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The kingdom of God is a beautiful revolution. Marked by the radical life, love, servanthood, and humility of Jesus, it stands in stark contrast to the values and ways of the world.Regrettably, many who profess to follow Christ have bought into the world’s methods, seeking to impose a sort of Christianized ethical kingdom through politics and control. In this illuminating s The kingdom of God is a beautiful revolution. Marked by the radical life, love, servanthood, and humility of Jesus, it stands in stark contrast to the values and ways of the world.Regrettably, many who profess to follow Christ have bought into the world’s methods, seeking to impose a sort of Christianized ethical kingdom through politics and control. In this illuminating sequel to his bestselling book The Myth of a Christian Nation, Dr. Gregory Boyd points us to a better way—a way of seeing and living that is consistent with the gospel of Jesus and his kingdom. Between the extremes of passivity on the one hand and political holy war on the other lies the radical, revolutionary path of imitating Jesus.In twelve areas ranging from racial and social issues to stewardship of the planet, this book will convince and inspire you to live a Christlike life of revolt and beauty—and it will help you attain a practical lifestyle of kingdom impact.


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The kingdom of God is a beautiful revolution. Marked by the radical life, love, servanthood, and humility of Jesus, it stands in stark contrast to the values and ways of the world.Regrettably, many who profess to follow Christ have bought into the world’s methods, seeking to impose a sort of Christianized ethical kingdom through politics and control. In this illuminating s The kingdom of God is a beautiful revolution. Marked by the radical life, love, servanthood, and humility of Jesus, it stands in stark contrast to the values and ways of the world.Regrettably, many who profess to follow Christ have bought into the world’s methods, seeking to impose a sort of Christianized ethical kingdom through politics and control. In this illuminating sequel to his bestselling book The Myth of a Christian Nation, Dr. Gregory Boyd points us to a better way—a way of seeing and living that is consistent with the gospel of Jesus and his kingdom. Between the extremes of passivity on the one hand and political holy war on the other lies the radical, revolutionary path of imitating Jesus.In twelve areas ranging from racial and social issues to stewardship of the planet, this book will convince and inspire you to live a Christlike life of revolt and beauty—and it will help you attain a practical lifestyle of kingdom impact.

30 review for The Myth of a Christian Religion: Losing Your Religion for the Beauty of a Revolution

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bart Breen

    Add another Voice to the Growing Revolution Gregory A. Boyd is hardly a new voice in religious circles although he certainly has developed something of a reputation for being on the outside of many circles looking in. Boyd is an evangelical pastor with a distinguished past of academic accomplishments including training with honors at Yale and Princeton Theological Schools. He has served in the past as a professor at Bethel University. Boyd is probably best known in the theological community as a l Add another Voice to the Growing Revolution Gregory A. Boyd is hardly a new voice in religious circles although he certainly has developed something of a reputation for being on the outside of many circles looking in. Boyd is an evangelical pastor with a distinguished past of academic accomplishments including training with honors at Yale and Princeton Theological Schools. He has served in the past as a professor at Bethel University. Boyd is probably best known in the theological community as a leading proponent of what is termed 'Open Theism' which seeks to reconcile some difficult elements of the Biblical Text by seeing God as less than all-knowing and all-powerful (although some see this as a voluntary limitation rather than one inherent to God's nature) and therefore God sees the future as a series of possibilities rather than from a position of transcendent knowledge or certainty. As a result, Greg Boyd hasn't been all that warmly embraced by those elements of "orthodoxy" in Christian evangelicalism that hold to more traditional positions, particularly the reformed and Calvinistic schools. Starting from this position, it shouldn't be particularly surprising that Boyd has some things to say about the state of 'traditional' Christianity. In fact Boyd has many things to say, and his latest book, 'The Myth of a Christian Religion,' follows nicely on the heels of his prior book, 'The Myth of a Christian Nation,' which addresses the religion comingled with nationalism that is the bread and butter of the so-called Religious Right in the United States. Some additional background that may be helpful is that Boyd reports in an interview for the New York Times from 2006 that about 20% of his congregation left when he took a stand against explicitly or implicitly endorsing conservative political causes from the pulpit. In that context, this book can be somewhat seen as an apologetic work pointing out the inconsistencies of religion-based nationalism as opposed to the Kingdom of God that Jesus preaches in the Gospels. As such, Boyd appears strongly aligned with a growing number of authors who address these types of issues in different literary Genres. This reviewer noted marked similarities to some degree with such authors as William P. Young, Wayne Jacobsen, C. Baxter Kruger, Jim Wallis, Malcolm Smith, Frank Viola and George Barna to name a few. The book is divided into 12 chapters and each stands somewhat alone as an essay addressing the conflicts that exist within the Gospel of the Kingdom as opposed to the popular forms of teaching and belief that have been traditionally accepted, almost without question or critical thought in much of the modern American church. The theme of most of the chapters is one of revolt, or Jesus as the revolutionary; the undeniable point being that much that comfortable christians and congregations embrace today has little to do with what Jesus taught and the early church modeled. The subjects include Christ and Caesar, Idolatry, Judgment, Religion, Individualism, Nationalism, Violence, Social Oppression, Racism, Poverty and Greed, Environmentalism, Gratuitous Sexuality and Secularism. Wrapped through all of these topics is the supremecy of Christ and the inadequacy of philosophic thought and religious systems to replace a basic relationship with Jesus. Boyd has a real gift for putting together precisely and succinctly in a pithy and provocative manner the arguments against much of how Christianity has been defined and presented by the evangelical movement over the past 40 years. He does it in a manner however, that while still provocative is not mean-spirited or merely an opposing political ideology. One comes away with the impression that the left, were it more in vogue wouldn't fare much better as the target of Boyd's scrutiny. The reviewer read the book in the Kindle version and the only real constructive criticism that arises is that the separation of the the Action Guide, which comprises about 25% of the material would have been easier to use if each section had followed the chapter in question. 5 Stars. A very worthy read and in the vein of these books as well. The Shack So You Don't Want to Go to Church Anymore Revolution Pagan Christianity?: Exploring the Roots of Our Church Practices The Myth of a Christian Nation: How the Quest for Political Power Is Destroying the Church Bart Breen

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lynne Stringer

    This book was a phenomenal read and woke me up to a number of things I was doing, as a Christian, out of unhealthy habits. It made me see, as a friend put it, that there is no 'us' and 'them' when it comes to people in the world, there is only 'us' and we should demonstrate that love to those who don't know Christ rather than distancing ourselves from them and waving the finger of judgement at them. This book was a phenomenal read and woke me up to a number of things I was doing, as a Christian, out of unhealthy habits. It made me see, as a friend put it, that there is no 'us' and 'them' when it comes to people in the world, there is only 'us' and we should demonstrate that love to those who don't know Christ rather than distancing ourselves from them and waving the finger of judgement at them.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This is a great book for Christians and non-Christians alike. For non-Christians it shows that the Christianity that they are most familiar with may not accurately reflect the teachings of Jesus. For Christians, it makes us confront the way many of us distort Jesus' teachings to suit our own desires, instead of living the revolutionary, radical way Christians are called to be. This is a great book for Christians and non-Christians alike. For non-Christians it shows that the Christianity that they are most familiar with may not accurately reflect the teachings of Jesus. For Christians, it makes us confront the way many of us distort Jesus' teachings to suit our own desires, instead of living the revolutionary, radical way Christians are called to be.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    Excellent book, especially the chapters on wealth and sexuality/marriage. A few of my favorite quotes: Reconciliation in the Kingdom looks very different from this, however. Our focus is not on equalizing power and privilege; it’s on following the example of Jesus by abandoning the quest for power and privilege. Our goal is not to achieve more fairness; it’s to manifest Christlike submission to one another. And our adversaries are not other people who have more power and privilege than ourselves. Excellent book, especially the chapters on wealth and sexuality/marriage. A few of my favorite quotes: Reconciliation in the Kingdom looks very different from this, however. Our focus is not on equalizing power and privilege; it’s on following the example of Jesus by abandoning the quest for power and privilege. Our goal is not to achieve more fairness; it’s to manifest Christlike submission to one another. And our adversaries are not other people who have more power and privilege than ourselves. Our adversaries are the Powers who keep humanity in bondage by fueling our hunger for power and privilege while enforcing social structures that give more to some by robbing it from others. The truth is that the Kingdom call to live without possessions and with outrageous generosity is a call to freedom. While the Powers delude us into believing that possessing things gives us Life, the truth is that whatever we think we possess actually possesses us. The truth is that owning things doesn’t give Life; it sucks Life out of us. The truth is that the perpetual hunger for more that fuels capitalism is a form of demonic bondage. our primary time and energy should be invested not in debating the relative merits of competing political and economic programs, but in individually and collectively imitating Jesus by bleeding for people who are in need. The widow gave all she had and thus advanced the Kingdom more than all the wealthy folks whose gifts were larger but didn’t cost them as much to give. So too, our confidence in addressing poverty must not be in things the world thinks are effective but in what God can do when people faithfully imitate Jesus and make costly sacrifices for the poor. This is the life we’re called to aspire to, and it’s the absolute antithesis of a life lived according to the secular worldview. Instead of thinking, living, and experiencing reality on a moment-by-moment basis as though God does not exist, we’re to think, live, and experience the world as though it is continually permeated with God’s presence—because, as a matter of fact, it is. We’re to live our lives with a moment-by-moment awareness of God’s presence. A commitment to nonviolence means you’re pledging to walk in that direction, practicing peace day-by-day. The more we develop a Christlike character, the more likely we are to respond to a hostile enemy in a Christlike way if they were to attack us or a loved one. prayer confronts the Powers that fuel hostility and is therefore a form of “social action.”

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    The Kingdom of God is advancing where people increasing live like Jesus. The Kingdom is far more radical and countercultural, so much so, that it would be impossible for someone to live this way by their own power. The Kingdom gives us a whole new kind of life when we submit to the reign of God. We manifest Heaven ahead of time. Everything that will characterize the fully-come kingdom should characterize us now (and things absent should be absent). In light of this, what aspects of life, thoughts The Kingdom of God is advancing where people increasing live like Jesus. The Kingdom is far more radical and countercultural, so much so, that it would be impossible for someone to live this way by their own power. The Kingdom gives us a whole new kind of life when we submit to the reign of God. We manifest Heaven ahead of time. Everything that will characterize the fully-come kingdom should characterize us now (and things absent should be absent). In light of this, what aspects of life, thoughts, attitudes, values, behaviors, will not be present in heaven? You are called to be heaven on earth. Krino judgment in Greek, is appropriate, necessary, separating, good: discernment and bad: judgmental. The same Greek word is used. helpful/unhelpful, godly/ungodly, wise/stupid. This discernment applies to money, safety, job hiring, trust, clothing, author’s argument, etc. This is good judging/discernment. But it’s not what NT authors are talking about. We are separating ourselves from other people and placing ourselves/our group above them, to be more worthy, significant, secure. Judgmentalism is a form of idolatry. What does your nationality mean? To be American, or other. Is any element of your worth, significance, security, is rooted in nationalistic identity? What are your values? (life, liberty, pursuit of happiness) Would you be impacted if these values were threatened? Perhaps this is an indication that you are not seeking or gaining all your life from Christ. Seek first the kingdom of God. Life liberty pursuit of happines, these are great rights that a government gives it people. Politically speaking, I’m a fan of the declaration of independence. But as a Kingdom person, I have to be careful not to think these are kingdom values. But as follower of Jesus, I may have to critically assess these values as things I have to revolt against to manifest the unique beauty of the kingdom. Are we as passionate about proclaiming that Jesus died for racial reconciliation than proclaiming that Jesus died for the forgiveness of sins?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nate Cook

    I’m a big fan of Greg Boyd. There is a lot here to process and chew on. Some of his ideas or arguments seem to be contradictory or flawed. I’m sure he’d have an explanation. He talks about pacifism at all cost because that’s what Jesus would do or advocate. Even to the extent of letting harm come to yourself and the ones you love. He goes to the extremes to make this point and leaves the reader with the idea that to follow a Jesus model, you’d never resort to violence under any circumstances. He I’m a big fan of Greg Boyd. There is a lot here to process and chew on. Some of his ideas or arguments seem to be contradictory or flawed. I’m sure he’d have an explanation. He talks about pacifism at all cost because that’s what Jesus would do or advocate. Even to the extent of letting harm come to yourself and the ones you love. He goes to the extremes to make this point and leaves the reader with the idea that to follow a Jesus model, you’d never resort to violence under any circumstances. He talks about worldly views on violence and the acceptance of violence and how we should basically become counter culture to the ways of the world. Ok. But then later he talks about taking out a restraining order against someone who was to some extent threatening toward a black member of his staff and he discusses his remorse that he didn’t listen to his staff sooner and get the restraining order sooner. These two chapters to me contradict one another. I’d be interested to know his thoughts on law enforcement and military and if those jobs are inherently bad or if on any level they serve some purpose of maintaining order in society. If he believes what he says about non violence I can only imagine there is not an exemption for police. So with that said wouldn’t it be very wrong or at least hypocritical to attain a restraining order knowing full well it would take force and violence to enforce that order should the individual not comply? My point being it seems more nuanced an issue than he makes it in the book. I would have liked him to discuss this topic further. Still a great read, still a big Boyd fan.

  7. 5 out of 5

    marcus miller

    Enjoyed Boyd's perspective on Christianity and its overall approach to a variety of issues, including violence, racism, wealth and poverty, sex and more. Boyd goes to the Gospels and Jesus, looking at ideas in place before Christianity became the favored religion of Rome and Augustine found ways to make being "Christian" compatible with being a member of elite Roman society. Though published in 2009 the book still seems timely and for the most part Boyd's observations are still quite relevant. Enjoyed Boyd's perspective on Christianity and its overall approach to a variety of issues, including violence, racism, wealth and poverty, sex and more. Boyd goes to the Gospels and Jesus, looking at ideas in place before Christianity became the favored religion of Rome and Augustine found ways to make being "Christian" compatible with being a member of elite Roman society. Though published in 2009 the book still seems timely and for the most part Boyd's observations are still quite relevant.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marion Wiley

    This is another great book by Boyd. I'd read The Myth of a Christian Nation first, one excellent book. This one is very similar and of course repeats some stuff, so I got a little bored toward the end. But all in all, it's a very good argument against Church involvement in politics, to the point that trust is in earthly power, earthly governments rather than in God. Favorite quote- "History teaches that the best way to destroy the Church is to give it political power." (p. 13) 'Nuf said. This is another great book by Boyd. I'd read The Myth of a Christian Nation first, one excellent book. This one is very similar and of course repeats some stuff, so I got a little bored toward the end. But all in all, it's a very good argument against Church involvement in politics, to the point that trust is in earthly power, earthly governments rather than in God. Favorite quote- "History teaches that the best way to destroy the Church is to give it political power." (p. 13) 'Nuf said.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ivar Ima

    Religion is forcing conformity under the Tree of knowledge of good and evil. We are fighting the wrong good/evil battle in stead of fighting the real life/death battle. Under the Tree of Death we learn how to judge. Under the Tree of Life we learn how to live. It is hard to judge and love at the same time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Silvia Ferrara

    There is no theologian I agree with more than Gregory Boyd. That said, this one has a few weird suggestions like “prayer stalking” (still stalking people...). Overall, I think he also gives amazing ideas to help us love those we find it difficult to love and challenges many of the church’s issues and weaknesses and as always challenges us to be more like Christ and let nothing get in the way.

  11. 5 out of 5

    ryan

    Hard Lessons Every single chapter challenged me, but there is no judgement. Even when I didn't want to agree, the validity of the statements rang true in my heart. Can you handle having every aspect of your practical life uprooted in a humble and genuinely loving way? Then read this book! Hard Lessons Every single chapter challenged me, but there is no judgement. Even when I didn't want to agree, the validity of the statements rang true in my heart. Can you handle having every aspect of your practical life uprooted in a humble and genuinely loving way? Then read this book!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    Stopped reading after about 100 pages - I appreciate the point that Boyd is trying to make, but the book seems to mostly be assertations about how the kingdom of God is without any real reasoning or argument for why it's that way. Stopped reading after about 100 pages - I appreciate the point that Boyd is trying to make, but the book seems to mostly be assertations about how the kingdom of God is without any real reasoning or argument for why it's that way.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steve Callahan

    I'd probably give it a higher rating if I hadn't already read his The Myth of a Christian Nation [twice]. I'd probably give it a higher rating if I hadn't already read his The Myth of a Christian Nation [twice].

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Gunnarson

    Excellent redirect away from culture centered religion to Jesus' focus on relationship centered life. Greg's call to follow Jesus' example in being a rebel with a cause was inspired. Excellent redirect away from culture centered religion to Jesus' focus on relationship centered life. Greg's call to follow Jesus' example in being a rebel with a cause was inspired.

  15. 4 out of 5

    R.

    This felt like a rehashing of Myth of a Christian Nation, and the other one is better. There are also parts of this I don’t buy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Greg Dill

    With much focus on the idolatry of nationalism, patriotism, and violence; all of which Boyd covers in great detail in, "The Myth of a Christian Nation", there doesn't seem to be much new material in this book. However, he does tackle a few additional topics not mentioned in his previous book with honesty and personal transparency; which I really love about Greg Boyd's material. The chapters on the Revolt Against Judgment and Individualism really resonated with me as they seem to be issues I myse With much focus on the idolatry of nationalism, patriotism, and violence; all of which Boyd covers in great detail in, "The Myth of a Christian Nation", there doesn't seem to be much new material in this book. However, he does tackle a few additional topics not mentioned in his previous book with honesty and personal transparency; which I really love about Greg Boyd's material. The chapters on the Revolt Against Judgment and Individualism really resonated with me as they seem to be issues I myself struggle with. He had a lot of good insight on these matters that I never really thought much about before. And, the last chapter, Revolt Against Secularism was one of the best chapters. Boyd describes how secularism has permeated our Western culture so much that essentially you cannot tell the difference between a Christian and a non-believer. To break this paradox, Boyd provides practical ways to remind us of God's presence in our lives every moment of the day. In a nutshell, "The Myth of a Christian Religion" was an excellent read, but I thought, "The Myth of a Christian Nation" was much better. However, I still enjoy all of Boyds work and look forward to reading, "The God of the Possible" next.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ben Zajdel

    The Myth of a Christian Religion is Gregory Boyd's follow up to The Myth of a Christian Nation. The book takes Boyd's opinions and views of a Christian nation even further, stating that Jesus did not come to start a new religion, but to bring the kingdom of God to earth. Boyd basically expounds on many of the themes he covered in Myth of a Christian Nation, but focuses less on America and more on the individual spiritual condition. His passion and caring exude from the chapters, and we see more The Myth of a Christian Religion is Gregory Boyd's follow up to The Myth of a Christian Nation. The book takes Boyd's opinions and views of a Christian nation even further, stating that Jesus did not come to start a new religion, but to bring the kingdom of God to earth. Boyd basically expounds on many of the themes he covered in Myth of a Christian Nation, but focuses less on America and more on the individual spiritual condition. His passion and caring exude from the chapters, and we see more of Gregory Boyd than in previous works. Boyd calls on readers to revolt against a variety of things: idolatry, judgement, religion, individualism, nationalism, violence, social oppression, racism, poverty, greed, abuse of sex and creation, and secularism. Boyd is quick to use the example of Jesus in response to any opposition to his views, showing that Christians are called to follow this example. This is a great book to add to your collection. It is less eye opening than Myth of a Christian Nation, but is a deeper and more personal work.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gerald Thomson

    Though Boyd makes some wonderful points about what it means to truly follow Jesus, the anti-church/anti-America rhetoric is a bit difficult to get through. In some sections Boyd indicates that Christians should not be involved in politics, and certainly not rely on politics to solve problems for us, but then asks that we support politicians who are emphasizing the changes that he thinks are important. Boyd also overuses the philosophy that Christians are supposed to live like Jesus lived. Since Though Boyd makes some wonderful points about what it means to truly follow Jesus, the anti-church/anti-America rhetoric is a bit difficult to get through. In some sections Boyd indicates that Christians should not be involved in politics, and certainly not rely on politics to solve problems for us, but then asks that we support politicians who are emphasizing the changes that he thinks are important. Boyd also overuses the philosophy that Christians are supposed to live like Jesus lived. Since Jesus wasn’t involved in politics, we shouldn’t get involved in politics. Because Jesus did not defend himself during his trial, we should not defend ourselves. Boyd picks and chooses what to use as literal examples, not condoning our entering churches with a whip and driving out those who use religion for financial gain or all of us becoming carpenters. Jesus has never called us to all be the same, as loving God and others looks very different in different circumstances.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I think Greg Boyd has a real insight into topics he writes about and this book is no exception...because I LOVED his last book "Myth of a Christian Nation", this one initially was a lot of repeat at the beginning, but then got a bit more involved in new concepts. Some good reminders about care of creation, nonviolence, and present-awareness....the last chapter talks about feeling God's presence in every mundane moment - and they get less mundane. ..."Our lives are nothing more than a series of pr I think Greg Boyd has a real insight into topics he writes about and this book is no exception...because I LOVED his last book "Myth of a Christian Nation", this one initially was a lot of repeat at the beginning, but then got a bit more involved in new concepts. Some good reminders about care of creation, nonviolence, and present-awareness....the last chapter talks about feeling God's presence in every mundane moment - and they get less mundane. ..."Our lives are nothing more than a series of present moments strung together. The only thing that's real is now. Yes, we remember the past and anticipate the future, but we do this in the present, for our life is always lived in the present. And the whole of our life is nothing over and beyond the totality of these present moments."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hillery

    Excellent, thought-provoking book by an evangelical minister that addresses a lot of the issues I have with organized religion in general. I recommend it for everyone, particularly my evangelical Christian friends. Living like Jesus would be truly revolutionary if we all did it, but no one does....especially the majority of Christian Conservatives in the US. So much of our western society is predicated on us not acting Christ-like. If we truly tried to emulate Christ, it would rock the American Excellent, thought-provoking book by an evangelical minister that addresses a lot of the issues I have with organized religion in general. I recommend it for everyone, particularly my evangelical Christian friends. Living like Jesus would be truly revolutionary if we all did it, but no one does....especially the majority of Christian Conservatives in the US. So much of our western society is predicated on us not acting Christ-like. If we truly tried to emulate Christ, it would rock the American economy to its foundations and would require huge lifestyle changes for all of us. No easy answers in the book, but a great source of things to think about and to try to live up to.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Geoff Glenister

    This is a great follow up to "The Myth of a Christian Nation". I especially appreciated Boyd's chapter on recognizing and dealing with racism in the church. He covers how subtle racism has become, why whites don't even recognize it, why a key feature of the gospel is to break down barriers of racism (the chapter comes right after a discussion on class-ism, so it's a good one-two punch), he tells a personal "I screwed up" story that is very powerful, discusses some practical things that need to h This is a great follow up to "The Myth of a Christian Nation". I especially appreciated Boyd's chapter on recognizing and dealing with racism in the church. He covers how subtle racism has become, why whites don't even recognize it, why a key feature of the gospel is to break down barriers of racism (the chapter comes right after a discussion on class-ism, so it's a good one-two punch), he tells a personal "I screwed up" story that is very powerful, discusses some practical things that need to happen to battle racism in the church - it's just really good material.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Warren Benton

    This book really got to me. Boyd talks about the Kingdom in a way we do not discuss the Kingdom. He talks about how if we are truly and alien here then why is there no difference in us and the current residents. A few times i had push back because he spoke of things like patriotism and how if we profess to be for the Kingdom then we have to not support a nation. He also brought up great points on viewing the other side of situations. Dont just look at them through our perspective.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is a well written book about who Jesus was and how his message got lost through the ages. He breaks down several controversial topics to uncover what Jesus would have done if given the situation. It cuts through the political rhetoric and reveals the power of Jesus Christ and the Father he represented. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It really made me think about a few things in a new perspective.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Stevenson

    Another solid book by Greg Boyd. I particularly enjoyed the chapters on government, racism, and secularism. Religion has come to represent human structures, instead of the principles Jesus lived out during his time on earth. This book provides some thought provoking insights that go against the predominant evangelical views.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bobby

    Very accessible and challenging chapters on a variety of topics all revolving around the question of what God's Kingdom looks like. Not quite as personally compelling as "Myth of a Christian Nation", but a good read. Very accessible and challenging chapters on a variety of topics all revolving around the question of what God's Kingdom looks like. Not quite as personally compelling as "Myth of a Christian Nation", but a good read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lon

    Not as good as the prequel, The Myth of a Christian Nation, but a good reminder that following Jesus takes courage and does not always follow the path of those who call themselves Christians but are functional atheists. I especially liked the chapters on violence and secularization.

  27. 4 out of 5

    David

    Third time through and it's better each time. First three chapters are a call to fall in love with God. The rest is how to stay in love and not get sucked into religious distractions. Thank you Boyd. Also see his book Present Perfect. Third time through and it's better each time. First three chapters are a call to fall in love with God. The rest is how to stay in love and not get sucked into religious distractions. Thank you Boyd. Also see his book Present Perfect.

  28. 5 out of 5

    David

    I only gave it four stars, since it overlaps with much of Boyd's previous book, "Myth of a Christian Nation." Still, the content is Biblically-based and thought-provoking. It's well worth the time to read. I suggest reading the previous book first -- this one will then logically follow. I only gave it four stars, since it overlaps with much of Boyd's previous book, "Myth of a Christian Nation." Still, the content is Biblically-based and thought-provoking. It's well worth the time to read. I suggest reading the previous book first -- this one will then logically follow.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    nothing in here that hasn't been said better somewhere else. It is a good book though. nothing in here that hasn't been said better somewhere else. It is a good book though.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Leroy Seat

    This is a very fine book, and I recommend it heartily. It is honest, perceptive, and written by one whom I consider, after having read his book, a true Christian.

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