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The Prince and the Pauper

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This treasured historical satire, played out in two very different socioeconomic worlds of 16th-century England, centers around the lives of two boys born in London on the same day: Edward, Prince of Wales and Tom Canty, a street beggar. During a chance encounter, the two realize they are identical and, as a lark, decide to exchange clothes and roles--a situation that brie This treasured historical satire, played out in two very different socioeconomic worlds of 16th-century England, centers around the lives of two boys born in London on the same day: Edward, Prince of Wales and Tom Canty, a street beggar. During a chance encounter, the two realize they are identical and, as a lark, decide to exchange clothes and roles--a situation that briefly, but drastically, alters the lives of both youngsters. The Prince, dressed in rags, wanders about the city's boisterous neighborhoods among the lower classes and endures a series of hardships; meanwhile, poor Tom, now living with the royals, is constantly filled with the dread of being discovered for who and what he really is.


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This treasured historical satire, played out in two very different socioeconomic worlds of 16th-century England, centers around the lives of two boys born in London on the same day: Edward, Prince of Wales and Tom Canty, a street beggar. During a chance encounter, the two realize they are identical and, as a lark, decide to exchange clothes and roles--a situation that brie This treasured historical satire, played out in two very different socioeconomic worlds of 16th-century England, centers around the lives of two boys born in London on the same day: Edward, Prince of Wales and Tom Canty, a street beggar. During a chance encounter, the two realize they are identical and, as a lark, decide to exchange clothes and roles--a situation that briefly, but drastically, alters the lives of both youngsters. The Prince, dressed in rags, wanders about the city's boisterous neighborhoods among the lower classes and endures a series of hardships; meanwhile, poor Tom, now living with the royals, is constantly filled with the dread of being discovered for who and what he really is.

30 review for The Prince and the Pauper

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mario the lone bookwolf (semi reviewing hiatus )

    The soft, more or less for the time, child friendly, today possibly not so much anymore, variation of Twains´ interpretation of the Middle Ages that is more realistic hardcore dark in his underrated masterpiece A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur´s court. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1... Especially the contrast to this one is big, it´s so white- and greenwashed that it´s exaggerated and unrealistic happy go lucky elements are in stark contrast to the darker tones that are somehow describe The soft, more or less for the time, child friendly, today possibly not so much anymore, variation of Twains´ interpretation of the Middle Ages that is more realistic hardcore dark in his underrated masterpiece A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur´s court. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1... Especially the contrast to this one is big, it´s so white- and greenwashed that it´s exaggerated and unrealistic happy go lucky elements are in stark contrast to the darker tones that are somehow described not too extreme, but actually self- satirizing. (view spoiler)[ Especially the dynamic of the prince, later king, seeing the horrible reality and inhumanity his father loved to form, just changing it without his ministers working against him or rebelling or that he helps the people who helped him by making them part of the elitist nepotist monarchy. So now just 99,999 percent of the people have to suffer except the ones who completely unrealistically decided to help a spoiled, arrogant brat like him they thought of as mentally ill in a predator dog eat dog world. (hide spoiler)] He inexplicably thought that he had to reduce the equality and sharpness of his writing to be appropriate for the younger audiences the work aimed at, but he fails by creating a weird hybrid of very serious topics and plotlines with illogical outcomes and actions of the main characters. He should have written a completely harmless children´s book in his own style and humor avoiding any too serious topics, not with this strange, unusual use of language one isn´t used from him. And it´s not at eye level for the appreciation of the intelligence of kids. Twain would have had the potential to become a kind of early Rick Riordan, Eoin Colfer, Jonathan Stroud,… because of his inherent humor and understanding of human society could have enabled him to make similar works, avoiding both violence and too bold criticism. Or he could instead have written a kind of prequel or sequel to the Connecticut Yankee, possibly with third person view. This could have made one of the founding fathers of Sci-Fi, because many of the ideas were already there, he could have become more primitive and drawn an earlier ancient or Stoneage version of his idea or gone all Verne and constructed future tech. So it´s more of an unnecessary, strange exception in his otherwise brilliant writing, nothing great for the adults and too explicit for the kids it was aimed at, filled with far too much melodramatic, bittersweet, dramedy fairy tale elements that make it an eye rolling overload. Especially the (view spoiler)[ dissociative identity disorder of the arrogant and unsympathetic royal snob, who arbitrarily switches between degenerated, unfriendly dictator who treats everyone like trash and friendly philanthropist who at least doesn´t want his slaves to be tortured and executed, just oppressed, takes the pleasure out of the reading, because it seems so improbable. (hide spoiler)] It could, of course, also be that I am so used to his sharp feather that I can´t deal with a downgraded version that still does a great job at opening the eyes of larger, hardened kids and teens for injustice and epic failing facepalmy societal systems. But wait, no, let me please recapitulate once more, little flag in opportunistic winds that I am, it´s really just unworthy to be associated with Twain's´ name, maybe he had writer's block, needed money, or just thought that kids weren´t clever enough to get that this thing isn´t written with heart blood, just a poor reduction of his main topics. Tropes show how literature is conceptualized and created and which mixture of elements makes works and genres unique: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.ph...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The prince and the pauper, (1881), Mark Twain The Prince and the Pauper is a novel by American author Mark Twain. It was first published in 1881 in Canada, before its 1882 publication in the United States. The novel represents Twain's first attempt at historical fiction. Set in 1547, it tells the story of two young boys who are identical in appearance: Tom Canty, a pauper who lives with his abusive father in Offal Court off Pudding Lane in London, and Prince Edward, son of King Henry VIII. عنوان1- The prince and the pauper, (1881), Mark Twain The Prince and the Pauper is a novel by American author Mark Twain. It was first published in 1881 in Canada, before its 1882 publication in the United States. The novel represents Twain's first attempt at historical fiction. Set in 1547, it tells the story of two young boys who are identical in appearance: Tom Canty, a pauper who lives with his abusive father in Offal Court off Pudding Lane in London, and Prince Edward, son of King Henry VIII. عنوان1-1: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم: محمد قاضی؛ نشر:‏‫ تهران، امیرکبیر‫، کتابهای جیبی، موسسه انتشارات فرانکلین، چاپ اول: 1337، مشخصات ظاهری:‫ 277ص‏؛ مصور بخشی رنگی عنوان2-1: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم: محمد قاضی؛ نشر‏‫ تهران، امیرکبیر‫، کتابهای جیبی، موسسه انتشارات فرانکلین، چاپ سوم: 1341، مشخصات ظاهری: ‫304ص‏؛ فروست: امیرکبیر، کتابهای جیبی؛ عنوان3-1: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم: محمد قاضی؛ نشر‏‫ تهران، امیرکبیر‫، 1362، مشخصات ظاهری: ‫266ص‏؛ شابک 9789640003930؛ چاپ سیزدهم: 1386، موضوع داستان‌های آمریکایی -- سده 19م عنوان4-1: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم: محمد قاضی؛ نشر‏‫ تهران، جامی، چاپ چهاردهم: 1388، مشخصات ظاهری: 266ص، مصور، شابک 9789642575626، فروست: ادبیات جهان‫؛ عنوان2: «شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم: ایاز حدادی، نشر: تهران، آرمان‏، 1344، در 128ص، شابک 9649067353؛ فروست کتابهای دو زبانی آرمان؛ فارسی- انگلیسی، چاپ دوم 1364، چاپ سوم تابستان 1370، چاپ چهارم 1381، چاپ پنجم 1382؛ واژه‌ نامه، موضوع: داستان‌های آمریکایی -- سده 19م. عنوان سوم: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم ولی‌الله ابراهیمی (سروش)؛ نشر تهران، سعیدی، 1363، در 208ص؛ ‏عنوان چهارم: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ تلخیص: مایکل وست؛ مترج‍م رشید بهنام، نشر: تهران، توسن‫، 1368؛ عنوان پنجم: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم: مهدی شاکر؛ نشر تهران، ارغوان‫، 1371، در 176ص، شابک 9646234224؛ چاپ دوم 1371، چ‍اپ‌ س‍وم 1376، چاپ چهارم 1376؛ عنوان شش - یک: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم داریوش شاهین، نشر تهران، مهتاب: عرفان، 1371، در 272ص؛ عنوان شش -دو: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم داریوش شاهین، نشر: تهران، مهتاب، ‏‫‏‏1387، در 318ص، شابک شابک 9789647886697؛ عنوان شش - سه: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم داریوش شاهین، و سوسن اردکانی، نقاشی‌ها رابرت هاجسن؛ نشر تهران، نگارستان کتاب‫، 1386، در 364ص، مصور، شابک 9789648155464؛ عنوان هفت: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ تلخیص مایکل وست؛ مترج‍م محمد ج‍وادی­پور؛ نشر تهران، سپیده، 1373، مشخصات ظاهری: 122ص، مصور؛ شابک 9645569745؛ چاپ دوم 1374؛ فروست ان‍‍تشارات سپیده، داستانی از...؛ عنوان هشت یک: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم: شکوفه اخوان، نشر تهران، نهال نویدان، 1375، در 160ص، شابک 9649004645؛ چاپ دوم 1380؛ عنوان هشت دو: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم شکوفه اخوان، نشر تهران، نهال نویدان، چاپ اول 1391، در 183ص؛ شابک 9789645680471؛ چاپ دوم 1392؛ عنوان نهم: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم: شهلا نق‍اش؛ نشر: تهران، کوشش‫، 1376، در 112ص، شابک 9646326080؛ عنوان دهم: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم: علی فاطمیان؛ نشر تهران، سازمان چاپ و انتشارات، نشر چشم‌انداز، 1377، در 241ص، مصور، شابک 9644220766؛ چاپ دوم 1379؛ عنوان یازده - یک: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم محسن سلیمانی؛ نشر: تهران، افق، چاپ دوم 1377، در ‏‫157ص، شابک 9646003478؛ فروست ادبیات کلاسیک برای نوجوانان؛ عنوان یازده - دو: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم محسن سلیمانی؛ نشر تهران، افق، چاپ سوم 1380، در 129ص‏، شابک 9646742645؛ فروست رمانهای جاویدان جهان؛ چاپ چهارم 1381، چاپ پنجم 1383، چاپ ششم 1385، چاپ هفتم سال 1386، شابک 9789646742642؛ چاپ هشتم 1387، چاپ نهم 1388؛ عنوان یازده - سه: شاهزاده و گدا: متن کوتاه شده؛ اثر: مارک تواین؛ مترجم محسن سلیمانی؛ نشر تهران، افق، 1388، در 256ص؛ شابک 9789643694944؛ فروست رمان‌های جاویدان جهان، چاپ دوم 1389، چاپ پنجم 1391؛ عنوان دوازده: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم مهدی علوی، نشر تهران، دبیر، 1389، در 112ص، شابک 9786005955187؛ عنوان سیزده: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم بهناز خارابی، نشر تهران، زرین، 1390، در ‫272ص؛ شابک 9789644074103؛ عنوان چهارده: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم کیومرث پارسای؛ نشر تهران، ناژ‫، 1390، در 292ص؛ شابک 9786009109753؛ عنوان پانزده: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم راضیه‌ السادات فروزان؛ نشر تهران، اردیبهشت، حباب‫، 1390، در 392ص، مصور، شابک 9789641710448؛ عنوان شانزده: شاهزاده و گدا؛ اثر: ‫مارک تواین؛ مترجم محمد همت‌خواه، نشر ‏تهران، عصر اندیشه‫، 1391، مشخصات ظاهری: ‫59ص، مصور رنگی، شابک 9786005550139؛ فروست ‏مجموعه داستانهای مصور شاهزاده و گدا با شانزده ترجمه متفاوت. ا. شربیانی این داستان دربارهٔ پادشاه ششم انگلستان که در ربع دوم سده شانزدهم میلادی میزیست نوشته شده است. در یکی از روزهای پاییزی، در خانواده‌ ای فقیر، پسری به دنیا آمد که خانواده‌ اش نمی‌خواستند به دنیا بیاید. ولی در‌‌ همان روز در خانوادهٔ پادشاه انگلستان - هنری هشتم – پسری به دنیا آمد که نه تنها خانواده‌ اش بلکه همهٔ مردم انگلستان منتظر به دنیا آمدنش بودند.آن روز همه دربارهٔ به دنیا آمدن ادوارد تئودور، شاهزادهٔ ویلز حرف می‌زدند و شاهزاده در پارچه‌ های ابریشم و اطلسی، در خواب ناز بود، اما کسی از به دنیا آمدن کودک دیگر یعنی تام کانتی که لای پارچه‌ های کهنه و پاره پوره خوابیده بود حرف نمی‌زد. ا. شربیانی

  3. 5 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    Imagine you're a nine-year-old boy grungy rags for clothes, belly empty a sadistic father beats you if you don't beg for money (and get it) . Afraid of life an endless, joyless struggle to survive. The only relief from the grim reality is sleep, for a few hours on the dirty floor in something not quite a shelter. Maybe dream of a better existence, then a few hours after a fantasy, everything you desire is no problem to obtain. And the child is now the King of England ! That's the plot of Mark Tw Imagine you're a nine-year-old boy grungy rags for clothes, belly empty a sadistic father beats you if you don't beg for money (and get it) . Afraid of life an endless, joyless struggle to survive. The only relief from the grim reality is sleep, for a few hours on the dirty floor in something not quite a shelter. Maybe dream of a better existence, then a few hours after a fantasy, everything you desire is no problem to obtain. And the child is now the King of England ! That's the plot of Mark Twain's interesting novel. Tom Canty the unhappy boy is wandering around London, during the last days of the fierce Henry the Eighth. Tom does not desire to go home, no money to give his father and a sure vicious beating as a consequence. He always wanted to see a royal but could never, in the slums of London wonder why ? Arriving at Westminister Palace after a long walk Tom spots the Prince, playing outside. Trying to get a closer view but a mob surrounds the gates. A guard roughs up the boy when he at last approaches the palace. The kindhearted Edward sees the incident and tells his guards, to let the pauper in. Poor Tom is going to talk to the future king ... The prince is lonely too much study not enough fun, Edward takes him Tom to his room. They exchange clothes, look in the mirror and are stunned. The two could be twins, so close is the resemblance nobody would be able to pick who is the great Prince, and who is the little Pauper . All the unlimited luxuries everywhere in the residence, jewels, fabulous clothes, furniture, delicious food, toys and books ... Yes life can be beautiful for some thinks the visitor. Later the Prince seeks to punish the guard, that had mistreated his new friend. Goes out the gates and ... Big mistake, he still has foul threads on. The palace guards believe he's the poor boy and drive him away, protesting Edward says he's the prince and receives big laughs from the rabble, obviously the kid is mad. The two worlds of the city both real same people, but how different separated by a chasm which can not be traversed by either. But the two children see for the first time in their young lives this. It changes them, they will never be quite the same again. With the help of Miles Hendon the prince's new friend, son of a rich man whose been fighting wars on the continent for ten years, the royal lives. A surprise awaits Miles at home however ... The mad boy survives many brutal adventures on the road staying away from his "father " John. Equally difficult the troubles of the other insane child. The phoney prince Tom , has delusions that he's not the son of the king. And Henry is dying, what a mess ... Still Tom starts to like being King, servants obey, all his wishes come to pass, everyone bows before him, forgetting about his mother and sisters, not caring that the real Edward the Sixth, is lost and in danger. It's good to be King !

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I read this several times as a kid, and loved it. Twain humor and class commentary about the hypocrisy of the upper classes. And a fantasy, turned weekly into a Disney movie that sapped all the Twain and satire out of it. Then many many spinoff books and movies. But the idea of a beggar switching places with a prince, that still has a draw in it. The Homes of Celebrity tv shows. The Lives of the Rich and Famous. This isn't Twain's best work, but it is Twain, so is always worth reading.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Piyangie

    The Prince and the Pauper is a good young adult fiction written by Mark Twain. It is also my introduction to him. The story is set up in the time of King Henry VIII reign and this historical setting was what really induced me to read the book. I'm not well versed with British history, but I have read a fair amount of detail of the reign of Henry Tudor. I was therefore a little familiar with the gruesome laws and the unfair persecutions that were carried out in England at that time period. The st The Prince and the Pauper is a good young adult fiction written by Mark Twain. It is also my introduction to him. The story is set up in the time of King Henry VIII reign and this historical setting was what really induced me to read the book. I'm not well versed with British history, but I have read a fair amount of detail of the reign of Henry Tudor. I was therefore a little familiar with the gruesome laws and the unfair persecutions that were carried out in England at that time period. The story set against this time focuses on Prince Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VI) and a pauper called Tom Canty, who is look alike of the Prince and the same age. When they accidentally meets, the Prince decides to switch their identities, and the rest of the story proceeds with the adventures each faces in their mistaken identities. Through his adventure, the Prince sees the true picture of the lives of his subjects, and learn about the unjust laws that are in force. Also he comes to learn true loyalty through Miles Hendon, the brave hero who protects the Prince throughout his misfortunes. The story is embellished with true account of incidents that have taken place in England thus exposing a dark and violent regime. It really was hard to read about the cruel and outrageous punishments that were carried out which are highly disproportionate to the offence committed. Moreover it was disturbing to read about the religious persecutions and also the false allegation and monstrous punishment of women of witchcraft. It is appalling when you consider these things happened in fifteen hundreds and how uncivilized the law had been nearly five hundred years ago. I'm a little surprised that Mark Twain chose such an unappealing time period to set a story for young adults. The story is a good one; and the setting it up against a true historical backdrop with true historical characters gave the story a realistic face. However, Mark Twain writing was a bit wordy. This made the read tedious at times. It also disturbed the pace of the story. All this made it quite impossible for me to give my full enthusiastic attention to the book. I did enjoy the read but I wasn't drawn in.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alan Allis

    3.6 stars. Very good. In my opinion, better than 'Sawyer' but not as good as 'Huck' or 'MS'. A fun read - too bad I didn't read it when I was a lil kiddo. I woud definitely appreciate it more then.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mεδ Rεδħα

    Edward, Prince of Wales, dreams of sharing the lives of street kids, of escaping the boredom that weighs on him, his monotonous life. He then decides to put on the rags of a street kid, exchanging his role with Tom for a few moments of freedom. Tom will realize his dream too; to become a prince Edward does not know anything about the life of his people. What could be better for a future king than to be immersed in the rough existence of his subjects, vagabonds, thieves and beggars, subject to ter Edward, Prince of Wales, dreams of sharing the lives of street kids, of escaping the boredom that weighs on him, his monotonous life. He then decides to put on the rags of a street kid, exchanging his role with Tom for a few moments of freedom. Tom will realize his dream too; to become a prince Edward does not know anything about the life of his people. What could be better for a future king than to be immersed in the rough existence of his subjects, vagabonds, thieves and beggars, subject to terrible laws, oppressed and kept in hunger, cold, filth and ignorance. When one becomes a "king of the kingdom of shadows", baptized in turn, by a band of vagabonds, "Fou-Fou 1st", then "king of the fighting cocks", you come down quickly from his pedestal. Only the habit counts in this world, and here it is clothed only rags! Beautiful lesson of life for this young prince just and courageous. On his side Tom learns the life of prince and begins to like his power. He uses it generously towards the poor and the oppressed. He would have all the qualities to make a good king, except that he was not born on the right side. It can only be "Prince for laughter". Each of the two boys learn from this experience. Beautiful adventure, full of twists and turns, which gives us a portrait of England in the 16th century. Sordid Prisons, ruthless courts, supernatural beliefs, abuse of power...And if all the great people of this world had this experience, they would probably also change their way of acting and thinking.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aakanksha

    It is a story of two young boys Edward and Tom Canty. One born as a Prince of England, and another in a poor household. Fate brought them together, and they switch places due to identical resemblances. Tom, who always imagined being a royal now living his dream life. While Edward, a gullible and gentle Prince, who never knows the suffering of any kind, is starving, beaten, and called names. I pick this book because a few months back, I watched The Princess Switch movie starring Vanessa Hudgens. It is a story of two young boys Edward and Tom Canty. One born as a Prince of England, and another in a poor household. Fate brought them together, and they switch places due to identical resemblances. Tom, who always imagined being a royal now living his dream life. While Edward, a gullible and gentle Prince, who never knows the suffering of any kind, is starving, beaten, and called names. I pick this book because a few months back, I watched The Princess Switch movie starring Vanessa Hudgens. A young princess switches place with a normal girl and finds love. Things will end on a good note. But I was naive that I think Mark Twain's novel will be like this at all. A lot of movies and series are inspired by The Prince and The Pauper's book. But the real essence of this book is missing in all those tales. It is a kind of account that is difficult to conjecture. It depicts the harsh realities of culture; when people were burned alive or hanged for petty offenses. Prince Edward witness these brutalities in his journey that changes the course of his life. Tom Canty's father and grandmother were abusive. They forced him and his two sisters to beg and beats them immensely without any remorse. When he switches place with Edward, the poor prince has endured all the humiliation. They both try to tell others the truth but labeled insane. This is the first time I read Mark Twain's book, but I am not sure if I am going to pick his work again anytime sooner. The reason is his writing and narratives, complex language did no good to me. This novel puts me nearly in a reading slump. But at the same time, I like how we wrote this historical fiction with accurate details of gentlefolk and elites. The different characters support the leads and help them to reach their destinations despite their miseries is commendable. I am not going to recommend this book, but if you are into classics, give this a try. Read more here - https://www.bookscharming.com/

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Upon moving to Glenview, I had no reliable bookstore I was aware of, save the bigass Barnes & Nobles near the train station by work. Such a shop near my train station isn’t quite helpful, as the maximum I have at such a locale is about 6 minutes, and it’s a 3 minute walk from the station. Upon finding Books-A-Million, I was quite content; in what I believe to be my first visit there, I had a hankering (for some unknown reason) to get a copy of the much-cited Mark Twain classic “The Celebrated Ju Upon moving to Glenview, I had no reliable bookstore I was aware of, save the bigass Barnes & Nobles near the train station by work. Such a shop near my train station isn’t quite helpful, as the maximum I have at such a locale is about 6 minutes, and it’s a 3 minute walk from the station. Upon finding Books-A-Million, I was quite content; in what I believe to be my first visit there, I had a hankering (for some unknown reason) to get a copy of the much-cited Mark Twain classic “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County”. I walked out with a book of his short stories and was duly pleased. It was on one of these trips to that I came across The Prince and The Pauper, and decided I’d give that sh-t a try someday in the remote future. And lo, that time hath come, and sadly, I wasn’t all that thrilled with this work. It’s fairly enjoyable, I’ll give it that, but much like Huck Finn and the usual required reading of Mr. Clemens, this just didn’t quite do it for me; in my estimation, the guy should have stuck to short stories, which are almost universally fricking sweet. This book has its ups and downs; while the saga of the identity crisis between Poor Tom Canty (of Led Zeppelin fame) and the noble Prince Edward is rich with Twain’s humor, the conversational Middle English gets annoying, and unless you love English history or geography (intimately) some of this is convoluted. Also, had this been a shorter book (not that it’s an exceedingly long volume by any means) it probably would have been better, as the adventures might be funny at times, some of the mishaps which take place aren’t up to the caliber of others, resulting in down time, which is usually filled with repetitive contemplations by the minor characters to the maladies which they presume have afflicted Prince or Pauper. The switch of persona between the two characters happens early in the story, by page 14, and the dual cover-ups of this event by both the mind-numbingly foolish royal troupe and the beggardly and bedraggled poor who succumb to their discontent and exist as villainous brutes takes an exceeding amount of time, as both the false Prince Tom Canty and the fallen, unrecognized urchin that is the disgraced Prince Edward are deemed by the medical masterminds of the time as suffering an affliction of the mind resulting in the loss of their socially accepted identities to assume one of the furthest possible aspect in these days of Olde London. The beggar-turned-Prince, who I thought the tale would focus about, and would be a truly spectacular character of moral integrity, actually is outshone by the bravado and unshakable persistence of the downtrodden former heir. At that point the story plods along rather endlessly, and while there certainly are some moments of worthy comedy, a fifty page abridgement could be made. The result of that would be a great novelette worthy of the Twain name, as it stands, I don’t see the need for the repetition of lengthy dialogs in a goofy manner of speech, which on both sides of the tale form the foundation of the rest of the world’s beliefs concerning this unspoken but suspected act of governmental subterfuge. Events great and small are covered on Edward’s path to regain the mighty crown which he has so far been unrighteously and unceremoniously denied since the death of King Henry. At the end of the day you don’t really get what you paid for, as far as the time invested in reading the tale went. I also must admit to a distraction whilst reading this parable, I cold not stop thinking that Twain also has a novel called A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, and kept thinking that this kind of made Twain the first that I am aware of in a respected line of alternate history sensationalists. That kind of freaked me the hell out.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anne Hawn Smith

    This is one of my favorite books of Mark Twain. Tom Canty is a poor boy in the London slums. His birth only brings more poverty to his already dirt poor family. Edward VI is the long awaited heir to the English throne. They are born on the same day and look so alike they can't believe it. They exchange clothes and Edward VI ends up being thrown out of the palace by guards who think he is the poor boy he looks to be. Both boys have difficulty fitting into the other's lives. Tom comes to like the l This is one of my favorite books of Mark Twain. Tom Canty is a poor boy in the London slums. His birth only brings more poverty to his already dirt poor family. Edward VI is the long awaited heir to the English throne. They are born on the same day and look so alike they can't believe it. They exchange clothes and Edward VI ends up being thrown out of the palace by guards who think he is the poor boy he looks to be. Both boys have difficulty fitting into the other's lives. Tom comes to like the life at the palace, but misses his freedom and his mother and sisters. Edward leads a hard life on the road and would have died without the help of a minor nobleman named Miles. The bulk of the books is the mad life of the poor boy during which Edward VI learns how many of his subjects live. He resolves to change things if he can get back to the palace and be restored to his rightful place. The book is full of Twain's wit and biting social commentary. His way with words in outstanding and the Middle English dialect is only distracting at first.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leo .

    Classic!🐯👍

  12. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    Will review later.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mikey B.

    What a delightful story this is! It is filled with wit and humor as one would expect from Mark Twain. We follow our two main protagonists in their re-adjustments to their new lifestyles as they inadvertently swap roles. So many interesting themes and nuances are interwoven into the narrative mix – such as be careful what you wish for. Neither character is painted as being immaculate, as their defects manifest themselves as they undertake their new positions. The contrasting lifestyles within the What a delightful story this is! It is filled with wit and humor as one would expect from Mark Twain. We follow our two main protagonists in their re-adjustments to their new lifestyles as they inadvertently swap roles. So many interesting themes and nuances are interwoven into the narrative mix – such as be careful what you wish for. Neither character is painted as being immaculate, as their defects manifest themselves as they undertake their new positions. The contrasting lifestyles within the era are visibly portrayed. The book is described as being for adults and children – but some passages I found to be approaching the horrific;(view spoiler)[ it is absolutely demonic when the “hermit-archangel” is looking down at the sleeping King (now a pauper) while sharpening his knife (hide spoiler)] . So entertaining and exquisitely written with penetrating observations on our two characters and the age they lived in. The scope is that of a Charles Dickens novel.

  14. 5 out of 5

    BAM Endlessly Booked

    Catching up with the classics #8 RTC

  15. 4 out of 5

    Pete daPixie

    The first thing to say is I NEVER read historical fiction. NEVER EVER. So that is why I picked up this book by Samuel Clemens. I just love what came off the silver gilded pen of this persona from Missouri. I could easily have gone higher than three stars if Mr Twain had extended this short novel. Short, but sweet with honeyed prose. 'The Prince and the Pauper' may appear in the guise of a feeble children's story. An unlikely tale of rags and riches set in Tudor England. Yet, Mark Clemens, or is t The first thing to say is I NEVER read historical fiction. NEVER EVER. So that is why I picked up this book by Samuel Clemens. I just love what came off the silver gilded pen of this persona from Missouri. I could easily have gone higher than three stars if Mr Twain had extended this short novel. Short, but sweet with honeyed prose. 'The Prince and the Pauper' may appear in the guise of a feeble children's story. An unlikely tale of rags and riches set in Tudor England. Yet, Mark Clemens, or is that Samuel Twain, has woven some deep personal and sociological messages for the reader to contemplate. The 'poles apart' worlds of Edward Tudor and Tom Canty transit before our eyes, allowing us to see the other side. Mark Twin appears to be telling us that our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet, we all breath the same air, we all cherish our children's futures and we are all mortal. Now, where have I heard that before? Even the president of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked. Yet, when Edward Tudor and Tom Canty imagine that same condition, the highest and the lowest are the same. Rich or poor, at both ends of the social spectrum, both can be pursued by dreams, doubt, insecurities and injustice.

  16. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    This is a nice classic piece of historical fiction by one of the USA's most beloved authors, Mark Twain. The story sounds light at first, but it's a real eye-opener for Prince Edward as he takes on the life of a poor person and sees how many of his subjects live and suffer.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah B

    I've heard other versions of The Prince and the Pauper ( I think we all have) but this is the first time I've read the actual book. And I had no idea that this story was originally created by Mark Twain. And it's a truly wonderful story too! It's incredibly easy to read, it's fast moving and it's full of adventure. This is the story of two boys who were born at the same time and who look alike. One is Prince Edward and the other is a poor boy living in the slums named Tom. Tom starts dreaming of I've heard other versions of The Prince and the Pauper ( I think we all have) but this is the first time I've read the actual book. And I had no idea that this story was originally created by Mark Twain. And it's a truly wonderful story too! It's incredibly easy to read, it's fast moving and it's full of adventure. This is the story of two boys who were born at the same time and who look alike. One is Prince Edward and the other is a poor boy living in the slums named Tom. Tom starts dreaming of meeting a real prince and he also likes to play a game where he acts like one. Well one day he meets Edward and the two switch clothes. And that is the beginning of their troubles. I liked that both characters learned things during this story. Tom learned that being a prince is not as fun as he had thought: there's actually a lot of boring stuff involved and hard decisions to make. But I do think Edward actually had the harder time of it, as he was forced to live under harsh conditions while he was used to having everything nice. But he learns about the people he's ruling and their troubles. And even though I knew more or less how the general plot would go (they switch places) the actual story has so many details I knew nothing about so it was a lot of fun to read. I never knew what would happen next. It's quite the adventure story! And as the end was coming closer I just couldn't see how Edward could ever get close enough to Tom or the other officials in charge to tell them he was the actual king. It seemed very impossible. One other thing I find very surprising is that Edward VI was a real king. There truly was a boy king by that name and he was crowned king when he was nine years old. I always thought these fairy tales (and this book reads just like a fairy tale) makes stuff up but this one seems to include some facts hidden in the story.. I also greatly enjoyed the old words used in here and learning what they meant, just because I enjoy that sort of thing. The edition I read contains notes at the back and I found many of these fascinating too. They are unique little facts. Like note number 4 says that salad greens were not grown in England and it was rare for anyone to actually eat them! I find this bit extremely interesting! It just shows how much our diet has changed over the years. This is one book I would buy a copy of. And as for the cover image of the one I read: I notice that Tom's hair is more shaggy while Edward has it nearly trimmed. One would think that the staff at the palace would notice Tom's unkempt hair? Even if Tom bathed and got clean, his hair should still be shaggy... right? But the fact I'm thinking about this stuff at all shows how much I loved the book and it's plot has inspired me to think about the little details.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    Mark Twain's Trading Places 9 November 2012 I had heard of this book but was never really sure what it was about, however when I read the first few chapters I suddenly realised that I have seen the story before – Trading Places. Okay, there are a few differences, such as the themes, however the plot is pretty much the same. Clements does indicate that this was not his original idea, suggesting that he has heard this story from some other place, though he is unsure as to the truth of it or not. Th Mark Twain's Trading Places 9 November 2012 I had heard of this book but was never really sure what it was about, however when I read the first few chapters I suddenly realised that I have seen the story before – Trading Places. Okay, there are a few differences, such as the themes, however the plot is pretty much the same. Clements does indicate that this was not his original idea, suggesting that he has heard this story from some other place, though he is unsure as to the truth of it or not. The end notes do suggest that Clements had done any research, but whether it is true or not it is still quite an enjoyable adventure. The story is about two boys, a poor boy named Tom Cantry and Prince Edward, the crown prince of England. Both boys were born at the same time on the same day and have a remarkable similarity. However, if it was not for a twist of fate they would never have met and this strange adventure would never have happened. As it turns out, Tom, despite his poverty, did have a little education due to the actions of a kindly priest, and Edward happened to have been allowed to go to the gates of the palace one day and rescued Tom from the hands of the guard. The thing about Tom was that he had a dream of meeting a prince, however it ended up that he got a lot more than he ever expected. While wandering around Westminster Tom stumbles upon the crown prince and is invited into the castle. While talking in the princes' room, they exchange clothes, and the prince then goes outside, is mistaken for Tom, and thrown out of the castle. Tom, on the other hand, is mistaken for the prince, and despite his protestations to the contrary, is suddenly kept inside the palace with no way out. Both boys are diagnosed with madness and end up becoming prisoners of their class. Tom knows his heritage but is unable to escape the palace, and the prince, in his beggarly rags, cannot convince anybody of his royal heritage, particularly since everybody thinks the prince is in the palace, and the palace is keeping tight lipped about the princes' madness. Many people these days talk about income inequality, however the distinction is nowhere near as evident as it is in this book. In this period, during the reign of Henry VIII, there was no middle class, only the nobility and the commoners, and neither of them would mix. The commoners would look up at the nobility in awe and the nobility would look down on the commoners in scorn. There was pretty much no way, but by the grace of God and the King, that anybody could move between the two classes. These days at least we have a semblance of wealth, and can live quite comfortable and easy lives without having millions of dollars in the bank. It is interesting to see how wealth and status do not necessarily bring freedom. Tom lives in the palace and has everything provided for him, however he is not free to go where he wants or to do what he wants. In fact everything, including the clothes that he wears, is dictated to him. Further, he is also a prisoner in the sense that nobody is allowed to touch him or to mistreat him. He has his own whipping boy, a boy that takes the punishment that is doled out to the prince if he does wrong. Edward is also a prisoner, and this is more than just the fact that he is thrown into the arms of poverty. He is unable to escape Tom's father, who seems to always lurk around every corner. As he travels through the dark and dirty laneways of London and Southern England, he must face many trials and tribulations, one of them being the fact that Tom's father is a brute, and pretty much uses him for his own wicked purposes. He even attempts to set him up for a crime whose punishment is death. However, despite that he still has some awe of respectability about him that draws some people to him. I suspect there is also some comment on the nature of crime and punishment. The reason that I suggest that is because he makes comments about the laws of Connecticut and the laws of Olde England. In particular he focuses on the death penalty, but more so the form of death that the penalty imposes. It is not so much that a person must die for their crime, but the crime also dictates the method of death. No doubt the worse the crime then the more painful the death. However this is not so because some minor crimes seem to attract the death of being submerged in boiling oil, and murder simply seems to result in swinging from a rope. These days there seems to be a desire to make the death penalty as painless as possible, however some question whether that is possible. Personally, I am pretty much opposed to the death penalty. As I have said and will write, it is better for a guilty man to go free than for an innocent man to be executed. If an innocent man is executed, that is it, there is no going back. Mind you, locking up an innocent man for years on end is still likely to cause irreparable damage, particularly since there is no compensation for the innocent man. An innocent man (or I should say person) who is locked up at the age of 25 and exonerated at the age of 35, has still lost 10 years of his life. Those ten years are not going to come back. Then there is the idea that the punishment is determined by one's status in society. The wealthier you are the more likely that you will get a lesser sentence, simply because you can afford the best lawyers. However, sometimes you can simply be punished by being associated with the wrong people. I remember one case where a man was associating with another group, and two of them had rented a shed for working on cars. One of the men, with his friends, went and stole a bunch of cars, and the only thing the other guy had done was hear about it. As it happened, the guy that had heard about it ended up being the only person who had not had the charges dropped, and his lawyer simply made a bargain with the prosecution because somebody had to be convicted of the offence. This is simply not the way a legal system should work. However, consider what Clemens says at the end of the book, how he points out that the number of crimes attracting the death penalty in Connecticut is around 25 while the number in England 100 years earlier was something like 225. In the same way we can compare our system with that of another country, such as Saudi Arabia. In that country there is a crime of forsaking your religion, which is punishable by death. There are other countries where you do not get a right or reply and are guilty until proven innocent. Mind you, that can be the same here, especially when the media has already convicted you long before the trial even begins. Though while we may point at another country and say 'at least we are not as bad as them' that does not mean that we should turn a blind eye to the flaws in our system. Personally, in a system where criminals are locked away in privately run institutions, which are considered to be the university of the underworld, we need to look for ways of reforming and helping people live in society, instead of locking them up and throwing away the key. Particularly since 90% of all prisoners are in prison due to drug related crimes, we must wake up an realise that there actually is a problem.

  19. 4 out of 5

    david

    First and foremost, I would like to thank our friend Luis C. for recommending this fine book to me. On my own, I had forgotten how much I enjoy Mark Twain. And I did not even know that he was the dude that penned this story. Do you remember Patty Duke? The television series about two teenage girls, identical twins (cousins?) and the antics they got themselves into? Well, this was nothing like that. So why did I just toss in that show in this review? Don’t know. Anyway, we all know the skeleton of t First and foremost, I would like to thank our friend Luis C. for recommending this fine book to me. On my own, I had forgotten how much I enjoy Mark Twain. And I did not even know that he was the dude that penned this story. Do you remember Patty Duke? The television series about two teenage girls, identical twins (cousins?) and the antics they got themselves into? Well, this was nothing like that. So why did I just toss in that show in this review? Don’t know. Anyway, we all know the skeleton of this tale. A poor boy and King Henry V son are conveniently interchanged and are found in the other’s shoes. They each must endure a lifestyle antithetical to what they have learned in their short life. Simple, yes. But a delight, nonetheless. And when a bonafide author writes it, it becomes an enjoyable experience. I read most of it yesterday while a hurricane and a tornado roared outside my window and electricity was nowhere to be found. We could all learn something about each other even if lives are drastically different. Peradventure (his word), there are many lessons to be learned here. Or, at least, adults occasionally need a refresher course in tolerance of our fellow man/woman. Thank you, Luis C. I will try to read all your books recommended, if time and eyesight allows it. It’s good to be a king. And it is also good not to be one.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Luís

    The prince and the pauper is a lucidly written masterpiece by Mark Twain. Easily understandable, the book is a display of sheer genius. All the characters have thoroughly explained, and as you go along, you fall in love with most of them, especially the prince and the Knight Miles Hendon. The former is a personification of pampered innocence while the latter is an epitome of self-less generosity. The story doesn't take long to shift gears, and as soon as the two protagonists move places (by mist The prince and the pauper is a lucidly written masterpiece by Mark Twain. Easily understandable, the book is a display of sheer genius. All the characters have thoroughly explained, and as you go along, you fall in love with most of them, especially the prince and the Knight Miles Hendon. The former is a personification of pampered innocence while the latter is an epitome of self-less generosity. The story doesn't take long to shift gears, and as soon as the two protagonists move places (by mistake, of course), things start to get interesting. The author succeeds in raising antipathy towards some characters, especially the head of the Canty family (Pauper's family). The characters are so black and white that even children can comprehend the book with minimal effort. The book also tastes success in creating the milieu of the era. The concept of the whipping boy is queer yet believable. For trivia, whipping boy is a person in the kingdom who takes the punishment on behalf of the prince if the latter is not doing well in studies. Teachers, afraid of hitting the would-be King, beat the whipping boy and his earnings are comparable to the whipping he gets. The end again is pleased, despite the death of the King. Despite the trials and tribulations, the young prince goes through. One consistently gets the feeling that it is only for the time being, and everything will change for good. This fact makes it even more loveable. The apprehensions of the pauper in the kingdom have also captured well. All in all, this is a good read for those looking for a change from the run-of-the-mill preaching fictions. The story has plainly stated, and it is up to the reader to extract morals. No explicit attempt has made to do the same.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kara Babcock

    This is not my first time to the Mark Twain rodeo, but it has been a long time since I last visited. Twain is not high on my list of priorities, sorry to say. However, this lovely edition of The Prince and the Pauper found its way into my possession, so I decided to challenge those priorities. While I don’t think I will be rushing to devour the rest of Twain’s oeuvre just yet, this book has certainly given me a more mature appreciation of Twain as a writer. After all, the last time I encountered This is not my first time to the Mark Twain rodeo, but it has been a long time since I last visited. Twain is not high on my list of priorities, sorry to say. However, this lovely edition of The Prince and the Pauper found its way into my possession, so I decided to challenge those priorities. While I don’t think I will be rushing to devour the rest of Twain’s oeuvre just yet, this book has certainly given me a more mature appreciation of Twain as a writer. After all, the last time I encountered Twain, I was a child or adolescent, with corresponding tastes. (No, I don’t know why I used a cowboy metaphor with a New England author. I’m wild and unpredictable!) Whenever I think of Mark Twain, particularly of Tom Sawyer or The Prince and the Pauper, I think of the 1990s PBS series Wishbone. I grew up with Wishbone, and it was right up there with Bill Nye the Science Guy and The Magic School Bus as a formative television show that I loved beyond all reason. I mean, it’s about a talking dog that re-enacts great works of literature in a way young people can understand and enjoy. How amazingly awesome is that? Consequently, my first—and usually most memorable—exposure to many classics came as a Wishbone adventure. When I think of The Hound of the Baskervilles, I don’t picture any of the innumerable human Sherlock Holmes actors; I see Wishbone dressed in a deerstalker. So everything I remembered about The Prince and the Pauper came from dim recollections of its Wishbone episode (“The Prince and the Pooch”). This disposed me favourably the book in general, but it also left me quite surprised. I did not expect a book like this to have endnotes or to be so meticulous in its research. Twain is cites works of English history and law by people like Hume and Dr. J. Hammond Trumbull! It is much more like a work of historical fiction I would expect to see today, complete with author’s note and caveats about the liberties the author has taken. Billed by Twain as “A Tale for Young People of All Ages”, this book has plenty of historical details for an adult reader as well. The story itself, in terms of structure and conflict, is simple, but the world Twain creates is rich and complex. Aside from the milieu, the best part of this book is clearly the two titular characters, Tom Canty the pauper and Prince Edward (later King Edward VI). We sympathize with both of these boys when they are thrust out of their element by Edward’s rash decision to exchange clothing with Tom. We are supposed to, and I did, find it hilarious that Tom, after a hard life in Offal Court with an abusive father and grandmother, finds court life dull and vexing. Similarly, Edward is a good lad, but initially he suspects that Tom planned to impersonate him on purpose, and he spends a good deal of the first part of the book railing against his usurper. In general, Edward’s insistence upon his true identity is a source of endless amusement to the people around him. Meanwhile, Tom has no choice but to accept his identity as a slightly-addled Edward and cope as best he can until the true Edward turns up again. We all dream of being princes and astronauts and dragon-slayers when we are kids, but Twain adds a dose of reality to Tom’s sudden fortune. Being a prince is hard work! And as someone accustomed to the freedom of one’s own agency, the obligations of royalty—both in terms of how he must act and how he must let others act for him—weigh heavily on Tom. We like the idea of having servants and sumptuous clothing and administering justice, but we also tend to like feeding ourselves, scratching our own noses, and not having a nosy Lord Protector trying to run the country for us. Conversely, Edward is quite used to being assisted—he is a capable and intelligent child in his own right, but he is not quite the independent person that Tom was on his way to becoming. Indeed, notice how the narrator follows Tom’s perspective very closely during his chapters, only occasionally delving into the thoughts of Lord Somerset or others. In contrast, most of Edward’s experiences come to us via Miles Hendon, once he and Edward meet and, later, when they reunite. Hendon gives us that perspective of Edward as a troubled, mentally ill child, whom he is nevertheless going to shepherd because, hey, he’s a nice guy. I also get a very Shakespearean vibe from The Prince and the Pauper. We have mistaken identities, a displaced king/pretender to the throne, reversals of fortunes, etc. Twain employs his own take on colloquial Early Modern English that you will find either endearing or distracting (or perhaps both) depending on your tolerance for such accented dialogue. The language in general, both of the characters and of the narrator, has that dramatic, Shakespearean flair. A random example: “Whithersoever Tom turned his happy young face, the people recognized the exactness of his effigy’s likeness to himself, the flesh and blood counterpart, and new whirlwinds of applause burst forth.” Notice how much action there is in this sentence and how violent it is: people aren’t just clapping; there are whirlwinds of their applause, and it bursts onto the scene. I imagine that some of the vocabulary, not to mention the archaic style of the dialogue, might be daunting for a younger reader, but Twain's style in general lends itself well to avoiding boredom. I think this is one of those books that would make great bedtime reading between a parent and a child, because the parent can explain or decipher the parts that are difficult for a child to follow. I suppose writing historical fiction for a younger audience must be quite difficult. (My recent experience with The Stolen One corroborates this.) There is a tension between striving for the accuracy that makes one’s fiction “historical” rather than merely fantastical or speculative and striving to retain the reader’s comprehension. I love fiction set in Tudor England, but I also know quite a bit about how Tudor England differs from the present day, so I am very used to reading stories set in Tudor England. For a young reader, new to this period, I imagine this can be difficult. The Mark Twain rodeo offers a very nice compromise between accuracy and comprehensibility, one that both adults and children can enjoy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ramon Remires

    I thought I was enlightened and knew everything. I thought I had read every masterpiece ever written, and then Luís C. came and recommended this book to me and I went back to my actual size and confessed with shame that I had never read Mark Twain's writing. So I quickly went to Google and checked who was the writer and then I read this book. Immediately I was fascinated - less than the story itself and more than the writing and the great ideas behind it considering the date of writing itself. Tha I thought I was enlightened and knew everything. I thought I had read every masterpiece ever written, and then Luís C. came and recommended this book to me and I went back to my actual size and confessed with shame that I had never read Mark Twain's writing. So I quickly went to Google and checked who was the writer and then I read this book. Immediately I was fascinated - less than the story itself and more than the writing and the great ideas behind it considering the date of writing itself. Thank you Luís C. for the introduction with Twain's book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    Twain's humor always has an absurdist element to it, and this is particularly strong here. Therefore I'm not a big fan of this one, much preferring The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn which I think is Twain's best. I hadn't before thought about the link between this one and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, which I have fond memories of from childhood (and I also plan to reread, to see if it holds up). For some reason this late 19th century American author from rural Missouri seemed a b Twain's humor always has an absurdist element to it, and this is particularly strong here. Therefore I'm not a big fan of this one, much preferring The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn which I think is Twain's best. I hadn't before thought about the link between this one and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, which I have fond memories of from childhood (and I also plan to reread, to see if it holds up). For some reason this late 19th century American author from rural Missouri seemed a bit obsessed with 16th century royal English customs. One thought: why do the boys decide to tell everyone who they really are? The premise is spoiled by the fact they don’t pretend to be each other for a little while first. Read first in high school. Audiobook reread in Feb 2019.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tarissa

    The Prince and the Pauper is a children's classic written by American author, Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens). This is a fun bit of literature to read. Children will especially enjoy the story since it centers upon two boys as they share the adventure of a lifetime. Tom Canty, a poor boy with an abusive father and only crumbs to eat for supper; Prince Edward, monarch of the Tudor dynasty and heir to King Henry VIII. What circumstances could possibly lead these two to even meet, with completely opposi The Prince and the Pauper is a children's classic written by American author, Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens). This is a fun bit of literature to read. Children will especially enjoy the story since it centers upon two boys as they share the adventure of a lifetime. Tom Canty, a poor boy with an abusive father and only crumbs to eat for supper; Prince Edward, monarch of the Tudor dynasty and heir to King Henry VIII. What circumstances could possibly lead these two to even meet, with completely opposite lives and social ranks creating a broad distance between them? Furthermore, that a prince and a pauper would then engage in conversation, or make the (almost!) fatal decision of switching lives? This is historical fiction at its finest. Clemens took on a "what if?" plot to try his hand at alternative history. Let us ask ourselves... "What could have happened in 1547, if Prince Edward left the throne empty for a look-alike peasant boy to rule his kingdom? Nothing could go horribly wrong. Right?" I found Clemens to be quite witty in his writing style. He makes many uses of alliteration and similes, so that the story becomes whimsical in its telling, sometimes poetic-sounding -- and just about always a bit comical. For some readers (especially younger readers), the wording may be hard to easily read in "Ye Olde English". Many sentences are similar to: "Ah, be merciful, thou! In sooth I am no lord, but only poor Tom Canty of Offal Court in the city. Prithee let me see the prince, and he will of his grace restore to me my rags, and let me hence unhurt." NOTE to the discerning reader & parents: There are a few references to drunkenness (as in the case of Tom Canty's father being prone to drink and beating his son). I really liked reading The Prince and the Pauper -- this being the first of Clemens' works that I've read. I now look forward to reading more from this famed author.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Everything by Mark Twain is good. I only knew this from a kids' (or maybe Disney) version. The most amusing thing was Twain's Shakespearian flourishes. Check out this little bit of "dialogue" from the dying king: "He is mad; but he is my son, and England's heir; and, mad or sane, still shall he reign! And hear ye further, and proclaim it: whoso speaketh of this his distemper worketh against the peace and order of these realms, and shall to the gallows! . . . Give me to drink -- I burn: this sorro Everything by Mark Twain is good. I only knew this from a kids' (or maybe Disney) version. The most amusing thing was Twain's Shakespearian flourishes. Check out this little bit of "dialogue" from the dying king: "He is mad; but he is my son, and England's heir; and, mad or sane, still shall he reign! And hear ye further, and proclaim it: whoso speaketh of this his distemper worketh against the peace and order of these realms, and shall to the gallows! . . . Give me to drink -- I burn: this sorrow sappeth my strength. . . . There, take away the cup. . . . Support me. There, that is well." I am a big fan of stage directions implied by the dialogue. I also found this poignant, when the poor young King Edward is lost in the forest: "Occasionally he caught the twinkle of a light -- always far away, apparently -- almost in another world; if he heard the tinkle of a sheep's bell, it was vague, distant, indistinct; the muffled lowing of the herds floated to him on the night wind in vanishing cadences, a mournful sound; now and then came the complaining howl of a dog over viewless expanses of field and forest; all sounds were remote; they made the little King feel that all life and activity were far removed from him, and that he stood solitary, companionless, in the centre of a measureless solitude." Anyhow this was no Huckleberry Finn, but it is an interesting predecessor to Connecticut Yankee and fun to read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    This book was excellent. It was hard to get into at first because I brought it to read in school, and because some of the diction is quite wordy and eloquent, it was hard to read with background noise. However, this is to be expected of any classic, so I didn't give up, I just read it at home instead where it was quieter and there were less distractions. In the beginning, I set myself to read 25 pages a day and I did, no more and no less, but eventually (about halfway through the novel) I starte This book was excellent. It was hard to get into at first because I brought it to read in school, and because some of the diction is quite wordy and eloquent, it was hard to read with background noise. However, this is to be expected of any classic, so I didn't give up, I just read it at home instead where it was quieter and there were less distractions. In the beginning, I set myself to read 25 pages a day and I did, no more and no less, but eventually (about halfway through the novel) I started to grow more of an appreciation and interest for the story. The characters and their stories grew on me, and within every 25-page chunk that I read, there was some new interesting and unique event that occurred, so by today and yesterday, I was reading for pure pleasure, not to fulfill a quota. That is what I'm looking for in a story, and I liked the book as much as I had thought I would. The ending - a happy ending - made me feel good and although the story was fantastical and unrealistic, who cares? It's fiction!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rizal

    I can't express my feeling enough on how much I really love this! andddddd straight up to my favourite pile! And Miles Hendon! Oh my... how I love his character.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    FANTABULOUS !!! Stayed up til 3:30 am reading this, and possibly some of the best use of time I’ve ever committed to. Just phenomenal. If this is Twain’s first attempt at historical fiction, it’s clear everyone else on the planet should desist from writing, period... perfection has already been achieved. Done. Finito. The footnotes alone are fascinating... and I don’t think I’ve ever said that before. Has anyone?? All characters are richly hewn, all subplots handsomely paid off, and Twain’s dept FANTABULOUS !!! Stayed up til 3:30 am reading this, and possibly some of the best use of time I’ve ever committed to. Just phenomenal. If this is Twain’s first attempt at historical fiction, it’s clear everyone else on the planet should desist from writing, period... perfection has already been achieved. Done. Finito. The footnotes alone are fascinating... and I don’t think I’ve ever said that before. Has anyone?? All characters are richly hewn, all subplots handsomely paid off, and Twain’s depth and humor magnificently brandished. A master craftsman par excellence. LibriVox this, everyone! Beautiful Quotes -------------- "In the ancient city of London, on a certain autumn day in the second quarter of the sixteenth century, a boy was born to a poor family… who did not want him. On the same day another English child was born to a rich family of the name of Tudor, who did want him. All England wanted him too.” “London was fifteen hundred years old…” “…the little Prince of Poverty passed in, in his fluttering rags, to join hands with the Prince of Limitless Plenty.” “…the little Prince of Pauperdom was tricked out in the gaudy plumage of royalty.” (*** Apparently ‘tricked-out’ is not a modern hip-hop term, but at least over a century old) “He had ceased to ask questions of anyone, since they brought him only insult instead of information.“ “… learning softeneth the heart and breedeth gentleness and charity.” “He had heard that the great were prompt about small matters.” “… clothed like butterflies... “ “...he laid himself down at last to rest, but not to sleep, for his head was too full of thoughts and the room too full of people.” “The river itself, as far as the eye could reach citywards, was so thickly covered with watermen’s boats and with pleasure-barges, all fringed with coloured lanterns, and gently agitated by the waves, that it resembled a glowing and limitless garden of flowers stirred to soft motion by summer winds.” “…hope was as stubborn now as doubt had been before..." “(London) Bridge was a sort of town to itself; it had its inn, its beer-houses, its bakeries, its haberdasheries, its food markets, its manufacturing industries, and even its church…. a village population and everybody in it knew all his fellow-townsmen intimately… who had occupied the same old premises for five or six hundred years, and knew the great history of the Bridge from beginning to end… It was just the sort of population to be narrow and ignorant and self-conceited. Children were born on the Bridge, were reared there, grew to old age, and finally died without ever having set a foot upon any part of the world but London Bridge alone. Such people would naturally imagine that the mighty and interminable procession which moved through its street night and day, with its confused roar of shouts and cries… was the one great thing in this world... " “... the Bridge furnished ‘object lessons’ in English history for its children--namely, the livid and decaying heads of renowned men impaled upon iron spikes atop of its gateways.” “… when genius and culture depart and leave no heir.” “… hunger is pride’s master…" “The King was … delighted to have the calf’s company; for he had been so rudely entreated by his own kind, that it was a real comfort to him to feel that he was at last in the society of a fellow-creature that had at least a soft heart and a gentle spirit…” “... furious sheets of rain drove along the roof...” "The dreaded Sir Hugh wheeled his horse about, and as he spurred away, the living wall divided silently to let him pass, and as silently closed together again. And so remained; nobody went so far as to venture…” “The shining pageant still went winding like a radiant and interminable serpent down the crooked lanes of the quaint old city.” "... unveil the sun of royalty… Lift up thy face, and smile upon the people.” “…frosted like a Milky Way with diamonds.” “Now began a movement of the gorgeous particles of that official group which was slow, scarcely perceptible, and yet steady and persistent--a movement such as is observed in a kaleidoscope that is turned slowly, whereby the components of one splendid cluster fall away and join themselves to another--a movement which, little by little, in the present case, dissolved the glittering crowd that stood about Tom Canty..." .

  29. 5 out of 5

    Renée Paule

    A fascinating tale with a tremendous amount to teach everyone who cares to reflect on it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Grace Grzy

    DNF. Maybe I'll finish it someday. :)

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