Lydia and Chang. Exciting plot twists, but told in the same fashion as the first book, which is why I loved reading it so much. After reading "The Russian Concubine" and this book, I wanted to find all of the authors books and read them all. Fantastic storytelling!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Graham Hunter

    A very engrossing book but perhaps a bit too long. Kate does use a large amount of descriptive text which I did find a bit excessive. I have just bought the Jewel of St Petersburg plus the Audible version and I have found this to be much more enjoyable, especially as the narrator uses voice intonation and character specific voices.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Tarr

    I loved learning more about Lydia and Chang An Lo. With her half brother, Alexei, searching for her father and the challenges and adventures they get themselves into. This is the second book after The Russian concubine.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    It was all for Nothing !!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Peter Jowers

    I enjoyed reading the trilogy beginning with the Jewel of St Petersburg, The Russian Concubine and this one. Potential for a fourth❓

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    I truly enjoyed this sequel to The Russian Concubine--especially the last half of the book. I will be reading the prequel next....

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alison Hydes

    Really enjoyed this sequal to The Russian Concubine.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anthea petersen

    Fabulous Beautifully written. Gets you hooked from page 1 and you cant put it down. Exciting and gripping. A real page turner. Fabulous Beautifully written. Gets you hooked from page 1 and you can’t put it down. Exciting and gripping. A real page turner.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sue Leslie

    Spellbinding A great read that keeps you guessing and enthralled right to the end. The history and magic of Russia was really interesting

  28. 5 out of 5

    Delia Gersh

    Finally Finished.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    The Concubine's Secret) is the sequel to The Russian Concubine. Our heroine, Lydia has since moved on with her life, leaving China and her Chinese lover, Chang An Lo, to search for her father back in her country land, Russia. She is still somewhat in shock to learn that her father had survived from the Bolshevik army so many years ago and is now captive in a prison camp. Together with her half-brother Alexei, they began their search for their father. Lydia couldn't bear the thought of leaving The Concubine's Secret) is the sequel to The Russian Concubine. Our heroine, Lydia has since moved on with her life, leaving China and her Chinese lover, Chang An Lo, to search for her father back in her country land, Russia. She is still somewhat in shock to learn that her father had survived from the Bolshevik army so many years ago and is now captive in a prison camp. Together with her half-brother Alexei, they began their search for their father. Lydia couldn't bear the thought of leaving Chang, but she knew that the Chinese Communist Party needs him and that someday they would reunion again.  Chang, on the other end, is adamant over their mission in driving out the Nationalists Party, but deep inside his heart he still felt for them whenever he succeeded in destroying the troops. He thought about the families and loved ones who are waiting for all of them. After all, they are all the same. And then, there are his doubts in their leader Mao Tse Tung, as he isn't sure if he is the right person to rule China, given his corruption, his lust for power and his ruthless actions. Would Mao bring to China the justice and equality it craves? And finally, would fate allows him to reunite with Lydia again should he travel to Russia as part of a Chinese Communist Party delegation to meet the Russian leader on Communism exchanges?  Back in her country land, Lydia has never felt any closer to her half-brother although her Russian is rusty. Though she isn't familiar with the land anymore, her hope in finding her father is high. But, danger looms in Moscow as in Junchow, China. In fact, the danger doubles as not only she has to thread carefully with the Commandant and his wife (who may hold some information to the prison camp where her father might be) but also Alexei being a member of a criminal brotherhood, after an incident which almost had him killed.  Despite this is the sequel to The Russian Concubine, this book could read as a standalone (there are flashes of some main scenarios like how Lydia and Chang was acquainted and so forth so readers get a gist of the background). While I think The Russian Concubine was a great read, this sequel gives us a more in-depth view of the two lead characters' struggles and dilemmas as not only they have to face the consequences of being caught if seen together but also the unforeseen circumstances that lies ahead should they choose to be together. We see a more matured Lydia in this sequel, in terms of her thoughts and her fiery determination still remains as strong as ever. Chang, on the other hand, became more sentimental as compared to Lydia, which I thought is a romantic notion since he felt so many emotions of both China and Lydia in The Russian Concubine. In fact, I'd seen him as a man who treasure sentimental values aside from his loyalty, and these make him more charming underneath his cool, calm demeanour.  Once again, I found myself engrossed in this historical fiction. Filled with adventures and romance, it had me captivated throughout the story as I found myself rooting for Lydia and Chang, hoping that their relationship would conquer every obstacles which are thrown into their ways. And the same goes to finding her father. All in all, it was an intense and satisfying read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Erin Moore

    The reason we read historical fiction is not for the history. Its for the fiction. We fall in love with a character, and whether she lives in Mongolia or Austin, ancient Rome or modern India, we want to know what its like to be her, to know her, and to fall in love, just as she does. Luckily, historical fiction fans, we have Kate Furnivall. Because Ms. Furnivalls writing is not just about the less-travelled destinations, the war-torn settings, the criminal underbellies of foreign cities: its The reason we read historical fiction is not for the history. It’s for the fiction. We fall in love with a character, and whether she lives in Mongolia or Austin, ancient Rome or modern India, we want to know what it’s like to be her, to know her, and to fall in love, just as she does. Luckily, historical fiction fans, we have Kate Furnivall. Because Ms. Furnivall’s writing is not just about the less-travelled destinations, the war-torn settings, the criminal underbellies of foreign cities: it’s about the people. And in Lydia Ivanova, we get the chance to fall in love, all over again. We first met Lydia in The Russian Concubine, and hat was the novel that sealed it for me: I had found a writer to follow across times and places that normally are of no interest to me (namely: Mao’s China and Stalin’s Russia – including prison camps in Siberia.) But she writes with such grace, such depth, and such well-researched detail, that I forget that I don’t like those time periods. Unlike some historical fiction, though, she never lets the history or the research overwhelm the story. And the story here (I was getting to it!) is that Lydia has left China in search of her father, who she had once believed dead. Knowing he’s alive but in a Soviet prison camp, she sets off with her half-brother Dmitri to find him, and leaves her lover Chang An Lo behind. The harshness of Siberia and then, later, of Moscow’s back-stabbing, selling of secrets, and incredible sadness are the backdrop for what is still, essentially, a love story. When Chang is sent to China at the request of Mao, he finds Lydia, but there are many around them who do not want them together, not the least of whom is the Russian officer who seems to know all of Lydia’s secrets. Including, most importantly, where her father is being held. Ms. Furnivall manages to tie many (many!) separate story lines together, weaving them between the narrative like the intertwining threads of fate. Dmitiri’s story, especially, almost deserved its own book. I did think that Chang and Lydia’s story was not quite as strong as in the Russian Concubine, not quite as urgent, as if we already knew the ending, but in the end, we didn’t. The Girl From Junchow will tether you to its pages like a secret Soviet blimp to its mooring, and it is only with the closing that you will be allowed loose. If you have not already managed to lose yourself between the pages of one of her novels, do so now.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.